Day 337- Daniel Higgs- Art of the Cosmos

It’s Day 337 and I am a huge fan of today’s artist/musician.  His art is amazing and I love the band Lungfish.  Please join me in honoring Daniel Higgs today.

Daniel Higgs

Daniel Higgs

Whale- Daniel Higgs

Whale- Daniel Higgs

Daniel Arcus Incus Ululat Higgs is a musician and artist from Baltimore, Maryland on whose behalf superlatives are destined to fail. It’s not that his artistic output – spanning three decades, numerous albums, books of poetry and collections of drawings – simply eludes classification, it defies it.

Often we hear that a true work of art is meant to speak for itself, and with the work of Daniel Higgs the maxim rings truer than ever. His art is of the cosmos,

DANIEL HIGGS "Cryptozoomorphic Hierograms" Exhibition

DANIEL HIGGS “Cryptozoomorphic Hierograms” Exhibition

we on Earth merely lucky that it happens to be confined to our atmosphere, in our lifetime.

Higgs is known primarily for his work as the sole lyricist and frontman of the band Lungfish, a four-piece dedicated to charting, in this listener’s estimation, nothing short of the evolution of all species, known and unknown.

Daniel Higgs

Daniel Higgs

That the band has undertaken this pursuit in the guise of a humble rock outfit, in the absence of any public relations fanfare, metanarrative, or manifesto has been enough to endear them to tens of thousands. They are enshrined as one of America’s last true folk bands, and Higgs anointed as a patron saint to artistic purity.

In recent years, Higgs has released a number of solo outings that can only be described as the ultimate in isolation, worlds away from the hypnotic, communal rock of his band. On Atomic Yggdrasil

Daniel Higgs

Daniel Higgs

Tarot, Higgs weaves meditative, casually ruptured drones using acoustic and electric guitar, upright pianos, banjo and jew’s harp, recorded entirely at home on cassette recorder. He pairs the music with a series of paintings that call to mind religious iconography passed through the disfiguring surrealism of Miro.

Stay Cold- Daniel Higgs

Stay Cold- Daniel Higgs

Higgs has wedded his music and his visual art into a singular being, meant to be encountered as a conjuring force similar to that of the tarot experience. The yggdrasil is the great tree of Norse myth that connects all worlds of cosmology.

Passing into Christian folklore, the tree is said to connect heaven and earth. In his relentless pursuit of the indivisible, Higgs travels

The Hieroglyphic Ideal- Daniel Higgs

The Hieroglyphic Ideal- Daniel Higgs

up and down this spine and hatches a new transubstantiation of sound and image into life-form.

Biography is from Thrill Jockey.

I wish I had room to put more of his art!  I hope you also enjoy my tribute piece as well!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 338.

Best,

Linda

The Rebirth of Yggdrasil- Tribute to Daniel Higgs Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

The Rebirth of Yggdrasil- Tribute to Daniel Higgs
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View The Rebirth of Yggdrasil- Tribute to Daniel Higgs Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
The Rebirth of Yggdrasil- Tribute to Daniel Higgs
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 The Rebirth of Yggdrasil- Tribute to Daniel Higgs Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
The Rebirth of Yggdrasil- Tribute to Daniel Higgs
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 The Rebirth of Yggdrasil- Tribute to Daniel Higgs Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
The Rebirth of Yggdrasil- Tribute to Daniel Higgs
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 The Rebirth of Yggdrasil- Tribute to Daniel Higgs Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
The Rebirth of Yggdrasil- Tribute to Daniel Higgs
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 336- Henry Darger Jr.- In the Realms of the Unreal

It’s Day 336 and I’ve been excited to do this artist for a long time.  I knew it was going to be challenging and I think I had too many ideas that my brain got a bit jumbled.  Well, I finally did it and I think I’m pretty happy with it.  Please join me in honoring Henry Darger Jr. today!

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

Hands of Fire- Henry Darger Jr.

Hands of Fire- Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Joseph Darger, Jr. (April 12, 1892 – April 13, 1973) was a reclusive American writer and artist who worked as a hospital custodian in Chicago, Illinois. He has become famous for his posthumously discovered 15,145-page, single-spaced fantasy manuscript called The Story of the Vivian Girls, in What is Known as the Realms of the Unreal, of the Glandeco-Angelinian War Storm, Caused by the Child Slave Rebellion, along with several hundred drawings and watercolor paintings illustrating the story.

The visual subject matter of his work ranges from idyllic scenes in Edwardian interiors and tranquil flowered landscapes populated by children and fantastic creatures, to scenes of horrific terror and

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

carnage depicting young children being tortured and massacred. Much of his artwork is mixed media with collage elements. Darger’s artwork has become one of the most celebrated examples of outsider art.

Darger was born in Chicago, Illinois, to Rosa Fullman and Henry Darger, Sr. on April 12, 1892. Cook County records show that he was born at his home, located at 350 W. 24th Street. When he was four years old, his mother died of puerperal fever after having given birth to a daughter, who was given up for adoption; Henry Darger never knew his sister. One of Darger’s biographers, the art historian and psychologist John M. MacGregor, discovered that Rosa had two children before Henry, but did not discover their whereabouts.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

By Darger’s own report, his father, Henry Sr., was kind and reassuring to him, and they lived together until 1900. In that year, the crippled and impoverished Darger Sr. had to be taken to live at St. Augustine’s Catholic Mission home and his son was placed in a Catholic boys’ home. Darger Sr. died in 1905, and his son was institutionalized in the Illinois Asylum for Feeble-Minded Children in Lincoln, Illinois, with the diagnosis, according to Stephen Prokopoff, that “Little Henry’s heart is not in the right place”. According to John MacGregor, the diagnosis was actually “self-abuse” (at the time, this term was a euphemism for masturbation, rather than self-injury).

