Day 355- Marta Minujin- Everything is Art

It’s Day 355 and I had a blast doing today’s extra bold and colorful piece.  She did so many different forms of art, but I really wanted to do something insanely bright and colorful today.  Please join me in honoring Marta Minujin today!

Marta Minujin

Marta Minujin

Marta Minujín (born January 30, 1943) is an Argentine conceptual and performance artist.

Freaking on Fluo- Marta Minujin

Freaking on Fluo- Marta Minujin

Marta Minujín was born in the San Telmo neighborhood of Buenos Aires. She met a young economist, Juan Carlos Gómez Sabaini, and married him in secret in 1959; the couple had two children. A student in the National University Art Institute, she first exhibited her work in a 1959 show at the Teatro Agón. A scholarship from the National Arts Foundation allowed her to travel to Paris as one of the young Argentine artists featured in Pablo Curatella Manes and Thirty Argentines of the New Generation, a 1960 exhibit organized by the prominent sculptor and Paris Biennale judge.

Her time in Paris inspired her to create “livable sculptures,” notably La Destrucción, in which she assembled mattresses along the Impasse Roussin, only to invite other avant-garde artists in her entourage, including Christo and Paul-Armand Gette, to destroy the display. This 1963 creation would be the first of her “Happenings” – events as works of arts in themselves; among her hosts during her stay was Finance Minister Valéry Giscard d’Estaing (later President of France).

She earned a National Award in 1964 at Buenos Aires’ Torcuato di Tella Institute, where she prepared two happenings: Eróticos en technicolor and

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

the interactiveRevuélquese y viva (Roll Around in Bed and Live). Her Cabalgata (Cavalcade) aired on Public Television that year, and involved horses with paint buckets tied to their tails. These displays took her to nearby Montevideo, where she organized Sucesos (Events) at the Uruguayan capital’s Tróccoli Stadium with 500 chickens, artists of contrasting physical shape, motorcycles, and other elements.

Marta Minujin

Marta Minujin

She joined Rubén Santantonín at the di Tella Institute in 1965 to create La Menesunda (Mayhem), where participants were asked to go through sixteen chambers, each separated by a human-shaped entry. Led by neon lights, groups of eight visitors would encounter rooms with television sets at full blast, couples making love in bed, a cosmetics counter (complete with an attendant), a dental office from which dialing an oversized rotary phone was required to leave, a walk-in freezer with dangling fabrics (suggesting sides of beef), and a mirrored room with black lighting, falling confetti, and the scent of frying food. The use of advertising throughout suggested the influence of pop art in Minujín’s “mayhem.”

These works earned her a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1966, by which she relocated to New York. The coup d’état by General Juan Carlos Onganía in June of that year made her fellowship all the more fortuitous, as the new regime would frequently censor and ban irreverent displays such as hers. Minujín delved into psychedelic art in New York, of which among her best-known creations was that of the “Minuphone,” where patrons could enter a telephone booth, dial a number, and be surprised by colors projecting from the glass panels, sounds, and seeing themselves on a television screen in the floor. She was on hand in 1971 for the Buenos Aires premiere of Operación Perfume, and in New York, befriended fellow conceptual artist Andy Warhol.

She returned to Argentina in 1976, and afterwards created a series of reproductions of classical Greek sculptures in plaster of paris, as well as miniatures of the Buenos Aires Obelisk carved out of panettone, of the Venus de Milo carved from cheese, and of Tango vocalist Carlos Gardel for a

Geometria blanda, 2014- Marta Minujin

Geometria blanda, 2014- Marta Minujin

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

1981 display in Medellín. The latter, a sheet metal creation, was stuffed with cotton and lit, creating a metaphor for the legendary crooner’s untimely 1935 death in a Medellín plane crash. She was awarded the first of a series of Konex Awards, the highest in the Argentine cultural realm, in 1982.

The return of democracy in 1983, following seven years of a generally failed dictatorship, prompted Minujín to create a monument to a glaring, inanimate victim of the regime: freedom of expression. Assembling 30,000 banned books (including works as diverse as those by Freud, Marx, Sartre, Gramsci, Foucault, Raúl Scalabrini Ortiz, and Darcy Ribeiro, as well as satires such as Absalom and Achitophel, reference volumes such as Enciclopedia Salvat, and even children’s texts, notably The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint Exupéry), she designed the “Parthenon of Books,” and following President Raúl Alfonsín’s December 10 inaugural, had it mounted on a boulevard median along the Ninth of July Avenue. Dismantled after three weeks, its mass of newly-unbanned titles was distributed to the public below.

A conversation with Warhol in New York regarding the Latin American debt crisis inspired one of her most publicized “happenings:” The Debt. Purchasing a shipment of maize, Minujín dramatized the Argentine cost of servicing the foreign debt with a 1985 photo

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

series in which she symbolically handed the maize to Warhol “in payment” for the debt; she never again saw Warhol, who died in 1987.

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

Minujín has continued to display her art pieces and happenings in the Buenos Aires Museum of Modern Art, the National Fine Arts Museum, the ArteBA festival, the Barbican Center, and a vast number of other international galleries and art shows, while continuing to satirize consumer culture (particularly relating to women). She is well known for her belief that “everything is art.”

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  My eyes hurt just a little after painting it, but I think it came out pretty nice.

I will see you tomorrow on Day 356!

Best,

Linda

 

Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 297- William Anastasi- Master of Accretion

It’s Day 297 and I happened to find this artist randomly and I’m so glad I did!  I was in the mood to do some conceptual art and I like the way this artist thinks.  Please join me in honoring William Anastasi today.

William Anastasi

William Anastasi

Untitled- William Anastasi

Untitled- William Anastasi

William Anastasi (b. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1933) is an American painter and visual artist. He has lived and worked in New York City since the early 1960s.

His work is predominantly abstract and conceptual. Early works such as Relief (1961) and Issue (1966) incorporate the use of industrial and construction materials. His works are held by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Guggenheim Museum, the Whitney Museum, the Walker Art Center, the National Gallery of Art, and the Art Institute of Chicago. In 2010 Anastasi was awarded The John Cage Award, an unrestricted grant awarded biennially, from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts.

Currently exhibited works include “Nine Polaroid Photographs of a Mirror”,

Subway Drawing- William Anastasi

Subway Drawing- William Anastasi

currently at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Biography above is from wikipedia.

American, b. 1933

William Anastasi, 60 Minutes, 1987

William Anastasi, 60 Minutes, 1987

A primary player in the first generation of American Conceptual artists, William Anastasi is a “classmate” of such artists as Andy Warhol, Sol LeWitt, and Hans Haacke. Though his name may not be as well known as his more famous contemporaries, his work is no less compelling. Anastasi’s formal education includes and is limited to high school, however he has lectured at numerous institutions including The School of Visual Arts where he taught for 18 years; University of North Carolina, and Yale University.

