Day Ninety-Nine- Max Bill- Smart Art

Day 99!  Having a busy day so I don’t have much time to post my blog…join me in celebrating Max Bill today!

Max Bill

Max Bill

 

Max Bill

Max Bill

Max Bill (22 December 1908 – 9 December 1994) was a Swiss architectartistpaintertypeface designerindustrial designer and graphic designer.

Bill was born in Winterthur. After an apprenticeship as a silversmith during 1924-

Max Bill

Max Bill

1927, Bill took up studies at the Bauhaus in Dessau under many teachers including Wassily KandinskyPaul Klee and Oskar Schlemmer from 1927 to 1929, after which he moved to Zurich.

After working on graphic designs for the few modern buildings being constructed, he built his first work, his own house and studio (1932–3) in Zurich-Höngg. From 1937 onwards he was a prime mover behind the Allianz group of Swiss artists.

Max Bill

Max Bill

Bill is widely considered the single most decisive influence on Swiss graphic design beginning in the 1950s with his theoretical writing and progressive work. His connection to the days of the Modern Movement gave him special authority. As an industrial designer, his work is characterized by a clarity of design and precise proportions. Examples are the elegant clocks and watches designed for Junghans, a

Max Bill

Max Bill

long-term client. Among Bill’s most notable product designs is the “Ulmer Hocker” of 1954, a stool that can also be used as a shelf element or a side table. Although the stool was a creation of Bill and Ulm school designer Hans Gugelot, it is often called “Bill Hocker” because the first sketch on a cocktail napkin was Bill’s work.

As a designer and artist, Bill sought to create forms which visually represent the New

Max Bill

Max Bill

Physics of the early 20th century. He sought to create objects so that the new science of form could be understood by the senses: that is as a concrete art. Thus Bill is not a rationalist -as is typically thought- but rather a phenomenologist. One who understands embodiment as the ultimate expression of a concrete art. In this way he is not so much extending as re-interpreting Bauhaus theory. Yet curiously Bill’s critical interpreters have not really grasped this fundamental issue. He made spare geometric paintings and spherical sculptures, some based on the Möbius strip, in stone, wood, metal and plaster. His architectural work included an office building in Germany, a radio studio in Zurich, and a bridge in eastern Switzerland.

Max Bill

Max Bill

He continued to produce architectural designs, such as those for a museum of contemporary art (1981) in Florence and for the Bauhaus Archive (1987) in Berlin. In 1982 he also entered a competition for an addition to the Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin, built to a design byMies van der Rohe. Pavillon-Skulptur (1979–83), a large granite sculpture, was installed adjacent to the Bahnhofstrasse, Zürich in 1983. As is often the case with modern art in public places, the installation generated some controversy. Endlose Treppe (1991), a sculpture made of North American granite, was designed for the philosopher Ernst Bloch.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today…and I’ll see you tomorrow…on DAY 100!  Wee.

Best, Linda

Blau und Grün- Tribute to Max Bill Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Blau und Grün- Tribute to Max Bill
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Blau und Grün- Tribute to Max Bill Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Blau und Grün- Tribute to Max Bill
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Blau und Grün- Tribute to Max Bill Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Blau und Grün- Tribute to Max Bill
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Blau und Grün- Tribute to Max Bill Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Blau und Grün- Tribute to Max Bill
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Blau und Grün- Tribute to Max Bill Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Blau und Grün- Tribute to Max Bill
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s