Day Thirty-Three- Martin Ramirez- Schizophrenic Genius

Day Thirty-Three and today was a good art day.  I’ve been busy with house stuff, but I’ve still been able to paint a piece every day.  Join me in celebrating the artist for today.  He is one of the most valued examples of an outsider artist, Martin Ramirez!

Martin Ramirez

Martin Ramirez

Martín Ramírez (March 30, 1895 – February 17, 1963) was a self-taught artist who spent most of his adult life institutionalized in 20090118_stephen_palmer_untitledCalifornia mental hospitals, diagnosed as a catatonic schizophrenic.

ramirezdesk200-1dd384de00ec44eda1f6f6ab47bc87989405f5a0-s6-c30He was born in 1895.

Having migrated to the United States from Tepatitlan, Mexico in 1925, Ramírez was institutionalized in 1931, first at Stockton State Hospital in Stockton, California, then, beginning in 1948, at DeWitt State Hospital in Auburn, near Sacramento, where he made the drawings and collages for which he is now known. At DeWitt, a visiting professor of psychology and art, Tarmo Pasto, came across Ramírez’s work and began to save the large-scale works Ramírez made using available materials, including brown paper bags, scraps of examining-table paper, and book pages glued together with a paste made of potatoes and saliva. His works display an idiosyncratic iconography that reflect both Mexican folk traditions and twentieth-century modernization: images of Madonnas, horseback riders, and trains entering and exiting tunnels proliferate in the work, along with undulating fields of concentric lines that describe landscapes, tunnels, theatrical prosceniums, and decorative patterns.

musing_200903_ramirezHe died in 1963.

Since his death in 1963, Ramírez’s drawings and collages have become some of the most highly valued examples of outsider art.

In January 2007, the American Folk Art Museum in New York City opened martin-ramirez-parade-horse-and-rider-with-bugle-and-flag“Martín Ramírez,” the first major retrospective of the artist’s work in the United States in more than 20 years. The exhibition featured about 100 of the 300 drawings and collages that had then been known to exist. It was accompanied by a catalog that includes a biographical essay, written by sociologistsVíctor M. Espinosa and Kristin E. Espinosa, which discusses many previously unpublished details of Ramírez’s life. The exhibition subsequently traveled to the San Jose Museum of Art (June–September 2007) and the Milwaukee Art Museum (October 2007–January 2008).

martin-ramirez-cowboyWhile the 2007 retrospective was on view at the American Folk Art Museum, that museum was contacted by descendants of Dr. Max Dunievitz, who served as medical 25819891director of DeWitt State Hospital in the early 1960s. Dunievitz had kept approximately 140 of Ramírez’s drawings and collages from the last three years of his life; they were nearly discarded by family members upon the doctor’s death in 1988. Dunievitz’s grandson Phil, having seen the works during childhood visits to his grandfather’s house, took them and brought them to his mother’s house in Auburn, where they were stored for nearly 20 years in the garage. The heirs of Martín Ramírez challenged the ownership of this group of works, claiming that as the descendents, they deserved an ownership portion of this body of work.

In mediation, the Dunievitz and Ramírez families reached an amicable agreement in 2008, which includes the representation of this work by the Ricco/Maresca Gallery in New York City.

39499-lg_ramirez_11661In October and November 2008, a portion of these drawings was concurrently exhibited at the Ramirez_PK32.lg_-224x463Ricco/Maresca Gallery and the American Folk Art Museum. An accompanying full-color catalog was produced by Roger Ricco and Frank Maresca and published by Pomegranate Communications. It includes essays by Brooke Davis Anderson, Richard Rodriguez, and Wayne Thiebaud.

Biography from wikipedia.  Look at more of his art at the American Folk Art Museum‘s site.

This article from NPR is also wonderful.

~

~

Initial sketch

Initial sketch

I was pretty excited to attempt to emulate Ramirez’s style.  It was difficult for numerous

Still sketching

Still sketching

reasons.  It’s hard to draw on canvas and his work is very detailed.  At first I tried to paste a piece of paper onto the canvas and then attempted to give it a yellowish-brown stain.  Everything about that went wrong so I decided just to take the paper off and do a wash onto the canvas.  I also didn’t know exactly what I wanted to draw/paint.  I went through so many of his drawings until I decided.  I was intrigued by his Madonna pictures, but also loved his decorative columns and tunnels.  I ended combining a few different ideas.  I also was torn about keeping it just pen & ink, but I was too drawn to the drawings he colored so I decided to paint some parts of mine.  I feel that I captured Ramirez’s spirit, but I also tried to incorporate some of my own.  Hope you enjoy!  See you tomorrow!  xoxo, Linda

Time for inking!

Time for inking!

And now the finished piece! (Color may be a little off since I didn’t take the photo in natural light outside)

Untitled (Madonna in Tunnel)- Tribute to Martin Ramirez Linda Cleary 2014 Pen/Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Untitled (Madonna in Tunnel)- Tribute to Martin Ramirez
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen/Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Untitled (Madonna in Tunnel)- Tribute to Martin Ramirez Linda Cleary 2014 Pen/Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Untitled (Madonna in Tunnel)- Tribute to Martin Ramirez
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen/Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Untitled (Madonna in Tunnel)- Tribute to Martin Ramirez Linda Cleary 2014 Pen/Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Untitled (Madonna in Tunnel)- Tribute to Martin Ramirez
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen/Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Untitled (Madonna in Tunnel)- Tribute to Martin Ramirez Linda Cleary 2014 Pen/Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Untitled (Madonna in Tunnel)- Tribute to Martin Ramirez
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen/Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Untitled (Madonna in Tunnel)- Tribute to Martin Ramirez Linda Cleary 2014 Pen/Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Untitled (Madonna in Tunnel)- Tribute to Martin Ramirez
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen/Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s