Well known for his delving concepts, the media of his work takes all forms. Anastasi’s subway drawings which prevail as some of his most

Pocket drawing 9.9.11, 2011 pencil on chinese silk paper- William Anastasi

Pocket drawing 9.9.11, 2011
pencil on chinese silk paper- William Anastasi

subtle albeit engaging works. Stemming from his Blind Drawing series, the Subway Drawings take their shape from the motion of the subway cars on which he rides. Placing the pencil on the page, the turns of the track and ridges in the wheels push the artist’s hand this way and that creating a cacophony of marks, reminiscent of a naive scribble. The chance taken in this manner of working is what drives the mystery and tension that is inherent to the process of making.

Untitled, 2013 one gallon of industrial high-gloss enamel, thrown- William Anastasi

Untitled, 2013
one gallon of industrial high-gloss enamel, thrown- William Anastasi

Anastasi’s work has enjoyed a star studded collection of showings nationally and internationally including Dwan Gallery, New York; The Mattress Factory Museum, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; The Guggenheim Museum, New York; and Stalke Galleri, Copenhagen.

Info above is from artsy.com.

One day, Anastasi was taking a ride on the New York city subway to play chess with a friend across town. He had his drawing supplies with him, so he taped a piece of paper to a board, put the board in his lap, held a pencil in his hand touching the paper, and closed his eyes. Then he let the bouncing and tilting of the subway car move the pencil. The drawing that he made on the way to see his friend that day was – in a way – a drawing of his trip.

When William Anastasi took art classes at school, he learned to draw in the regular way – with his eyes open, looking at the paper. He wondered what his drawings would look like if he didn’t use his eyes, so he began to experiment. He discovered that he liked drawing this way, and even liked the drawings themselves better than when he looked at what he was doing.

Sometimes Anastasi will tie a piece of cloth over his eyes like a blindfold and take a pencil in each hand, drawing for a specific length of

In Heat Portfolio: Semiconscious, 2007- William Anastasi

In Heat Portfolio: Semiconscious, 2007- William Anastasi

time. He calls these his “timed blind drawings.” That’s what he did at the Mattress Factory.

Untitled (July 25, 2010 Laporte), 2010 Ink & graphite on paper- William Anastasi

Untitled (July 25, 2010 Laporte), 2010
Ink & graphite on paper- William Anastasi

For one drawing, called April 15, 1989, 32 minutes, 4B, he held a 4B pencil in each hand. With his eyes covered, he moved from one end of the room to the other for exactly 32 minutes, marking the wall in big, sweeping movements as far as his arms could reach.

Excerpt above is from The Mattress Factory Art Museum.

Read this wonderful interview with him here on artsy.net.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I painted with a blindfold on and with a timer for 10 minutes.

I decided to do it with white pen on a

Me drawing blind-folded...10 minutes.

Me drawing blind-folded…10 minutes.

black background.  There were moments while scribbling where I thought things like, I want to draw a bird, a face, a lightning bolt, a cloud, etc.  There is something magical about not knowing at all how things will turn out.  I love my end result.  It was a release!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 298.

Best,

Linda

10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Side-View 10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Side-View
10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 1 10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 1
10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 2 10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 2
10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 3 10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 3
10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Day 291- Esteban Vicente- Concrete Improvisations

It’s Day 291 and I’m full of inspiration today.  I want to play music, edit videos and more.  But first I need to post this blog!  Please join me in honoring Esteban Vicente today.  I needed a break from self-portraits and anything insanely difficult.  Enjoy!

Esteban Vicente

Esteban Vicente

Esteban Vicente

Esteban Vicente

Esteban Vicente Pérez (January 20, 1903 – January 10, 2001), was an American painter born in Turégano, Spain. He was one of the first generation of New York School abstract expressionists.

Esteban Vicente was born in Turégano, Spain on January 20, 1903. His mother, Sofia Pérez y Álvarez came from an Asturian family and was born in Valladolid. His father, Toribio Vicente Ruiz, came from a military family near Salamanca and was an army officer. Esteban Vicente had two sisters and three brothers. He was the third child and second son. Vicente’s father resigned his commission and moved his family to the capital, Madrid, where he worked as a buildings administrator for the Banco de Españaso that the children could be educated at good Jesuit schools. Vicente was taken to the Museo del Prado by his father, an art enthusiast, almost every Sunday from the time he was four years old and began to draw when he was sixteen. He was expected to follow family tradition and join the army. After three months in military school he decided to become an artist.

Vicente enrolled at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes in Madrid in 1921 intending to study sculpture. He completed his training in 1924. Commenting on his experience at the Academy he said “It doesn’t give you any

Collage with Yellow, Blue and Orange- Esteban Vicente

Collage with Yellow, Blue and Orange- Esteban Vicente

ideas about anything. It gives you tools, and teaches you about materials. Academic training is safe. It prepares you to be against.”

He had his first one-man exhibition in Madrid in 1928, after which he left for Paris and did not return to Spain until 1930. In 1935 he married Estelle Charney, an American whom he had met in Paris. After the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War in 1936 Vicente, supporting the Loyalist forces, painted camouflage in the mountains outside Madrid for a few months. Later that year he and his wife moved to New York. The (Loyalist) Spanish Ambassador to the U.S. set him up as a Vice Consul in Philadelphia, a position which supported his family for three years. Vicente had ample time to continue with his art and had his first one-man show in New York at the Kleeman Gallery in 1937. After the fall of the Spanish Republic in 1939 he returned to New York City. During World War II he supported himself with portrait commissions and by teaching Spanish. A 1945 exhibition in Puerto Rico led in 1946 to a position at the University of Puerto Rico teaching painting. After his return to New York in 1947 he established relationships with most of the members of the nascent New York School, participating in their seminal exhibitions at the Kootz Gallery in 1950, in the 9th Street Art Exhibition in 1951 and in exhibitions at the Sidney Janis Gallery and Charles Egan Gallery. Subsequently he was represented by the Leo Castelli, André Emmerich[6] and Berry-Hill Galleries in New York City. He was a founding member of the New York Studio School, where he taught for 36 years. Although he never exhibited in Spain during the rule of Francisco Franco, in 1998 the Spanish government opened the Esteban Vicente Museum of Contemporary Art in Segovia.

Esteban Vicente. Black, Grey, and Green. 1961. Reina Sofía Museum, Madrid.

Esteban Vicente. Black, Grey, and Green. 1961. Reina Sofía Museum, Madrid.

Vicente maintained a house and studio in Bridgehampton, New York from 1964. His marriage to Estelle Charney ended in divorce in 1943. Their daughter Mercedes, died at aged six. A second marriage, to Maria Teresa Babin, also ended in divorce. Vicente died in Bridgehampton on January 10, 2001. He was survived by his third wife, Harriet Peters, whom he married in 1961.

