Day Thirty-Two- Jean Michel Basquiat- “I am not a black artist. I am an artist.”

Today was the complete opposite than yesterday!  It’s the first painting of February and the first day of Horse year.  Maybe that was on my side because it’s my year.  Oh yeah.  I was sooooo super excited about today’s painting.  My only downfall was that I wanted to paint more than one painting to honor this wonderful man.  Jean Michel Basquiat!

Basquiat!

Basquiat!

Jean-Michel Basquiat (December 22, 1960 – August 12, 1988) was a Haitian-American artist.  Basquiat first achieved notoriety as part of SAMO, an informal graffiti group who wrote enigmatic epigrams in the cultural hotbed of the Lower East Side of Manhattan, New York City during the late 1970s where the hip hop, post-punk and street art movements had coalesced. By the 1980s he was exhibiting his Neo-expressionist and Primitivist paintings in galleries and museums internationally, but he died of a heroin overdose at the age of 27 in 1988. The Whitney Museum of American Art held a retrospective of his art in 1992.

Untitled_acrylic,_oilstick_and_spray_paint_on_canvas_painting_by_--Jean-Michel_Basquiat--,_1981Basquiat’s art focused on “suggestive dichotomies,” such as wealth versus poverty, integration versus segregation, and inner versus outer experience.  He appropriated poetry, drawing and painting, and married text and image, abstraction and figuration, and historical information mixed with contemporary critique.

Basquiat used social commentary in his paintings as a “springboard to deeper truths about the individual”, as well as attacks on power structures and systems of racism, while his poetics were acutely political and direct in their criticism of colonialism and support for class struggle.

Jean-Michel Basquiat, born in Brooklyn, New York, was the second of four children of Matilda Andrades (July 28, 1934 – November 17, 2008)  and Gerard Basquiat (born 1930).  He had two younger sisters: Lisane, born in 1964, and Jeanine, born in 1967.

His father, Gerard Basquiat, was born in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and his mother, Matilde Basquiat, of Afro-Puerto Rican descent, was born in Brooklyn, New York. Matilde instilled a love for art in her young son by taking him to art museums in Manhattan and enrolling him as a junior member of the Brooklyn Museum of Art.  Basquiat was a precocious child who learned how to read and write by age four and was a gifted artist. His teachers noticed his artistic abilities, and his mother encouraged her son’s artistic talent. By the age of 11, Basquiat could fluently speak, read and write French, Spanish, and English.

In September 1968, when Basquiat was about 8, he was hit by a car while playing in the street. His arm was broken and he suffered Untitled_acrylic_and_mixed_media_on_canvas_by_--Jean-Michel_Basquiat--,_1984several internal injuries, and he eventually underwent a splenectomy.  While he was recuperating from his injuries, his mother brought him the Gray’s Anatomy book to keep him occupied. This book would prove to be influential in his future artistic outlook. His parents separated that year and he and his sisters were raised by their father.  The family resided in Boerum Hill, Brooklyn, for five years, then moved to San Juan, Puerto Rico in 1974. After two years, they returned to New York City.

When he was 11, his mother was committed to a mental institution and thereafter spent time in and out of institutions.  At 15, Basquiat ran away from home.  He slept on park benches in Washington Square Park, and was arrested and returned to the care of his father within a week.

Contemporary Art AuctionBasquiat dropped out of Edward R. Murrow High School in the tenth grade. His father banished him from the household and Basquiat stayed with friends in Brooklyn. He supported himself by selling T-shirts and homemade post cards.

In 1976, Basquiat and friend Al Diaz began spray-painting graffiti on buildings in Lower Manhattan, working under the pseudonym SAMO. The designs featured inscribed messages such as “Plush safe he think.. SAMO” and “SAMO as an escape clause”. In 1978, Basquiat worked for the world famous Unique Clothing Warehouse, in their art department, at 718 Broadway in NoHo and at night he became “SAMO” painting his original graffiti art on neighborhood buildings. Harvey discovered Basquiat painting a building one night, they became friends, and Harvey offered him a day job. On December 11, 1978, The Village Voice published an article about the graffiti.  When Basquiat & Diaz ended their friendship, The SAMO project ended with the epitaph “SAMO IS DEAD,” inscribed on the walls of SoHo buildings in 1979.

In 1979, Basquiat appeared on the live public-access television cable TV show TV Party hosted by Glenn O’Brien, and the two fb_basquiat_08started a friendship. Basquiat made regular appearances on the show over the next few years. That same year, Basquiat formed the noise rock band Test Pattern – which was later renamed Gray – which played at Arleen Schloss’s open space, “Wednesdays at A’s”, where in October 1979 Basquiat showed, among others, his SAMO color Xerox work.

Gray also consisted of Shannon Dawson, Michael Holman, Nick Taylor, Wayne Clifford and Vincent Gallo, and the band performed at nightclubs such as Max’s Kansas City, CBGB, Hurrah, and the Mudd Club. In 1980, Basquiat starred in O’Brien’s independent film Downtown 81, originally titled New York Beat. That same year, Basquiat met Andy Warhol at a restaurant. Basquiat presented to Warhol samples of his work, and Warhol was stunned by Basquiat’s genius and allure. The men later collaborated. Downtown 81 featured some of Gray’s recordings on its soundtrack.  Basquiat also appeared in the Blondie music video “Rapture” as a nightclub disc jockey.

basquiat-gagosian-chelsea-julius-caeser-on-goldThe early 1980s were Basquiat’s breakthrough as a solo artist. In June 1980, Basquiat participated in The Times Square Show, a multi-artist exhibition sponsored by Collaborative Projects Incorporated (Colab) and Fashion Moda. In September of the same year, Basquiat joined the Annina Nosei gallery and worked in a basement below the gallery toward his first one-man show, which took place in March 1981 with great success. In December 1981, René Ricard published “The Radiant Child” in Artforum magazine, which brought Basquiat to the attention of the art world.

In March 1982 he worked in Modena and from November, Basquiat worked from the ground-floor display and studio space Larry Gagosian had built below his Venice home and commenced a series of paintings for a 1983 show, his second at Gagosian Gallery, then in West Hollywood.  During this time he took considerable interest in the work that Robert Rauschenberg was producing at Gemini G.E.L. in West Hollywood, visiting him on several occasions and finding inspiration in the accomplishments of the painter.  In 1982, Basquiat also worked briefly with musician and artist David Bowie.

In 1983, Basquiat produced a 12″ rap single featuring hip-hop artists Rammellzee and K-Rob. Billed as Rammellzee vs. K-Rob, the Basquiat-Black-246x300single contained two versions of the same track: “Beat Bop” on side one with vocals and “Beat Bop” on side two as an instrumental. The single was pressed in limited quantities on the one-off Tartown Record Company label. The single’s cover featured Basquiat’s artwork, making the pressing highly desirable among both record and art collectors.

At the suggestion of Swiss dealer Bruno Bischofberger, Warhol and Basquiat worked on a series of collaborative paintings between 1983 and 1985. In the case of Olympic Rings (1985), Warhol made several variations of the Olympic five-ring symbol, rendered in the original primary colors. Basquiat responded to the abstract, stylized logos with his oppositional graffiti style.

Basquiat often painted in expensive Armani suits and would even appear in public in the same paint-splattered suits.

By 1986, Basquiat had left the Annina Nosei gallery, and was showing in the famous Mary Boone gallery in SoHo. On February 10, 1985, he appeared on the cover of The New York Times Magazine in a feature entitled “New Art, New Money: The Marketing of an American Artist”.  He was a successful artist in this period, but his growing heroin addiction began to interfere with his personal relationships.

6f267a022b68d05dadcec6ecf9f900cc-lWhen Andy Warhol died on February 22, 1987, Basquiat became increasingly isolated, and his heroin addiction and depression grew more severe.  Despite an attempt at sobriety during a trip to Maui, Hawaii, Basquiat died on August 12, 1988, of a heroin overdose at his art studio in Great Jones Street in New York City’s NoHo neighborhood. He was 27.

Basquiat was interred in Brooklyn’s Green-Wood Cemetery.

Read more of his biography at wikipedia.

So, like I said…my biggest hurdle was trying to figure out what to paint…I wanted to paint a million different things.  As I researched his paintings (I’ve seen them before of course) I took on a whole new respect for them.  I love his style so much.

This quote explains a lot about the message of his paintings.

“Basquiat’s canon revolves around single heroic figures: athletes, prophets, warriors, cops, musicians, kings and the artist himself. In these images the head is often a central focus, topped by crowns, hats, and halos. In this way the intellect is emphasized, lifted up to notice, privileged over the body and the physicality of these figures (i.e. black men) commonly represent in the world.”

— Kellie Jones, Lost in Translation: Jean-Michel in the (Re)Mix

My tribute doesn’t really have much of a sociologically or political message.  I have to be honest in that respect. 🙂  I took an old

Let's get going!

Let’s get going!

journal entry from about 10 years ago and pasted it onto the canvas and then let the brush take over.

You can see the reference photo on the right that I took.

I like that you can still see the words through the paint…if you look close enough!

Close-Up during progress...

Close-Up during progress…

Another little thing from my journal that survived the paint!

Another little thing from my journal that survived the paint!

BLOOD!

BLOOD!

Teeth and tongue!

Teeth and tongue!

And now here’s my tribute to Jean Michel!  I hope you like it.  Happy Lunar New Year All and let’s all make it a good one.  It is going great so far for me!  Thanks to everyone who have been following the blog far and near.  I’ve gotten more messages to reserve these paintings.  I think there’s a good amount that are called for, so as soon as you see one you like.  Let me know!

xoxo, Linda

There are Secrets under Me and My Puppet- Tribute to Jean Michel Basquiat Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Pen/Paper/Glue on Canvas

There are Secrets under Me and My Puppet- Tribute to Jean Michel Basquiat
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Pen/Paper/Glue on Canvas

Side-View There are Secrets under Me and My Puppet- Tribute to Jean Michel Basquiat Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Pen/Paper/Glue on Canvas

Side-View
There are Secrets under Me and My Puppet- Tribute to Jean Michel Basquiat
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Pen/Paper/Glue on Canvas

Close-Up 1 There are Secrets under Me and My Puppet- Tribute to Jean Michel Basquiat Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Pen/Paper/Glue on Canvas

Close-Up 1
There are Secrets under Me and My Puppet- Tribute to Jean Michel Basquiat
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Pen/Paper/Glue on Canvas

Close-Up 2 There are Secrets under Me and My Puppet- Tribute to Jean Michel Basquiat Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Pen/Paper/Glue on Canvas

Close-Up 2
There are Secrets under Me and My Puppet- Tribute to Jean Michel Basquiat
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Pen/Paper/Glue on Canvas

Close-Up 3 There are Secrets under Me and My Puppet- Tribute to Jean Michel Basquiat Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Pen/Paper/Glue on Canvas

Close-Up 3
There are Secrets under Me and My Puppet- Tribute to Jean Michel Basquiat
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Pen/Paper/Glue on Canvas

Close-Up 4 There are Secrets under Me and My Puppet- Tribute to Jean Michel Basquiat Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Pen/Paper/Glue on Canvas

Close-Up 4
There are Secrets under Me and My Puppet- Tribute to Jean Michel Basquiat
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Pen/Paper/Glue on Canvas

2 thoughts on “Day Thirty-Two- Jean Michel Basquiat- “I am not a black artist. I am an artist.”

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