Darger himself felt that much of his problem was being able to see through adult lies and becoming a ‘smart-aleck’ as a result, which often led to his being disciplined by teachers and ganged up on by classmates. He also went through a lengthy phase of feeling compelled to make strange noises (perhaps as a result of Tourette Syndrome) which irritated others. The Lincoln asylum’s practices included forced labor and severe punishments, which Darger seems to have worked into In the Realms of the Unreal. He later said that, to be

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

fair, there were also good times there, he enjoyed some of the work, and he had friends as well as enemies. While he was there, he received word that his father had died. A series of attempted escapes ended successfully in 1908, the 16-year-old returned to Chicago and, with the help of his godmother, found menial employment in a Catholic hospital and in this fashion continued to support himself until his retirement in 1963.

Except for a brief stint in the U.S. Army during World War I, his life took on a pattern that seems to have varied little: he attended Mass daily, frequently returning for as many as five services; he collected and saved a bewildering array of trash from the streets. His dress was shabby, although he attempted to keep his clothes clean and mended. He was largely solitary; his one close friend, William Schloeder, was of like mind on the subject of protecting abused and neglected children, and the pair proposed founding a “Children’s Protective Society”, which would put such children up for adoption to loving families. Schloeder left Chicago sometime in the mid-1930s, but he and Darger stayed in touch through letters until Schloeder’s death in 1959. Darger biographer Jim Elledge suggests that Darger and Schloeder may have had a romantic relationship while Schloeder lived in Chicago.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

In 1930, Darger settled into a second-floor room on Chicago’s North Side, at 851 W. Webster Avenue, in the Lincoln Park section of the city, near the DePaul Universitycampus. It was in this room, for 43 years, that Darger imagined and wrote his massive tomes (in addition to a 10-year daily weather journal and assorted diaries) until his death in April 1973 in St. Augustine’s Catholic Mission home (the same institution in which his father had died). In the last entry in his diary, he wrote: “January 1, 1971. I had a very poor nothing like Christmas. Never had a good Christmas all my life, nor a good new year, and now… I am very bitter but fortunately not revengeful, though I feel should be how I am…”

Darger is buried in All Saints Cemetery in Des Plaines, Illinois, in a plot called “The Old People of the Little Sisters of the Poor Plot”. Darger’s headstone is inscribed “Artist” and “Protector of Children”.

In the Realms of the Unreal is a 15,145-page work bound in fifteen immense, densely typed volumes (with three of them consisting of several hundred illustrations, scroll-like watercolor paintings on paper derived from magazines and coloring books) created over six decades. The majority of the book, The Story of the Vivian Girls,

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

in What is Known as the Realms of the Unreal, of the Glandeco-Angelinian War Storm Caused by the Child Slave Rebellion, follows the adventures of the daughters of Robert Vivian, seven princesses of the Christian nation of Abbieannia who assist a daring rebellion against the evil regime of child slavery imposed by John Manley and the Glandelinians.

Children take up arms in their own defense and are often slain in battle or viciously tortured by the Glandelinian overlords. The elaborate mythology includes the setting of a large planet, around which Earth orbits as a moon (where most people are Christian and mostly Catholic), and a species called the “Blengigomeneans” (or Blengins for short), gigantic winged beings with curved horns who occasionally take human or part-human form, even disguising themselves as children. They are usually benevolent, but some Blengins are extremely suspicious of all humans, due to Glandelinian atrocities. Darger illustrated his stories using a technique of traced images cut from magazines and catalogues, arranged in large panoramic landscapes and painted in watercolours, some as large as 30 feet wide and painted on both sides. He wrote himself into the narrative as the children’s protector.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

Once released from the asylum, Darger repeatedly attempted to adopt a child, but his efforts failed. Images of children often served as his inspiration, particularly a portrait from the Chicago Daily News from May 9, 1911: a five-year-old murder victim, named Elsie Paroubek. The girl had left home on April 8 of that year telling her mother she was going to visit her aunt around the corner from her home. She was last seen listening to an organ grinder with her cousins. Her body was found a month later in a sanitary district channel near the screen guards of the powerhouse at Lockport, Illinois. An autopsy found she had probably been suffocated—not strangled, as is often stated in articles about Darger. Paroubek’s disappearance and murder, her funeral, and the subsequent investigation, were the subjects of a huge amount of coverage in the Daily News and other papers at the time.

This newspaper photo was part of a growing personal archive of clippings Darger had been gathering. There is no indication that the murder or the news photo and article had any particular significance for Darger, until one day he could not find it. Writing in his journal at the time, he began to process this forfeiture of yet another

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

child, lamenting that “the huge disaster and calamity” of his loss “will never be atoned for”, but “shall be avenged to the uttermost limit”. According to his autobiography, Darger believed the photo was among several items that were stolen when his locker at work was broken into. He never found his copy of the photograph again. Because he couldn’t remember the exact date of its publication, he couldn’t locate it in the newspaper archive. He carried out an elaborate series of novenas and other prayers for the picture to be returned.

The fictive war that was sparked by Darger’s loss of the newspaper photograph of the murdered girl, whose killer was never found, became Darger’s magnum opus. He had been working on some version of the novel before this time (he makes reference to an early draft which was also lost or stolen), but now it became an all-consuming creation.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

In The Realms of the Unreal, Elsie is imagined as Annie Aronburg, the leader of the first child slave rebellion. “The assassination of the child labor rebel Annie Aronburg… was the most shocking child murder ever caused by the Glandelinian Government” and was the cause of the war. Through their sufferings, valiant deeds and exemplary holiness, the Vivian Girls are hoped to be able to help bring about a triumph of Christianity. Darger provided two endings to the story, one in which the Vivian Girls and Christianity are triumphant and another in which they are defeated and the godless Glandelinians reign.

Darger’s human figures were rendered largely by tracing, collage, or photo enlargement from popular magazines and children’s books (much of the “trash” he collected was old magazines and newspapers, which he clipped for source material). Some of his favorite figures were the Coppertone Girl and Little Annie Rooney. He is praised for his natural gift for composition and the brilliant use of color in his watercolors. The images of daring escapes, mighty battles, and painful torture are reminiscent not only of epic films such as Birth of a Nation (which Darger might easily have seen) but of events in Catholic history; the text makes it clear that the child victims are heroic martyrs like the early saints.