He has been honored as a renowned artist and child advocate by a New York City Bronx School Public School 170, a Kindergarten to Second Grade school has been

Esteban Vicente: "Noon," 1982; Lithograph, 21-3/4 x 29-1/2 inches.

Esteban Vicente: “Noon,” 1982; Lithograph, 21-3/4 x 29-1/2 inches.

named the Esteban Vicente school. A family member has incorporated Art programs into the schools. Students’ talents emerge as they are exposed to the culture. At PS 170 students learn about Esteban Vicente and his style, color and design. Examples of his work adorn the walls of the school.

Vicente has a museum devoted to him in Segovia, Spain, the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo Esteban Vicente, and a street named after him in Turégano.

Esteban Vicente

Esteban Vicente

In March 2011 the Grey Art Gallery at New York University exhibited Concrete Improvisations: Collages and Sculpture by Esteban Vicente. In addition to 60 paper collages, the exhibit included 20 of Vicente’s small-scale assemblages called divertimentos (toys), composed from pieces of found wood and covered with white plaster, with others composed of plastic and wood with architectonic elements.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece for today.  Again, it was more challenging than I always think paintings like these will be.  I try my hardest and they are always inspired by the artist’s paintings whether or not they turn out exactly how they look in my mind. 🙂  I will see you tomorrow on Day 292!

Best,

Linda

Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 288- Elaine de Kooning- Returning to Things

It’s Day 288 and I was excited to work on today’s painting.  Another artist I could’ve sworn I had already paid tribute to!  Join me in honoring Elaine de Kooning today!

Elaine de Kooning

Elaine de Kooning

Elaine de Kooning, Bacchus #63, 1982

Elaine de Kooning, Bacchus #63, 1982

Elaine de Kooning (March 12, 1918 – February 1, 1989)

Elaine de Kooning was born Elaine Marie Catherine Fried in 1918 (although she would later claim her birth year was 1920), to Marie and Charles Frank Fried, a plant manager for the Bond Bread Company in Brooklyn, NY. She was the first of four children who were all raised in the Sheepshead Bay neighborhood of Brooklyn. Elaine’s younger sister, Marjorie, once recalled that their mother was not the most attentive and loving parent, but she did instill in her children a love for the arts, often taking them to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and to several Broadway shows.

Elaine was clearly their mother’s favorite of the four children. According to an old friend

Bullfight- Elaine de Kooning

Bullfight- Elaine de Kooning

of Elaine’s, Marie’s nickname for her oldest daughter was “Samson,” from the Old Testament figure who was granted great strength by God. Marie was an eccentric and highly intelligent woman who was frequently seen walking around town in disheveled clothing and heavy makeup.

Self-Portrait

Self-Portrait

In the late 1920s, a neighbor reported Marie to the police for neglecting her children, and when the police arrived at the Fried home, Marie had to be physically forced from the premises. She was committed to the Creedmoor Psychiatric

Bullfight La Corrida- Elaine de Kooning

Bullfight La Corrida- Elaine de Kooning

Center in Queens Village for a year, during which time the children’s primary caregiver was their housekeeper. Elaine de Kooning became a surrogate parent for her younger siblings.

In 1932, de Kooning began attending Erasmus Hall High School where she excelled at nearly everything, including sports and academics. Four years later, she enrolled at Hunter College in Manhattan, but dropped out after only a few weeks of classes.

After leaving Hunter, de Kooning enrolled in classes at the Leonardo da Vinci Art School, located on 3rd Avenue and 34th Street, where artists employed by the New Deal-funded WPA (Works Progress Administration) were working as teachers. It was at the da Vinci School where she met artist Robert Jonas, whom she dated briefly, and remained close to throughout her life.

Portrait of John F. Kennedy- Elaine de Kooning

Portrait of John F. Kennedy- Elaine de Kooning

While attending classes at the da Vinci School, de Kooning became politically active, representing the school at meetings of the leftist John Reed Club. At these meetings she attempted to organize students into a new auxiliary union for artists, simply called the Artists’ Union. It was also at the John Reed Club meetings where she met artist Milton Resnick, who was representing the American Artists School. Resnick and de Kooning began dating soon thereafter, at which point she dropped out of Leonardo da Vinci and enrolled in classes at American Artists, where she learned from teachers Stuart Davis and Raphael Soyer.

Through her involvement with the American Artists School, de Kooning became active with

Untitled Corrida- Elaine de Kooning

Untitled Corrida- Elaine de Kooning

the Young Communist League (YCL), and frequently attended workers camps and other meetings sponsored by the Communist Party. To support herself financially during her student years, de Kooning joined the Models’ Union to find work as an artist’s model.

In the autumn of 1938, Elaine’s art teacher introduced her to the 34-year-old Dutch emigre Willem (Bill) de Kooning, but there is little evidence to suggest any romantic connection at their initial meeting. Elaine was with Resnick at the time, who had supposedly commented once to her, “Bill is going to be the greatest painter in the country.”

Untitled 1965- Elaine de Kooning

Untitled 1965- Elaine de Kooning

Shortly after their introduction, a friend of de Kooning’s took her to Willem’s studio. Later in life, Elaine recalled, “It was the cleanest place I ever saw in my life. It had painted gray floors, white walls, one table…one easel, one fantastically good phonograph that cost $800 when he was only making $22 a week, and one painting of a man on the easel.”

Shortly after meeting, Willem offered to give Elaine drawing lessons, which she

Portrait of Jack Greenbaum- Elaine de Kooning

Portrait of Jack Greenbaum- Elaine de Kooning

accepted. In late 1938, de Kooning finally sold her first work, a watercolor, for $10.

Photographer Rudy Burkhardt, who Willem introduced to Elaine, later recalled that “Bill was incredibly in love with her, but she didn’t treat him very well at the beginning… She would lean back on the couch and say, ‘Bill. Cigarette.’ And he would leap to get it.” In 1939, the year after the two artists met, de Kooning moved into Willem’s studio on West 22nd Street.

On December 9, 1943, Elaine and Willem were married at a small, understated ceremony at City Hall. De Kooning later recalled that the wedding itself was “kind of bleak… afterwards, we went to a bar in the downtown district and we all had a drink… it was kind of amusing.”

Elaine de Kooning, Al Lazar (Man in a Hotel Room), 1954

Elaine de Kooning, Al Lazar (Man in a Hotel Room), 1954

Working and teaching outside the shadow of her more famous husband, de Kooning gained acclaim as one of America’s premier artists. In 1962, she received a commission from the White House to paint the portrait of President John F. Kennedy; an impressive honor bestowed upon an artist commonly associated with the bohemian New York School of painting. De Kooning then spent the better part of 1963 fine-tuning the portrait, collecting hundreds of photographs of Kennedy, and drawing short-hand sketches of him whenever he appeared on TV. The resulting portrait remains one of de Kooning’s most well-known and celebrated paintings, and easily stands out in the long line of presidential portraits.

She died February 1, 1989.

Partial biography is from www.theartstory.org.

I decided to use a few matador/bullfighting photos as reference for my piece today, since it seemed to be a recurring theme in some of her paintings.  I really enjoyed the gestural and fluid style of today’s piece.  I think I needed to return to that after doing artists like van Gogh and Matisse this week!  I hope you enjoy my piece and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 289!

Best,

Linda

Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side View Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side View
Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 285- Milton Resnick- Resolution of Opposites

It’s Day 285 and the heat wave is back.  Today’s piece was a contrast to yesterday’s painting.  Please join me in honoring Milton Resnick today.

Milton Resnick

Milton Resnick

Milton Resnick, 'AS.2' (1959)

Milton Resnick, ‘AS.2’ (1959)

Milton Resnick (January 7, 1917 – March 12, 2004) was an abstract expressionist painter and teacher known for his mystical, abstract and figurative paintings. Born in Bratslav, Russia, he emigrated to the United States in 1922.

Milton Resnick was one of the last survivors of the first generation of the New York Abstract Expressionists. Born in Russia, Resnick and his family left and arrived in New York City in 1922 at age five. He settled in Brooklyn with his family and attended public school where a teacher renamed him from his birth name of

Untitled- Milton Resnick

Untitled- Milton Resnick

Rachmiel and nickname of Milya to Milton. At age 14, he enrolled in the commercial art program at the Pratt Institute Evening School of Art in Brooklyn, but a teacher there suggested he switch to fine arts, so the next year he enrolled in the American Artists’ School in New York City. Ad Reinhardt, future Abstract Expressionist, was a classmate, and they shared a budding interest in abstraction.

You & Me- Milton Resnick

You & Me- Milton Resnick

However, Resnick’s father forbid any expression from his son of wanting to be an artist and faced with this disapproval of his commitment to painting, Resnick moved out in 1934 when he was 17. He supported himself as an elevator boy and continued at the American Artists’ School, where he was given a small studio room and each day provided with materials left behind by students attending night classes.

During the Great Depression, Resnick was in the Easel and Mural Division of the WPA of the Works Progress Administration. By 1938, he had his own studio on West 21st Street, and there was nearby Willem de Kooning with whom he formed a close friendship in the 1940s. However, Resnick’s art career was interrupted by World War II, and he served five years in the Army, stationed in Iceland and Europe. After the war he lived for three years in Paris, where among others, he associated with modernist sculptors Alberto Giacometti and Constantin Brâncuși. He endured near-starvation during this period only to have the one show of his work created in Paris canceled by an unsavory dealer.

In 1948, Milton Resnick returned to New York, and used his G.I. benefits to enroll in abstract expressionist painter Hans Hofmann’s

Untitled- Milton Resnick

Untitled- Milton Resnick

school. He also took a studio on East 8th Street, near Jackson Pollock, de Kooning, and Franz Kline, and in September through de Kooning met artist Pat Passlof, whom he married in 1961. Passlof (1928–2011) was also an accomplished abstract expressionist painter and remained married to Resnick until his death in 2004.

In the late 1940s, he debated painting with his friends and colleagues Willem de Kooning, Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock, sometimes at The Club, a regular meeting of modern artists working in and around Tenth Street in New York. Like them Resnick was striving for an overall quality for his pictures, a way to unite foreground and background, in order to achieve a resolution of opposites, a metaphor for all dialectics.

Untitled- Milton Resnick

Untitled- Milton Resnick

While the others moved toward throwing or dragging quantities of paint across the face of the canvas, Resnick retained a particularly personal and impassioned confrontation with brush painting. Sometimes his work was referred to as Abstract Impressionismbecause of his all over style. Coming into prominence just as Pop Art moved into the limelight, his great accomplishments weren’t recognized to the extent some thought they merited, as a painterly integration of Western metaphysics and Eastern philosophy. In his mature years, he worked in a converted synagogue on Eldridge Street in the Lower East Side, attended by devoted students, admirers, and his wife Pat Passlof.

During the 1950s and 1960s, Resnick earned respect for his Abstract Expressionist paintings and

Ulysses- Milton Resnick

Ulysses- Milton Resnick

also was one of the few New York artists to have a large working space for large-scale canvases. In 1976, he purchased the space that served him to the end of his active career, an abandoned synagogue on Eldridge Street on New York’s lower east side. It was near his wife’s studio, which was another abandoned synagogue purchased by the couple in 1963.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  It was much more difficult than I thought it would.  I did at least 3 different versions and kept painting over it.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 286.

Best,

Linda

Ghost of the Past- Tribute to Milton Resnick Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Ghost of the Past- Tribute to Milton Resnick
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Ghost of the Past- Tribute to Milton Resnick Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Ghost of the Past- Tribute to Milton Resnick
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Ghost of the Past- Tribute to Milton Resnick Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Ghost of the Past- Tribute to Milton Resnick
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Ghost of the Past- Tribute to Milton Resnick Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Ghost of the Past- Tribute to Milton Resnick
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Ghost of the Past- Tribute to Milton Resnick Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Ghost of the Past- Tribute to Milton Resnick
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 281- Otto Piene- Pure Energy

It’s Day 281 and I felt like playing with fire today!  This artist also made me want to play with light…fire was a little more accessible however.  Join me in honoring Otto Piene today.

Otto Piene

Otto Piene

Silver Fire, acrylic and burning on linen by Otto Piene, 1973, Honolulu Museum of Art

Silver Fire, acrylic and burning on linen by Otto Piene, 1973, Honolulu Museum of Art

Otto Piene (18 April 1928 – 17 July 2014) was a German artist. He lived and worked in Düsseldorf and Groton, Massachusetts.

Otto Piene was born 1928 in Bad Laasphe and was raised in Lübbecke. Between 1949 and 1953 he studied painting and art education at the Academy of Art in Munich and the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf. He was lecturer at the Fashion Institute in Düsseldorf. From 1952 to 1957 he studied philosophy at the University of Cologne.

He was a Visiting Professor at the University of Pennsylvania beginning in 1964.

Otto Piene, Pool, Öl auf Leinwand

Otto Piene, Pool, Öl auf Leinwand

From 1968 to 1971, he was the first Fellow of the MIT Center for Advanced Visual Studies (CAVS), founded by György Kepes. In 1972, he became a Professor of Environmental Art at MIT. In 1974 he succeeded Kepes as director of the CAVS, in which position he served until September 1, 1993.

Otto Piene

Otto Piene

With Günther Uecker, Heinz Mack and Mattijs Visser he founded in 2008 the international ZERO foundation. The foundation has the ZERO archives from the three Düsseldorfer artists as well as documents and photos from other related artists.

Piene died on July 17, 2014 while in a taxi on his way to continue preparations for a “Sky Art Event” at Neue Nationalgalerie. His survivors included his wife, the former Elizabeth Goldring, a poet and artist who also worked on Centerbeam, as well as four children, a stepdaughter and five grandchildren.

In 1957, Piene and Heinz Mack founded the group ZERO. In 1961, Günther Uecker joined the group. In 1957 he developed the Grid Picture, a type of stencilled painting made from half-tone screens with regularly arranged

Otto Piene

Otto Piene

points in single colours (yellow, silver, white or gold), for example Pure Energy (1958; New York, MOMA). Piene’s work then developed in a variety of forms. The Lichtballette (“light ballet”) (from 1959) were a development of the Grid Pictures: light from moving torches was projected through grids, thus extending and stimulating the viewer’s perception of space. This series of works is inspired by László Moholy-Nagy’s Light Space Modulator (1930) and Fernand Léger’s Ballet Mécanique (1924).

Also in 1959, the combination of these grids with sources of fire (candles, gas-burners) produced smoke-traces and fire paintings, in which the paint was burnt. Piene created these Rauchbilder (“smoke pictures”) as a reference to elementary natural energies. In the “fire paintings”, he lightly burned a layer of solvent on pigmented paper, developing organic forms from the remnant, or the soot.

Otto Piene

Otto Piene

Throughout the remainder of his career he continued the practice of making “smoke pictures”. Fire and smoke (their traces) are important elements in these pictures. Silver Fire from 1973, in the collection of the Honolulu Museum of Art, is an example of a “smoke picture”. He also experimented with multimedia combinations. In 1963, together with Günther Uecker and Heinz Mack, he became a spokesman of Neuen Idealismus (“the new idealism”). Piene is also noted for having explorined new uses for broadcast television. In 1968, along with Aldo Tambellini, he produced Black Gate Cologne, which is cited as one of the first television programs to have been produced by experimental visual artists.

1967 marked the beginning of Piene’s involvement with Sky art, a term he coined in 1969 and which allowed him to use landscape and cities themselves as the focal point of his work. For the closing of the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, Piene created the sky workOlympic Rainbow, made up of five differently coloured helium-filled polythene tubes, each one 600 m long. Between 1981 and 1986 Piene organized four Sky art conferences in the USA and Europe.

He took a stab at industrial design in the 1970s with a 500-piece run of the upscale Suomi tableware by Timo Sarpaneva that Piene decorated for the German Rosenthal porcelain maker’s Studio Linie. 

Working as the director of the Center for Advanced Visual Studies (C.A.V.S.) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Piene collaborated in the design of the kinetic sculpture performance Centerbeam first exhibited in Kassel, Germany in 1977. Later mounted on

Light Ballet- Otto Piene

Light Ballet- Otto Piene

the National Mall in Washington, it featured laser-projected images on moving steam screens, solar-tracked holograms, a 144-foot water prism and helium-lifted sky sculptures. The C.A.V.S. allowed artists to work using sophisticated techniques and scientific partnership, promoting a highly collaborative environment.

In 1978, Piene was commissioned by the Smithsonian Art Collectors Program to create a print to benefit the educational and cultural programs of the Smithsonian Associates. The print was to commemorate a Washington, D.C. festival much like the 1977 exhibition in Kassel. Three lithographs resulted, all titled, Centerbeam, one of which hangs in the ongoing exhibition, Graphic Eloquence, in the S. Dillon Ripley Center in the National Mall.

In 1999, Piene presented his idea of a statue called Das Geleucht in the Ludwig Galerie Schloss Oberhausen for the first time. That monument in the form of a mining lamp ought to be built on the spoil tip Halde Rheinpreußen in Moers, with illumation at night. That project enthused the publicity but as recently as 2006 sponsors were found. Until 2007, the 30 metres (98 ft) high monument lightened the spoil tip every night.

Light Ballet- Otto Piene

Light Ballet- Otto Piene

Piene had his first solo exhibition at Galerie Schmela, Düsseldorf, in 1959. With Light Ballet, he debuted at Howard Wise Gallery, New York, in 1966. He represented Germany at the Venice Biennale in 1967 and 1971, and exhibited at documenta in Kassel, Germany, in 1959, 1964 and 1977. In 1985, he exhibited at the São Paulo Biennial.

Piene’s solo exhibitions include retrospectives at the Kunstmuseum im Ehrenhof, Düsseldorf, in 1996 and at the Prague City Gallery Prague, in 2002, and a show at the Museum am Ostwall, Dortmund in 2008-2009.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I had fun, but burnt my finger while creating it.  The pains of art!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 282.

Best,

Linda

 

 

Feuer und Rauch- Tribute to Otto Piene Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Burning on Canvas

Feuer und Rauch- Tribute to Otto Piene
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Burning on Canvas

Side-View Feuer und Rauch- Tribute to Otto Piene Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Burning on Canvas

Side-View
Feuer und Rauch- Tribute to Otto Piene
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Burning on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Feuer und Rauch- Tribute to Otto Piene Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Burning on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Feuer und Rauch- Tribute to Otto Piene
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Burning on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Feuer und Rauch- Tribute to Otto Piene Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Burning on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Feuer und Rauch- Tribute to Otto Piene
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Burning on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Feuer und Rauch- Tribute to Otto Piene Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Burning on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Feuer und Rauch- Tribute to Otto Piene
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Burning on Canvas

Day 269- Josef Mikl- New Discoveries

It’s Day 269 and my busy week is wrapping up…I had a very nice time painting today’s piece.  I feel like I haven’t done an abstract piece quite like this one in a while.  There’s something very freeing about these kind of paintings.  Join me in honoring Josef Mikl today!

Josef Mikl

Josef Mikl

The dog Kopejkin (Gogol), 2000, oil on canvas, 200x200 cm- Josef Mikl

The dog Kopejkin (Gogol), 2000, oil on canvas, 200×200 cm- Josef Mikl

Josef Mikl (August 8, 1929 – March 29, 2008) was an Austrian abstract painter of the Informal style.

Born in Vienna, he received his first training at the Graphische Lehr- und Versuchsanstalt, studying at the prominent Viennese academy from 1949 to 1956 under Josef Dobrovský. Collaborating with Friedensreich Hundertwasser at the Vienna Art Club, Mikl later was a member of the Galerie St. Stephan group. In 1968 Mikl, well known in Austria, represented his home country at the 34th Biennale in Venice.

Classified as an Informal and Modernist artist, Mikl himself despised his artwork being placed under a specific label, calling it “an insult” in an undated interview. He worked in oil, pastels and water colors, as well as sculptures and drawings that either stood alone or served as illustrations in a book or decorations in a church. Mikl is best known for renovating the Redoutensaal in Vienna’s Imperial Palace after it was destroyed in a 1992 fire. The hall once served as a venue for the first performance of Ludwig van Beethoven’s 8th Symphony as well as a summit between U.S. President John F. Kennedy and Soviet leader Nikita S. Krushchev and was reopened in 1997 with vibrant reds and yellows depicting notable themes and figures of Austrian literature, all of Mikl’s design.

Josef Mikl died of cancer on March 29, 2008. His funeral was held on April 3 though his death was not announced until the next day, in

Josef Mikl

Josef Mikl

accordance with Mikl’s wishes.  Survivors include his wife, Brigitte Bruckner, and their 20-year-old daughter Anna Mikl.

Biography above is from wikipedia.

Below is from his obituary in The Guardian.

The painter Josef Mikl, who has died from cancer at the age of 78, was one of the most distinguished abstract artists of his generation. Though relatively little known in Britain, in his native Austria he received many honours, including a commission to decorate the state room known as the Redoutensaal, in Vienna’s Hofburg Palace, after its destruction by fire in 1992.

Josef Mikl

Josef Mikl

As well as its impressive size and vibrant fields of colour, the hall’s painted ceiling includes 34 verses by the early 20th-century author Karl Kraus, handwritten by Mikl on such a small scale that they are invisible to the spectator below. Public art and personal expression have rarely been so deftly combined.

Mikl was born in Vienna, where he started his training at the end of the second world war. After three years at the Graphische Lehr- und Versuchsanstalt (Vienna Training and Research Institute of Graphic Arts), in 1949 he began studying under Josef Dobrowsky, who had recently been appointed to the Academy of Fine Arts, the institution in which Mikl was himself to become a professor 20 years later. Dobrowsky’s vivid landscapes and genre paintings had a significant effect after the cultural sterility of the Nazi era. However, together with his fellow academy student Friedensreich Hundertwasser, Mikl helped to open Austria to more radical foreign influences, especially the expressive abstraction of French art informal.

Even more important was Mikl’s relationship with Markus Prachensky, Arnulf Rainer and Wolfgang Hollegha. In 1956 these abstract painters joined the circle around the extraordinary Monsignor Otto Mauer, a liberal Catholic intellectual who set up a gallery, next to St Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna, at which Mikl frequently exhibited in the late 1950s and 60s.

His rising reputation led to some monumental commissions, for example to design a stained-glass window in 1959 for the Peace Church

Josef Mikl

Josef Mikl

in Hiroshima. During this period he was also invited to prestigious international shows, representing Austria at the 34th Venice Biennale in 1968, and twice participating in the documenta exhibition in Kassel.

Mikl’s output was certainly varied, ranging from oils, pastels and watercolours to sculpture and book illustrations. The clearly defined, almost mechanistic forms of his youth gave way to more lyrical images in which the human figure was often hinted at through sensuous washes of colour.

The influence from action painting can hardly be denied: like other artists, most famously Jackson Pollock, Mikl sometimes laid his canvases on the floor in order to work. The scale of his projects also increased, as in his 300-square-metres decoration for a chapel at the St Virgil educational centre in Salzburg in 1975-76. However, he was still capable of producing small, subtle pieces: lithographs and other prints, for example, filled with delicate shifts of tone and linear patterns.

Josef Mikl

Josef Mikl

Moreover, Mikl was keen to distance himself from abstract expressionism’s more extravagant aesthetic and intellectual claims. Above all, he did not wish to be seen as representing contemporary anguish or any other spirit of his age. He dismissed the concept of zeitgeist as “decorative”: as he put it, “it works with the masses as the most powerful force, with sentimentality, foolish content, false form, bad technique, the pseudo-philosophy of the art trade. The word zeitgeist is an insult.” Mikl saw himself rather as the Thomas Edison of painting, continually making new discoveries, regardless of the preconceptions of the day. This intellectual dynamism is most clearly reflected in the Redoutensaal canvases, which were completed in 1997. While the ceiling and some of the wall paintings are responses to modern works by Kraus and Elias Canetti, other images in the room refer to the 19th-century dramatists Johann Nestroy and Ferdinand Raimund.

Nestroy’s sharp satire, often using comic songs and wordplay, could be expressed only obliquely through abstract art, and yet the contrast with the reconstructed room’s pompous architecture is highly effective. It is hard to imagine a more fitting adornment to a chamber that hosts such magnificent functions as the council of EU ministers and the Viennese coffee-makers’ ball.

Mikl himself was given numerous awards, from the Austrian Decoration for Science and Art (1990) to the City of Vienna’s Ring of Honour (2004). He is survived by his wife, the artist Brigitte Bruckner, who was over 30 years his junior, and his daughter Anna. The news of his death was not made public, according to his wishes, until shortly after his funeral.

· Josef Mikl, artist, born August 8 1929; died March 29 2008

I hope you enjoy my piece for today!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 270!

Best,

Linda

Rot und Blau Tanzen- Tribute to Josef Mikl Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Rot und Blau Tanzen- Tribute to Josef Mikl
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Rot und Blau Tanzen- Tribute to Josef Mikl Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Rot und Blau Tanzen- Tribute to Josef Mikl
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Rot und Blau Tanzen- Tribute to Josef Mikl Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Rot und Blau Tanzen- Tribute to Josef Mikl
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Rot und Blau Tanzen- Tribute to Josef Mikl Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Rot und Blau Tanzen- Tribute to Josef Mikl
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Rot und Blau Tanzen- Tribute to Josef Mikl Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Rot und Blau Tanzen- Tribute to Josef Mikl
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 262- Frank Bowling- Freedom in the Abstract

It’s Day 262 and when I found today’s artist I got pretty excited about doing a tribute for him!  Join me in honoring Frank Bowling today. 🙂

Frank Bowling

Frank Bowling

Frank Bowling 'Julia' (1975) courtesy of Tate website.

Frank Bowling ‘Julia’ (1975) courtesy of Tate website.

Richard Sheridan Franklin Bowling, known as Frank Bowling, OBE (born 29 February 1936), is a

For rose - Frank Bowling

For rose – Frank Bowling

Guyana-born British artist who is widely considered to be one of the most distinguished artists to emerge from post-war British art schools. His paintings relate to Abstract expressionism, Color Field painting and Lyrical Abstraction.

Bowling was born in Bartica, Guyana, South America. His father was a police district paymaster and his

mother a seamstress, and in 1950, at the age of 15, he moved to England, where he lived with an uncle and completed his education.

After doing his National Service in the Royal Air Force, Bowling went on to study art, despite earlier ambitions to be a poet and a writer. He studied at the Chelsea School of Art, then in 1959 won a scholarship to London’s Royal College of Art, where fellow students included artists such as David Hockney, Derek Boshier, Allen Jones, R. B. Kitaj and Peter Phillips.

At graduation in 1962, Hockney was awarded the gold medal while Bowling was given the silver. Bowling had been tipped to win the gold

Frank Bowling, Upright, 2012, acrylic on canvas, 74 x 53 inches

Frank Bowling, Upright, 2012, acrylic on canvas, 74 x 53 inches

but due to his controversial 1960 marriage to Royal College Registrar Paddy Kitchen (they divorced in the late 1960s), he was relegated to silver.

Frank Bowling- Crossing Liberty 1 (courtesy of the artist and ROLLO Contemporary Art)

Frank Bowling- Crossing Liberty 1 (courtesy of the artist and ROLLO Contemporary Art)

His first one-person exhibition, entitled “Image in Revolt,” was held in London in 1962 at the Grabowski Galleries, and other exhibitions followed. However, Bowling was frustrated at being pigeonholed as a Caribbean artist; as he said in a Guardian interview with Laura Barnett: “It seemed that everyone was expecting me to paint some kind of protest art out of postcolonial discussion. For a while I fell for it. I painted a picture called the Martyrdom of Patrice Lumumba.”

A move to New York in the mid-1960s exposed Bowling to his American

contemporaries and soon won him a place in the 1971 Whitney Biennial. As Maya Jaggi writes: “unlike contemporaries who founded British pop art, Bowling took a singular path, from Bacon-esque figurative painting to an abstract art touched by

Frank Bowling- Tony’s Anvil 1975, acrylic on canvas

Frank Bowling- Tony’s Anvil 1975, acrylic on canvas

personal memory and history…. Encouraged by the US critic Clement Greenberg, he found a freedom in

Head (1974)- Frank Bowling

Head (1974)- Frank Bowling

abstract art, alongside Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock and Barnett Newman.” Between 1969 and 1972 Bowling was a contributing editor of Arts Magazine.

Bowling now spends part of each year between London and New York, where he maintains studios.

Bowling’s paintings have been shown in numerous exhibitions in Europe, the United Kingdom and the United States and are included in major private and corporate collections worldwide. His work can also be seen in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Museum of Modern Art in New York, as well as the Tate Gallery in London.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I had such a fun time with my “pouring” painting today!  This is definitely one I want to emulate on a much larger scale.  I hope you like my piece today and I will see you tomorrow on Day 263.

Best,

Linda

Standing Up- Tribute to Frank Bowling Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Standing Up- Tribute to Frank Bowling
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Standing Up- Tribute to Frank Bowling Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Standing Up- Tribute to Frank Bowling
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Standing Up- Tribute to Frank Bowling Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Standing Up- Tribute to Frank Bowling
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Standing Up- Tribute to Frank Bowling Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Standing Up- Tribute to Frank Bowling
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Standing Up- Tribute to Frank Bowling Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Standing Up- Tribute to Frank Bowling
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

 

Day 233- Daniel Spoerri- Eat Art

It’s Day 233 and I had a great time doing today’s piece.  I got a little overwhelmed because I had too many ideas of what I wanted to do.  Join me in honoring Daniel Spoerri today!

Daniel Spoerri

Daniel Spoerri

Assemblage, 1990, assemblage sur bois- Daniel Spoerri

Assemblage, 1990, assemblage sur bois- Daniel Spoerri

Daniel Spoerri (born 27 March 1930 in Galați) is a Swiss artist and writer born in Romania. Spoerri is best known for his “snare-pictures,” a type of assemblage or object art, in which he captures a group of objects, such as the remains of meals eaten by individuals, including the plates, silverware and glasses, all of which are fixed to the

Daniel Spoerri

Daniel Spoerri

table or board, which is then displayed on a wall. He also is widely acclaimed for his book, Topographie Anécdotée* du Hasard (An Anecdoted Topography of Chance), a literary analog to his snare-pictures, in which he mapped all the objects located on his table at a particular moment, describing each with his personal recollections evoked by the object.

Spoerri was born Daniel Isaac Feinstein, on 27 March 1930, in Galați, Romania. Although his father, Isaac Feinstein, had converted to Christianity, after Romania entered the War on the side of Nazi Germany he was arrested and killed in 1941. His mother, born Lydia Spoerri, was Swiss and was therefore able to emigrate with her family of 6 children to Switzerland in 1942. There, he was adopted by his maternal uncle and registered as Daniel Spoerri, a name he has retained.

In the 1950s he was active in dance, studying classical dance with Olga Preobrajenska and in 1954 becoming the lead dancer at the State

Daniel Spoerri

Daniel Spoerri

Opera of Bern, Switzerland. He later staged several avant-garde plays including Ionesco’s The Bald Soprano and Picasso’s surrealist Desire Trapped by the Tail. During that period he met a number of Surrealist artists, including Jean Tinguely, Marcel Duchampand Man Ray, and also a number of artists subsequently associated with the Fluxus movement, including Robert Filliou, Dieter Roth and Emmett Williams. In the late 1950s, Spoerri married Vera Mertz.

Kichka's Breakfast- Daniel Spoerri

Kichka’s Breakfast- Daniel Spoerri

In 1959 Spoerri founded Editions MAT (“Multiplication d’art Transformable”), a venture which produced and sold copies of three-dimensional constructed artworks by artists such as Marcel Duchamp, Dieter Roth, Jean Tinguely and Victor Vasarely. One of the best known works produced by Editions MAT was Man Ray’s Indestructible Object. Spoerri is credited with coining the term “multiples” for such works.

In 1960, Spoerri made his first “snare-picture”. Spoerri later explained snare-pictures as follows: “objects found in chance positions, in order or disorder (on tables, in boxes, drawers, etc.) are fixed (‘snared’) as they are. Only the plane is changed: since the result is called a picture,

Daniel Spoerri

Daniel Spoerri

what was horizontal becomes vertical. Example: remains of a meal are fixed to the table at which the meal was consumed and the table hung on the wall.” His first “snare-picture”,

Daniel Spoerri

Daniel Spoerri

Kichka’s Breakfast was created from his girlfriend’s leftover breakfast. The piece is now in the collection in the Museum of Modern Art in New York.  One snare-picture, made in 1964, consists of the remains of a meal eaten by Marcel Duchamp.  This work holds the auction price record for Spoerri, selling for €136,312 ($200,580) in January 2008, distantly followed by another snare-picture from 1972, which sold for €44,181 ($69,860) in April 2008.

Spoerri was one of the original signers of the manifesto creating the Nouveau réalisme (New Realism) art movement, an avant garde endeavor begun in 1960. His use of everyday life as the main subject-matter of his art reflects his involvement in the New Realism movement.

Spoerri is also closely associated with the Fluxus art movement, a movement formed in the early 1960s, “characterized by a strongly Dadaist attitude, [whose] participants were a divergent group of individualists whose most common theme was their delight in spontaneity and humor.”  It has been said that his Anecdoted Topography of Chance “seems perfectly to embody aspects of its spirit.”

A major theme of Spoerri’s artwork is food, and he has called this aspect of his work “Eat Art.”

Daniel Spoerri

Daniel Spoerri

Daniel Spoerri

Daniel Spoerri

This is seen not only in his snare-pictures of eaten meals, but in a variety of other contexts. For example, in 1961 he sold in an art-gallery in Copenhagen store-bought canned food which he had signed and rubber-stamped “Attention: Work of Art.” In 1963, he enacted a sort of performance art called Restaurant de la Galerie J in Paris, for which he cooked on several evenings. Art-critics took over the role of waiters, playing on the idea of the critic bringing the art to the consumers and giving them an understanding of the work. On June 18, 1968, Spoerri opened the Restaurant Spoerri in Düsseldorf, and on September 18, 1970, he opened the Eat-Art-Gallery upstairs. He also published in 1970 a diary of his life on the Greek island of Symi, in which he included numerous recipes of the dishes he ate there. Originally titled A Gastronomic Itinerary, it was later republished under the title Mythology & Meatballs.

Partial biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you like my piece I did in honor of Mr. Spoerri today.  I decided to keep in simple because of the scale of my canvas (which is much smaller…inches!) and lack of materials.  For instance, I can’t adhere an actual plate, wine bottle etc. onto a 10 inch canvas.  Anyways, I really liked what I did and I hope you do too!

Best, Linda

A Light Snack- Tribute to Daniel Spoerri Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

A Light Snack- Tribute to Daniel Spoerri
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View A Light Snack- Tribute to Daniel Spoerri Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View
A Light Snack- Tribute to Daniel Spoerri
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 A Light Snack- Tribute to Daniel Spoerri Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
A Light Snack- Tribute to Daniel Spoerri
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 A Light Snack- Tribute to Daniel Spoerri Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
A Light Snack- Tribute to Daniel Spoerri
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 A Light Snack- Tribute to Daniel Spoerri Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
A Light Snack- Tribute to Daniel Spoerri
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

 

 

Day 231- John “Crash” Matos- Street Life

It’s Day 231 and I’m sure once you start scrolling you can understand why I am so excited about today’s artist.  I had a blast painting this today.  Join me in honoring John Matos a.k.a CRASH today.

John CRASH Matos

John CRASH Matos

John CRASH Matos

John CRASH Matos

Crash (b. John Matos, Bronx, New York, Oct. 11, 1961) is a graffiti artist. As early as 13, John Matos was spray painting New York City trains, the full image art as opposed to simpler tagging soon transferred to silk screened canvas. He was first noticed through his murals on subway cars and dilapidated buildings, he is now regarded as a pioneer of the Graffiti art movement.

His work is said to convey a “visual link between street life and established society”. In

John CRASH Matos

John CRASH Matos

1980, Crash curated the now iconic exhibition:”Graffiti Art Success for America” at Fashion MODA, launching the graffiti movement that has remained very active through today. By the 1980s Matos had exhibits across the United States and abroad. Galerie Yaki Kornblit was the first instrumental gallery in Amsterdam that help launch his career in Europe.

Mural- John CRASH Matos

Mural- John CRASH Matos

In 1981 Crash, along with 10 other artists were chosen by The Public Art Fund to design animated imagery for The Spectacolor Billboard in Times Square. He was given his first gallery showing by Sidney Janis at the Sidney Janis Gallery in 1983. Chase Manhattan, N.A., as well as CITIBANK, N.A., and other collections came calling. In 1984, Crash along with Keith Haring painted mural installations for the 5/5 Figuration Libre France/USA at the Musee d’art Moderne de la Villa de Paris.

In 1988 he sprayed Notes in the Wind measuring 178 x 178 centimetres to be exhibited and eventually to be owned by the Peter Stuyvesant Foundation in Zevenaar, Netherlands. In 1995, Crash was commissioned by British American Tobacco to create a commission for Lucky Strike brand cigarette, joining fellow artist Keith Haring, to create a special work for this company and their collection.

In 1996, Crash painted an Eric Clapton Signature Stratocaster and gave it to the artist as a gift. Clapton went on to use the specially designed

John CRASH Matos

John CRASH Matos

Stratocaster guitar by Crash

Stratocaster guitar by Crash

guitar through his 2001 tour and later appeared with another. In total Crash has created 5 guitars for Clapton, though only three of them have made public appearances. One of Clapton’s “Crashocasters” (nicknamed by Eric’s former guitar tech, Lee Dickson) auctioned for $321,100 (USD) by the name of “Crash-3” and was used extensively during the first Crossroads Guitar Festival in 2004.

Soon after Fender Musical Instruments commissioned the creation of 50 such graffiti designed guitars from Crash and named the line “Crashocasters.” Crash went on to also design a line of custom painted Telecasters with matching Fender amps. Other artists such as John Mayer have used the custom painted Crashocaster guitars.

John CRASH Matos

John CRASH Matos

In July 2006, the pieces titled “Aeroplane 1” (1983) and “A-U-T-O-matic”,(1985), along with other paintings from their permanent collection were displayed in the Brooklyn Museum of Art in a featured exhibit titled “Graffiti.” In 2009, Crash held his first exhibition of painted guitars and guitar related artwork in NYC.

In 2010, Crash held a 30 year retrospective at Fairfield University’s Walsh Gallery. Crash was asked by Sanrio to create a series of paintings to be shown at Art Basel, Miami Beach, FL, featuring Hello Kitty and other characters from Sanrio’s catalogue. Also, in 2010, Crash was commissioned to create a special limited edition luggage for TUMI, Inc. A painting was created and used for the design, which was released world wide in 2011. Same day releases were coordinated in Tokyo, Hong Kong, New York, Germany, Paris and London. Crash is one of the New York artist featured at MOCA, The David Geffen Building, Los Angeles’ “Art in the Streets”, April–August 2011. In 2011, Crash held his first print survey exhibition in Southport, Ct., at Southport Galleries.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I pulled out some of my old X-Men comics from high school and really wanted Archie to be in there as well. 🙂  I will see you tomorrow on Day 232!  Best, Linda

WHAK- Tribute to CRASH Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

WHAK- Tribute to CRASH
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View WHAK- Tribute to CRASH Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
WHAK- Tribute to CRASH
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 WHAK- Tribute to CRASH Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
WHAK- Tribute to CRASH
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 WHAK- Tribute to CRASH Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
WHAK- Tribute to CRASH
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 WHAK- Tribute to CRASH Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
WHAK- Tribute to CRASH
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas