Day 178- Gerhard Richter- “Art is the highest form of hope”

It’s Day 178 and I woke up early to do my painting and get things done before heading out tonight.  I’m still feeling a little tired from fighting some weird bug or insane allergies.  Join me in honoring Gerhard Richter today.

Gerhard Richter with a huge squeegee.

Gerhard Richter with a huge squeegee.

Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter (born 9 February 1932) is a German visual artist and one of the pioneers of the New European Painting that has emerged in the second half of the twentieth century. Richter has produced abstract as well as photorealistic paintings, and also photographs and glass pieces. His art follows the examples of Picasso and Jean Arp in undermining the concept of the artist’s obligation to maintain a single cohesive style.

In October 2012, Richter’s Abstraktes Bild set an auction record price for a painting by a living artist at £21m ($34m). This was exceeded in May 2013 when his 1968 piece Domplatz, Mailand (Cathedral square, Milan) was sold for $37.1 million (£24.4 million) in New York.

Richter was born in Dresden, Saxony, and grew up in Reichenau, Lower Silesia, and in

Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter

Waltersdorf (Zittauer Gebirge), in the Upper Lusatian countryside. He left school after 10th grade and apprenticed as an advertising and stage-set painter, before studying at the Dresden Academy of Fine Arts. In 1948, he finished higher professional school inZittau, and, between 1949 and 1951, successively worked as an apprentice with a sign painter, a photographer and as a painter. In 1950 his application for tuition in the Dresden Academy of Fine Arts was rejected as “too bourgeois”. He finally began his studies at the Dresden Academy of Fine Arts in 1951. His teachers were Karl von Appen,Heinz Lohmar (de) and Will Grohmann.

In the early days of his career, he prepared a wall painting (Communion with Picasso, 1955) for the refectory of his Academy of Arts as part of his B.A. Another mural followed at the German Hygiene Museum entitled Lebensfreude (Joy of life), for his diploma and intended to produce an effect “similar to that of wallpaper or tapestry”.

Gerhard Richter Editions

Gerhard Richter Editions

Both paintings were painted over for ideological reasons after Richter escaped from East to West Germany two months before the building of the Berlin Wall in 1961; after German reunification two “windows” of the wall painting Joy of life (1956) were uncovered in the stairway of the German Hygiene Museum, but these were later covered over when it was decided to restore the Museum to its original 1930 state. From 1957 to 1961 Richter worked as a master trainee in the academy and took commissions for the then state of East Germany. During this time, he worked intensively on murals like Arbeiterkampf (Workers’ struggle), on oil paintings (e.g. portraits of the East German actress Angelica Domröse and of Richter’s first wife Ema), on various self-portraits and furthermore, on a panorama of Dresden with the neutral name Stadtbild (Townscape, 1956).

When he escaped to West Germany, Richter began to study at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf under Karl Otto Götz. With Sigmar Polkeand Konrad Fischer (de) (pseudonym Lueg) he introduced the term Kapitalistischer Realismus (Capitalistic Realism) as an anti-style of art, appropriating the pictorial shorthand of advertising. This title also referred to the realist style of art known as Socialist Realism, then the official art doctrine of the Soviet Union, but it also commented upon the consumer-driven art doctrine of western capitalism.

Richter taught at the Hochschule für bildende Künste Hamburg and the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design as a visiting professor; he returned to the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf in 1971, where he was a professor for over 15 years.

Coming full-circle from his early Table (1962) in which he cancelled his photorealist image with haptic swirls of grey paint, in 1969, Richter

Artist Gerhard Richter at work, as seen in Corinna BelzÕs documentary GERHARD RICHTER PAINTING.  Courtesy of Kino Lorber.

Artist Gerhard Richter at work, as seen in Corinna BelzÕs documentary GERHARD RICHTER PAINTING. Courtesy of Kino Lorber.

produced the first of a group of grey monochromes that consist exclusively of the textures resulting from different methods of paint application.

In 1976, Richter first gave the title Abstract Painting to one of his works. By presenting a painting without even a few words to name and explain it, he felt he was “letting a thing come, rather than creating it.” In his abstract pictures, Richter builds up cumulative layers of non-representational painting, beginning with brushing big swaths of primary color onto canvas. The paintings evolve in stages, based on his responses to the picture’s progress: the incidental details and patterns that emerge. Throughout his process, Richter uses the same techniques he uses in his representational paintings, blurring and scraping to veil and expose prior layers. From the mid-1980s, Richter began to use a home-made squeegee to rub and scrape the paint that he had applied in large bands across his canvases. In the 1990s the artist began to run his squeegee up and down the canvas in an ordered fashion to produce vertical columns that take on the look of a wall of planks.

Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter

Richter’s abstract work is remarkable for the illusion of space that develops, ironically, out of his incidental process: an accumulation of spontaneous, reactive gestures of adding, moving, and subtracting paint. Despite unnatural palettes, spaceless sheets of color, and obvious trails of the artist’s tools, the abstract pictures often act like windows through which we see the landscape outside. As in his representational paintings, there is an equalization of illusion and paint. In those paintings, he reduces worldly images to mere incidents of Art. Similarly, in his abstract pictures, Richter exalts spontaneous, intuitive mark-making to a level of spatial logic and believability.

Firenze continues a cycle of 99 works conceived in the autumn of 1999 and executed in the same year and thereafter. The series of overpainted photographs, or übermalte Photographien, consists of small paintings bearing images of the city of Florence, created by the artist as a tribute to the music of Steve Reich and the work of Contempoartensemble, a Florence-based group of musicians.

After 2000, Richter made a number of works that dealt with scientific phenomena, in particular, with aspects of reality that cannot be seen by the naked eye. In 2006, Richter conceived six paintings as a coherent group under the title Cage, named after the American avant-garde composer John Cage. In May 2002, Richter photographed 216 details of his abstract painting no. 648-2, from 1987. Working on a long table over a period of several weeks, Richter combined these 10 x 15 cm details with 165 texts on the Iraq war, published in the German FAZ newspaper on March 20 and 21. This work was published in 2004 as a book entitled War Cut.

In November 2008, Richter began a series in which he applied ink droplets to wet paper, using alcohol and lacquer to extend and retard the

Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter

ink’s natural tendency to bloom and creep. The resulting November sheets are regarded as a significant departure from his previous watercolours in that the pervasive soaking of ink into wet paper produced double-sided works. Sometimes the uppermost sheets bled into others, generating a sequentially developing series of images. In a few cases Richter applied lacquer to one side of the sheet, or drew pencil lines across the patches of colour.

Since there is no such thing as absolute rightness and truth, we always pursue the artificial, leading, human truth. We judge and make a truth that excludes other truths. Art plays a formative part in this manufacture of truth.- Gerhard Richter

Art is the highest form of hope.- Gerhard Richter

Partial biography is from wikipedia.  I only included the “abstract” art section from his bio since it was so long and that was the work I focused on with my piece.

My squeegee work…much smaller than his squeegee...

My squeegee work…much smaller than his squeegee…

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I bought a squeegee for just this occasion and for future painting that I may want to use it for.  I am loving using unlikely tools for creating these pieces.  I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 179…getting closer to the halfway mark!  Best, Linda

Abstract Blur- Tribute to Gerhard Richter Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Abstract Blur- Tribute to Gerhard Richter
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Abstract Blur- Tribute to Gerhard Richter Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Abstract Blur- Tribute to Gerhard Richter
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Abstract Blur- Tribute to Gerhard Richter Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Abstract Blur- Tribute to Gerhard Richter
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Abstract Blur- Tribute to Gerhard Richter Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Abstract Blur- Tribute to Gerhard Richter
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Abstract Blur- Tribute to Gerhard Richter Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Abstract Blur- Tribute to Gerhard Richter
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

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