One idiosyncratic feature of Darger’s artwork is its apparent transgenderism. Many of his subjects which appear

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

to be girls are shown to have penises when unclothed or partially clothed. Darger biographer Jim Elledge speculates that this represents a reflection of Darger’s own childhood issues with gender identity and homosexuality.  Darger’s second novel, Crazy House, deals with these subjects more explicitly.

In a paraphrase of the Declaration of Independence, Darger wrote of children’s right “to play, to be happy, and to dream, the right to normal sleep of the night’s season, the right to an education, that we may have an equality of opportunity for developing all that are in us of mind and heart”.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

A second work of fiction, provisionally titled Crazy House: Further Adventures in Chicago, contains over 10,000 handwritten pages. Written after The Realms, it takes that epic’s major characters—the seven Vivian sisters and their companion/secret brother, Penrod—and places them in Chicago, with the action unfolding during the same years as that of the earlier book. Begun in 1939, it is a tale of a house that is possessed by demons and haunted by ghosts, or has an evil consciousness of its own. Children disappear into the house and are later found brutally murdered. The Vivians and a male friend are sent to investigate and discover that the murders are the work of evil ghosts. The girls go about exorcising the place, but have to resort to arranging for a full-scale Holy Mass to be held in each room before the house is clean. They do this repeatedly, but it never works. The narrative ends mid-scene, with Darger having just been rescued from the Crazy House.

In 1968, Darger became interested in tracing some of his frustrations back to his childhood and began writing The History of My Life. Spanning eight volumes, the book only spends 206 pages detailing Darger’s early life before veering off into 4,672 pages of fiction about a huge twister called “Sweetie Pie”, probably based on memories of a tornado he had witnessed in 1908.

Despite Darger’s unusual lifestyle and strange behavior, he has not generally been considered mentally ill. This

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

topic is addressed in the biographical film In the Realms of the Unreal, in which Darger, while certainly described as eccentric, is also mentioned to be “in complete control of his life”. MacGregor, in the appendix to his book on Darger, speculates that the most fitting diagnosis is autism, of an Asperger syndrome type.

Darger’s landlords, Nathan and Kiyoko Lerner, came across his work shortly before his death, a day after his birthday, on April 13, 1973. Nathan Lerner, an accomplished photographer whose long career the New York Times wrote “was inextricably bound up in the history of visual culture in Chicago”, immediately recognized the artistic merit of Darger’s work. By this time Darger was in the Catholic mission St. Augustine’s, operated by the Little Sisters of the Poor, where his father had died.

The Lerners took charge of the Darger estate, publicizing his work and contributing to projects such as the 2004 documentary In the Realms of the Unreal. In cooperation with Kiyoko Lerner, Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art dedicated the Henry Darger Room Collection in 2008 as part of its permanent collection. Darger has become internationally recognized thanks to the efforts of people who knew to save his works. After Nathan Lerner’s death in 1997, Kiyoko Lerner became the sole figure in charge of both her husband’s and Darger’s estates. The U.S. copyright representative for the Estate of Henry Darger and the Estate of Nathan Lerner is the Artists Rights Society.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

Darger is today one of the most famous figures in the history of outsider art. At the Outsider Art Fair, held every January in New York City, and at auction, his work is among the highest-priced of any self-taught artist. The American Folk Art Museum, New York City, opened a Henry Darger Study Center in 2001. His work now commands upwards of $80,000.

Since his death in 1973 and the discovery of his massive opus, and especially since the 1990s, there have been many references in popular culture to Darger’s work by other visual artists including, but not limited to, artists of comics and graphic novels; numerous popular songs; a 1999 book-length poem, Girls on the Run, by John Ashbery; a multi-player online game, SiSSYFiGHT 2000, and a 2004 multimedia piece by choreographer Pat Graney incorporating Darger images. Jesse Kellerman’s 2008 novel The Genius took part of its inspiration from Darger’s story. These artists have variously drawn from and responded to Darger’s artistic style, his themes (especially the Vivian Girls, the young heroines of Darger’s massive illustrated novel), and the events in his life.

Jessica Yu’s 2004 documentary In the Realms of the Unreal details Darger’s life and artworks.

Comic book artist Scott McCloud refers to Darger’s work in his book Making Comics, while describing the danger artists encounter in the creation of a character’s back-story. McCloud says that complicated narratives can easily spin out of control when too much unseen information is built up around the characters.

Darger and his work have been an inspiration for several music artists. The Vivian Girls were an all-girl indie/punk trio from Brooklyn; “Henry Darger” is a song by Natalie Merchant on her album Motherland,

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

“Vivian Girls” is song by the band Wussy on their album Left for Dead. “The Vivian Girls Are Visited in the Night by Saint Dargarius and His Squadron of Benevolent Butterflies” is a song by Sufjan Stevens on his album The Avalanche: Outtakes and Extras from the Illinois Album, “The Story of the Vivian Girls” is a song by Comet Gain on their 2005 album City Fallen Leaves, and “Segue: In the Realms of the Unreal” is song by the band …And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead on their album So Divided, “The Vivian Girls” is a 1979 song by Snakefinger (Philip Lithman Roth) also recorded by the Monks of Doom on their album The Cosmodemonic Telegraph Company, “Vivian girls” is a song by the band Fucked Up on their album Hidden World, and “Lost girls” (about Darger’s work) is a song by Tilly and the Wall on their album Bottoms of Barrels. On their 1994 album Triple Mania II, San Diego’s industrial noise performance outfit Crash Worship reworked several Darger images and screen printed them on a copper foil foldout discfolio; as well as the insert and disc.

Darger is the subject of a radio play, Darger and the Detective, by Mike Walker performed by members of the Chicago-based Steppenwolf Theatre Company for BBC Radio 3.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I love his story so I decided to include all the the page.  I hope you enjoy my piece for today and I will see you tomorrow on Day 336.

Best,

Linda

Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr. Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Side-View Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr. Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Side-View
Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr. Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr. Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr. Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

 

Day 226- Irving Shapiro- Artist and Educator

It’s Day 226 and today I wanted to work with watercolors again.  I’m still learning techniques and am constantly learning more as I’m painting.  Join me in honoring Irving Shapiro today.  I was really drawn to his style of watercolors. 🙂  Below is his short bio and some notes about his techniques.  I’ve also included his obituary from the Chicago Tribune at the bottom.  I could not find a photo of this man so I did the best I could!

How to Make a Painting- by Irving Shapiro Thinking about getting this one!

How to Make a Painting- by Irving Shapiro
Thinking about getting this one!

Irving Shapiro (1927 – 1994)

Irving Shapiro

Irving Shapiro

” A slightly false statement, yet fresh, is much better than a tiresomely truthful one”. My mentor, Irving Shapiro, on watercolor painting.  from An Interview with Eric Weigardt – Watercolorist

Irving Shapiro went out into nature to make sketches, color samples, and black-and-white photographs for his watercolors. Then, back in his studio, he would begin his large paintings. He believed that only the fewest of pencil lines should be used to give guidelines to the composition, which he designed in his head. First, he applied the main color washes to define the large areas of the painting. He preferred risking mistakes while being bold and fresh with the paint, rather than risking getting bogged down in static details.

This painting shows a glimpse of the grasses, plants, and dead limbs that carpet the floor of a forest

Forest Floor- Irving Shapiro

Forest Floor- Irving Shapiro

in summer. The artist used the white of the paper and dark washes to show sunlight piercing the forest canopy to cast shadows of the leaves.

Irving Shapiro
Irving Shapiro was born in Chicago. He studied painting at the Art Institute and the American Academy of Art, both in Chicago. He taught art at the Academy from 1945 until he retired. Many artists working in watercolor today mention Shapiro as one of their teachers.

Watercolor

In progress...

In progress…

The characteristic of watercolor painting that sets it apart from other types of painting is its transparency. Watercolor consists of a thin mixture of paint pigment (from a tube or a solid block) suspended in water. As the brush lays down the paint, often on wet paper, the color spreads rapidly, leaving a transparent layer of color on the paper. A watercolor painting is built of controlled areas of wash.

Techniques
White areas of a watercolor painting are made by covering them with a layer of liquid rubber calledmasque instead of by using white paint. The masque is pulled off after the painting is finished and dried. That is how the tiny twigs of Forest Floor were done.

A dry brush technique paints stronger color onto dry paper. Artists use this for adding details such as the small, dark twigs in the background of this painting.

Tools
Shapiro used 300 or 400 pound paper, heavy enough to stay flat without stretching or taping down.

Irving Shapiro

Irving Shapiro

He used numbers eight and twelve round sable brushes and flat camel’s hair brushes one and two inches wide. He chose these colors for his palette: alizarin crimson golden, light vermilion, cadmium orange, light cadmium yellow, mauve, cobalt violet, thalo-blue, ultramarine, cerulean, lemon yellow, sap green, thalo green, yellow ochre, burnt sienna, burnt umber, sepia, and Payne’s gray.

Shapiro, Irving. “Irving Shapiro Says Watercolor Has Gender”American Artist. April, 1959. Pp. 60, 92.

From the Chicago Tribune below.

Irving Shapiro

Irving Shapiro

Irving Shapiro, 67, an artist, educator and author, was associated with the American Academy of Art for 50 years and served for many years as its director and president.

A resident of Highland Park, he died Tuesday in Whitehall North Convalescent Home in Deerfield.

His watercolors have been exhibited throughout the United States, Europe and, most recently, in China. His works hang in galleries, in hundreds of corporate offices and in private collections.

Mr. Shapiro in 1992 was given the Artist’s Achievement Award in Watercolor by the American Artist Magazine. He has won the High Winds Medal and the Mary Litt Medal at juried shows of the American Watercolor Society and was one of the youngest artists ever admitted to signature membership in that organization.

In addition to teaching and to his administrative responsibilities at the academy, he has lectured in

Irving Shapiro Signature

Irving Shapiro Signature

the U.S., Italy, France and Switzerland. Six of his demonstrations in watercolor painting have been videotaped and distributed widely.

His book, “How to Make a Painting: Planning, Procedures and Techniques in Watercolor,” has been translated into eight languages.

Mr. Shapiro has served on the boards of the Palette and Chisel Academy of Art, the Municipal Art League, the Midwest Watercolor Society and the American Watercolor Society, New York.

“He was a very dignified gentleman,” his wife, Syril, said. “He was an educator all his life and a man with the soul of an artist.”

Survivors, besides his wife, include three daughters, Paula Winter, Diane Golin and Gail; a son, Dan; a brother; and nine grandchildren.

Services for Mr. Shapiro will be 11 a.m. Friday in Shalom Memorial Park, U.S. Highway 12, Palatine.

~

I hope you enjoy my piece for today!  I’m happy with it, but I still have a ton to learn when it comes to watercolors.  I really want to try my hand at a huge piece.  Maybe something photographic or more abstract.  It’s definitely a medium I love working with, but it still has it’s mysteries.  It’s going to be fun experimenting for sure!  I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 227!

Best, Linda

The Wild- Tribute to Irving Shapiro Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor on Canvas

The Wild- Tribute to Irving Shapiro
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor on Canvas

Side-View The Wild- Tribute to Irving Shapiro Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor on Canvas

Side-View
The Wild- Tribute to Irving Shapiro
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 1 The Wild- Tribute to Irving Shapiro Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 1
The Wild- Tribute to Irving Shapiro
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 2 The Wild- Tribute to Irving Shapiro Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 2
The Wild- Tribute to Irving Shapiro
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 3 The Wild- Tribute to Irving Shapiro Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 3
The Wild- Tribute to Irving Shapiro
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor on Canvas

Day 225- Mimmo Paladino- Beyond Avant-Garde

It’s Day 225 and I’ve been wanting to paint a colorful piece today.  I’m also kind of pooped because of various activities…including a nice doggie hike in the heat today!  Join me in celebrating Mimmo Paladino today!

Mimmo Paladino

Mimmo Paladino

Mimmo Paladino, Italia, 1948

Mimmo Paladino

Mimmo Paladino (born 18 December 1948) is an Italian sculptor, painter and printmaker.

Mimmo Paladino was born Domenico Paladino in Paduli, Campania, southern Italy. He attended the Liceo Artistico of Benevento (Benevento Art High School) from 1964 to 1968, when minimalism and conceptualism dominated the international art scene. He played a leading part in the international revival of painting towards the end of the 1970s.

His first work, in line with the prevailing conceptual climate at

Mimmo Paladino- Calce 1995

Mimmo Paladino- Calce 1995

the time, showed an interest in photography, but in 1977 he had already moved on to the creation of two major tempera murals, one at the Toselli gallery in Milan and one at the Lucio Amelio gallery in Naples.

Mimmo Paladino, Italia, 1948

Mimmo Paladino

In 1980, he exhibited his work at the Venice Biennale, in the “Aperto 80” exhibition. Other Italian artists present included Sandro Chia, Francesco Clemente, Enzo Cucchi and Nicola de Maria: the leaders of the Transavantgarde movement. However, it was largely thanks to a picture exhibition held in a range of Central European museums, from the Kunsthalle in Basel, to the Museum Folkwang in Essen and the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, that Paladino finally consolidated his international fame. Meanwhile, two personal exhibitions were held simultaneously in New York that year, by Annina Nosei and Marian Goodman, extending his fame to the United States.

In 1981, the Kunstmuseum in Basel organised a major

Mimmo Paladino- Untitled Green Painting

Mimmo Paladino- Untitled Green Painting

personal exhibition of paintings, curated by Dieter Koepplin. This was then also put on at the Kestner-Gesellschaft inHanover, the Mannheimer Kunstverein in Mannheim and the Groninger Museum in Groningen. The Galleria d’Arte Moderna in Bologna also dedicated a personal exhibition to him that year.

In 2001, the general catalogue of his graphic work was published (Opera Grafica 1974-2001), curated by Enzo di Martino, for Art of this Century, New York – Paris. The Centro d’Arte Contemporanea Luigi Pecci, Prato, granted him the most comprehensive retrospective exhibition ever organised by an Italian museum, curated by Bruno Corà (2002).

The Perfect Room- Mimmo Paladino

The Perfect Room- Mimmo Paladino

In 2003, together with Sandro Chia, Francesco Clemente, Enzo Cucchi, and Nicola de Maria, he put on “Transavanguardia 1979-1985” at the Castello di Rivoli Museo di Arte Contemporanea, curated by Ida Gianelli. He also put on personal exhibitions at the Reggia di Caserta, and in Galleria Scognamiglio in Naples and Galleria Valentina Bonomo, Rome (2004). He presented a travelling exhibition on Pinocchio at modern art museums across eight Japanese cities, in Venice’s 17th-century Scola dei Battioro and then at the Museo Civico di Udine, the Museo di Palazzo Pio a Carpi and in Rotterdam (2004–2006).

In 2004, he created the doors for the Padre Pio church in San Giovanni Rotondo, designed by Renzo Piano. In 2005 he exhibited at the Museum der Moderne Rupertinum in Salzburg, and the Loggetta Lombardesca in Ravenna put on “Paladino in Scena”, a major exhibition of his theatre work, curated by Claudio Spadoni. In June that year, he put on an exhibition of major sculptures at the Galleria Internazionale d’Arte Moderna Ca’ Pesaro in Venice, curated by Enzo di Martino, for the Biennale.

At the end of 2005, he put on a major exhibition dedicated to Cervantes’ Don Quixote, featuring

Matemática 2 de Mimmo Paladino

Matemática 2 de Mimmo Paladino

Mimmo Paladino, Mathematica Portfolio with 6 Etchings.

Mimmo Paladino, Mathematica Portfolio with 6 Etchings.

paintings, sculptures, drawings and a film, at the Museo Capodimonte in Naples. As requested by Marco Müller, the film was presented at the 2006 Venice Film Festival, with great success. That year, he also created the doors for the San Giovanni Battista church in Lecce (designed by Franco Purini), concluded the intervention in piazza dei Conti Guidi, in Vinci, and exhibited at the Cardi and Christian Stein Gallery in Milan, and the Waddington Gallery in London.

In 2007, he produced two theatre set designs for OEdipus Rex and Cavalleria rusticana, for the Teatro Regio in Turin, and put on a personal exhibition at the Galleria Civica in Modena. In 2008 he presented a major installation at the Museo dell’Ara Pacis in Rome, set to music by Brian Eno. That year, the University of Lugano granted him an honoris causa degree in Architecture. In June 2008, “Porta di Lampedusa – Porta d’Europa”, an important monument in memory of migrants deceased at sea, was inaugurated.

In 2009, a group of his sculptures was shown “en plein air” in Orta San Giulio, Lake of Orta, in a show curated by Flavio Arensi; among the various works it was a horse floating to the shore in front of Villa Bossi, the Town Hall. On 10 April the same year he installed a big blue horse over four metres high (13 feet) at the Amphitheatre of Vittoriale degli Italiani di Gardone Riviera (BS), house-museum of the novelist Gabriele D’Annunzio.

He is interested in the relationship between visual art and sound and has worked with the sound

Mimmo Paladino

Mimmo Paladino

artist Brian Eno on the installation I Dormienti for the Roundhouse, London in 1999 and on a piece for the Ara Pacis Museum in Rome in 2008. Paladino’s works have been featured in Piran Coastal Galleries.

Paladino currently lives and works in Rome, Paduli and Mattinata.

Partial biography is from wikipedia.

I had a great time painting today’s piece.  I hope you enjoy it!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 226!

Best, Linda

Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

photo 2 photo 3 photo 4 photo 5

 

Day 224- Thornton Dial- The Hard Truth

It’s Day 224 and today’s piece is an example of an artwork that I would’ve never done if I wasn’t inspired by today’s artist! I had so much fun doing today’s tribute. Join me in honoring Thornton Dial today.

Thornton Dial

Thornton Dial

Beginning of Life in Yellow Jungle- Thornton Dial

Beginning of Life in Yellow Jungle- Thornton Dial

Thornton Dial was born in 1928 in Emelle, Alabama. Dial is a self-taught artist who came to prominence in the United States in the late 1980s.

Thornton Dial was born to Mattie Bell in 1928 in Emelle, Alabama. He lived with his mother until he was around three when Dial and his half-brother Arthur moved in with their second cousin, Buddy Jake Dial, who was a farmer. When Thornton moved in with Buddy Jake, he farmed and learned about the

Close Up- Beginning of Life in Yellow Jungle- Thornton Dial

Close Up- Beginning of Life in Yellow Jungle- Thornton Dial

sculptures that Buddy Jake made from items lying around the yard, an experience that greatly influenced him. Dial grew up in poverty and without the presence of his father. This poverty led him and his siblings to create toys from the discarded objects around them.

Thornton Dial Close up of mixed media piece

Thornton Dial
Close up of mixed media piece

In 1940, Dial moved to Bessemer, Alabama. When he arrived in Bessemer, he noticed the art along the way in people’s yard and was amazed at the level of craft exhibited. He married Clara Mae Murrow in 1951. They have five children, one of which died of cerebral palsy. He was cousins with the late artist Ronald Lockett.

His principal place of employment was the Pullman Company in Bessemer, Alabama, until the company closed its doors in 1981. After the Pullman factory shut down, Dial began to dedicate himself to his art for his own pleasure. In 1987, he was introduced to Bill Arnett, a local art collector of great influence who brought Dial’s work to public attention.

In a 1997 profile about Dial, the New York

Thornton Dial

Thornton Dial

Times mentions a show entitled “Bearing Witness: African-American Vernacular Art of the South.” In the article, Dial is described as an artist who “can barely read and write” but who friends describe as “smart as a fox” and good at math, with an ability to accurately estimate the size of a canvas by eye”.

Dial has lived, worked, and created art in Alabama for his entire life. He continues to create works of art and shows them throughout the United States.

Thornton Dial met another self-taught artist Lonnie Holley, who introduced Dial to Atlanta collector and art historian William Arnett. Arnett, who focuses on African-American vernacular art and artists, brought Dial’s

Drummond Mines The Strip Mining Business- Thornton Dial

Drummond Mines The Strip Mining Business- Thornton Dial

work to national prominence. The art historian has also brought Lonnie Holley, the Gee’s Bend Quilters and others to the attention of the United States. Arnett also helped to create the Tinwood publishing company in 1996, along with his sons Paul and Matt.

Dial’s work addresses urgent issues in the realm of history and politics in the United States, such as war, racism, bigotry and homelessness. He constructs large-scale assemblages using cast-away objects, anything from rope to bones to buckets. Some of his compositions are delicate drawings whilst others are dramatic and dark paintings which tend to be large-scale with strong use of colour and fluid forms. Combining paint and found materials Dial weaves together an interpretation of history and politics in the United States. David C. Driskell, an artist and art historian of African American art, points to one of Dial’s symbolic creatures, the tiger. The Tiger represents the struggle to survive through difficult events and eventually the tiger symbolizes the African American struggle to obtain equal rights in the United States.

In 2011, Dial’s work was profiled in a four-page story in Time Magazine, where art and architecture

DON'T MATTER HOW RAGGLY THE FLAG, IT STILL GOT TO TIE US TOGETHER Thornton Dial

DON’T MATTER HOW RAGGLY THE FLAG, IT STILL GOT TO TIE US TOGETHER
Thornton Dial

critic Richard Lacayo argued that Dial’s work belongs to the category of art and should not be pigeon-holed into narrowly defined categories:

“Dial’s work has sometimes been described as “outsider art”, a term that attempts to cover the product of everyone from naive painters like Grandma Moses to institutionalized lost souls like Martín Ramírez and full-bore obsessives like Henry Darger, the Chicago janitor who spent a lifetime secretly producing a private fantasia of little girls in peril. But if there’s one lesson to take away from “Hard Truths: The Art of Thornton Dial,” a triumphant new retrospective at the Indianapolis Museum of Art, it’s that Dial, 82, doesn’t belong within even the broad confines of that category….What he does can be discussed as art, just art, no surplus notions of outsiderness required….And not just that, but some of the most assured, delightful and powerful art around.”

Thornton Dial with Arnett in front of one of Dial's assemblages.

Thornton Dial with Arnett in front of one of Dial’s assemblages.

Michael Kimmelman, from the New York Times, called Dial “preternaturally gifted,” and said he looks “dumfoundingly adept to some of us because his energy and fluent line, abstracted in maelstroms of color, easily call to mind Pollock and de Kooning,” while New York Times reporter Carol Kino described Dial’s “work’s look, ambition, and obvious intellectual reach hew[ing] closely to that of many other modern and contemporary masters, from Jackson Pollock and Robert Rauschenberg to Jean-Michel Basquiat.”

In 1993, Dial’s work was the subject of a large exhibition that was presented simultaneously at the New Museum of Contemporary Art and the American Folk Art Museum in New York. In 2000, the artist’s work was included in the Whitney Biennial, and in 2005-06, the Museum of Fine Art; Houston presented a major exhibition entitled “Thornton Dial in the 21st Century”. Dial’s works can be found in many notable public and private collections, including those of, among other institutions, the High Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; the American Folk Art Museum, New York; the Philadelphia Museum of Art; The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C.; the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington D.C.; and the Indianapolis Museum of Art.

Biography is from wikipedia.

Getting everything onto the canvas!  It was a challenge!

Getting everything onto the canvas! It was a challenge!

I hope you enjoy my piece in honor of Mr. Dial today.  It was a joy to work with all these strange materials and a challenge on how to assemble it and actually get it onto the canvas.  I used a doll, a small plastic baby figure, sticks, sand, rocks, hot glue, feathers and leaves. After getting it onto the canvas I primed it with white spray and then painted it.  Whew!

I will see you tomorrow on Day 225! 

Best, Linda

We Are All Children of the Earth- Tribute to Thornton Dial Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

We Are All Children of the Earth- Tribute to Thornton Dial
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View We Are All Children of the Earth- Tribute to Thornton Dial Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View
We Are All Children of the Earth- Tribute to Thornton Dial
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 We Are All Children of the Earth- Tribute to Thornton Dial Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
We Are All Children of the Earth- Tribute to Thornton Dial
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 We Are All Children of the Earth- Tribute to Thornton Dial Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
We Are All Children of the Earth- Tribute to Thornton Dial
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 We Are All Children of the Earth- Tribute to Thornton Dial Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
We Are All Children of the Earth- Tribute to Thornton Dial
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Day 171- Daniel Johnston- The Beast of Times

It’s Day 171 and I had a lot of fun doing today’s artist.  I couldn’t wait to pay tribute to Daniel Johnston.  I’m a fan of his artwork and music.  In the past, every time I’d start a new job I’d listen to “First Day At Work” in the morning.  Join me in honoring him today!

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Dale Johnston (born January 22, 1961) is an American singer, songwriter, musician, and artist. Johnston was the subject of the 2005 documentary The Devil and Daniel Johnston. He currently lives in Waller, Texas.

Johnston was born in Sacramento, California, and grew up in the northern panhandle of West

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Johnston

Virginia between Ohio and Pennsylvania near Chester and New Cumberland, West Virginia. He began recording music in the late 1970s on a $59 Sanyomonaural Boombox, singing and playing piano and chord organ. Following graduation from Oak Glen High School, Johnston spent a few weeks at Abilene Christian University in West Texas, but soon dropped out. Later he attended the East Liverpool branch of Kent State University.

Johnston’s musical work gained some notoriety when he moved to Austin, Texas. Johnston began to attract the attention of the local press and gained a following augmented in numbers by his habit of handing out tapes to people he met. Live performances were well-attended and hotly anticipated.

Big Joe- Daniel Johnston

Big Joe- Daniel Johnston

His local standing led to him being featured in a 1985 episode of the MTV program The Cutting Edge featuring performers from Austin’s “New Sincerity” music scene. Subsequently he performed at the 1985 Woodshock music festival in Austin, where he was featured in a short documentary of the festival, Woodshock.

In 1988, Johnston visited New York City and recorded 1990 with producer Kramer at his Noise

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Johnston

New York studio. It was released in 1990 on Kramer’s Shimmy-Disc label. This was Johnston’s first experience in a professional recording environment after a decade of releasing home-made cassette recordings. His mental health further deteriorated during the making of 1990. In 1989 Johnston released the album It’s Spooky in collaboration with Half Japanese singer Jad Fair.

In 1990, Johnston played at a music festival in Austin, Texas. On the way back to West Virginia on a small, private two-seater plane piloted by his father Bill, Johnston had amanic psychotic episode believing he was Casper the Friendly Ghost and removed the key from the plane’s ignition and threw it out of the plane. His father, a former Air Force pilot, managed to successfully crash-land the plane, even though “there was nothing down there but trees”. Although the plane was destroyed, Johnston and his father emerged with only minor injuries. As a result of this episode, Johnston was involuntarily committed to a mental hospital.

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Johnston

Interest in Johnston increased when Kurt Cobain was frequently photographed wearing a t-shirt featuring the cover image of Johnston’s album Hi, How Are You which music journalist Everett True gave him. Kurt Cobain listed Yip/Jump Music as one of his favorite albums in his journal in 1993. In spite of Johnston being resident in a mental hospital at the time, a bidding war to sign him ensued. He refused to sign a multi-album deal with Elektra Records because Metallica was on the label’s roster and he was convinced that they were of Satan and would hurt him. He also dropped his manager after having a psychotic episode at a Butthole Surfers concert. His manager, Kramer, called Johnston’s parents after the episode and was in turn fired because he thought: “they’ll put me in a looneybin”. Ultimately he signed with Atlantic Records in February 1994 and that September released Fun, produced by Paul Leary of Butthole Surfers. It was a commercial failure. In June 1996, Atlantic dropped Daniel from the label.

Johnston contributed two songs to the soundtrack for Larry Clark’s controversial 1995 film Kids,

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Johnston

produced by Folk Implosion and Sebadoh’s frontman, Lou Barlow. Johnston later covered Schoolhouse Rock!’s “Unpack Your Adjectives” for a compilation of the popular education songs called Schoolhouse Rock! Rocks in 1996.

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Johnston

In 2004, he released The Late Great Daniel Johnston: Discovered Covered, a two-disc compilation. The first disc featured many artists, such as Tom Waits, Beck, TV on the Radio, Jad Fair, Eels, Bright Eyes, Calvin Johnson, Death Cab for Cutie, Sparklehorse, Mercury Rev and The Flaming Lips covering songs written by Johnston. The second disc featured Johnston’s original recordings of the songs.

In 2005, Texas-based theater company Infernal Bridegroom Productions received a Multi-Arts Production/MAP Fund grant to work with Johnston to create a rock operabased on his music, titled Speeding Motorcycle.

A 2005, Dutch documentary about Johnston for the TV series R.A.M. was followed in 2006 by The Devil and Daniel Johnston. Jeff Feuerzeig’s documentary, four years in the making, collated some of the vast amount of recorded material Johnston (and in some case, others) had produced over the years to portray his life and music. The film won high praise, receiving the Director’s Award at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival. The film also inspired more interest in Johnston’s work, and increased his pull as a touring artist.

In 2006, Johnston’s own Eternal Yip Eye Music label released his first greatest hits compilation, Welcome to My World. He also appeared as

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Johnston

musical guest on The Henry Rollins Show on which he performed “Mask” and “Care Less” (the latter was exclusive to the internet).

Through the next few years Johnston toured extensively across the world, and continued to attract press attention. In 2008, Dick Johnston, Daniel’s brother and manager, revealed that “a movie deal based on the artist’s life and music had been finalized with a tentative 2011 release.” He also said that a deal had been struck with the Conversecompany for a “signature series” Daniel Johnston shoe. Later, it was revealed by Dick Johnston that Converse had dropped the plan. In late 2008, Adjustable Productions released Johnston’s first concert DVD, The Angel and Daniel Johnston – Live at the Union Chapel, featuring a 2007 appearance in Islington, London.

On January 31, 2009, Daniel Johnston joined the band The Swell Season on a broadcast of Austin City Limits (previously recorded on September 28, 2008) to perform the song “Life in Vain”.

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Johnston

His latest album, Is and Always Was, was released on October 6, 2009 on his Eternal Yip Eye Music record label. In 2009, it was announced that Matt Groening had chosen Johnston to perform at the edition of the All Tomorrow’s Parties festival that he curated in May 2010 in Minehead, England. Later that year, he was invited by rock band Cage the Elephant to appear at Starry Nights Fest, an upstart music festival in Bowling Green, Kentucky. Johnston performed a brief solo set before being joined on stage by Cage, who backed performances of several songs, including “Speeding Motorcycle” and “True Love Will Find You in the End”.

In August 2012, male cosmetics company Axe used Daniel’s song “True Love Will Find You In The End” in a television advertisement marketing a men’s hair care product.

Johnston has been diagnosed with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

Biography is from wikipedia.

My painting for today was just created on the fly.  I didn’t want to overanalyze what I was going to draw so I just doodled something that was inspired by Daniel Johnston.  Now I want to go listen to some Daniel Johnston songs!  I hope you enjoy my piece for today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 172.  Best, Linda

Let's Be Best Friends- Tribute to Daniel Johnston Linda Cleary 2014 Pen & Ink/ Acrylic on Canvas

Let’s Be Best Friends- Tribute to Daniel Johnston
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen & Ink/ Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Let's Be Best Friends- Tribute to Daniel Johnston Linda Cleary 2014 Pen & Ink/ Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Let’s Be Best Friends- Tribute to Daniel Johnston
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen & Ink/ Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Let's Be Best Friends- Tribute to Daniel Johnston Linda Cleary 2014 Pen & Ink/ Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Let’s Be Best Friends- Tribute to Daniel Johnston
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen & Ink/ Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Let's Be Best Friends- Tribute to Daniel Johnston Linda Cleary 2014 Pen & Ink/ Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Let’s Be Best Friends- Tribute to Daniel Johnston
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen & Ink/ Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Let's Be Best Friends- Tribute to Daniel Johnston Linda Cleary 2014 Pen & Ink/ Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Let’s Be Best Friends- Tribute to Daniel Johnston
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen & Ink/ Acrylic on Canvas

 

 

Day Ninety-Nine- Max Bill- Smart Art

Day 99!  Having a busy day so I don’t have much time to post my blog…join me in celebrating Max Bill today!

Max Bill

Max Bill

 

Max Bill

Max Bill

Max Bill (22 December 1908 – 9 December 1994) was a Swiss architectartistpaintertypeface designerindustrial designer and graphic designer.

Bill was born in Winterthur. After an apprenticeship as a silversmith during 1924-

Max Bill

Max Bill

1927, Bill took up studies at the Bauhaus in Dessau under many teachers including Wassily KandinskyPaul Klee and Oskar Schlemmer from 1927 to 1929, after which he moved to Zurich.

After working on graphic designs for the few modern buildings being constructed, he built his first work, his own house and studio (1932–3) in Zurich-Höngg. From 1937 onwards he was a prime mover behind the Allianz group of Swiss artists.

Max Bill

Max Bill

Bill is widely considered the single most decisive influence on Swiss graphic design beginning in the 1950s with his theoretical writing and progressive work. His connection to the days of the Modern Movement gave him special authority. As an industrial designer, his work is characterized by a clarity of design and precise proportions. Examples are the elegant clocks and watches designed for Junghans, a

Max Bill

Max Bill

long-term client. Among Bill’s most notable product designs is the “Ulmer Hocker” of 1954, a stool that can also be used as a shelf element or a side table. Although the stool was a creation of Bill and Ulm school designer Hans Gugelot, it is often called “Bill Hocker” because the first sketch on a cocktail napkin was Bill’s work.

As a designer and artist, Bill sought to create forms which visually represent the New

Max Bill

Max Bill

Physics of the early 20th century. He sought to create objects so that the new science of form could be understood by the senses: that is as a concrete art. Thus Bill is not a rationalist -as is typically thought- but rather a phenomenologist. One who understands embodiment as the ultimate expression of a concrete art. In this way he is not so much extending as re-interpreting Bauhaus theory. Yet curiously Bill’s critical interpreters have not really grasped this fundamental issue. He made spare geometric paintings and spherical sculptures, some based on the Möbius strip, in stone, wood, metal and plaster. His architectural work included an office building in Germany, a radio studio in Zurich, and a bridge in eastern Switzerland.

Max Bill

Max Bill

He continued to produce architectural designs, such as those for a museum of contemporary art (1981) in Florence and for the Bauhaus Archive (1987) in Berlin. In 1982 he also entered a competition for an addition to the Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin, built to a design byMies van der Rohe. Pavillon-Skulptur (1979–83), a large granite sculpture, was installed adjacent to the Bahnhofstrasse, Zürich in 1983. As is often the case with modern art in public places, the installation generated some controversy. Endlose Treppe (1991), a sculpture made of North American granite, was designed for the philosopher Ernst Bloch.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today…and I’ll see you tomorrow…on DAY 100!  Wee.

Best, Linda

Blau und Grün- Tribute to Max Bill Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Blau und Grün- Tribute to Max Bill
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Blau und Grün- Tribute to Max Bill Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Blau und Grün- Tribute to Max Bill
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Blau und Grün- Tribute to Max Bill Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Blau und Grün- Tribute to Max Bill
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Blau und Grün- Tribute to Max Bill Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Blau und Grün- Tribute to Max Bill
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Blau und Grün- Tribute to Max Bill Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Blau und Grün- Tribute to Max Bill
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas