Day 346- Kelly Moore- Absurdity is My Friend

It’s Day 346 and I have an improv show tonight and things to get done today…so I’ve finished my painting and I

Kelly Moore

Kelly Moore

am excited to honor today’s artist.  Please join me in honoring Kelly Moore today!  I’ve compiled information about him from various sites.

Kelly Moore

Kelly Moore

Kelly Moore is a Self Taught Artist who has no formal training or education in art. His Original, Expressive work has been referred to as Outsider Art, Art Brut, Raw Art and Visionary Art. His intuitive style and technique reflects a raw, primitive quality that is frequently juxtaposed with a startling innocence.

From the website- www.artistaday.com

Toxic Alternatives-Kelly Moore

Toxic Alternatives-Kelly Moore

i paint at the flea market

on the tesuque reservation in new mexico.

and i am a completely self taught full time artist.

Massacre- Kelly Moore

Massacre- Kelly Moore

folks have described my work

as art brut, folk and even outsider art

personally

i think i am my own

genre of art

i am a flea market artist

From his website. www.kellymoore.net.

Review of Absurdity is My Friend available on amazon.com.

Aliens- Kelly Moore

Aliens- Kelly Moore

This is a well produced book outlining the work of self-taught artist Kelly Moore from New Mexico, where he shows his work at the local Tesuque Pueblo Market. Large color reproductions fill the volume and are accompanied by Moore’s poems and photographs of his desert environment and surrounding landscape.

His colourful paintings are composed of a whole variety of strange figures and beasts often in a carnival

Desert Light- Kelly Moore

Desert Light- Kelly Moore

procession across the surface or set within a distant landscape.

Other compositions are more involved with lettering, swirling, colors, thick impasto and dark surrounding atmosphere, while others show different series of strange figures, including ghosts, or ornamental beasts lined up in rows before one’s eyes. An attractive book which is an impressive documentation of Moores work. –Raw Vision Magazine

ABSURDLY MOVING ART

I met absurdity out West and now he’s a friend of mine. I stole that,

Brave- Kelly Moore

Brave- Kelly Moore

actually, from the title of a book published by an artist we discovered at a flea market outside Santa Fe. What’s absurd is that Kelly Moore isn’t as well known as Thornton Dial or Howard Finster. He’s so outside art that he actually makes art outside – almost year round, in his Tesuque Flea Market “stall.” He bungie-cords this three-sided gallery closed during the week, more to keep out the snow or desert summer heat than thieves.

If it was just the wack-factor, I probably wouldn’t be writing a blog about this guy. We have plenty of crazy right here in Beaufort, South Carolina. But Kelly Moore’s work stopped me cold and it was 97 degrees out at the time with forest fires burning on two sides. He was adding the finishing touches to an unframed canvass in the one triangle of shade inside his flea market stall, listening to Sixto Rodriguez on a battery-powered CD player.

“You ever hear this guy?” said the painter. “He blows my mind.” I had, actually, just a few days earlier when I

Billy the Kid- Kelly Moore

Billy the Kid- Kelly Moore

watched “Searching for Sugarman.” Rodriguez gives away the money he earns — now that he’s been rediscovered. Kelly Moore gave me a copy of his book of paintings and poems.

He writes with even less punctuation and spell check that Word autocorrects for – stream of consciousness from a mind determined to swim against the stream. Describing his painting is more difficult. There’s something so personal, and gripping about the unrestrained figures, dreams and animals he paints that it’s impossible to art-speak it away. He tries, mostly in self-deprecating quips about failure and rejection.

"Dead Cowboy Totem" by New Mexico flea market artist Kelly Moore

“Dead Cowboy Totem” by New Mexico flea market artist Kelly Moore

He wanted me to be sure to mention his body odor and his three-photo-only policy for not sucking away his soul. He scuffed the dust off a metal sewer cover that a friend sent him from New Orleans after the hurricane – in case I needed a portal to get the hell away from him in a hurry. It was not-so-subtle satire from a man rebuffed for not being native enough, primitive enough, awe-struck-by-art-schools enough for the outsider art word to champion.

So I will, for what it’s worth. I’m not an art scholar but I’ve been lucky enough to look at art around the world. With Kelly’s work, I didn’t even have to leave this country to be transported. It lifted me out of the representational, the familiar, the pretty and took me on darker dreams to wilder places. Great art is like that. It’s a connection that transcends language or culture, whether you live in a camper or a castle or paint in a studio or a shed in the desert.

Above is from Teresa Bruce Books Blog, Right Brain Safari.

I hope you enjoy my tribute piece today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 347!  I’m definitely buying his book!  And you should too!

Best,

Linda

Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 341- Len Jessome- Need To Create

It’s Day 341 and I really had a great time with today’s painting.  I love the style and somewhat therapeutic effect it had on me.  Please join me in honoring Len Jessome today.  I couldn’t find a photo of him online so I decided to use a self portrait.

Autoportrait- Len Jessome

Autoportrait- Len Jessome

Jesus wouldn't like it - Len Jessome

Jesus wouldn’t like it – Len Jessome

Canadian artist , Leonardo Jessome was born in 1963 in Hamilton, where he lives and works. He left his career in 2000 to devote himself full time to his artistic activity.  Its very singular work is already present in many private collections in North America and Europe.

His work is based on the human condition and man’s place in contemporary society . He painted portraits of rare intensity in a unique graphical style .

His inner demons led him naturally to the raging street art but it’s

Almost Happy- Len Jessome

Almost Happy- Len Jessome

not the bomb attack that the artist but his canvases with brushes in a raw style , powerful and free.

Biography is from Galerie Sylvie’s site.

i have a manic need to create—my work is based on the temporality and fragility of life and all the experiences life may encompass. i use whatever medium is available to express an idea. sometimes i use house paint, industrial rust paint and / or mix these with artists paints, each has a unique property and express ideas differently.
 
I Love You- Len Jessome

I Love You- Len Jessome

flowing industrial paint achieves different results than artists oil. as in life not everything mixes as perfectly as one might hope, exceptions are made to the exclusion of others. as a result my work may patina and change over time.

It is the capturing of the idea that is key. the patina records the passage of

Darkness I Wish I Was Yours- Len Jessome

Darkness I Wish I Was Yours- Len Jessome

time. the style of my work changes often, expanding my awareness and perceptions.

i like that my paintings live in many parts of the world. snippets of my thoughts and feelings scattered around this earth that will remain when i am no longer here.
Len Jessome

Len Jessome

Above is from Len Jessome’s blog.

I hope you enjoy my piece for today!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 342!
Best,
Linda
Always Lurking...-Tribute to Len Jessome Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Always Lurking…-Tribute to Len Jessome
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Always Lurking...-Tribute to Len Jessome Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Always Lurking…-Tribute to Len Jessome
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Always Lurking...-Tribute to Len Jessome Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Always Lurking…-Tribute to Len Jessome
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Always Lurking...-Tribute to Len Jessome Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Always Lurking…-Tribute to Len Jessome
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Always Lurking...-Tribute to Len Jessome Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Always Lurking…-Tribute to Len Jessome
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 339- Marc Chagall- Color is All

It’s Day 339 and I’m very happy about today’s artist.  Intimidated but happy.  Please join me in honoring the wonderful Marc Chagall today.

Marc Chagall

Marc Chagall

Marc Chagall Biography Illustrator, Painter (1887–1985)

Bonjour Paris- Marc Chagall

Bonjour Paris- Marc Chagall

Marc Chagall was a Belorussian-born French artist whose work generally was based on emotional association rather than traditional pictorial fundamentals.

Born in Belarus in 1887, Marc Chagall was a painter, printmaker and designer associated with several major artistic styles, synthesizing elements of Cubism, Symbolism and Fauvism. One work in particular, “I and the Village” (1911), pre-dated Surrealism as an artistic expression of psychic reality.

An early modernist, Chagall created works in nearly every artistic medium, including sets for plays and ballets, biblical etchings, and stained-glass windows. Chagall died in France in 1985. Today, he is widely regarded as one of the most successful artists of the 20th century.

Marc Chagall was born on July 7, 1887, in Vitebsk, Belarus (in the Russian Empire), and was raised in a devoutly Jewish environment with eight other siblings. His father worked in a fish

Circus- Marc Chagall

Circus- Marc Chagall

warehouse, and his mother ran a shop where she sold fish and sundry baking supplies. As a child, Chagall attended heder (Jewish elementary school) and later went to public school, where lessons were taught in Russian.

After learning the elements of drawing at school, from 1907 to 1910, Chagall studied painting in St. Petersburg at the Imperial Society for the Protection of the Arts, eventually under stage designer Léon Bakst. A characteristic work from this early period is “The Dead Man” (1908), a painting that depicts a violinist (a recurring image for the artist) amid a nightmarish rooftop scene.

Chagall moved to Paris in 1910, and then moved into a studio on the edge of town in a Bohemian area known as La Ruche (“the Beehive”). There, he met several writers and artists, including Guillaume Apollinaire, Robert Delaunay and Albert Gleizes. In such artistic company, experimentation was encouraged, and Chagall quickly began developing the poetic and innovative tendencies that had begun to emerge in Russia at the time—tendencies that may not have previously been encouraged.

Marc Chagall

Marc Chagall

At the same time, he came under the influence of the Impressionist, Post-Impressionist and Fauvist pictures he saw in Paris museums, and was introduced to Fauvism and Cubism. Before long, he was participating in the Salon des Indépendants and the Salon d’Automne (1912), annual French exhibits, staging his first solo show in 1914 in Berlin to great adulation.

This period—during which he created several images of his childhood and hometown of Vitebsk—is considered Chagall’s strongest, artistically, and the style he developed would remain with him for the rest of his life. His works during this time include “Hommage Apollinaire” (1911-12), “The Fiddler” (1912) and “Paris Through the Window” (1913).

World War I

After the Berlin exhibition, Chagall returned to Vitebsk, Belarus, where he intended to stay long enough to

I and the Village- Marc Chagall

I and the Village- Marc Chagall

marry his fiancée, Bella. A few weeks later, though, he was stranded by the outbreak of World War I, as the Russian borders were closed indefinitely. Instead of despairing, Chagall embraced local scenes in his art, working at the time in an unusually realistic style. Paintings such as “The Praying Jew” (or “The Rabbi of Vitebsk”; 1914) and “Jew in Green” (1914) emerged during this period.

Chagall married Bella in 1915, and the flying lovers of “Birthday” (1915-23) and the playful, acrobatic “Double Portrait With a Glass of Wine” (1917) serve as testaments to the joyousness of the artist’s spirit during the early years of his marriage.

At first, Chagall was enthusiastic about the Russian Revolution of October 1917, and he decided to settle in Vitebsk. In 1918, he was appointed commissar for art, and then founded and directed the Vitebsk Popular Art School. Disagreements with the Suprematists (a group of artists primarily concerned with geometric shapes) resulted in Chagall’s resignation from the school in 1920, after which he

Marc Chagall

Marc Chagall

moved to Moscow, there undertaking his first stage designs for the State Jewish Chamber Theater. Chagall then left Russia for good. After a stop-over in Berlin in 1922, the artist returned to Paris in 1923 with his wife and daughter; his first retrospective took place there the following year, at the Galerie Barbazanges-Hodebert.

Chagall had learned engraving while in Berlin, and he received his first engraving commission in 1923, from Paris art dealer and publisher Ambroise Vollard, for creating etchings to illustrate a special edition of Nikolay Gogol’s novel Dead Souls. Over the next three years, Chagall completed 107 plates for the Gogol book, 100 gouaches for poet Jean de La Fontaine’s Fables, and a series of etchings illustrating the Bible; his career as a printmaker was in full swing.

During the 1930s, besides painting and engraving, Chagall traveled extensively: to the Netherlands, Spain, Poland, Italy and Palestine, where he stayed for two months, visiting the Holy Land to inspire his Bible etchings. In Palestine in 1931, Chagall immersed himself in Jewish life and history, and by the time he returned to France, he had completed 32 of biblical plates (he would create 105 in total).

World War II

With Hitler rising to power, a full-blown war was waged in Germany against artists, and, subsequently, anything

Birthday 1915- Marc Chagall

Birthday 1915- Marc Chagall

deemed modern or difficult to interpret being confiscated and burned (with some of Chagall’s works being singled out). The once-impressed German press now turned on Chagall, and in response, Chagall’s paintings struck a different tone, with terror and persecution taking on foreground roles.

In “Solitude” (1933), Chagall’s anxiety over the fate of humanity is represented by an atmosphere of despondency and in the figure of the huddled, pious Jew; in “White Crucifixion” (1938), Jewish and Christian symbols are mixed in a depiction of a Nazi crowd terrorizing Jews. The artist would be dealt another blow in 1939, when Ambroise Vollard died and Chagall’s various etching projects were put on hiatus. (Another publisher later picked up where Vollard had left off, issuing Dead Souls in 1948, La Fontaine’s Fables in 1952 and the Bible in 1956.)

Marc Chagall

Marc Chagall

With the outbreak of World War II, Chagall moved farther and farther south in France, as the Nazi threat became increasingly real for European Jews. A group of Americans ran a rescue operation smuggling artists and intellectuals out of Europe to the United States via forged visas, and Marc Chagall was one of more than 2,000 who escaped this way. He arrived in New York with Bella on June 23, 1941—the day after Germany invaded the Soviet Union—and spent most of the next few years in the New York area.

In New York, Chagall continued to develop his signature themes, but in 1942, a new commission came his way: to design the sets and costumes for a new ballet, Aleko, by Léonide Massine, which would stage Pushkin’s The Gypsiesand be accompanied by the music of Tchaikovsky. When Aleko—Chagall’s first ballet—premiered on September 8, 1942, it was a great success. Also during this period, Chagall designed the backdrops and costumes for Stravinsky’s ballet The Firebird (1945), another success.

The course of Chagall’s life and art was changed yet again in 1944, when his wife, Bella, passed away. Thereafter, depictions of memories of his wife recurred in Chagall’s work; she appears in several forms—a haunted weeping wife, an angel and a phantom bride—in “Around Her” (1945), and as a bride in “The Wedding Candles” (1945) and “Nocturne” (1947).

Before moving back to France for good in 1948, Chagall was honored with retrospective exhibitions at both the

Blue Violinist‏ by Marc Chagall

Blue Violinist‏ by Marc Chagall

Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Art Institute of Chicago.

Later Years

In 1948, Chagall settled again in France, on the French Riviera at Vence. During the 1950s, he forayed into painting and modeling ceramics, stone sculptures and mosaics. In 1958, Chagall designed the scenery and costumes for the ballet Daphnis and Chloe for the Paris Opera, from whom, five years later, he received a commission to paint a new ceiling for its theater.

The choice of artist, however, stirred controversy, as some objected to having a French national monument redesigned by a Russian Jew, while others disliked the idea of a modernist working on such a historic building. Nonetheless, the project went forward with Chagall at the helm, and when it was unveiled, it was a huge hit with all factions, surprising many and vindicating others, Chagall included.

The Bridal Pair with The Eiffel Tower by Marc Chagall

The Bridal Pair with The Eiffel Tower by Marc Chagall

Over Chagall’s decades-long career, his use of color captured the attention of viewers, and his varying projects in his later years were no different: In 1960, he began creating stained-glass windows for the synagogue of Hebrew University’s Hadassah Medical Center in Jerusalem—a project that became a spiritual journey for Chagall, once again linking him to his Jewish heritage. Chagall later took on more stained-glass projects, including at the United Nations building (1964); the Fraumünster Cathedral in Zurich (1967); St. Stephen’s Church in Mainz, Germany (1978); and the All Saints’ Church in the United Kingdom (1978).

Marc Chagall died in Saint-Paul de Vence, France, on March 28, 1985, leaving behind a vast collection of work in several branches of the arts, as well as a rich legacy as a major Jewish artist and a pioneer of modernism. Pablo Picasso famously once said of the artist, “When Matisse dies, Chagall will be the only painter left who understands what color really is.”

Biography is from www.biography.com.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 340!  25 left…

Best,

Linda

Blue Night Flight- Tribute to Marc Chagall Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Blue Night Flight- Tribute to Marc Chagall
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Blue Night Flight- Tribute to Marc Chagall Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Blue Night Flight- Tribute to Marc Chagall
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Blue Night Flight- Tribute to Marc Chagall Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Blue Night Flight- Tribute to Marc Chagall
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Blue Night Flight- Tribute to Marc Chagall Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Blue Night Flight- Tribute to Marc Chagall
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Blue Night Flight- Tribute to Marc Chagall Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Blue Night Flight- Tribute to Marc Chagall
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 338- Josiah Polhemus- A Sober and Amazing Journey

It’s Day 338 and I am super duper excited about today’s artist.  First off, because he happens to be a good friend of mine that not only inspired my very project, but I also have the honor to play with him in my improv group The Incidentalists.  He is such an inspiring and amazing friend in so many ways and I am so glad to know him.  Please join me in honoring Josiah Polhemus today!  Another neat thing is that he wrote his own story below!

 

Josiah Polhemus (at his 365 Painting A Day Art Show!)- I took this photo. :)

Josiah Polhemus (at his 365 Painting A Day Art Show!)- I took this photo. 🙂

Josiah Polhemus

Josiah Polhemus

Josiah Polhemus

I grew up in Palo Alto CA. Born in 1967 to parents who were both teachers. Robert Polhemus a Stanford Professor and Elizabeth Hamilton a schoolteacher. I have three siblings two older Camilla and Mackinlay.   My younger sister, Andromeda, was born 5 years after and was the child of Rebecca Reynolds. The split in the marriage was likely the reason I turned to art. I found it early in life to be an escape from my reality. I had friends who also enjoyed drawing and were creative. Many of them were more talented than me. I think, at first, I just tried to mimic the styles of my friends.

We were all heavily influenced by comics and, for me, MAD magazine. To me, MAD was the very very best. I wanted to be Sergio Aragones and I wanted to be Don Martin. My brother and I would spend hours drawing. At the same

Josiah Polhemus

Josiah Polhemus

time, I began acting very early, first at my school, then, in community productions. I never lost my interest in acting or drawing. In high school I would draw comics for my high school paper. I never took my talent too seriously because my very first art teacher in high school gave me a “C.” It was my lowest grade in high school.

In college I turned to theater but would always give cards to my fellow actors as opening night gifts. Many commented on my good wit and ability to capture likenesses. It wasn’t until after graduating with an MFA from the American Conservatory Theater and

Josiah Polhemus

Josiah Polhemus

reaching a level of professional acting I didn’t expect so quickly that I decided to move to Los Angeles. As Matt Groening found fame first with his comic Life In Hell about his time in LA then later becoming the creator of The Simpsons, I found drawing to be a way of facing the difficulty of trying to make it as an actor in LA. While I had some success acting, most actors I knew had jobs doing things like catering, office temp jobs, working for famous people as their assistants. I landed a job at 1-800 Dentist as an operator.

Several up and coming actors and directors had part time jobs there, too. I got my brother a job there and during a crafty art fair we decided to make a series of post cards about Santa Claus called Santa Facts. Each post card depicted some made up fact about Santa. The cards were a hit and launched our greeting card business Avant-Kardz. My brother Mack and I began collaborating on making money with our art.

Josiah Polhemus

Josiah Polhemus

Avant-Kardz started in Venice Beach and we were able to get our cards into Borders Books, Fred Segal and several other coffee shops and greeting card stores. We got tired of peddling our wares and decided to approach magazines to see if they might be interested in a comic strip about the entertainment industry. Several magazines took us seriously and we were able to meet with Entertainment Weekly, Premiere, Variety, The Hollywood Reporter and Film Threat.

Finally, we landed a deal with then national magazine BUZZ. We were given a year contract to do our comic strip The Wize Brothers. Meanwhile, I was teaching Art at Hollywood High School and still pursuing acting and my brother was working at 1-800 Dentist and pursuing a filmmaking career.

We eventually made two films together The Scottish Tale and My Bad Dad. Both were accepted into many film festivals and got distribution through Hollywood Video. The brothers blew a book deal when both ignored a successful pitch to a publishing company. We were too busy trying to make it in the other fields of acting and

Josiah Polhemus

Josiah Polhemus

screenwriting. I was in talks and met a few times with Sandra Tsing Loh to develop a comic based on here NPR series The Loh Life. It fell through when her husband starting drawing the pictures himself and sort of, didn’t want the strip to be about the real Loh family.

I gave up on the comic business and began to just concentrated on writing, directing and acting. I was getting a lot of work at the time doing all three. I successfully made two short films that got distribution through Vanguard Cinema.

Josiah Polhemus

Josiah Polhemus

While I had begun to paint and was highly influenced by my Mother Elizabeth Vezzani who taught me so much about the appreciation of art, how to mix colors, depth and perspective and balance. I never took it seriously. I developed a bad habit of smoking pot that kept me from picking up the paintbrush. When I did and saw the results of being high and creating, they were always disappointing.

After moving back to the Bay Area in 2006 and landing more film, teaching and full time work running a theater company in Oakland, I found myself feeling trapped in by my addiction and a marriage that was suffering. The separation caused a 6-month period of total depression and a constant use of pot.

After meeting Amy Prosser the fog lifted and I came out of my depression and found an ability to stay sober for

Josiah Polhemus

Josiah Polhemus

at least the majority of my time. I have since had occasional slips with pot but after realizing the importance and joy of living sober I made a decision to do a 365 paintings in a year project.

The paintings would reflect every day of my sobriety. The project almost fell apart when, 8 months in, I slipped. For a few weeks I was smoking pot and the paintings suddenly stopped. The effect was profound. It showed me that my life had no creativity when I was using and that, the minute I stopped using, color and creativity came flowing out of me.

Josiah Polhemus (Getting ready for his 365 Painting A Day art show!)

Josiah Polhemus (Getting ready for his 365 Painting A Day art show!)

I caught up on the project and completed 365 paintings. The completion of the project is now a book and an art show. They are featured at the YWCA in Berkeley through January 8th and will then be shown at the Little Farm in Bolinas California through February 1s 2015.   A documentary is being made about the project.

You can like my project on facebook here.

https://www.facebook.com/PaintADayProject

 

I hope you enjoy my tribute today!  The one challenging thing was trying to choose from the millions of ideas I had.  All of his paintings are so clever, emotional and inspiring that I really wanted mine to be meaningful.  I think it turned out good. 🙂  Hope you love it Josiah!

I will see you tomorrow on Day 339!

Best,

Linda

Dream BIG- Tribute to Josiah Polhemus Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Dream BIG- Tribute to Josiah Polhemus
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Dream BIG- Tribute to Josiah Polhemus Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Dream BIG- Tribute to Josiah Polhemus
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Dream BIG- Tribute to Josiah Polhemus Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Dream BIG- Tribute to Josiah Polhemus
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Dream BIG- Tribute to Josiah Polhemus Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Dream BIG- Tribute to Josiah Polhemus
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Dream BIG- Tribute to Josiah Polhemus Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Dream BIG- Tribute to Josiah Polhemus
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 324- André Derain- Intoxicated With Color

It’s Day 324 and there’s water falling from the sky!  I really hope it’s doing something to help the drought here in California.  I love the rain…my dogs and joints don’t however.  Well, I’ve got to finish up some other things like feedback for my writing group tonight so please join me in honoring André Derain today!  I had so much fun with playing with color.  Fauvism has definitely become one of my favorite movements as I journeyed through this challenge.

André_Derain circa 1903

André_Derain circa 1903

Self Portrait in Red Cap- André Derain

Self Portrait in Red Cap- André Derain

André Derain (10 June 1880 – 8 September 1954) was a French artist, painter, sculptor and co-founder of Fauvism with Henri Matisse.

Derain was born in 1880 in Chatou, Yvelines, Île-de-France, just outside Paris. In 1895 Derain began to study on his own, contrary to claims that meeting Vlaminck or Matisse began his efforts to paint, and occasionally went to the countryside with an old friend of Cézanne’s, Father Jacomin along with his two sons. In 1898, while studying to be an engineer at the Académie Camillo, he attended painting classes under Eugène Carrière, and there met Matisse.

In 1900, he met and shared a studio with Maurice de Vlaminck and together they began to paint

Big Ben London 1906- André Derain

Big Ben London 1906- André Derain

scenes in the neighbourhood, but this was interrupted by military service at Commercy from September 1901 to 1904. Following his release from service, Matisse persuaded Derain’s parents to allow him to abandon his engineering career and devote himself solely to painting; subsequently Derain attended the Académie Julian.

Derain and Matisse worked together through the summer of 1905 in the Mediterraneanvillage of Collioure and later that year displayed their highly innovative paintings at the Salon d’Automne. The vivid, unnatural colors led the critic Louis Vauxcelles to derisively dub their works as les Fauves, or “the wild beasts”, marking the start of the Fauvist movement.

Charing Cross Bridge- André Derain

Charing Cross Bridge- André Derain

In March 1906, the noted art dealer Ambroise Vollard sent Derain to London to produce a series of paintings with the city as subject. In 30 paintings (29 of which are still extant), Derain presented a portrait of London that was radically different from anything done by previous painters of the city such as Whistler or Monet. With bold colors and compositions, Derain painted multiple pictures of the Thames and Tower Bridge.

These London paintings remain among his most popular work. Art critic T.G Rosenthal: “Not since Monet has anyone made London seem so fresh and yet remain quintessentially English. Some of his views of the Thames use the Pointillist technique of multiple dots, although by this time, because the dots have become much larger, it is rather more simply the separation of colours called Divisionism and it is peculiarly effective in conveying the fragmentation of colour in moving water in sunlight.”

In 1907 art dealer Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler purchased Derain’s entire studio, granting Derain financial stability. He experimented with stone sculpture and moved to Montmartre to be near his friend Pablo Picasso and other noted artists. Fernande Olivier, Picasso’s mistress at the time, described Derain as:

Slim, elegant, with a lively colour and enamelled black hair. With an English chic, somewhat striking. Fancy waistcoats, ties

André Derain

André Derain

in crude colours, red and green. Always a pipe in his mouth, phlegmatic, mocking, cold, an arguer.

At Montmartre, Derain began to shift from the brilliant Fauvist palette to more muted tones, showing the influence of Cubism and Paul Cézanne. (According to Gertrude Stein, there is a tradition that Derain discovered and was influenced by African sculpture before the Cubists did.) Derain supplied woodcuts in primitivist style for an edition of Guillaume Apollinaire’s first book of prose,L’enchanteur pourrissant (1909). He displayed works at the Neue Künstlervereinigung in Munich in 1910, in 1912 at the secessionist Der Blaue Reiter and in 1913 at the seminal Armory Show in New York. He also illustrated a collection of poems by Max Jacob in 1912.

Andre Derain - The Turning Road, L'Estaque - 1906

Andre Derain – The Turning Road, L’Estaque – 1906

At about this time Derain’s work began overtly reflecting his study of the Old Masters. The role of color was reduced and forms became austere; the years 1911–1914 are sometimes referred to as his gothic period. In 1914 he was mobilized for military service in World War I and until his release in 1919 he would have little time for painting, although in 1916 he provided a set of illustrations for André Breton’s first book, Mont de Piete.

After the war, Derain won new acclaim as a leader of the renewed classicism then ascendant. With the wildness of his Fauve years far behind, he was admired as an upholder of tradition. In 1919 he designed the ballet La Boutique fantasque for Diaghilev, leader of the Ballets Russes. A major success, it would lead to his creating many ballet designs.

The 1920s marked the height of his success, as he was awarded the Carnegie Prize in 1928 and began to exhibit extensively abroad—in London, Berlin, Frankfurt, Düsseldorf, New York City and Cincinnati, Ohio.

During the German occupation of France in World War II, Derain lived primarily in Paris and was much courted by the Germans because

Portrait of Matisse- Andre Derain

Portrait of Matisse- Andre Derain

he represented the prestige of French culture. Derain accepted an invitation to make an official visit to Germany in 1941, and traveled with other French artists to Berlin to attend a Nazi exhibition of an officially endorsed artist, Arno Breker. Derain’s presence in Germany was used effectively by Nazi propaganda, and after the Liberation he was branded a collaborator and ostracized by many former supporters.

A year before his death, he contracted an eye infection from which he never fully recovered. He died in Garches, Hauts-de-Seine, Île-de-France, France in 1954 when he was struck by a moving vehicle.

Derain’s London paintings were the subject of a major exhibition at the Courtauld Institute from 27 October 2005 to 22 January 2006.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I really wanted to do a seascape painting.  I also didn’t want to use all pointillism and mix up his styles a bit.  I was torn with doing a portrait of myself…but sometimes I get sick of staring at my own mug with all the self portraits I’ve done and today was one of those days! 🙂  I will see you tomorrow on Day 325!  40 to go?  I’m a little sad.

Best,

Linda

Voilier sur l'eau- Tribute to André Derain Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Voilier sur l’eau- Tribute to André Derain
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Voilier sur l'eau- Tribute to André Derain Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Voilier sur l’eau- Tribute to André Derain
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Voilier sur l'eau- Tribute to André Derain Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Voilier sur l’eau- Tribute to André Derain
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Voilier sur l'eau- Tribute to André Derain Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Voilier sur l’eau- Tribute to André Derain
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Voilier sur l'eau- Tribute to André Derain Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Voilier sur l’eau- Tribute to André Derain
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 321- Wolf Kahn- Sweeping Bands of Color

It’s Day 321 and I’m still healing…or still getting sick.  I hate being on the teeter toter of getting ill.  It could just be the weather…who knows?  I am excited about today’s artist…I love his paintings and enjoyed doing today’s piece.  Join me in honoring Wolf Kahn today.

Wolf Kahn

Wolf Kahn

Wolf Kahn - Woodland Swamp

Wolf Kahn – Woodland Swamp

Wolf Kahn (born October 4, 1927) is a German-born American painter.

Kahn is known for his combination of realism and Color Field, and known to work in pastel and oil paint. He studied under Hans Hofmann, and also graduated from the University of Chicago. Kahn

Wolf Kahn Original Oil on Canvas

Wolf Kahn Original Oil on Canvas

is a resident of both New York City and, during the summer and autumn, West Brattleboro, Vermont.

Wolf Kahn was born in Stuttgart, Germany in 1927. He states that he began drawing at the age of 4. In 1939, at the age of 12 he fled Germany for England and in 1940 moved to the United States of America.

Barn on Cooks Lane- Wolf Kahn

Barn on Cooks Lane- Wolf Kahn

He attended the High School of Music and Art in New York City and graduated in 1945. Under the GI Bill, he was able to continue his studies with abstract expressionist Hans Hofmann at the Hans Hofmann School. He became Hofmann’s studio assistant. He enrolled for a degree from the University of Chicago in 1950 and completed this in only one year, receiving a Bachelor’s Degree in 1951.

His wife Emily Mason is also a painter. They have two daughters,

Wolf Kahn - Order in Disorder

Wolf Kahn – Order in Disorder

Cecily and Melany.

Wolf Kahn works in oil and pastel. His works usually covers the subject of landscapes and his own personal vision of nature. His convergence of light and color has been described as combining pictorial landscapes and painterly abstraction.

His gallery, Ameringer|McEnery|Yohe, states

Yellow Symphony- Wolf Kahn

Yellow Symphony- Wolf Kahn

“The unique blend of Realism and the formal discipline of Color Field painting sets the work of Wolf Kahn apart. Kahn is an artist who embodies the synthesis of his modern abstract training with Hans Hofmann, with the palette of Matisse, Rothko’s sweeping bands of color, and the atmospheric qualities of American Impressionism. It is precisely this fusion of color, spontaneity and representation that has produced such a rich and expressive body of work.”

Wolf Kahn has received a number of awards including a Fulbright Scholarship in 1962, a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship in 1966, and an Award in Art from the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1979.

Wolf Kahn became a member of the National Academy of Design in 1980 and the American Academy of Arts

Wolf Kahn

Wolf Kahn

and Letters in 1984. He is currently on the Board of Trustees forMarlboro College, in Marlboro, VT.

In 2005 the Smithsonian Art Collectors Program commissioned Kahn to produce a print to benefit the cultural

and educational programs of the Smithsonian Associates. The screen print, entitled Aura, hangs in the Graphic Eloquence exhibit in the S. Dillon Ripley Center in the National Mall.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I didn’t use pastels or oil paints.  I only have oil pastels and I don’t think they would’ve worked as well as soft pastels.  I used watercolors and acrylics, but I think the style and spirit came through.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 322!

Best,

Linda

Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Autumn Forest- Tribute to Wolf Kahn
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Day 320- Elena Sisto- In The Act

It’s Day 320 and I still feel like I’m fighting off some sort of cold.  I had fun with today’s painting.  I had to play with it for a while and I still feel like I could’ve kept altering it.  The shading of today’s artist’s pieces are hard to emulate.  My instinct is to go with bolder lines…I had to fight that.  I also wanted to do an interesting perspective piece.  Join me in honoring Elena Sisto today.  Her paintings are wonderful and I couldn’t wait to do a tribute.

Elena Sisto

Elena Sisto

Hat 2013, Ear 2013- Elena Sisto

Hat 2013, Ear 2013- Elena Sisto

Elena Sisto, American, born 1952

In her paintings Elena Sisto uses the structuring ideas of abstraction to mine content that relates to her interest in how people define their own identity and present themselves.

The combination of abstract means and figurative content often results in imagery that has a simplified or slightly cartoonish cast. Sisto uses the economy of cartooning language to access emotion

Check Shirt- Elena Sisto

Check Shirt- Elena Sisto

directly and to keep the image functioning on a structural level both in terms of form and content. This way she bypasses a more anecdotal approach.

She aims to invest the paintings with the real weight of experience, but keep the figures emblematic. A character in Sisto’s world is a persona rather than a person. Her content-development process fluctuates between the pop culture/social (signified by the abstracted language of cartoon) and the personal (signified by elements of realism). There’s a touch of cubism as well. She finds an interiority through fracturing and simultaneity, seeking to avoid using a specific narrative to spell things out.

Painting with Music 2011- Elena Sisto

Painting with Music 2011- Elena Sisto

Sisto’s current work centers around the artist’s experience of being in the studio, and the passage into adulthood of young women artists. Her characters are an invented hybrid of fiction and reality. They are images of women as workers, thinkers, and creators. In creating them she has been much influenced by the students she teaches at the School of Visual Arts.

Sisto has had nineteen one-person shows, including at the Maier Museum in Lynchburg, Virginia; the Katzen Museum in Washington, D.C.; the Greenville County Museum, Greenville, south Carolina; and the Miami Dade College of Art + Design, Miami, Florida.

She exhibited work in the 43rd Biennial of Contemporary Painting at the

From- Fairy Tales: Portrait Paintings by Elena Sisto

From- Fairy Tales: Portrait Paintings by Elena Sisto

Corcoran Gallery of Art, in Washington, D.C. and numerous group shows throughout the U.S.

She’s been the recipient of two National Endowment for the Arts grants, fellowships to Yaddo, the Fine Arts Work Center in

From Fairy Tales: Portrait Paintings by Elena Sisto

From Fairy Tales: Portrait Paintings by Elena Sisto

Provincetown, the Millay Colony, the Peter S. Reed Foundation Grant, a Hand Hollow Foundation Fellowship and scholarships to the New York Studio School, the Skowhegan School, and the Yale Norfolk Program. Sisto received the National Academy Museum and School of Fine Arts 183rd Invitational Inglish Griswold Nelson Prize in painting.

Her work has been written about or reviewed in the New York Times, Arts Magazine, Art in America, Art News, Modern Painters, Art Forum, the Orange County Register, the Newark Star-Ledger, the New Art Examiner, Review Magazine, the Boston Globe, the L.A. Times, Art Journal, and the Philadelphia Inquirer, among others.

Her work has been included in numerous public and private collections.

She organized and moderated a panel for the College Art Association on drawing and has taught at the School of Visual Arts (since 1997), Columbia University, Rhode Island School of Design, the New York Studio School, The Yale Norfolk summer program, and the Chautauqua Institution. She’s been a visiting artist at about thirty-five art schools, colleges, and universities.

Sisto is newly affiliated with Lori Bookstein Fine Arts where she will be presenting her first exhibit entitled

Elena Sisto

Elena Sisto

Between Silver Light and Orange Shadow, which will be on view from April 25th through June 1st, 2013.

Article is from John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation website.

What I took from this piece is doing a whole new perspective in a painting that I normally wouldn’t have done.  I hope I captured some of Sisto’s spirit if not the style exactly.  I love the painting of the hat and ear and used those as my main inspirations.  I hope you enjoy my tribute and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 321!

Best,

Linda

The Blues- Tribute to Elena Sisto Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

The Blues- Tribute to Elena Sisto
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View The Blues- Tribute to Elena Sisto Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
The Blues- Tribute to Elena Sisto
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 The Blues- Tribute to Elena Sisto Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
The Blues- Tribute to Elena Sisto
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 The Blues- Tribute to Elena Sisto Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
The Blues- Tribute to Elena Sisto
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 The Blues- Tribute to Elena Sisto Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
The Blues- Tribute to Elena Sisto
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 318- Amy Sillman- Layer By Layer

It’s Day 318 and I’m having another difficult art day.  Just not feeling very intuitive or creative today and a little under the weather.  I am thankful that I haven’t had too many days like this throughout the past year.  Yet I persevered and did my painting.  I enjoyed the creation process, but I kept altering and jiggering the piece…overanalyzing everything going on in my brain.  I hope I captured the artist’s style…even just a little.  Her pieces are surprisingly difficult to emulate which makes them special.  Maybe on a different day I would’ve been less critical!  Join me in honoring Amy Sillman today!

Amy Sillman

Amy Sillman

Amy Sillman

Amy Sillman

Amy Sillman (born 1955) is an American painter. She lives and works in Brooklyn.

Sillman was born in Detroit, Michigan, and the winding story line of her early years led her to work in a cannery in Alaska and a feminist silkscreen factory in Chicago, and to train at New York University as a Japanese interpreter for the United Nations. She finally landed at Manhattan’s School of Visual Arts, graduating in 1979. Then she spent more than a decade content, as she has said, with “learning how to make paintings—just working, not showing.”

In a 2006 Artforum article, Jan Avgikos wrote that Sillman’s paintings “mine the edges of abstraction, meshing patches of color with bursts of chaotic line and web-like compositional scaffolding.”

Amy Sillman, Blue Diagram, 2009

Amy Sillman, Blue Diagram, 2009

Embracing a modernist reverence of inspired imagination, Sillman defines honesty as the most enduring quality of painting and speaks of painting as “physical, like an extension of my arm.” In a New York Times review of Sillman’s 2006 exhibition at Sikkema Jenkins & Co., Ken Johnson wrote, “The paintings are especially gratifying up close, where you can study the richly complicated textures and colors…” In 2007 Sillman completed four etchings at Crown Point Press, and of this experience, she has said, “Everything that is done in my painting was taken apart layer by layer in printmaking. You take one hundred layers apart and figure out which six will work.”

Bed- Amy Sillman

Bed- Amy Sillman

In a 2007 article in Artforum, Linda Norden wrote of Amy Sillman’s “fearless, tenacious pursuit of a painting that might accurately register the discomfort, incoherence, and absurdity that can characterize painterly experience—and experience in general,” and speaks of “her increasingly influential place among younger painters in both New York and Los Angeles, where she regularly shows, and her growing currency even among contingents of European painters.” Art critic Roberta Smith compared Sillman to similar women painters such as Elena Sisto, Margaret Curtis, and Sue Williams.

Sillman lives in Williamsburg, Brooklyn and maintains a studio in Bushwick.

Sillman began showing at the Brent Sikkema Gallery in New York in 2000. She is represented by Sikkema

Pirate- Amy Sillman

Pirate- Amy Sillman

Jenkins & Co., New York, and shows at Capitain-Petzel in Berlin, at Thomas Dane Gallery in London, and at Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects, Los Angeles. The first large scale survey of her work, curated by Helen Molesworth, premiered at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston in October 2013. The exhibition will also travel to the Aspen Art Museum and the Center for Curatorial Studies and Art in Contemporary Culture at Bard College. Her solo show “Third Person Singular,” the exhibition of a year-long project of portraiture and abstract painting, was on view at theHirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, DC, and travelled to the Tang Museum at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York, until 2009.

Sillman’s paintings are in the permanent collections of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York as well as private collections including the collection of CJ Follini and Renee Ryan.

Amy Sillman, P, 2007, courtesy of the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York.

Amy Sillman, P, 2007, courtesy of the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York.

In 1995, the same year she received an MFA from Bard College, Sillman was awarded a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship in painting and the Elaine de Kooning Memorial Fellowship in 1995. In 1999 she received fellowships from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation and the Joan Mitchell Foundation, and in 2000 was awarded aGuggenheim Fellowship. In 2012, as part of the fifth anniversary of the Brooklyn Museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, the museum presented Sillman with the First Award, a prize given to 15 women who were first in their fields.

Amy Sillman was a Guna S. Mundheim Fellow in the Visual Arts at the American Academy in Berlin, Germany, during the Spring of 2009. During the fall of 2010, she was a Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University. In May 2011, the Montserrat College of Art awarded Amy Sillman an honorary doctoral degree in fine arts.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 319.  I’m going to take the world’s longest nap now.  I hope I feel better tomorrow.  Bummed to be missing my improv rehearsal tonight.

Best,

Linda

Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 316- Grace Hartigan- Painting Poems

It’s Day 316 and I struggled today with art in general.  I started to panic a little yesterday about including all the artists I wanted to before the project is over…which is an impossible thing so therefore my anxiety is a little irrelevant.  I started, restarted, and altered my painting and artists today until I came up with my piece.  I really liked the outcome and am thinking that the slight panic was a sort of gift.  I’ll explain more below.  For now, join me in honoring Grace Hartigan today.

Grace Hartigan

Grace Hartigan

Woman with Red Flower- Grace Hartigan

Woman with Red Flower- Grace Hartigan

Grace Hartigan, a second-generation Abstract Expressionist linked historically to artists of the first, such as Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning, who forged a new form of painting based on bold gesture and experimental brushwork. Within the movement, she was respected for her commitment and thick skin, and her striking paintings reflect this attitude.

Though she built her early career upon complete abstraction, in 1952 Hartigan began

Since Rousseau- Grace Hartigan

Since Rousseau- Grace Hartigan

incorporating recognizable motifs and characters from various sources into her art, and moved

fluidly between figuration and abstraction throughout her long career. For this reason, her work is often considered to be a precursor to Pop art.

Hartigan’s belief that painting must have “content and emotion” continued throughout her career. Even though her work is often associated with Pop art, Hartigan disliked the idea of mass manufacturing that Pop embraced, preferring the emotion generated by the evident hand of the artist.
Ask Me No More- Grace Hartigan

Ask Me No More- Grace Hartigan

Hartigan’s best-known works combine the abstraction of her early work with recognizable images from everyday life or motifs from art history, particularly from the Renaissance and Baroque periods. The distinction between abstraction and figuration is often blurred by her experimental brushwork and lack of shading.

Hartigan was born in Newark, New Jersey, in 1922. As a child, she was close to her grandmother and her aunt, both of whom encouraged her creativity with stories and folktales. Hartigan was later involved with her high school drama program and wanted to be an actress. She married at 17 to Robert Jachens because, she claimed, he was the first boy to read poetry to her. Wanting to escape their narrow upbringing, the couple headed for Alaska to homestead.

They got as far as Los Angeles before they ran out of money and Hartigan found out

Second Sitting: In her "Bronzino's Young Man," from 1985, Grace Hartigan riffs on a 16th-century cult classic of portraiture, Agnolo Bronzino's "Portrait of Lodovico Capponi."

Second Sitting: In her “Bronzino’s Young Man,” from 1985, Grace Hartigan riffs on a 16th-century cult classic of portraiture, Agnolo Bronzino’s “Portrait of Lodovico Capponi.”

she was pregnant with her only child, Jeffrey. She took a few painting classes before they returned to New Jersey. When Robert was drafted to fight in World War II, Hartigan lived with his parents and got a job as a mechanical draughtsman to support herself and her son. She was sent to the Newark College of Engineering for on-the-job training. It was during this period, after she and her husband separated, that a friend introduced her to the works of Henri Matisse and she began taking art courses from a local artist named Isaac Lane Muse.

”Crowning of the Poet” by Grace Hartigan

”Crowning of the Poet” by Grace Hartigan

Hartigan is admired for having, as one critic noted, “resolved the problem that doomed many artists of the New York School: where to go from art in the 1950s.” Since she was able to reconcile abstraction with her usage of realism and iconography, she influenced many future artists, including Neo-Expressionists like David Salle and Julian Schnabel. She made the Maryland Institute College of Art a nationally prominent program and mentored hundreds of students during her tenure there.

GRACE HARTIGAN QUOTES

“Well, it is not very comforting when you are going through it. But after you have gone through it, won the facility after years of hard work, and are able to say what you feel and think, then it is a sweet triumph.”

“A line is like a lasso. You throw it over your head and you grab something. It’s like writing. You can read a line in painting almost the way

Grazie Rosetti, 1995- Grace Hartigan

Grazie Rosetti, 1995- Grace Hartigan

you can read a word. Drawing is really like writing poetry. Color itself is not like a poem. It diffuses from the very specific. It’s changeable – its images change.”

“Now as before it is the vulgar and the vital and the possibility of its transformation into the beautiful which continues to challenge and fascinate me.”

“Or perhaps the subject of my art is like the definition of humor – emotional pain remembered in tranquility.”

Biography is from www.theartstory.com.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  Earlier I was saying that the anxiety was somewhat of a gift.  My painting wouldn’t have turned out the way it did without it.  The concept of the piece wouldn’t have happened either.  The two figures beside me are my inner voices in my head and the main “me” is content with blocking them out.  A huge lesson I am still learning on a daily basis.  So in the end this piece was very therapeutic!  I also wanted to incorporate the artist’s abstract and figurative styles.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 317!

Best,

Linda

Block Them Out- Tribute to Grace Hartigan Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Block Them Out- Tribute to Grace Hartigan
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Block Them Out- Tribute to Grace Hartigan Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Block Them Out- Tribute to Grace Hartigan
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Block Them Out- Tribute to Grace Hartigan Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Block Them Out- Tribute to Grace Hartigan
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Block Them Out- Tribute to Grace Hartigan Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Block Them Out- Tribute to Grace Hartigan
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Block Them Out- Tribute to Grace Hartigan Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Block Them Out- Tribute to Grace Hartigan
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 314- Ernst Ludwig Kirchner- Allegories

It’s Day 314 and today’s piece is a little sunnier than yesterday’s but just as fun to create!  I love the style and colors of today’s painting.  Join me in honoring Ernst Ludwig Kirchner today.  Although today’s art is sunny, the artist’s story is still a sad one.

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner was a driving force in the Die Brücke group that flourished in Dresden and Berlin before World War I, and he has come to be seen as one of the most talented and influential of Germany’s Expressionists. Motivated by the same anxieties that gripped the movement as a whole – fears about humanity’s place in the modern world, its lost feelings of spirituality and authenticity – Kirchner had conflicting attitudes to the past and present.

An admirer of Albrecht Dürer, he revived the old art of woodblock printing, and saw himself in the German tradition, yet he rejected academic styles and was inspired by the modern city. After the war, illness drove him to settle in Davos, Switzerland, where he painted many landscapes, and, ultimately, he found himself ostracized from mainstream German art. When the Nazis rose to power in the early 1930s he was also a victim of their campaign against “Degenerate Art.” Depressed and ill, he eventually committed suicide.

The human figure was central to Kirchner’s art. It was vital to the pictures that took his

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

studio as their backdrop – pictures in which he captured models posing as well as aspects of his bohemian life. For Kirchner, the studio was an important nexus where art and life met. But the figure also informed his images of Berlin, in which the demeanor of figures in the street often seemed more important than the surrounding cityscape. And, most commonly, he depicted the figure in movement, since he believed that this better expressed the fullness and vitality of the human body.

Fränzi vor geschnitztem Stuhl- Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

Fränzi vor geschnitztem Stuhl- Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

Kirchner’s Expressionistic handling of paint represented a powerful reaction against theImpressionism that was dominant in German painting when he first emerged. For him, it marked a reaction against the staid civility of bourgeois life. He would always deny that he was influenced by other artists, yet Henri Matisse and Edvard Munch were clearly important in shaping his style. Fauvism was particularly significant in directing his palette, encouraging him to use flat areas of unbroken, often unmixed color and simplified forms.

Kirchner believed that powerful forces – enlivening yet also destructive – dwelt beneath the veneer of Western civilization, and he believed that creativity offered a means of harnessing them. This outlook shaped the way in which he depicted men and women in his pictures, as people who often seem at war with themselves or their environment. It also encouraged his interest in Primitive art, in particular that of the Pacific Islands, for he considered that this work offered a more direct picture of those elemental energies. Primitive art was also important in directing Kirchner to a more simplified treatment of form. Primitive sculpture undoubtedly inspired his own approach to the medium and his love of rough-hewn, partially painted surfaces.

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner was born on May 6, 1880 in Aschaffenburg, Bavaria, and began studying architecture at the Dresden Technical

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

High School in 1901 at the encouragement of his parents. While attending classes, he became close friends with Fritz Bleyl, who shared his radical outlook on art and nature. During this time, Kirchner chose to dedicate himself to fine art rather than architecture.

In 1905, Kirchner and Bleyl, along with fellow architecture students Karl Schmidt-Rottluff and Erich Heckel, founded the artist group Die Brücke (“The Bridge.”) The aim was to eschew traditional academic styles and to create a new mode of artistic expression, forming a “bridge” between classical motifs of the past and the present avant-garde. Die Brücke expressed extreme emotion through crude lines and a vibrant, unnatural color palette.

Do Do with Large Fan- Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

Do Do with Large Fan- Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

The group would meet in an old butcher’s shop that served as Kirchner’s studio to practice figure drawing. (Studio meetings, however, would often devolve into casual lovemaking and general nudity.) Much of the artwork created by Die Brücke was a direct response to the graphic work of Albrecht Dürer and the bold color palette of the Neo-Impressionists. Kirchner held a particular interest in the woodcarvings of Dürer, and sought to modernize them with his own unique style of pared-down lines and dynamic compositions.

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner was a leading force behind the Expressionist movement in Germany. Since 1913, his work has gained international recognition, extending its popularity into America. His art captures German culture at a critical point in pre-World War I history. Although his work speaks to a specific culture, his expressive skill as a painter and printmaker has influenced generations. Many attempt to emulate Kirchner’s distorted sense of perspective. The graphic, agitated lines and highly-keyed color palette are timeless and distinct to the artist. Kirchner’s work continues to be exhibited and sold around the world. It has also been a significant influence on new generations of Expressionists, including artists such as Georg Baselitz and Jörg Immendorf.

Quotes

“My paintings are allegories not portraits.”

“The heaviest burden of all is the pressure of the war and the increasing superficiality. It gives me incessantly the impression of a bloody carnival. I feel as though the outcome is in the air and everything is topsy-turvy.. All the same, I keep on trying to get some order in my

Self-portrait as a Soldier- Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

Self-portrait as a Soldier- Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

thoughts and to create a picture of the age out of confusion, which is after all my function.”

“It seems as though the goal of my work has always been to dissolve myself completely into the sensations of the surroundings in order to then integrate this into a coherent painterly form.”

“All art needs this visible world and will always need it. Quite simply because, being accessible to all, it is the key to all other worlds.”

Biography is from www.theartstory.org.

I hope you enjoy my painting today!  I love painting with these colors and there’s this kind of abandon with painting such bold strokes and colors.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 315!  Then it’s only 50 paintings to go.  Whew.

Best,

Linda

Mädchen in Einem Grünen Zimmer- Tribute to Ernst Ludwig Kirchner Acrylic on Canvas

Mädchen in Einem Grünen Zimmer- Tribute to Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Mädchen in Einem Grünen Zimmer- Tribute to Ernst Ludwig Kirchner Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Mädchen in Einem Grünen Zimmer- Tribute to Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Mädchen in Einem Grünen Zimmer- Tribute to Ernst Ludwig Kirchner Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Mädchen in Einem Grünen Zimmer- Tribute to Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Mädchen in Einem Grünen Zimmer- Tribute to Ernst Ludwig Kirchner Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Mädchen in Einem Grünen Zimmer- Tribute to Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Mädchen in Einem Grünen Zimmer- Tribute to Ernst Ludwig Kirchner Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Mädchen in Einem Grünen Zimmer- Tribute to Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
Acrylic on Canvas