Day 357- Hannelore Baron- A Complete Thing

It’s Day 357 and I had a very busy day with filming and also have a holiday party this evening.  I was still able to get today’s piece done.  I wish I had more time to focus on it.  Please join me in honoring Hannelore Baron today.

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron 1978

Hannelore Baron 1978

Hannelore Baron (June 8, 1926 – April 28, 1987) was an artist whose work has become known for the highly personal, book-sized, abstract collages and box constructions that she began exhibiting in the late 1960s. Born in Dillingen/Saar, Germany, she and her family fled persecution in Nazi Germany, illegally crossing the border into Luxembourg in 1939. In 1941 Baron’s family sailed from Lisbon to New York and setteled in the Bronx, New York City.

By the time she graduated from the Staubenmiller Textile High School in Manhattan, Baron was avidly reading eastern philosophy, making increasingly abstract paintings and probably already experiencing the symptoms of claustrophobia and depression that would lead to a series of nervous breakdowns throughout her life. In the late 1950s Baron combined a variety of techniques and began making her first collages. Occupied with raising two children (daughter Julie and son Mark) and beset by psychological problems, Hannelore nevertheless exhibited her work and in 1969, the year of her one-person exhibition at Ulster County Community College, she began to make the box constructions that would become her signature. In the early 1970s, Baron established a studio and devoted her time and energy completely to her artwork until her death in 1987. Hannelore Baron was self-taught.

Although her compositions are completely abstract, she considered them to be both personal and political statements. In her own words,

Everything I’ve done is a statement on the, as they say, human condition…the way other people march to

Hannelore Baron- Untitled Collage 1977

Hannelore Baron- Untitled Collage 1977

Washington, or set themselves on fire, or write protest letters, or go to assassinate someone. Well, I’ve had all the same feelings that these people had about various things, and my way out, because of my inability to do anything else for various reasons, has been to make the protest through my artwork… H.B.

Throughout the 1970s and 1980s her work garnered critical acclaim, along with gallery and museum exhibitions in the United States, Europe and Japan. In 1995, her work was the subject of a one-person exhibition at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. In 2001 her work was the subject of a traveling exhibition curated by Ingrid Schaffner and organized by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service. Her works can be found in the collections of The Museum of Modern Art, New York; the conSolomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Biography is from wikipedia.

Below bio is from artist’s website. www.hannelorebaron.net

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron practiced an art of concealment and protection. Out of rough and common materials she fashioned constructions, drawings and collages that transmuted the painful experiences of her life into indelible images of the darkness and mystery of being. Baron was born Hannelore Alexander in Dilligen, a small town in the Saar region of Germany in 1926. Her father, Julius, was a Jewish textile merchant, and almost as soon as Hitler came to power, the family began to feel the ominous consequences. Hannelore and her brother were sent to a special school for Jews only. On Kristallnacht, the family’s apartment was ransacked and her father beaten. Thus began a period of flight and border crossing that did not end until the family managed to emigrate from Lisbon to New York in 1941. In the midst of all this, one of Baron’s most vivid memories was that of a brief return to her family’s wrecked apartment, where the bloody handprints of her father were still visible on the walls.

By the time she graduated from the Staubenmiller Textile High School in Manhattan, Baron was avidly reading eastern philosophy, making increasingly abstract paintings and probably already experiencing the symptoms of claustrophobia and depression that would lead to a series of nervous breakdowns throughout her life. On one of her rare forays out, to sketch, she met Herman Baron, a book salesman for the Philosophical Library, and they

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron

married in 1950. The milieu was intellectually rich: Baron’s brother ran a small press and published works by avant-garde writers such as Maya Deren and Henry Miller, and Baron himself soon opened his own bookstore in the Bronx. Isolated by her mental distress, however, Hannelore developed her art without instruction and without direct knowledge of the currents that were changing the art world. Her abstract paintings betray no debt to Rothko, Gorky or Motherwell. But she did manage to visit an exhibition by John Heliker, a friend of Baron’s brother, and the experience was decisive: she saw how collage could combine all aspects of art, from drawing and painting to sculptural manipulation of materials. Over the next three decades, Hannelore would explore the implications of mixed media with depth, subtlety and daring.

Occupied with raising two children (daughter Julie and son Mark) and beset by psychological problems, Hannelore nevertheless exhibited her work and in 1969, the year of her one-person exhibition at Ulster County Community College, she began to make the box constructions that would become her signature. In these works, damaged wood and metal, often tied or nailed together, enclose secrets that can only be guessed at: scraps of

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron

her past, mysterious games without rules, concealed objects. In their rawness and obscurity they form the necessary counterpart to Joseph Cornell’s elegant enigmas. In these works and in her collages, Hannelore was able to convey her sense of the fragility of life, the mythic substratum of human experience, and broader concerns for the environment, the injustices of war, especially the Vietnam conflict, and the physical pain of existence. In 1973, she was diagnosed with cancer and would struggle with various forms of the disease until it took her life in 1987. After her death, Hannelore’s work was the subject of a one-person exhibition at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York and, in 2002, a national touring exhibition organized by the Smithsonian Institution. She once remarked of one of her works, “The solution didn’t come only from my head, it was lived out and worked out. It is a complete thing.”

~

I hope you enjoy my tribute today!  It was a therapeutic experience creating it.  Her style is very distinct and hard to emulate because of it’s subtlety, so I tried to get into a mind frame of my own while creating this piece.

I will see you tomorrow on Day 358!

Best,

Linda

Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View
Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Day 355- Marta Minujin- Everything is Art

It’s Day 355 and I had a blast doing today’s extra bold and colorful piece.  She did so many different forms of art, but I really wanted to do something insanely bright and colorful today.  Please join me in honoring Marta Minujin today!

Marta Minujin

Marta Minujin

Marta Minujín (born January 30, 1943) is an Argentine conceptual and performance artist.

Freaking on Fluo- Marta Minujin

Freaking on Fluo- Marta Minujin

Marta Minujín was born in the San Telmo neighborhood of Buenos Aires. She met a young economist, Juan Carlos Gómez Sabaini, and married him in secret in 1959; the couple had two children. A student in the National University Art Institute, she first exhibited her work in a 1959 show at the Teatro Agón. A scholarship from the National Arts Foundation allowed her to travel to Paris as one of the young Argentine artists featured in Pablo Curatella Manes and Thirty Argentines of the New Generation, a 1960 exhibit organized by the prominent sculptor and Paris Biennale judge.

