Day 324- André Derain- Intoxicated With Color

It’s Day 324 and there’s water falling from the sky!  I really hope it’s doing something to help the drought here in California.  I love the rain…my dogs and joints don’t however.  Well, I’ve got to finish up some other things like feedback for my writing group tonight so please join me in honoring André Derain today!  I had so much fun with playing with color.  Fauvism has definitely become one of my favorite movements as I journeyed through this challenge.

André_Derain circa 1903

André_Derain circa 1903

Self Portrait in Red Cap- André Derain

Self Portrait in Red Cap- André Derain

André Derain (10 June 1880 – 8 September 1954) was a French artist, painter, sculptor and co-founder of Fauvism with Henri Matisse.

Derain was born in 1880 in Chatou, Yvelines, Île-de-France, just outside Paris. In 1895 Derain began to study on his own, contrary to claims that meeting Vlaminck or Matisse began his efforts to paint, and occasionally went to the countryside with an old friend of Cézanne’s, Father Jacomin along with his two sons. In 1898, while studying to be an engineer at the Académie Camillo, he attended painting classes under Eugène Carrière, and there met Matisse.

In 1900, he met and shared a studio with Maurice de Vlaminck and together they began to paint

Big Ben London 1906- André Derain

Big Ben London 1906- André Derain

scenes in the neighbourhood, but this was interrupted by military service at Commercy from September 1901 to 1904. Following his release from service, Matisse persuaded Derain’s parents to allow him to abandon his engineering career and devote himself solely to painting; subsequently Derain attended the Académie Julian.

Derain and Matisse worked together through the summer of 1905 in the Mediterraneanvillage of Collioure and later that year displayed their highly innovative paintings at the Salon d’Automne. The vivid, unnatural colors led the critic Louis Vauxcelles to derisively dub their works as les Fauves, or “the wild beasts”, marking the start of the Fauvist movement.

Charing Cross Bridge- André Derain

Charing Cross Bridge- André Derain

In March 1906, the noted art dealer Ambroise Vollard sent Derain to London to produce a series of paintings with the city as subject. In 30 paintings (29 of which are still extant), Derain presented a portrait of London that was radically different from anything done by previous painters of the city such as Whistler or Monet. With bold colors and compositions, Derain painted multiple pictures of the Thames and Tower Bridge.

These London paintings remain among his most popular work. Art critic T.G Rosenthal: “Not since Monet has anyone made London seem so fresh and yet remain quintessentially English. Some of his views of the Thames use the Pointillist technique of multiple dots, although by this time, because the dots have become much larger, it is rather more simply the separation of colours called Divisionism and it is peculiarly effective in conveying the fragmentation of colour in moving water in sunlight.”

In 1907 art dealer Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler purchased Derain’s entire studio, granting Derain financial stability. He experimented with stone sculpture and moved to Montmartre to be near his friend Pablo Picasso and other noted artists. Fernande Olivier, Picasso’s mistress at the time, described Derain as:

Slim, elegant, with a lively colour and enamelled black hair. With an English chic, somewhat striking. Fancy waistcoats, ties

André Derain

André Derain

in crude colours, red and green. Always a pipe in his mouth, phlegmatic, mocking, cold, an arguer.

At Montmartre, Derain began to shift from the brilliant Fauvist palette to more muted tones, showing the influence of Cubism and Paul Cézanne. (According to Gertrude Stein, there is a tradition that Derain discovered and was influenced by African sculpture before the Cubists did.) Derain supplied woodcuts in primitivist style for an edition of Guillaume Apollinaire’s first book of prose,L’enchanteur pourrissant (1909). He displayed works at the Neue Künstlervereinigung in Munich in 1910, in 1912 at the secessionist Der Blaue Reiter and in 1913 at the seminal Armory Show in New York. He also illustrated a collection of poems by Max Jacob in 1912.

Andre Derain - The Turning Road, L'Estaque - 1906

Andre Derain – The Turning Road, L’Estaque – 1906

At about this time Derain’s work began overtly reflecting his study of the Old Masters. The role of color was reduced and forms became austere; the years 1911–1914 are sometimes referred to as his gothic period. In 1914 he was mobilized for military service in World War I and until his release in 1919 he would have little time for painting, although in 1916 he provided a set of illustrations for André Breton’s first book, Mont de Piete.

After the war, Derain won new acclaim as a leader of the renewed classicism then ascendant. With the wildness of his Fauve years far behind, he was admired as an upholder of tradition. In 1919 he designed the ballet La Boutique fantasque for Diaghilev, leader of the Ballets Russes. A major success, it would lead to his creating many ballet designs.

The 1920s marked the height of his success, as he was awarded the Carnegie Prize in 1928 and began to exhibit extensively abroad—in London, Berlin, Frankfurt, Düsseldorf, New York City and Cincinnati, Ohio.

During the German occupation of France in World War II, Derain lived primarily in Paris and was much courted by the Germans because

Portrait of Matisse- Andre Derain

Portrait of Matisse- Andre Derain

he represented the prestige of French culture. Derain accepted an invitation to make an official visit to Germany in 1941, and traveled with other French artists to Berlin to attend a Nazi exhibition of an officially endorsed artist, Arno Breker. Derain’s presence in Germany was used effectively by Nazi propaganda, and after the Liberation he was branded a collaborator and ostracized by many former supporters.

A year before his death, he contracted an eye infection from which he never fully recovered. He died in Garches, Hauts-de-Seine, Île-de-France, France in 1954 when he was struck by a moving vehicle.

Derain’s London paintings were the subject of a major exhibition at the Courtauld Institute from 27 October 2005 to 22 January 2006.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I really wanted to do a seascape painting.  I also didn’t want to use all pointillism and mix up his styles a bit.  I was torn with doing a portrait of myself…but sometimes I get sick of staring at my own mug with all the self portraits I’ve done and today was one of those days! 🙂  I will see you tomorrow on Day 325!  40 to go?  I’m a little sad.

Best,

Linda

Voilier sur l'eau- Tribute to André Derain Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Voilier sur l’eau- Tribute to André Derain
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Voilier sur l'eau- Tribute to André Derain Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Voilier sur l’eau- Tribute to André Derain
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Voilier sur l'eau- Tribute to André Derain Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Voilier sur l’eau- Tribute to André Derain
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Voilier sur l'eau- Tribute to André Derain Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Voilier sur l’eau- Tribute to André Derain
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Voilier sur l'eau- Tribute to André Derain Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Voilier sur l’eau- Tribute to André Derain
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 321- Wolf Kahn- Sweeping Bands of Color

It’s Day 321 and I’m still healing…or still getting sick.  I hate being on the teeter toter of getting ill.  It could just be the weather…who knows?  I am excited about today’s artist…I love his paintings and enjoyed doing today’s piece.  Join me in honoring Wolf Kahn today.

Wolf Kahn

Wolf Kahn

Wolf Kahn - Woodland Swamp

Wolf Kahn – Woodland Swamp

Wolf Kahn (born October 4, 1927) is a German-born American painter.

Kahn is known for his combination of realism and Color Field, and known to work in pastel and oil paint. He studied under Hans Hofmann, and also graduated from the University of Chicago. Kahn

Wolf Kahn Original Oil on Canvas

Wolf Kahn Original Oil on Canvas

is a resident of both New York City and, during the summer and autumn, West Brattleboro, Vermont.

Wolf Kahn was born in Stuttgart, Germany in 1927. He states that he began drawing at the age of 4. In 1939, at the age of 12 he fled Germany for England and in 1940 moved to the United States of America.

Barn on Cooks Lane- Wolf Kahn

Barn on Cooks Lane- Wolf Kahn

He attended the High School of Music and Art in New York City and graduated in 1945. Under the GI Bill, he was able to continue his studies with abstract expressionist Hans Hofmann at the Hans Hofmann School. He became Hofmann’s studio assistant. He enrolled for a degree from the University of Chicago in 1950 and completed this in only one year, receiving a Bachelor’s Degree in 1951.

His wife Emily Mason is also a painter. They have two daughters,

Wolf Kahn - Order in Disorder

Wolf Kahn – Order in Disorder

Cecily and Melany.

Wolf Kahn works in oil and pastel. His works usually covers the subject of landscapes and his own personal vision of nature. His convergence of light and color has been described as combining pictorial landscapes and painterly abstraction.

His gallery, Ameringer|McEnery|Yohe, states

Yellow Symphony- Wolf Kahn

Yellow Symphony- Wolf Kahn

“The unique blend of Realism and the formal discipline of Color Field painting sets the work of Wolf Kahn apart. Kahn is an artist who embodies the synthesis of his modern abstract training with Hans Hofmann, with the palette of Matisse, Rothko’s sweeping bands of color, and the atmospheric qualities of American Impressionism. It is precisely this fusion of color, spontaneity and representation that has produced such a rich and expressive body of work.”

Wolf Kahn has received a number of awards including a Fulbright Scholarship in 1962, a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship in 1966, and an Award in Art from the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1979.

Wolf Kahn became a member of the National Academy of Design in 1980 and the American Academy of Arts

Wolf Kahn

Wolf Kahn

and Letters in 1984. He is currently on the Board of Trustees forMarlboro College, in Marlboro, VT.

In 2005 the Smithsonian Art Collectors Program commissioned Kahn to produce a print to benefit the cultural

and educational programs of the Smithsonian Associates. The screen print, entitled Aura, hangs in the Graphic Eloquence exhibit in the S. Dillon Ripley Center in the National Mall.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I didn’t use pastels or oil paints.  I only have oil pastels and I don’t think they would’ve worked as well as soft pastels.  I used watercolors and acrylics, but I think the style and spirit came through.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 322!

Best,

Linda

Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Day 319- Raoul Dufy- Painting With His Heart

It’s Day 319 and I thought, “Why not paint a vase of flowers?”.  I’m still a little under the weather so it was nice to paint something cheerful.  Join me in honoring Raoul Dufy today.

Raoul Dufy

Raoul Dufy

Interior with Indian Woman - Raoul Dufy

Interior with Indian Woman – Raoul Dufy

Raoul Dufy (French: [ʁa.ul dy.fi]; 3 June 1877 – 23 March 1953) was a French Fauvist painter. He developed a colorful, decorative style that became fashionable for designs of ceramics and textiles, as well as decorative schemes for public buildings. He is noted for scenes of open-air social events. He was also a draftsman, printmaker, book illustrator, Scenic designer, a designer of furniture, and a planner of public spaces.

Raoul Dufy was born into a large family at Le Havre, in Normandy. He left school at the age of fourteen to work in a coffee-importing company. In 1895, when he was 18, he started taking evening

Bouquet of Flowers 1937- Raoul Dufy

Bouquet of Flowers 1937- Raoul Dufy

classes in art at Le Havre’s École d’Art (municipal art school). The classes were taught by Charles Lhuillier, who had been, forty years earlier, a student of the remarkable French portrait-painter, Ingres. There, Dufy met Raymond Lecourt and Othon Friesz with whom he later shared a studio in Montmartre and to whom he remained a lifelong friend. During this period, Dufy painted mostly Norman landscapes in watercolors.

Raoul Dufy

Raoul Dufy

In 1900, after a year of military service, Raoul Dufy won a scholarship to the École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris, where again he crossed paths with Othon Friesz. (He was there when Georges Braque also was studying.) He concentrated on improving his drawing skills. The impressionist landscape painters, such as Claude Monet and Camille Pissarro, influenced Dufy profoundly.

His first exhibition (at the Exhibition of French Artists) took place in 1901. Introduced to Berthe Weill in 1902, Dufy showed his work in her gallery. Then he exhibited again in 1903 at the Salon des

Independants. A boost to his confidence: the painter, Maurice Denis, bought one of his paintings. Dufy continued to paint, often in the vicinity of Le Havre, and, in particular, on the beach at Sainte-Adresse, made

Raoul Dufy

Raoul Dufy

famous by Eugène Boudin and Claude Monet. In 1904, with his friend, Albert Marquet, he worked in Fecamp on the English Channel (La Manche).

Henri Matisse’s Luxe, Calme et Volupté, which Dufy saw at the Salon des Indépendants in 1905, was a revelation to the young artist, and it directed his interests towards Fauvism. Les Fauves (the wild beasts) emphasized bright color and bold contours in their work. Dufy’s painting reflected this aesthetic until about 1909, when contact with the work of Paul Cézanne led him to adopt a somewhat subtler technique. It was not until 1920, however, after he had flirted briefly with yet another style, cubism, that Dufy developed his own distinctive approach. It involved skeletal structures, arranged with foreshortened perspective, and the use of thin washes of color applied quickly, in a manner that came to be known as stenographic.

Raoul Dufy- Still Life 1941

Raoul Dufy- Still Life 1941

Dufy’s cheerful oils and watercolors depict events of the time period, including yachting scenes, sparkling views of the French Riviera, chic parties, and musical events. The optimistic, fashionably decorative, and illustrative nature of much of his work has meant that his output has been less highly valued critically than the works of artists who have addressed a wider range of social concerns.

Dufy completed one of the largest paintings ever contemplated, a huge and immensely popular ode to electricity, the fresco La Fée Electricité for the 1937 Exposition Internationale in Paris.

Dufy also acquired a reputation as an illustrator and as a commercial artist. He painted murals for public buildings; he also produced a huge number of tapestries and ceramic designs. His plates appear in books by Guillaume Apollinaire, Stéphane Mallarmé, and André Gide.

In 1909, Raoul Dufy was commissioned by Paul Poiret to design stationery for the house, and after 1912 designed textile patterns for Bianchini-Ferier used in Poiret’s and Charvet’s garments.

In the late 1940s and early 1950s Dufy exhibited at the annual Salon des Tuileries in Paris. By 1950, his hands

Raoul Dufy

Raoul Dufy

were struck with rheumatoid arthritis and his ability to paint diminished, as he has to fasten the brush to his hand. In April he went to Boston to undergo an experimental treatment with cortisone and corticotropin, based on the work of Philip S. Hench. It proved successful, and some of his next works were dedicated to the doctors and researchers in the United States. In 1952 he received the grand prize for painting in the 26th Venice Biennale. Dufy died at Forcalquier, France, on 23 March 1953, of intestinal bleeding, which is a likely result of his continuous treatment. He was buried near Matisse in the Cimiez Monastery Cemetery in Cimiez, a suburb of the city of Nice.

Biography is from wikipedia.

What I wish to show when I paint is the way I see things with my eyes and in my heart. (Raoul Dufy)

I hope you enjoy my piece for today.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 320.

Best,

Linda

Vase of Flowers- Tribute to Raoul Dufy Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolors and Acrylics on Canvas

Vase of Flowers- Tribute to Raoul Dufy
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolors and Acrylics on Canvas

Side-View Vase of Flowers- Tribute to Raoul Dufy Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolors and Acrylics on Canvas

Side-View
Vase of Flowers- Tribute to Raoul Dufy
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolors and Acrylics on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Vase of Flowers- Tribute to Raoul Dufy Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolors and Acrylics on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Vase of Flowers- Tribute to Raoul Dufy
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolors and Acrylics on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Vase of Flowers- Tribute to Raoul Dufy Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolors and Acrylics on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Vase of Flowers- Tribute to Raoul Dufy
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolors and Acrylics on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Vase of Flowers- Tribute to Raoul Dufy Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolors and Acrylics on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Vase of Flowers- Tribute to Raoul Dufy
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolors and Acrylics on Canvas

 

Day 318- Amy Sillman- Layer By Layer

It’s Day 318 and I’m having another difficult art day.  Just not feeling very intuitive or creative today and a little under the weather.  I am thankful that I haven’t had too many days like this throughout the past year.  Yet I persevered and did my painting.  I enjoyed the creation process, but I kept altering and jiggering the piece…overanalyzing everything going on in my brain.  I hope I captured the artist’s style…even just a little.  Her pieces are surprisingly difficult to emulate which makes them special.  Maybe on a different day I would’ve been less critical!  Join me in honoring Amy Sillman today!

Amy Sillman

Amy Sillman

Amy Sillman

Amy Sillman

Amy Sillman (born 1955) is an American painter. She lives and works in Brooklyn.

Sillman was born in Detroit, Michigan, and the winding story line of her early years led her to work in a cannery in Alaska and a feminist silkscreen factory in Chicago, and to train at New York University as a Japanese interpreter for the United Nations. She finally landed at Manhattan’s School of Visual Arts, graduating in 1979. Then she spent more than a decade content, as she has said, with “learning how to make paintings—just working, not showing.”

In a 2006 Artforum article, Jan Avgikos wrote that Sillman’s paintings “mine the edges of abstraction, meshing patches of color with bursts of chaotic line and web-like compositional scaffolding.”

Amy Sillman, Blue Diagram, 2009

Amy Sillman, Blue Diagram, 2009

Embracing a modernist reverence of inspired imagination, Sillman defines honesty as the most enduring quality of painting and speaks of painting as “physical, like an extension of my arm.” In a New York Times review of Sillman’s 2006 exhibition at Sikkema Jenkins & Co., Ken Johnson wrote, “The paintings are especially gratifying up close, where you can study the richly complicated textures and colors…” In 2007 Sillman completed four etchings at Crown Point Press, and of this experience, she has said, “Everything that is done in my painting was taken apart layer by layer in printmaking. You take one hundred layers apart and figure out which six will work.”

Bed- Amy Sillman

Bed- Amy Sillman

In a 2007 article in Artforum, Linda Norden wrote of Amy Sillman’s “fearless, tenacious pursuit of a painting that might accurately register the discomfort, incoherence, and absurdity that can characterize painterly experience—and experience in general,” and speaks of “her increasingly influential place among younger painters in both New York and Los Angeles, where she regularly shows, and her growing currency even among contingents of European painters.” Art critic Roberta Smith compared Sillman to similar women painters such as Elena Sisto, Margaret Curtis, and Sue Williams.

Sillman lives in Williamsburg, Brooklyn and maintains a studio in Bushwick.

Sillman began showing at the Brent Sikkema Gallery in New York in 2000. She is represented by Sikkema

Pirate- Amy Sillman

Pirate- Amy Sillman

Jenkins & Co., New York, and shows at Capitain-Petzel in Berlin, at Thomas Dane Gallery in London, and at Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects, Los Angeles. The first large scale survey of her work, curated by Helen Molesworth, premiered at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston in October 2013. The exhibition will also travel to the Aspen Art Museum and the Center for Curatorial Studies and Art in Contemporary Culture at Bard College. Her solo show “Third Person Singular,” the exhibition of a year-long project of portraiture and abstract painting, was on view at theHirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, DC, and travelled to the Tang Museum at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York, until 2009.

Sillman’s paintings are in the permanent collections of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York as well as private collections including the collection of CJ Follini and Renee Ryan.

Amy Sillman, P, 2007, courtesy of the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York.

Amy Sillman, P, 2007, courtesy of the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York.

In 1995, the same year she received an MFA from Bard College, Sillman was awarded a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship in painting and the Elaine de Kooning Memorial Fellowship in 1995. In 1999 she received fellowships from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation and the Joan Mitchell Foundation, and in 2000 was awarded aGuggenheim Fellowship. In 2012, as part of the fifth anniversary of the Brooklyn Museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, the museum presented Sillman with the First Award, a prize given to 15 women who were first in their fields.

Amy Sillman was a Guna S. Mundheim Fellow in the Visual Arts at the American Academy in Berlin, Germany, during the Spring of 2009. During the fall of 2010, she was a Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University. In May 2011, the Montserrat College of Art awarded Amy Sillman an honorary doctoral degree in fine arts.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 319.  I’m going to take the world’s longest nap now.  I hope I feel better tomorrow.  Bummed to be missing my improv rehearsal tonight.

Best,

Linda

Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 306- Vivian Springford- Beautiful Stains

It’s Day 306 and I really wanted to do a color field artist today so I stumbled upon today’s artist while browsing art magazines when running errands today.  This piece was more challenging to create than I thought!  Join me in honoring Vivian Springford today.

Vivian Springford

Vivian Springford

Martinique Series 1972- Vivian Springford

Martinique Series 1972- Vivian Springford

Vivian Springford was born 1914 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and educated at the Spence School in New York City, and then the Art Students League. Born to a prominent family (her father was the former president and chairman of the board of Sevel, Inc, an early maker of refrigerators), she was pictured in The New York Times “Debutantes of the Winter Season in New York” in 1932.

Originally a portrait artist, she illustrated Albert Carr’s 1938 book Juggernaut with portraits of twenty political dictators from the Napoleanic era to the early twentieth century.

She was championed in the late 1950s by Howard DeVree, the New York Times art

Untitled 1959- Vivian Springford

Untitled 1959- Vivian Springford

critic, and Harold Rosenberg helped Springford get her first show at Great Jones Gallery in 1960.

The show generated much excitement and was filmed in the movie “Bowl of Cherries”, in the film library of the Museum of Modern Art. Prominent collectors such as Leon Mnuchin purchased paintings from the exhibition.

Natalie Edgar reviewed the show for Art News, and wrote:
“Vivian Springford has a freely brushed calligraphic style with the fantasy and naturalism of Chinese derivation. An arrested immanence results.”

James R. Mellow wrote in the Arts Magazine:
“Calligraphy is said to have played an important part in the development of her style, but its effect upon the dominating blacks of these paintings is kinesthetic rather than formal – that is, it supplies the impetuous but not the resultant shape of things. The work itself is notable for a first one-­‐‑man showing.”

Untitled 1976- Vivian Springford

Untitled 1976- Vivian Springford

And Peter Wood reviewed the show at length in The Villager, stating:

“… Miss Springford’s pictures are of a kind – all roughly four by five feet, all on unprepared canvas, all containing a major black form soaked up by the canvas, all embellished with colors, sprays and swirls of paint. In a sense, one might say that these works, too, are mere variations on a theme. But for me they have something more; they have an emotional content which I found lacking in the Camino

pictures. And this it seems to me is the essential difference between good abstract expressionism and bad. Miss Springford’s works evokes the feeling of some primeval or post-­‐‑atomic chaos, or perhaps a conflict of the mind inexpressible in words. I saw darkness and fire and motion there…”

Springford was attracted early on to Chinese calligraphy:

“I liked the direct approach of the early Chinese painters. Whatever they put down

Vivian Springford

Vivian Springford

on paper stayed there; they didn’t edit. They didn’t copy nature, either; they interpreted it. In fact, some of the older Chinese drawings are much more abstract than anything done today. I adapted their rhythm and free motion to develop my own abstract paintings.”

Springford shared studio space with the Asian American artist Walasse Ting for ten years, and helped him with the translations of his poetry. Through her association with Ting, Springford developed close contacts with artists such as Pierre Alechinsky, Sam Francis and Karel Appel. Springford wrote “My painting is my own small plot of energy, in terms of color and movement, in the universal whole.”

Springford also had a solo show at Preston Gallery in NYC in 1963, but became a reclusive artist after that, only showing in a few group exhibitions at the request of fellow artists and friends. She otherwise refused to sell or promote her own works. She worked in her NY studio through the mid 1980s until macular degeneration rendered her blind.

Vivian Springford

Vivian Springford

Having no immediate family, she was unable to leave her small New York midtown apartment. In 1998, a volunteer from United-­‐‑Neighbors-­‐‑of-­‐‑the-­‐‑East-­‐‑Side, which works with New York City’ʹs elderly “ʺshut-­‐‑ins”ʺ, was visiting with Springford and learned about a storage room in Chelsea that held her life’ʹs work. They visited the room and found more than 40 years worth of paintings and drawings covered in plastic and a decades worth of dust since the room was last opened. The volunteer brought samples of Springford’ʹs work to Gary Snyder, an art dealer known for his revisionist exhibitions of historically rooted art and artists. Snyder immediately recognized its importance and began the process of cleaning, restoring, and showing her work. Snyder’ʹs first exhibition of Springford’ʹs work in 1998 was nearly sold out before its opening.

When Vivian Springford died in 2003, Gary Snyder presented a memorial show that was well received .

Doug McClemont reviewed the exhibition for Artnews, ending with:

“…The influences of artists such as Georgia O’Keeffe and Sam Francis are difficult not to notice, but Springford’s experiments with making acrylics behave like watercolors were original and skillful, and the results convey a rare sense of magic.”

Grace Glueck reviewed the show in The New York Times:
“The recent rediscovery of Springford’ʹs work, which lay in a warehouse for years after this reclusive painter stopped exhibiting, has generated her second show here. An American painter who started out as a portraitist and then came into the orbit of the New York

Vivian Springford

Vivian Springford

School, Springford (1914-­‐‑2003) was introduced to Asian art and philosophy by her friend the poet Walasse Ting.
Her strong sense of color is tempered by an Asian feeling for delicate, calligraphic line, seen in works of the 1960’ʹs. These exuberant linear scribblings and doodlings, stained and painted on paper or canvas, are enhanced and sometimes almost overcome by areas of black paint, worked onto the surface by stain, brushing or other means.
In the Tanzania and Martinique series -­‐‑-­‐‑ canvases from the 1970s -­‐‑-­‐‑ she has gravitated to stain painting and lightened her palette. Big, blotchy cabbage-­‐‑like shapes are built up in overlays of color that usually progress from light and translucent at the edges to intense opacity at the center.”

As the history of Abstract Expressionism continues to be explored and defined, Vivian Springford is emerging as an important figure, who developed a sophisticated and original stain style of painting.

Biography is from Peyton Wright Gallery’s website.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today.  I painted it in many layers and it was nice to create.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 307!

Best,

Linda

 

Stained- Tribute to Vivian Springford Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Stained- Tribute to Vivian Springford
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-VIew Stained- Tribute to Vivian Springford Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-VIew
Stained- Tribute to Vivian Springford
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Stained- Tribute to Vivian Springford Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Stained- Tribute to Vivian Springford
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Stained- Tribute to Vivian Springford Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Stained- Tribute to Vivian Springford
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Stained- Tribute to Vivian Springford Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Stained- Tribute to Vivian Springford
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 298- Pedro Calapez- Extending Past the Edges

It’s Day 298 and I’m having a big painting day.  I’m trying to get a little ahead and plan a bit this week.  My schedule has been a little busy and will stay that way until the holidays get started.  And then I’ll be busy in a whole new way!  Join me in honoring Pedro Calapez today.

Pedro Calapez

Pedro Calapez

Pedro Calapez ESTUDIO PARA PINTURA SIN TÍTULO 11 Acrylic on cardboard

Pedro Calapez
ESTUDIO PARA PINTURA SIN TÍTULO 11
Acrylic on cardboard

Pedro Calapez was born 1953 in Lisbon where he lives and works. He began his studies in civil engineering but changed later to the Escola de Belas Artes (School of Fine Arts). While attending Belas Artes he worked as a professional photographer until 1985, when he was able to dedicate himself exclusively to painting.

Pedro Calapez is internationally exhibiting since the 80’s and has presented his

Gallery Installation- Pedro Calapez

Gallery Installation- Pedro Calapez

work in many important museums and galleries. He has participated 1986 at the Venice Biennale and 1987 and 1991 at the São Paulo Biennale. In the german speaking part of Europe, his work was shown 1999 at the Kunstmuseum Bonn in the exhibition “Tage der Dunkelheit und des Lichts”.

Expansion rather than concentration, is an obvious driving power in the artistic language of Pedro Celapez, who is working in the field between drawing and painting, figurative expression and abstraction.

horizonte bloqueado | 2013 | acryl on canvas- Pedro Calapez

horizonte bloqueado | 2013 | acryl on canvas- Pedro Calapez

He often divides his multiple-part image compositions puzzle-like on strictly geometric surfaces and within those are ruling the most expressive gestures and mediterranean colors. Pedro Calapez is creating on individual aluminium boards images of large painted ribbons and surfaces, placing strong primary colors near muddy shades that are defining, layer after layer, the painted space.

But not only each board might appear in a severe struggle, but as well the different parts of the whole composition can be of distinct depth. The several painted boards invade more or less deeply the exhibition space and are forming a relief-like macro mosaic and as in a magnetic field, the individual components are attracting or rejecting each other.

Sometimes few painted boards are creating tension and form, but other works are

Pedro Calapez, Bareira J, painted aluminium

Pedro Calapez, Bareira J, painted aluminium

compositions of twenty or more image bodies with different sizes and suddenly a mediterranean color spectrum opens the view to the southern brightness.

“My major concern is always the discussion of the edges of painting. I want the picture to extend beyond those. In a determined space my paintings together form a single piece that I cannot imagine being broken up in different walls.

Untitled- Pedro Calapez

Untitled- Pedro Calapez

Each painting goes beyond itself, each wall is a painting by itself; this does not allow the gaze to be fixed, it is all around. The fact is that your look dominates the reason why you keep looking at a painting; the eye takes over control of the way in which we look at a picture. Reason invokes a discourse made up of these fragments of vision. You penetrate/enter the painting by the invoking of its own details. It is not the general idea of a painting that is important, but the small stroke or line. What is important is the particular, the detail.” Pedro Calapez

Biography is from arthobler.com.

I hope you enjoy my piece for today!  I really loved looking at today’s artist’s paintings.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 299…almost to 300!  Then only 65 days to go.  Whew!

Best,

Linda

Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 291- Esteban Vicente- Concrete Improvisations

It’s Day 291 and I’m full of inspiration today.  I want to play music, edit videos and more.  But first I need to post this blog!  Please join me in honoring Esteban Vicente today.  I needed a break from self-portraits and anything insanely difficult.  Enjoy!

Esteban Vicente

Esteban Vicente

Esteban Vicente

Esteban Vicente

Esteban Vicente Pérez (January 20, 1903 – January 10, 2001), was an American painter born in Turégano, Spain. He was one of the first generation of New York School abstract expressionists.

Esteban Vicente was born in Turégano, Spain on January 20, 1903. His mother, Sofia Pérez y Álvarez came from an Asturian family and was born in Valladolid. His father, Toribio Vicente Ruiz, came from a military family near Salamanca and was an army officer. Esteban Vicente had two sisters and three brothers. He was the third child and second son. Vicente’s father resigned his commission and moved his family to the capital, Madrid, where he worked as a buildings administrator for the Banco de Españaso that the children could be educated at good Jesuit schools. Vicente was taken to the Museo del Prado by his father, an art enthusiast, almost every Sunday from the time he was four years old and began to draw when he was sixteen. He was expected to follow family tradition and join the army. After three months in military school he decided to become an artist.

Vicente enrolled at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes in Madrid in 1921 intending to study sculpture. He completed his training in 1924. Commenting on his experience at the Academy he said “It doesn’t give you any

Collage with Yellow, Blue and Orange- Esteban Vicente

Collage with Yellow, Blue and Orange- Esteban Vicente

ideas about anything. It gives you tools, and teaches you about materials. Academic training is safe. It prepares you to be against.”

He had his first one-man exhibition in Madrid in 1928, after which he left for Paris and did not return to Spain until 1930. In 1935 he married Estelle Charney, an American whom he had met in Paris. After the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War in 1936 Vicente, supporting the Loyalist forces, painted camouflage in the mountains outside Madrid for a few months. Later that year he and his wife moved to New York. The (Loyalist) Spanish Ambassador to the U.S. set him up as a Vice Consul in Philadelphia, a position which supported his family for three years. Vicente had ample time to continue with his art and had his first one-man show in New York at the Kleeman Gallery in 1937. After the fall of the Spanish Republic in 1939 he returned to New York City. During World War II he supported himself with portrait commissions and by teaching Spanish. A 1945 exhibition in Puerto Rico led in 1946 to a position at the University of Puerto Rico teaching painting. After his return to New York in 1947 he established relationships with most of the members of the nascent New York School, participating in their seminal exhibitions at the Kootz Gallery in 1950, in the 9th Street Art Exhibition in 1951 and in exhibitions at the Sidney Janis Gallery and Charles Egan Gallery. Subsequently he was represented by the Leo Castelli, André Emmerich[6] and Berry-Hill Galleries in New York City. He was a founding member of the New York Studio School, where he taught for 36 years. Although he never exhibited in Spain during the rule of Francisco Franco, in 1998 the Spanish government opened the Esteban Vicente Museum of Contemporary Art in Segovia.

Esteban Vicente. Black, Grey, and Green. 1961. Reina Sofía Museum, Madrid.

Esteban Vicente. Black, Grey, and Green. 1961. Reina Sofía Museum, Madrid.

Vicente maintained a house and studio in Bridgehampton, New York from 1964. His marriage to Estelle Charney ended in divorce in 1943. Their daughter Mercedes, died at aged six. A second marriage, to Maria Teresa Babin, also ended in divorce. Vicente died in Bridgehampton on January 10, 2001. He was survived by his third wife, Harriet Peters, whom he married in 1961.

He has been honored as a renowned artist and child advocate by a New York City Bronx School Public School 170, a Kindergarten to Second Grade school has been

Esteban Vicente: "Noon," 1982; Lithograph, 21-3/4 x 29-1/2 inches.

Esteban Vicente: “Noon,” 1982; Lithograph, 21-3/4 x 29-1/2 inches.

named the Esteban Vicente school. A family member has incorporated Art programs into the schools. Students’ talents emerge as they are exposed to the culture. At PS 170 students learn about Esteban Vicente and his style, color and design. Examples of his work adorn the walls of the school.

Vicente has a museum devoted to him in Segovia, Spain, the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo Esteban Vicente, and a street named after him in Turégano.

Esteban Vicente

Esteban Vicente

In March 2011 the Grey Art Gallery at New York University exhibited Concrete Improvisations: Collages and Sculpture by Esteban Vicente. In addition to 60 paper collages, the exhibit included 20 of Vicente’s small-scale assemblages called divertimentos (toys), composed from pieces of found wood and covered with white plaster, with others composed of plastic and wood with architectonic elements.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece for today.  Again, it was more challenging than I always think paintings like these will be.  I try my hardest and they are always inspired by the artist’s paintings whether or not they turn out exactly how they look in my mind. 🙂  I will see you tomorrow on Day 292!

Best,

Linda

Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 288- Elaine de Kooning- Returning to Things

It’s Day 288 and I was excited to work on today’s painting.  Another artist I could’ve sworn I had already paid tribute to!  Join me in honoring Elaine de Kooning today!

Elaine de Kooning

Elaine de Kooning

Elaine de Kooning, Bacchus #63, 1982

Elaine de Kooning, Bacchus #63, 1982

Elaine de Kooning (March 12, 1918 – February 1, 1989)

Elaine de Kooning was born Elaine Marie Catherine Fried in 1918 (although she would later claim her birth year was 1920), to Marie and Charles Frank Fried, a plant manager for the Bond Bread Company in Brooklyn, NY. She was the first of four children who were all raised in the Sheepshead Bay neighborhood of Brooklyn. Elaine’s younger sister, Marjorie, once recalled that their mother was not the most attentive and loving parent, but she did instill in her children a love for the arts, often taking them to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and to several Broadway shows.

Elaine was clearly their mother’s favorite of the four children. According to an old friend

Bullfight- Elaine de Kooning

Bullfight- Elaine de Kooning

of Elaine’s, Marie’s nickname for her oldest daughter was “Samson,” from the Old Testament figure who was granted great strength by God. Marie was an eccentric and highly intelligent woman who was frequently seen walking around town in disheveled clothing and heavy makeup.

Self-Portrait

Self-Portrait

In the late 1920s, a neighbor reported Marie to the police for neglecting her children, and when the police arrived at the Fried home, Marie had to be physically forced from the premises. She was committed to the Creedmoor Psychiatric

Bullfight La Corrida- Elaine de Kooning

Bullfight La Corrida- Elaine de Kooning

Center in Queens Village for a year, during which time the children’s primary caregiver was their housekeeper. Elaine de Kooning became a surrogate parent for her younger siblings.

In 1932, de Kooning began attending Erasmus Hall High School where she excelled at nearly everything, including sports and academics. Four years later, she enrolled at Hunter College in Manhattan, but dropped out after only a few weeks of classes.

After leaving Hunter, de Kooning enrolled in classes at the Leonardo da Vinci Art School, located on 3rd Avenue and 34th Street, where artists employed by the New Deal-funded WPA (Works Progress Administration) were working as teachers. It was at the da Vinci School where she met artist Robert Jonas, whom she dated briefly, and remained close to throughout her life.

Portrait of John F. Kennedy- Elaine de Kooning

Portrait of John F. Kennedy- Elaine de Kooning

While attending classes at the da Vinci School, de Kooning became politically active, representing the school at meetings of the leftist John Reed Club. At these meetings she attempted to organize students into a new auxiliary union for artists, simply called the Artists’ Union. It was also at the John Reed Club meetings where she met artist Milton Resnick, who was representing the American Artists School. Resnick and de Kooning began dating soon thereafter, at which point she dropped out of Leonardo da Vinci and enrolled in classes at American Artists, where she learned from teachers Stuart Davis and Raphael Soyer.

Through her involvement with the American Artists School, de Kooning became active with

Untitled Corrida- Elaine de Kooning

Untitled Corrida- Elaine de Kooning

the Young Communist League (YCL), and frequently attended workers camps and other meetings sponsored by the Communist Party. To support herself financially during her student years, de Kooning joined the Models’ Union to find work as an artist’s model.

In the autumn of 1938, Elaine’s art teacher introduced her to the 34-year-old Dutch emigre Willem (Bill) de Kooning, but there is little evidence to suggest any romantic connection at their initial meeting. Elaine was with Resnick at the time, who had supposedly commented once to her, “Bill is going to be the greatest painter in the country.”

Untitled 1965- Elaine de Kooning

Untitled 1965- Elaine de Kooning

Shortly after their introduction, a friend of de Kooning’s took her to Willem’s studio. Later in life, Elaine recalled, “It was the cleanest place I ever saw in my life. It had painted gray floors, white walls, one table…one easel, one fantastically good phonograph that cost $800 when he was only making $22 a week, and one painting of a man on the easel.”

Shortly after meeting, Willem offered to give Elaine drawing lessons, which she

Portrait of Jack Greenbaum- Elaine de Kooning

Portrait of Jack Greenbaum- Elaine de Kooning

accepted. In late 1938, de Kooning finally sold her first work, a watercolor, for $10.

Photographer Rudy Burkhardt, who Willem introduced to Elaine, later recalled that “Bill was incredibly in love with her, but she didn’t treat him very well at the beginning… She would lean back on the couch and say, ‘Bill. Cigarette.’ And he would leap to get it.” In 1939, the year after the two artists met, de Kooning moved into Willem’s studio on West 22nd Street.

On December 9, 1943, Elaine and Willem were married at a small, understated ceremony at City Hall. De Kooning later recalled that the wedding itself was “kind of bleak… afterwards, we went to a bar in the downtown district and we all had a drink… it was kind of amusing.”

Elaine de Kooning, Al Lazar (Man in a Hotel Room), 1954

Elaine de Kooning, Al Lazar (Man in a Hotel Room), 1954

Working and teaching outside the shadow of her more famous husband, de Kooning gained acclaim as one of America’s premier artists. In 1962, she received a commission from the White House to paint the portrait of President John F. Kennedy; an impressive honor bestowed upon an artist commonly associated with the bohemian New York School of painting. De Kooning then spent the better part of 1963 fine-tuning the portrait, collecting hundreds of photographs of Kennedy, and drawing short-hand sketches of him whenever he appeared on TV. The resulting portrait remains one of de Kooning’s most well-known and celebrated paintings, and easily stands out in the long line of presidential portraits.

She died February 1, 1989.

Partial biography is from www.theartstory.org.

I decided to use a few matador/bullfighting photos as reference for my piece today, since it seemed to be a recurring theme in some of her paintings.  I really enjoyed the gestural and fluid style of today’s piece.  I think I needed to return to that after doing artists like van Gogh and Matisse this week!  I hope you enjoy my piece and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 289!

Best,

Linda

Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side View Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side View
Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 286- Lynne Drexler- …Nature clarifies you to yourself…

It’s Day 286 and I really really enjoyed doing today’s piece.  I fell in love with the artist’s paintings.  Join me in honoring Lynne Drexler today.  I spent so long attempting to find a photo of the artist, but couldn’t!  Very strange.

Lynne Drexler Book

Lynne Drexler Book

Orientalia- Lynne Drexler

Orientalia- Lynne Drexler

Lynne Drexler (1928 – 1999) was an American abstract and representational artist, who was a painter and photographer.

Lynne Drexler was born and raised in the Newport News, Virginia area. Her parents were Lynne P. and Norman E. Drexler, who was a manager at a public utility. At the age of 11 she was an only

Felled Tree- Lynne Drexler

Felled Tree- Lynne Drexler

child and had been living in Raleigh Terrace, Elizabeth City (now Hampton), Virginia. She began painting as a child. Later, Drexler took art classes in Virginia at the Richmond Professional Institute and at the College of William and Mary.

She moved to New York City in the mid to late 1950s to further her study art under Robert Motherwell at Hunter College and Hans Hofmann, under their tutelage she developed an interest in Abstract Expressionism.  Motherwell taught her composition and draftsmanship techniques and the philosophy “that to be an artist meant first and foremost that one had to create work worthy of attention”. Her tendency to create vibrant paintings using a free brush stroke was influenced by Hofman and the work of Henri Matisse.  Hofman also introduced the notion that composition is influenced by color, which he called the “push-pull” concept.

Lynne Drexler

Lynne Drexler

In the late 1950s she was an abstract expressionist and was “counted among an important group of women artists whose figural and landscape works were often overlooked during the heyday of post-abstract expressionist modernism – artists such as Jane Freilicher, Lois Dodd, and Jane Wilson.”

She was a devotee of classical music, attending up to 3 opera performances each week, and

Blued- Lynne Drexler

Blued- Lynne Drexler

would often go to opera and symphony performances with a sketchpad and colored crayons in hand to make sketches inspired by the music. Drexler’s Pattern and Decoration embroidery and patchwork influenced some of her later works, similar designs often appeared in her painting’s backgrounds.

In 1961 Drexler met fellow artist John Hultberg at The Artist’s Club in New York. Artists there discussed abstract expressionism and it was there she met accomplished artists. Through their connections she had her first solo exhibition of 11 works at Tanager Gallery. Drexler and Hultberg were married and for three years traveled and lived in Mexico, the West Coast and Hawaii. They then lived at New York’s Chelsea Hotel in the late 1960s.  For six months, Drexler had a case of colorblindness and developed a severe case of depression.

Early Spring- Lynne Drexler

Early Spring- Lynne Drexler

Seeking a relaxing environment, the couple bought a house off the coast of Maine on Monhegan Island in 1971 and split their time between New York City and Maine, particularly spending the summers at their island house.

By 1983, Drexler moved year-around and permanently near Lighthouse Hill on Monhegan Island, an artists’ haven off the coast of Maine, where she had spent most summers since 1963. The island people and landscape were the subject of many of her paintings from that time. Drexler’s paintings became less strictly abstract and exhibited a synthesis of abstract and representational influences.

Drexler died December 30, 1999, living two years longer than expected battling cancer.

The first comprehensive exhibit of her work – showcasing over fifty paintings,

photographic images and textiles – ran at the Monhegan Museum in August and September 2008. It then ran at the Portland Museum of Art from December 6, 2008 through March 1, 2009. The exhibition was organized by the Monhegan Historical and Cultural Museum Association.  In 2010 her works were shown at the Portland Museum in 2010 until March 1 and from April 17 to June 5 at the McCormick Gallery in Chicago.

Biography is from wikipedia.

Flower Bushes- Tribute to Lynne Drexler Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Flower Bushes- Tribute to Lynne Drexler
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Flower Bushes- Tribute to Lynne Drexler Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Flower Bushes- Tribute to Lynne Drexler
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Flower Bushes- Tribute to Lynne Drexler Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Flower Bushes- Tribute to Lynne Drexler
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Flower Bushes- Tribute to Lynne Drexler Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Flower Bushes- Tribute to Lynne Drexler
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Flower Bushes- Tribute to Lynne Drexler Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Flower Bushes- Tribute to Lynne Drexler
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 278- Michael Staniak- Processes

It’s Day 278 and I spent most of the day on working on music, but I was able to finish my painting early.  The drying process is what took most the time!  Join me in honoring Michael Staniak today.

Michael Staniak

Michael Staniak

Michael Staniak. New Acquisitions Vol.III

Michael Staniak. New Acquisitions Vol.III

MICHAEL STANIAK (b. 1982)

Lives and works in Melbourne, Australia.

Michael Staniak is a painter whose interests are aligned with artists who use digital strategies to create objects or make works of art inspired by the culture of the web.

Michael Staniak earned a BFA and an MFA from the Victorian College of the Arts,

Michael Staniak

Michael Staniak

Melbourne as well as a BA from Middle Tennessee State University.

He is the founder and Director of Paradise Hills Gallery, an artist run initiative in Melbourne Victoria. He has had solo exhibitions at Nellie Castan, Metro Gallery and Blockprojects, Melbourne and Artereal Gallery, Sydney.

Michael Staniak

Michael Staniak

His international representation and reputation is growing with a solo show in 2014, Image DNA, at Steve Turner Contemporary, Los Angeles, USA who took Staniak’s new works to Brussels Art Fair and he has been included in group shows at Horton Gallery and Charles Bank, New York. In the remainder of 2014 and in 2015 he has showings in Vienna, Naples, Brussels, South America, Italy, Los Angeles and Istanbul scheduled.

Biography is from www.artereal.com.au.  It was difficult to find an extensive biography.

Here’s a blurb about his painting from www.rhizome.org.

Steve Turner Contemporary is pleased to present Image DNA, a solo exhibition by Melbourne-

Michael Staniak

Michael Staniak

based artist Michael Staniak, featuring paintings that seamlessly combine attributes of analog and digital processes. Although Staniak creates the paintings mostly by hand—he builds up texture with uneven layers of plaster and then paints the surface in a range of ways—the paintings bear an uncanny resemblance to flat digital prints. Indeed, one must view the works up close to perceive any texture or depth, and as such, they behave like contemporary trompe l’oeil paintings that baffle the senses. Some paintings do however utilize digital methods of output and in so doing create a dialogue between the two modes of production.

~

I hope you enjoy my tribute today.  It was another day that was nice to honor an artist around

my age. 🙂  I decided to do a monochromic painting because his paint work seems so difficult to emulate without using an airbrush or maybe the proper type of paint.  I’m not sure!  I still like my piece and had a great time creating it.  It was very inspiring!

I will see you on Day 279.  Best, Linda

 

Static- Tribute to Michael Staniak Linda Cleary 2014 Modeling Paste on Canvas

Static- Tribute to Michael Staniak
Linda Cleary 2014
Modeling Paste on Canvas

Side-View Static- Tribute to Michael Staniak Linda Cleary 2014 Modeling Paste on Canvas

Side-View
Static- Tribute to Michael Staniak
Linda Cleary 2014
Modeling Paste on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Static- Tribute to Michael Staniak Linda Cleary 2014 Modeling Paste on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Static- Tribute to Michael Staniak
Linda Cleary 2014
Modeling Paste on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Static- Tribute to Michael Staniak Linda Cleary 2014 Modeling Paste on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Static- Tribute to Michael Staniak
Linda Cleary 2014
Modeling Paste on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Static- Tribute to Michael Staniak Linda Cleary 2014 Modeling Paste on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Static- Tribute to Michael Staniak
Linda Cleary 2014
Modeling Paste on Canvas