Day 313- Francisco De Goya- Light and Shadow

It’s Day 313 and I’m nervous because I’m paying tribute to one of my favorite painters today and there’s no way I’m going to paint exactly like him…but I tried and accomplished it somewhat.  I decided to focus on his “Black Paintings” series because of the intrigue and style.  I thought I could capture those a little easier since I only have one day!  I’m also working with acrylics and crackle paint and not oils so that’s another constraint.  Other than that I like how my piece turned out.  Join me in honoring Francisco De Goya today!

Self-Portrait at 69 years- Francisco De Goya

Self-Portrait at 69 years- Francisco De Goya

Don Manuel Osorio Manrique de Zuniga(oil on canvas)- Francisco De Goya

Don Manuel Osorio Manrique de Zuniga(oil on canvas)- Francisco De Goya

Francisco de Goya y Lucientes was born on March 30, 1746, in Fuendetodos, a village in northern Spain. The family later moved to Saragossa, where Goya’s father worked as a gilder. At about 14 young Goya was apprenticed to Jose Luzan, a local painter. Later he went to Italy to continue his study of art.

On returning to Saragossa in 1771, he painted frescoes for the local cathedral. These works, done

Old Men- Francisco De Goya

Old Men- Francisco De Goya

in the decorative rococo tradition, established Goya’s artistic reputation. In 1773 he married Josefa Bayeu, sister of Saragossa artist Francisco Bayeu. The couple had many children, but only one–a son, Xavier–survived to adulthood.

From 1775 to 1792 Goya painted cartoons (designs) for the royal tapestry factory in Madrid. This was the most important period in his artistic development. As a tapestry designer, Goya did his first genre paintings, or scenes from everyday life.

Lucientes- Francisco De Goya

Lucientes- Francisco De Goya

The experience helped him become a keen observer of human behavior. He was also influenced by neoclassicism, which was gaining favor over the rococo style. Finally, his study of the works of Velazquez in the royal collection resulted in a looser, more spontaneous painting technique.

At the same time, Goya achieved his first popular success. He became established as a portrait painter to the Spanish aristocracy. He was elected to the Royal Academy of San Fernando in 1780, named painter to the king in 1786, and made a court painter in 1789.

A serious illness in 1792 left Goya permanently deaf. Isolated from others by his deafness, he became increasingly occupied with the fantasies and inventions of his imagination and with critical and satirical observations of mankind. He evolved a bold, free new style close to caricature. In 1799 he

Satan Devouring His Son- Francisco De Goya

Satan Devouring His Son- Francisco De Goya

published the Caprichos, a series of etchings satirizing human folly and weakness. His portraits became penetrating characterizations, revealing their subjects as Goya saw them. In his religious frescoes he employed a broad, free style and an earthy realism unprecedented in religious art.

Monk Talking to an Old Woman- Francisco De Goya

Monk Talking to an Old Woman- Francisco De Goya

Goya served as director of painting at the Royal Academy from 1795 to 1797 and was appointed first Spanish court painter in 1799. During the Napoleonic invasion and the Spanish war of independence from 1808 to 1814, Goya served as court painter to the French. He expressed his horror of armed conflict in The Disasters of War, a series of starkly realistic etchings on the atrocities of war. They were not published until 1863, long after Goya’s death.

Upon the restoration of the Spanish monarchy, Goya was pardoned for serving the French, but his work was not favored by the new king. He was called before the Inquisition to explain his earlier portrait of The Naked Maja, one of the few nudes in Spanish art at that time.

In 1816 he published his etchings on bullfighting, called the Tauromaquia. From

Witches' Sabbath- Francisco De Goya

Witches’ Sabbath- Francisco De Goya

1819 to 1824 Goya lived in seclusion in a house outside Madrid. Free from court restrictions, he adopted an increasingly personal style. In the Black Paintings, executed on the walls of his house, Goya gave expression to his darkest visions. A similar nightmarish quality haunts the satirical Disparates, a series of etchings also called Proverbios.

Old Men Eating Soup- Francisco De Goya

Old Men Eating Soup- Francisco De Goya

In 1824, after the failure of an attempt to restore liberal government, Goya went into voluntary exile in France. He settled in Bordeaux, continuing to work until his death there on April 16, 1828. Today many of his best paintings hang in Madrid’s Prado art museum. (From WebMuseum)

Biography is from www.franciscodegoya.net.

I’m sure if you’re not familiar with Goya’s art it would seem gloomy, but keep in mind that I’m focusing on his black paintings…which I read somewhere that he never really intended on people seeing.  I love the story of these paintings and I think they are very haunting and wonderful!  I hope you enjoy my piece for today and I will see you tomorrow on Day 314!

Best,

Linda

 

Please Don't Kill Me- Tribute to Francisco De Goya Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Crackle Paint on Canvas

Please Don’t Kill Me- Tribute to Francisco De Goya
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Crackle Paint on Canvas

Side-View Please Don't Kill Me- Tribute to Francisco De Goya Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Crackle Paint on Canvas

Side-View
Please Don’t Kill Me- Tribute to Francisco De Goya
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Crackle Paint on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Please Don't Kill Me- Tribute to Francisco De Goya Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Crackle Paint on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Please Don’t Kill Me- Tribute to Francisco De Goya
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Crackle Paint on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Please Don't Kill Me- Tribute to Francisco De Goya Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Crackle Paint on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Please Don’t Kill Me- Tribute to Francisco De Goya
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Crackle Paint on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Please Don't Kill Me- Tribute to Francisco De Goya Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Crackle Paint on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Please Don’t Kill Me- Tribute to Francisco De Goya
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Crackle Paint on Canvas

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