Her time in Paris inspired her to create “livable sculptures,” notably La Destrucción, in which she assembled mattresses along the Impasse Roussin, only to invite other avant-garde artists in her entourage, including Christo and Paul-Armand Gette, to destroy the display. This 1963 creation would be the first of her “Happenings” – events as works of arts in themselves; among her hosts during her stay was Finance Minister Valéry Giscard d’Estaing (later President of France).

She earned a National Award in 1964 at Buenos Aires’ Torcuato di Tella Institute, where she prepared two happenings: Eróticos en technicolor and

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

the interactiveRevuélquese y viva (Roll Around in Bed and Live). Her Cabalgata (Cavalcade) aired on Public Television that year, and involved horses with paint buckets tied to their tails. These displays took her to nearby Montevideo, where she organized Sucesos (Events) at the Uruguayan capital’s Tróccoli Stadium with 500 chickens, artists of contrasting physical shape, motorcycles, and other elements.

Marta Minujin

Marta Minujin

She joined Rubén Santantonín at the di Tella Institute in 1965 to create La Menesunda (Mayhem), where participants were asked to go through sixteen chambers, each separated by a human-shaped entry. Led by neon lights, groups of eight visitors would encounter rooms with television sets at full blast, couples making love in bed, a cosmetics counter (complete with an attendant), a dental office from which dialing an oversized rotary phone was required to leave, a walk-in freezer with dangling fabrics (suggesting sides of beef), and a mirrored room with black lighting, falling confetti, and the scent of frying food. The use of advertising throughout suggested the influence of pop art in Minujín’s “mayhem.”

These works earned her a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1966, by which she relocated to New York. The coup d’état by General Juan Carlos Onganía in June of that year made her fellowship all the more fortuitous, as the new regime would frequently censor and ban irreverent displays such as hers. Minujín delved into psychedelic art in New York, of which among her best-known creations was that of the “Minuphone,” where patrons could enter a telephone booth, dial a number, and be surprised by colors projecting from the glass panels, sounds, and seeing themselves on a television screen in the floor. She was on hand in 1971 for the Buenos Aires premiere of Operación Perfume, and in New York, befriended fellow conceptual artist Andy Warhol.

She returned to Argentina in 1976, and afterwards created a series of reproductions of classical Greek sculptures in plaster of paris, as well as miniatures of the Buenos Aires Obelisk carved out of panettone, of the Venus de Milo carved from cheese, and of Tango vocalist Carlos Gardel for a

Geometria blanda, 2014- Marta Minujin

Geometria blanda, 2014- Marta Minujin

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

1981 display in Medellín. The latter, a sheet metal creation, was stuffed with cotton and lit, creating a metaphor for the legendary crooner’s untimely 1935 death in a Medellín plane crash. She was awarded the first of a series of Konex Awards, the highest in the Argentine cultural realm, in 1982.

The return of democracy in 1983, following seven years of a generally failed dictatorship, prompted Minujín to create a monument to a glaring, inanimate victim of the regime: freedom of expression. Assembling 30,000 banned books (including works as diverse as those by Freud, Marx, Sartre, Gramsci, Foucault, Raúl Scalabrini Ortiz, and Darcy Ribeiro, as well as satires such as Absalom and Achitophel, reference volumes such as Enciclopedia Salvat, and even children’s texts, notably The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint Exupéry), she designed the “Parthenon of Books,” and following President Raúl Alfonsín’s December 10 inaugural, had it mounted on a boulevard median along the Ninth of July Avenue. Dismantled after three weeks, its mass of newly-unbanned titles was distributed to the public below.

A conversation with Warhol in New York regarding the Latin American debt crisis inspired one of her most publicized “happenings:” The Debt. Purchasing a shipment of maize, Minujín dramatized the Argentine cost of servicing the foreign debt with a 1985 photo

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

series in which she symbolically handed the maize to Warhol “in payment” for the debt; she never again saw Warhol, who died in 1987.

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

Minujín has continued to display her art pieces and happenings in the Buenos Aires Museum of Modern Art, the National Fine Arts Museum, the ArteBA festival, the Barbican Center, and a vast number of other international galleries and art shows, while continuing to satirize consumer culture (particularly relating to women). She is well known for her belief that “everything is art.”

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  My eyes hurt just a little after painting it, but I think it came out pretty nice.

I will see you tomorrow on Day 356!

Best,

Linda

 

Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 321- Wolf Kahn- Sweeping Bands of Color

It’s Day 321 and I’m still healing…or still getting sick.  I hate being on the teeter toter of getting ill.  It could just be the weather…who knows?  I am excited about today’s artist…I love his paintings and enjoyed doing today’s piece.  Join me in honoring Wolf Kahn today.

Wolf Kahn

Wolf Kahn

Wolf Kahn - Woodland Swamp

Wolf Kahn – Woodland Swamp

Wolf Kahn (born October 4, 1927) is a German-born American painter.

Kahn is known for his combination of realism and Color Field, and known to work in pastel and oil paint. He studied under Hans Hofmann, and also graduated from the University of Chicago. Kahn

Wolf Kahn Original Oil on Canvas

Wolf Kahn Original Oil on Canvas

is a resident of both New York City and, during the summer and autumn, West Brattleboro, Vermont.

Wolf Kahn was born in Stuttgart, Germany in 1927. He states that he began drawing at the age of 4. In 1939, at the age of 12 he fled Germany for England and in 1940 moved to the United States of America.

Barn on Cooks Lane- Wolf Kahn

Barn on Cooks Lane- Wolf Kahn

He attended the High School of Music and Art in New York City and graduated in 1945. Under the GI Bill, he was able to continue his studies with abstract expressionist Hans Hofmann at the Hans Hofmann School. He became Hofmann’s studio assistant. He enrolled for a degree from the University of Chicago in 1950 and completed this in only one year, receiving a Bachelor’s Degree in 1951.

His wife Emily Mason is also a painter. They have two daughters,

Wolf Kahn - Order in Disorder

Wolf Kahn – Order in Disorder

Cecily and Melany.

Wolf Kahn works in oil and pastel. His works usually covers the subject of landscapes and his own personal vision of nature. His convergence of light and color has been described as combining pictorial landscapes and painterly abstraction.

His gallery, Ameringer|McEnery|Yohe, states

Yellow Symphony- Wolf Kahn

Yellow Symphony- Wolf Kahn

“The unique blend of Realism and the formal discipline of Color Field painting sets the work of Wolf Kahn apart. Kahn is an artist who embodies the synthesis of his modern abstract training with Hans Hofmann, with the palette of Matisse, Rothko’s sweeping bands of color, and the atmospheric qualities of American Impressionism. It is precisely this fusion of color, spontaneity and representation that has produced such a rich and expressive body of work.”

Wolf Kahn has received a number of awards including a Fulbright Scholarship in 1962, a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship in 1966, and an Award in Art from the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1979.

Wolf Kahn became a member of the National Academy of Design in 1980 and the American Academy of Arts

Wolf Kahn

Wolf Kahn

and Letters in 1984. He is currently on the Board of Trustees forMarlboro College, in Marlboro, VT.

In 2005 the Smithsonian Art Collectors Program commissioned Kahn to produce a print to benefit the cultural

and educational programs of the Smithsonian Associates. The screen print, entitled Aura, hangs in the Graphic Eloquence exhibit in the S. Dillon Ripley Center in the National Mall.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I didn’t use pastels or oil paints.  I only have oil pastels and I don’t think they would’ve worked as well as soft pastels.  I used watercolors and acrylics, but I think the style and spirit came through.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 322!

Best,

Linda

Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Day 318- Amy Sillman- Layer By Layer

It’s Day 318 and I’m having another difficult art day.  Just not feeling very intuitive or creative today and a little under the weather.  I am thankful that I haven’t had too many days like this throughout the past year.  Yet I persevered and did my painting.  I enjoyed the creation process, but I kept altering and jiggering the piece…overanalyzing everything going on in my brain.  I hope I captured the artist’s style…even just a little.  Her pieces are surprisingly difficult to emulate which makes them special.  Maybe on a different day I would’ve been less critical!  Join me in honoring Amy Sillman today!

Amy Sillman

Amy Sillman

Amy Sillman

Amy Sillman

Amy Sillman (born 1955) is an American painter. She lives and works in Brooklyn.

Sillman was born in Detroit, Michigan, and the winding story line of her early years led her to work in a cannery in Alaska and a feminist silkscreen factory in Chicago, and to train at New York University as a Japanese interpreter for the United Nations. She finally landed at Manhattan’s School of Visual Arts, graduating in 1979. Then she spent more than a decade content, as she has said, with “learning how to make paintings—just working, not showing.”

In a 2006 Artforum article, Jan Avgikos wrote that Sillman’s paintings “mine the edges of abstraction, meshing patches of color with bursts of chaotic line and web-like compositional scaffolding.”

Amy Sillman, Blue Diagram, 2009

Amy Sillman, Blue Diagram, 2009

Embracing a modernist reverence of inspired imagination, Sillman defines honesty as the most enduring quality of painting and speaks of painting as “physical, like an extension of my arm.” In a New York Times review of Sillman’s 2006 exhibition at Sikkema Jenkins & Co., Ken Johnson wrote, “The paintings are especially gratifying up close, where you can study the richly complicated textures and colors…” In 2007 Sillman completed four etchings at Crown Point Press, and of this experience, she has said, “Everything that is done in my painting was taken apart layer by layer in printmaking. You take one hundred layers apart and figure out which six will work.”

Bed- Amy Sillman

Bed- Amy Sillman

In a 2007 article in Artforum, Linda Norden wrote of Amy Sillman’s “fearless, tenacious pursuit of a painting that might accurately register the discomfort, incoherence, and absurdity that can characterize painterly experience—and experience in general,” and speaks of “her increasingly influential place among younger painters in both New York and Los Angeles, where she regularly shows, and her growing currency even among contingents of European painters.” Art critic Roberta Smith compared Sillman to similar women painters such as Elena Sisto, Margaret Curtis, and Sue Williams.

Sillman lives in Williamsburg, Brooklyn and maintains a studio in Bushwick.

Sillman began showing at the Brent Sikkema Gallery in New York in 2000. She is represented by Sikkema

Pirate- Amy Sillman

Pirate- Amy Sillman

Jenkins & Co., New York, and shows at Capitain-Petzel in Berlin, at Thomas Dane Gallery in London, and at Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects, Los Angeles. The first large scale survey of her work, curated by Helen Molesworth, premiered at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston in October 2013. The exhibition will also travel to the Aspen Art Museum and the Center for Curatorial Studies and Art in Contemporary Culture at Bard College. Her solo show “Third Person Singular,” the exhibition of a year-long project of portraiture and abstract painting, was on view at theHirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, DC, and travelled to the Tang Museum at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York, until 2009.

Sillman’s paintings are in the permanent collections of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York as well as private collections including the collection of CJ Follini and Renee Ryan.

Amy Sillman, P, 2007, courtesy of the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York.

Amy Sillman, P, 2007, courtesy of the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York.

In 1995, the same year she received an MFA from Bard College, Sillman was awarded a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship in painting and the Elaine de Kooning Memorial Fellowship in 1995. In 1999 she received fellowships from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation and the Joan Mitchell Foundation, and in 2000 was awarded aGuggenheim Fellowship. In 2012, as part of the fifth anniversary of the Brooklyn Museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, the museum presented Sillman with the First Award, a prize given to 15 women who were first in their fields.

Amy Sillman was a Guna S. Mundheim Fellow in the Visual Arts at the American Academy in Berlin, Germany, during the Spring of 2009. During the fall of 2010, she was a Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University. In May 2011, the Montserrat College of Art awarded Amy Sillman an honorary doctoral degree in fine arts.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 319.  I’m going to take the world’s longest nap now.  I hope I feel better tomorrow.  Bummed to be missing my improv rehearsal tonight.

Best,

Linda

Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 316- Grace Hartigan- Painting Poems

It’s Day 316 and I struggled today with art in general.  I started to panic a little yesterday about including all the artists I wanted to before the project is over…which is an impossible thing so therefore my anxiety is a little irrelevant.  I started, restarted, and altered my painting and artists today until I came up with my piece.  I really liked the outcome and am thinking that the slight panic was a sort of gift.  I’ll explain more below.  For now, join me in honoring Grace Hartigan today.

Grace Hartigan

Grace Hartigan

Woman with Red Flower- Grace Hartigan

Woman with Red Flower- Grace Hartigan

Grace Hartigan, a second-generation Abstract Expressionist linked historically to artists of the first, such as Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning, who forged a new form of painting based on bold gesture and experimental brushwork. Within the movement, she was respected for her commitment and thick skin, and her striking paintings reflect this attitude.

Though she built her early career upon complete abstraction, in 1952 Hartigan began

Since Rousseau- Grace Hartigan

Since Rousseau- Grace Hartigan

incorporating recognizable motifs and characters from various sources into her art, and moved

fluidly between figuration and abstraction throughout her long career. For this reason, her work is often considered to be a precursor to Pop art.

Hartigan’s belief that painting must have “content and emotion” continued throughout her career. Even though her work is often associated with Pop art, Hartigan disliked the idea of mass manufacturing that Pop embraced, preferring the emotion generated by the evident hand of the artist.
Ask Me No More- Grace Hartigan

Ask Me No More- Grace Hartigan

Hartigan’s best-known works combine the abstraction of her early work with recognizable images from everyday life or motifs from art history, particularly from the Renaissance and Baroque periods. The distinction between abstraction and figuration is often blurred by her experimental brushwork and lack of shading.

Hartigan was born in Newark, New Jersey, in 1922. As a child, she was close to her grandmother and her aunt, both of whom encouraged her creativity with stories and folktales. Hartigan was later involved with her high school drama program and wanted to be an actress. She married at 17 to Robert Jachens because, she claimed, he was the first boy to read poetry to her. Wanting to escape their narrow upbringing, the couple headed for Alaska to homestead.

They got as far as Los Angeles before they ran out of money and Hartigan found out

Second Sitting: In her "Bronzino's Young Man," from 1985, Grace Hartigan riffs on a 16th-century cult classic of portraiture, Agnolo Bronzino's "Portrait of Lodovico Capponi."

Second Sitting: In her “Bronzino’s Young Man,” from 1985, Grace Hartigan riffs on a 16th-century cult classic of portraiture, Agnolo Bronzino’s “Portrait of Lodovico Capponi.”

she was pregnant with her only child, Jeffrey. She took a few painting classes before they returned to New Jersey. When Robert was drafted to fight in World War II, Hartigan lived with his parents and got a job as a mechanical draughtsman to support herself and her son. She was sent to the Newark College of Engineering for on-the-job training. It was during this period, after she and her husband separated, that a friend introduced her to the works of Henri Matisse and she began taking art courses from a local artist named Isaac Lane Muse.

”Crowning of the Poet” by Grace Hartigan

”Crowning of the Poet” by Grace Hartigan

Hartigan is admired for having, as one critic noted, “resolved the problem that doomed many artists of the New York School: where to go from art in the 1950s.” Since she was able to reconcile abstraction with her usage of realism and iconography, she influenced many future artists, including Neo-Expressionists like David Salle and Julian Schnabel. She made the Maryland Institute College of Art a nationally prominent program and mentored hundreds of students during her tenure there.

GRACE HARTIGAN QUOTES

“Well, it is not very comforting when you are going through it. But after you have gone through it, won the facility after years of hard work, and are able to say what you feel and think, then it is a sweet triumph.”

“A line is like a lasso. You throw it over your head and you grab something. It’s like writing. You can read a line in painting almost the way

Grazie Rosetti, 1995- Grace Hartigan

Grazie Rosetti, 1995- Grace Hartigan

you can read a word. Drawing is really like writing poetry. Color itself is not like a poem. It diffuses from the very specific. It’s changeable – its images change.”

“Now as before it is the vulgar and the vital and the possibility of its transformation into the beautiful which continues to challenge and fascinate me.”

“Or perhaps the subject of my art is like the definition of humor – emotional pain remembered in tranquility.”

Biography is from www.theartstory.com.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  Earlier I was saying that the anxiety was somewhat of a gift.  My painting wouldn’t have turned out the way it did without it.  The concept of the piece wouldn’t have happened either.  The two figures beside me are my inner voices in my head and the main “me” is content with blocking them out.  A huge lesson I am still learning on a daily basis.  So in the end this piece was very therapeutic!  I also wanted to incorporate the artist’s abstract and figurative styles.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 317!

Best,

Linda

Block Them Out- Tribute to Grace Hartigan Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Block Them Out- Tribute to Grace Hartigan
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Block Them Out- Tribute to Grace Hartigan Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Block Them Out- Tribute to Grace Hartigan
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Block Them Out- Tribute to Grace Hartigan Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Block Them Out- Tribute to Grace Hartigan
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Block Them Out- Tribute to Grace Hartigan Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Block Them Out- Tribute to Grace Hartigan
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Block Them Out- Tribute to Grace Hartigan Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Block Them Out- Tribute to Grace Hartigan
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 309- Jad Fair- Cuttings and Covers

It’s Day 309 and all I used today was a pen and a pair of scissors!  It was super difficult and I can’t believe today’s artist does such complex pieces.  Today’s artist is not only an artist, but a musician and more.  He’s one of my favorites!  Please join me in honoring Jad Fair today.

Jad Fair

Jad Fair

Monster Party, Haunted House Album Cover- Jad Fair

Monster Party, Haunted House Album Cover- Jad Fair

Jad Fair (born June 9, 1954) is an American singer, guitarist and graphic artist, most famous for being a founding member of lo-fi alternative rock group Half Japanese.

Fair was born in Coldwater, Michigan. In 1974, with his brother David, Jad Fair founded the lo-fi group Half Japanese. Since then, Half Japanese released nearly 30 records.

Besides Half Japanese Fair performs and records as a solo artist, as well as collaborating with such artists as Terry Adams, Norman Blake, Kevin Blechdom, Isobel Campbell,Eugene Chadbourne, DQE, Steve Fisk, Fred Frith, God Is My Co-

Jad Fair, Old Lady and the Devil, 2007

Jad Fair, Old Lady and the Devil, 2007

Pilot, Richard Hell, Daniel Johnston, J. Mascis, Jason Willett, Monster Party, Weird Paul Petroskey, R. Stevie Moore, Thurston Moore, The Pastels, Phono-Comb, Steve Shelley, Strobe Talbot, Teenage Fanclub, The Tinklers, Moe Tucker, Bill Wells, Jason Willett, Adult Rodeo,Lumberob, Yo La Tengo, and John Zorn. Because of his constant output and his large series of collaborations, his discography is very large, and mostly consists of releases on small independent labels. In 1982 Fair released his first solo work, the single “The Zombies of Mora-Tau” followed by the full length album Everyone Knew … But Me one year later.

Me Got You (Drawing)- Jad Fair

Me Got You (Drawing)- Jad Fair

Besides his musical career he’s also active as a visual artist, drawings as well as papercuttings. He took up papercutting to alleviate boredom while touring on the road.  Many of the album covers are made by Fair. Four books of Fair’s art have been published. Exhibitions of Fair’s paper cuts and drawings have taken place in New York, Tokyo, Glasgow, Austin, Paris, London, Houston, The Hague at the State-X New Forms festival and in Nantes at Le Lieu Unique together with Daniel Johnston.

It’s Spooky is a 1989 collaboration album by Daniel Johnston and Jad Fair. Strange but True is a collaborative album between the band Yo La Tengo and Jad Fair. It was released by Matador Records in 1998. Song titles on the album were taken from outrageous newspaper headlines.

In 2002 Fair recorded an album with R. Stevie Moore, titled FairMoore, described as “a lovely, heartfelt effort that shows both in top form” by Dave Mandl, who stated that it “brings together two fiercely original figures in

Jad and David Fair, Best Friends Album Cover- Jad Fair

Jad and David Fair, Best Friends Album Cover- Jad Fair

the American music underground”, the album consisting of Fair reciting his poetry over Moore’s instrumental backing. Words Of Wisdom And Hope is a collaboration between Glasgow, Scotland’s Teenage Fanclub and Fair, released in 2002.

In 2008 Vincent Moon made a short documentary called Paris lost in Texas, which is part of his The Take-Away Shows-series. In this short movie he visits Fair in house in Texas. In the same year experimental instrument builder Yuri Landman constructed for Fair a special 2 string instrument called the Bachelor QS.

Paper Cuttings- Jad Fair

Paper Cuttings- Jad Fair

In 2011 Half Japanese reunited as a live band and toured through Europe. In 2011 Thick Syrup Records released the compilation album ’78 LTD. This album features the track “36 Perfect Ways I Ching of Love” Fair made with Ken Stringfellow (Posies, R.E.M.). In 2012 Fair contributed to the Landman album That’s Right Go Cats with a 22 minute vocal contribution on side A of the record. The Nantes based venue Le Lieu Unique has organised a large exhibition of graphical work made by Fair and Daniel Johnston in April 2012. In the same month Fair released a lost album called Songs from a Haunted House with Gilles Reider on Interbang Records.

In 2012 Jad Fair released on Joyful Noise Recordings a collaboration with French experimentalist trio Hifiklub, and German guitarist/producer kptmichigan. The band was originally assembled to provide the audio component to Jad Fair’s art exhibition at Le Dojo – Nice in France, 2011.

Biography is from wikipedia.

In 1974, with his brother David, Jad Fair co-founded the lo-fi alternative rock group Half Japanese. Over the ensuing three decades, Half

Houston- Jad Fair

Houston- Jad Fair

Japanese released nearly 30 records, and in the process, attracted a solid base of fans passionate about the band’s pure, unbridled enthusiasm for rock and roll. Jad also performs and records as a solo artist, and occasionally collaborates with such musicians as Daniel Johnston, Teenage Fanclub, Moe Tucker (of Velvet Underground), Yo La Tengo, Steve Shelly and Thurston Moore (of Sonic Youth), John Zorn, Kramer, and more.

Jad’s talent for album cover design (he designed many of Half Japanese’s and all of his own solo album covers) led Jad to a second career as visual artist. His simple, joyous drawings and intricate, complex paper cuttings are shown in galleries around the world. Books of his artwork have been published in the U.S., UK, Germany, France and Japan. Jad is available for illustration work, including CD covers, t shirt designs, and advertisements.

Short bio above is from www.jadfair.org.

I decided to do a paper cutting for today’s tribute.  I hadn’t done anything like it this whole challenge.  I like how it turned out.  It was a challenge and reminded me of paper cutting snowflakes when I was little!  This was hard because I was trying to do a very specific design. I hope you enjoy it and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 310.  Only 55 paintings to go!  Wow.

Best,

Linda

Squidman Loves Me- Tribute to Jad Fair Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Squidman Loves Me- Tribute to Jad Fair
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View Squidman Loves Me- Tribute to Jad Fair Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View
Squidman Loves Me- Tribute to Jad Fair
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Squidman Loves Me- Tribute to Jad Fair Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Squidman Loves Me- Tribute to Jad Fair
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Squidman Loves Me- Tribute to Jad Fair Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Squidman Loves Me- Tribute to Jad Fair
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Squidman Loves Me- Tribute to Jad Fair Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Squidman Loves Me- Tribute to Jad Fair
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

 

 

Day 307- Edvard Munch- Painting Anxiety

It’s Day 307 and I had a great time doing today’s painting. 🙂  I still feel like I’m fighting off a cold…so I’m going to try and rest up the rest of the afternoon and evening.  Join me in honoring Edvard Munch today…one of my favorites!

Edvard Munch

Edvard Munch

The Scream- Edvard Munch

The Scream- Edvard Munch

Edvard Munch.  Painter (1863–1944)

Norwegian painter Edvard Munch is widely known for his iconic pre-Expressionist painting “The Scream” (“The Cry”).

Born in 1863 in Löten, Norway, famed painter Edvard Munch established a free-flowing, psychological-themed style all his own. His painting “The Scream” (“The Cry”; 1893), is one of the most recognizable works in the history of art. His later works proved to be less intense, but his earlier, darker paintings ensured his legacy. A testament to his importance, “The Scream” sold for more than $119 million in 2012—setting a new record.

Edvard Munch was born on December 12, 1863, in Löten, Norway, the second of five children.

Jealousy- Edvard Munch

Jealousy- Edvard Munch

In 1864, Munch moved with his family to the city of Oslo, where his mother died four years later of tuberculosis—he beginning of a series of familial tragedies in Munch’s life: His sister, Sophie, also died of tuberculosis, in 1877 at the age of 15; another of his sisters spent most of her life institutionalized for mental illness; and his only brother died of pneumonia at age 30.

In 1879, Munch began attending a technical college to study engineering, but left only a year later when his passion for art overtook his interest in engineering. In 1881, he enrolled at the Royal School of Art and Design. The following year, he rented a studio with six other artists and entered his first show, at the Industries and Art Exhibition.

Anxiety- Edvard Munch

Anxiety- Edvard Munch

Three years of study and practice later, Munch received a scholarship and traveled to Paris, France, where he spent three weeks. After returning to Oslo, he began working on new paintings, one of which was “The Sick Child,” which he would finish in 1886. In what would be seen as the first work to represent Munch’s break from the realist style, the painting symbolically captures intense emotion on the canvas—specifically depicting his feelings about the death of his sister nearly nine years earlier.

From 1889 (the year his father died) to 1892, Munch lived mainly in France—funded by state scholarships—embarking on the most productive, as well as the most troubled, period of his artistic life. It during this period that Munch undertook a series of paintings he called the “Frieze of Life,” ultimately encompassing 22 works for a 1902 Berlin exhibition.

With paintings bearing such titles as “Despair” (1892), “Melancholy” (c. 1892–93), “Anxiety” (1894), “Jealousy” (1894–95) and “The Scream” (also known as “The Cry”)—the last of which,

Golgotha- Edvard Munch

Golgotha- Edvard Munch

painted in 1893, would go on to become one of the most famous paintings ever produced—Munch’s mental state was on full display, and his style varied greatly, depending on which emotion had taken hold of him at the time. The collection was a huge success, and Munch soon became known to the art world. Subsequently, he found brief happiness in a life otherwise colored by excessive drinking, family misfortune and mental distress.

Separation- Edvard Munch

Separation- Edvard Munch

Success wasn’t enough to tame Munch’s inner demons for long, however, and as the 1900s began, his drinking spun out of control. In 1908, hearing voices and suffering from paralysis on one side, he collapsed and soon checked himself into a private sanitarium, where he drank less and regained some mental composure. In the spring of 1909, he checked out, eager to get back to work, but as history would show, most of his great works were behind him.

Munch moved to a country house in Ekely (near Oslo), Norway, where he lived in isolation and began painting landscapes. He nearly died of influenza in the pandemic of 1918-19, but recovered and would survive for more than two decades thereafter (he died at his country home in Ekley on January 23, 1944). Munch painted right up to his death, often depicting his deteriorating condition and

Madonna- Edvard Munch

Madonna- Edvard Munch

various physical maladies in his work.

In May 2012, Munch’s “The Scream” went on the auction block, selling at Sotheby’s in New York for more than $119 million—a record-breaking price—sealing its reputation as one of the most famous and important works of art ever produced.

Biography is from www.biography.com.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today.  I of course had to do a version of The Scream with myself doing the screaming. 🙂  I will see you tomorrow on Day 308!  I’m going to go and lay around snacking and napping now.

Best,

Linda

Linda Screaming- Tribute to Edvard Munch Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Linda Screaming- Tribute to Edvard Munch
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Linda Screaming- Tribute to Edvard Munch Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Linda Screaming- Tribute to Edvard Munch
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Linda Screaming- Tribute to Edvard Munch Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Linda Screaming- Tribute to Edvard Munch
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Linda Screaming- Tribute to Edvard Munch Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Linda Screaming- Tribute to Edvard Munch
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Linda Screaming- Tribute to Edvard Munch Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Linda Screaming- Tribute to Edvard Munch
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 306- Vivian Springford- Beautiful Stains

It’s Day 306 and I really wanted to do a color field artist today so I stumbled upon today’s artist while browsing art magazines when running errands today.  This piece was more challenging to create than I thought!  Join me in honoring Vivian Springford today.

Vivian Springford

Vivian Springford

Martinique Series 1972- Vivian Springford

Martinique Series 1972- Vivian Springford

Vivian Springford was born 1914 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and educated at the Spence School in New York City, and then the Art Students League. Born to a prominent family (her father was the former president and chairman of the board of Sevel, Inc, an early maker of refrigerators), she was pictured in The New York Times “Debutantes of the Winter Season in New York” in 1932.

Originally a portrait artist, she illustrated Albert Carr’s 1938 book Juggernaut with portraits of twenty political dictators from the Napoleanic era to the early twentieth century.

She was championed in the late 1950s by Howard DeVree, the New York Times art

Untitled 1959- Vivian Springford

Untitled 1959- Vivian Springford

critic, and Harold Rosenberg helped Springford get her first show at Great Jones Gallery in 1960.

The show generated much excitement and was filmed in the movie “Bowl of Cherries”, in the film library of the Museum of Modern Art. Prominent collectors such as Leon Mnuchin purchased paintings from the exhibition.

Natalie Edgar reviewed the show for Art News, and wrote:
“Vivian Springford has a freely brushed calligraphic style with the fantasy and naturalism of Chinese derivation. An arrested immanence results.”

James R. Mellow wrote in the Arts Magazine:
“Calligraphy is said to have played an important part in the development of her style, but its effect upon the dominating blacks of these paintings is kinesthetic rather than formal – that is, it supplies the impetuous but not the resultant shape of things. The work itself is notable for a first one-­‐‑man showing.”

Untitled 1976- Vivian Springford

Untitled 1976- Vivian Springford

And Peter Wood reviewed the show at length in The Villager, stating:

“… Miss Springford’s pictures are of a kind – all roughly four by five feet, all on unprepared canvas, all containing a major black form soaked up by the canvas, all embellished with colors, sprays and swirls of paint. In a sense, one might say that these works, too, are mere variations on a theme. But for me they have something more; they have an emotional content which I found lacking in the Camino

pictures. And this it seems to me is the essential difference between good abstract expressionism and bad. Miss Springford’s works evokes the feeling of some primeval or post-­‐‑atomic chaos, or perhaps a conflict of the mind inexpressible in words. I saw darkness and fire and motion there…”

Springford was attracted early on to Chinese calligraphy:

“I liked the direct approach of the early Chinese painters. Whatever they put down

Vivian Springford

Vivian Springford

on paper stayed there; they didn’t edit. They didn’t copy nature, either; they interpreted it. In fact, some of the older Chinese drawings are much more abstract than anything done today. I adapted their rhythm and free motion to develop my own abstract paintings.”

Springford shared studio space with the Asian American artist Walasse Ting for ten years, and helped him with the translations of his poetry. Through her association with Ting, Springford developed close contacts with artists such as Pierre Alechinsky, Sam Francis and Karel Appel. Springford wrote “My painting is my own small plot of energy, in terms of color and movement, in the universal whole.”

Springford also had a solo show at Preston Gallery in NYC in 1963, but became a reclusive artist after that, only showing in a few group exhibitions at the request of fellow artists and friends. She otherwise refused to sell or promote her own works. She worked in her NY studio through the mid 1980s until macular degeneration rendered her blind.

Vivian Springford

Vivian Springford

Having no immediate family, she was unable to leave her small New York midtown apartment. In 1998, a volunteer from United-­‐‑Neighbors-­‐‑of-­‐‑the-­‐‑East-­‐‑Side, which works with New York City’ʹs elderly “ʺshut-­‐‑ins”ʺ, was visiting with Springford and learned about a storage room in Chelsea that held her life’ʹs work. They visited the room and found more than 40 years worth of paintings and drawings covered in plastic and a decades worth of dust since the room was last opened. The volunteer brought samples of Springford’ʹs work to Gary Snyder, an art dealer known for his revisionist exhibitions of historically rooted art and artists. Snyder immediately recognized its importance and began the process of cleaning, restoring, and showing her work. Snyder’ʹs first exhibition of Springford’ʹs work in 1998 was nearly sold out before its opening.

When Vivian Springford died in 2003, Gary Snyder presented a memorial show that was well received .

Doug McClemont reviewed the exhibition for Artnews, ending with:

“…The influences of artists such as Georgia O’Keeffe and Sam Francis are difficult not to notice, but Springford’s experiments with making acrylics behave like watercolors were original and skillful, and the results convey a rare sense of magic.”

Grace Glueck reviewed the show in The New York Times:
“The recent rediscovery of Springford’ʹs work, which lay in a warehouse for years after this reclusive painter stopped exhibiting, has generated her second show here. An American painter who started out as a portraitist and then came into the orbit of the New York

Vivian Springford

Vivian Springford

School, Springford (1914-­‐‑2003) was introduced to Asian art and philosophy by her friend the poet Walasse Ting.
Her strong sense of color is tempered by an Asian feeling for delicate, calligraphic line, seen in works of the 1960’ʹs. These exuberant linear scribblings and doodlings, stained and painted on paper or canvas, are enhanced and sometimes almost overcome by areas of black paint, worked onto the surface by stain, brushing or other means.
In the Tanzania and Martinique series -­‐‑-­‐‑ canvases from the 1970s -­‐‑-­‐‑ she has gravitated to stain painting and lightened her palette. Big, blotchy cabbage-­‐‑like shapes are built up in overlays of color that usually progress from light and translucent at the edges to intense opacity at the center.”

As the history of Abstract Expressionism continues to be explored and defined, Vivian Springford is emerging as an important figure, who developed a sophisticated and original stain style of painting.

Biography is from Peyton Wright Gallery’s website.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today.  I painted it in many layers and it was nice to create.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 307!

Best,

Linda

 

Stained- Tribute to Vivian Springford Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Stained- Tribute to Vivian Springford
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-VIew Stained- Tribute to Vivian Springford Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-VIew
Stained- Tribute to Vivian Springford
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Stained- Tribute to Vivian Springford Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Stained- Tribute to Vivian Springford
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Stained- Tribute to Vivian Springford Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Stained- Tribute to Vivian Springford
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Stained- Tribute to Vivian Springford Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Stained- Tribute to Vivian Springford
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 303- Robert Indermaur- The Theater of Man

It’s Day 303 and I’m feeling slightly under the weather…hopefully it’s just allergies and not a cold or flu…I have shows coming up that I don’t want to miss!  My friend Jon told me about today’s artist and lent me a book of his and I love his work.  It was really challenging finding much information on him online AND it was difficult to paint in his style…but it was very inspiring and thought-provoking.  I love the images and people he portrays.  Join me in honoring Robert Indermaur today!  I did find a small biography on his website.

Robert Indermaur

Robert Indermaur

Der Kuckuck 1981- Robert Indermaur

Der Kuckuck 1981- Robert Indermaur

Robert Indermaur

Born 1947 in Chur / Graubünden.

I went to school in Chur until completion at the Grisons teacher seminar in 1967.

In the following years I was traveling with friends across Europe, Asia and Africa.

In between, I taught as a primary school teacher in St.Antönien, Passugg, Domat / Ems and Chur.

With my future wife and a few friends I founded in 1974 in Chur, the first small theater (Klibühni Schnidrzunft) in Graubünden, which we initiated ten years and accompanied.

30 years ago I began to make my favorite activity to the profession. First, as an abstract, then as a figurative painter and sculptor later I showed my works at more than one hundred solo and many group exhibitions in Switzerland and abroad.

In 1977, the graphic artist Albert Brun and I, six issues of the satirical magazine

Kopf V 1988-  Robert Indermaur

Kopf V 1988- Robert Indermaur

“The ball horn” out.

I am married since 1975. My wife, Barbara, gave birth to our three children, daughter Rebecca and their two sons Alexander and Adrian.
I have different sculptures and murals for public spaces – created and for three theater productions the stage.

Fenster V 1988-  Robert Indermaur

Fenster V 1988- Robert Indermaur

1989/90 we spent a year in California / USA. Otherwise, since 1983, we live in Almens / GR. I work there – and from 2004 also in my second studio in the neighboring village Paspels.

Biography is from www.indermaur.net.  The translation is kind of wonky, but understandable!

Below is text transcribed from the book that was loaned to me.  Robert Indermaur- Departure (Bilder 1983-1989) I wanted to include more information. 🙂 Photos are also from the same book.

Excerpts from Ambiguous Dramas, Tangible Dreams: The Art of Robert Indermaur- By Katherine Gregor

Robert Indermaur’s paintings capture this bittersweet quality of human experience in a powerful, wonderfully visual fashion.  His work makes the unspoken tangible; in his odd, often mysterious images we instinctively recognize our own internal doubts, perceptions, moods, anxieties.  Indermaur’s world of muted palettes and deep shadows, isolated individuals, empty rooms, and ambiguous drams

Frauenhaus 1988-  Robert Indermaur

Frauenhaus 1988- Robert Indermaur

seems to map a kind of universal psychological terrain.  The searching characters at the center of this world, who carry on and look for meaning despite the oddness of their circumstances, serve as our allegorical stand-ins, so that ultimately these paintings portray not individuals but something larger and more tentative – the difficulties and tensions of being human.

Many of these paintings are strongly narrative, literary, even theatrical.  They tell us stories, complete with characters and settings and dramatic tension, but their tales are strange, absurdist, incomplete; they provoke our need to explain.

In other works Indermaur explores the idea of the theater of man – Humans on display in another sense, by their own choice.  An audience is almost never visible in these works; the issue seems to be the individual’s act of exposure, the experience of being publicly “on stage”.

Der Freund 1982-  Robert Indermaur

Der Freund 1982- Robert Indermaur

Through works like these, Indermaur stimulates us to think deeply about the experience of being human.  Sometimes these paintings suggest the artist’s own conclusions; more often they pose open-ended questions, merely hinting at shades of meaning. To solve the puzzles of these paintings present, we must supply pieces of ourselves.

~

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  It was much more difficult that I initially thought it was going to be this morning.  I couldn’t quite get the brushstrokes right and if I was feeling better, I could spend more time on it, but I think it turned out well enough.  I really like the concept of my piece and I hope you do too!

I will see you tomorrow on Day 304!  Whew, I can’t believe I haven’t missed a day this year yet!  Knock on wood.  Knock knock.

 

Best,

Linda

Lachen ist Leben- Tribute to Robert Indermaur Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Lachen ist Leben- Tribute to Robert Indermaur
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Lachen ist Leben- Tribute to Robert Indermaur Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Lachen ist Leben- Tribute to Robert Indermaur
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Lachen ist Leben- Tribute to Robert Indermaur Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Lachen ist Leben- Tribute to Robert Indermaur
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Lachen ist Leben- Tribute to Robert Indermaur Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Lachen ist Leben- Tribute to Robert Indermaur
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Lachen ist Leben- Tribute to Robert Indermaur Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Lachen ist Leben- Tribute to Robert Indermaur
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 299- Antonio Ballester Moreno- Sublimated Props of Childhood

It’s Day 299 and I have a meeting with my landscaper and also a long rehearsal with my improv group!  So I worked on my painting earlier and want to finish this blog before I head out.  I had such a fun time with today’s piece.  Join me in honoring Antonio Ballester Moreno today!

Antonio Ballester Moreno

Antonio Ballester Moreno

Antonio Ballester Moreno

Antonio Ballester Moreno

Antonio Ballester Moreno. Born in Madrid in 1977, the artist studied at the Universität der Künste in Berlin and graduated from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, where he studied both painting and more contemporary forms of art practice. Upcoming exhibitions include a solo show at the Museo de Arte Contemporaneo de Castilla y Leon, Leon, Spain (MUSAC) in September. The artist will be present for the opening.

Over the last few years, Antonio Ballester Moreno has decidedly focused on

Antonio Ballester Moreno, SIN TÍTULO, 2008

Antonio Ballester Moreno, SIN TÍTULO, 2008

returning to the basics, often painting as a child, and even going as far as dedicating an entire week to only generating one type of image – for example scribbling triangles on his canvases for weeks, then dedicating another week to spreading dots over the works…the end results are works that can be seen as both abstract and figurative, real and surreal. Yet their bright colors and silly playfulness belie a darker side.

Antonio Ballester Moreno

Antonio Ballester Moreno

Composed for the gallery’s two exhibition spaces, “Hunter House” will present an installation of large-scale paintings and drawings, while “Bear Suit Number Two” is a continuation of “Barkostum” (or “Bear Suit”), the artist’s 2008 exhibition at Peres Projects Berlin. The latter draws its title from the figure of Timothy Treadwell, the eco-warrior, who spent thirteen summers living in dangerous proximity to grizzly bears in Alaska’s Katmai National Park.

More at home among the simple laws of nature, Treadwell reflects a certain current

Antonio Ballester Moreno

Antonio Ballester Moreno

in distrust of the industrial-technological system. Like Ted Kaczinski (the unabomber), who also makes an appearance in Antonio Ballester Moreno’s works, his madness is indeed anti-social and manic; it is both chilling and brilliant.

Antonio Ballester Moreno

Antonio Ballester Moreno

Delving into the fascinating and unsettling waters between madness and society, the artist creates works that teeter on the crux between man and nature, between technology and Walden-like hermeticism. These works approach true madness unromanticized – banal and inescapable, all the while with a low-fi approach that is comic, darkly comic.

With broad, heavily layered brushstrokes and occasional thick drips depicting everything from lions and pixelated flowers to castles and ghosts, he underlies his subjects with repeating patterns (checkerboards, floral patterns, skulls) often executed in ink.

Antonio’s figures are romantic and nostalgic, churning up the forgotten, sublimated props of childhood, which, in their consciously rough

"Montañas", Antonio Ballester Moreno, 2012

“Montañas”, Antonio Ballester Moreno, 2012

execution, reveal the careful hand of someone who cares deeply about his subject. Indeed what the works of Antonio Ballester Moreno reveal is an absolutely authentic aesthetic in the face of their own disturbed context.

Blurb is from Art Agenda’s website.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I had a fun time creating it.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 300!  Whew!

Best,

Linda

Nuevo Día- Tribute to Antonio Ballester Moreno Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Nuevo Día- Tribute to Antonio Ballester Moreno
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Nuevo Día- Tribute to Antonio Ballester Moreno Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Nuevo Día- Tribute to Antonio Ballester Moreno
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Nuevo Día- Tribute to Antonio Ballester Moreno Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Nuevo Día- Tribute to Antonio Ballester Moreno
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Nuevo Día- Tribute to Antonio Ballester Moreno Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Nuevo Día- Tribute to Antonio Ballester Moreno
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Nuevo Día- Tribute to Antonio Ballester Moreno Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Nuevo Día- Tribute to Antonio Ballester Moreno
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas