Day 353- Pierre-Auguste Renoir- “The pain passes, but the beauty remains”

It’s Day 353 and I was a little nervous about today’s artist.  First of all, his style is the most challenging (to me at least) and his artwork is so wonderful.  I kept describing his paintings as whispers…since they are so soft looking.  I find this type of impressionistic painting so difficult to do since I tend to paint bolder lines than this.  Please join me in honoring Pierre- Auguste Renoir today.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Dance in the Country (Aline Charigot and Paul Lhote), 1883- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Dance in the Country (Aline Charigot and Paul Lhote), 1883- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Pierre-Auguste Renoir (25 February 1841 – 3 December 1919) was a French artist who was a leading painter in the development of the Impressionist style. As a celebrator of beauty, and especially feminine sensuality, it has been said that “Renoir is the final representative of a tradition which runs directly from Rubens to Watteau.”

Pierre-Auguste was the father of actor Pierre Renoir (1885–1952), filmmaker Jean Renoir (1894–1979) and ceramic artist Claude Renoir (1901–69). He was the grandfather of the filmmaker Claude Renoir (1913–1993), son of Pierre.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir was born in Limoges, Haute-Vienne, France, the child of a working-class family. As a boy, he worked in a porcelain factory where his drawing talents led to his being chosen to paint designs on fine china. Before he enrolled in art school, he also painted hangings for overseas missionaries and decorations on fans.  During those early years, he often visited the Louvre to study the French master painters.

In 1862, he began studying art under Charles Gleyre in Paris. There he met Alfred Sisley, Frédéric Bazille, and Claude Monet. At times, during the 1860s, he did not have enough money to buy paint. Although Renoir first

Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Pierre-Auguste Renoir

started exhibiting paintings at the Paris Salon in 1864, recognition did not come for another ten years, due, in part, to the turmoil of the Franco-Prussian War.

During the Paris Commune in 1871, while Renoir painted on the banks of the Seine River, some Communards thought he was a spy and were about to throw him into the river when a leader of the Commune, Raoul Rigault, recognized Renoir as the man who had protected him on an earlier occasion.

In 1874, a ten-year friendship with Jules Le Cœur and his family ended, and Renoir lost not only the valuable support gained by the association, but also a generous welcome to stay on their property near Fontainebleau and its scenic forest. This loss of a favorite painting location resulted in a distinct change of subjects.

Le Moulin de la Galette- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Le Moulin de la Galette- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Renoir experienced his initial acclaim when six of his paintings were hung in the first Impressionist exhibition in 1874. In the same year, two of his works were shown with Durand-Ruel in London.

In 1881, he traveled to Algeria, a country he associated with Eugène Delacroix, then to Madrid, to see the work of Diego Velázquez. Following that, he traveled to Italy to see Titian’s masterpieces in Florence and the paintings of Raphael in Rome. On 15 January 1882 Renoir met the composer Richard Wagner at his home in Palermo, Sicily. Renoir painted Wagner’s portrait in just thirty-five minutes. In the same year, after contracting pneumonia which permanently damaged his respiratory system, Renoir convalesced for six weeks in Algeria.

In 1883, Renoir spent the summer in Guernsey, creating fifteen paintings in little over a month. Most of these feature Moulin Huet, a bay in Saint Martin’s, Guernsey. Guernsey is one of the Channel Islands in the English Channel, and it has a varied landscape that includes beaches, cliffs and bays. These paintings were the subject of a set of commemorative postage stamps issued by the Bailiwick of Guernsey in 1983.

While living and working in Montmartre, Renoir employed Suzanne Valadon as a model, posing for him (The Bathers, 1885–87; Dance at Bougival, 1883) and many of his fellow painters while studying their techniques; eventually she became one of the leading painters of the day.

In 1887, the year when Queen Victoria celebrated her Golden Jubilee, and upon the request of the queen’s associate, Phillip Richbourg, Renoir

La Grenouillere (Bathing at la Grenouiller) -Pierre-Auguste Renoir

La Grenouillere (Bathing at la Grenouiller) -Pierre-Auguste Renoir

donated several paintings to the “French Impressionist Paintings” catalog as a token of his loyalty.

In 1890, he married Aline Victorine Charigot, who, along with a number of the artist’s friends, had already served as a model for Le Déjeuner des canotiers (Luncheon of the Boating Party, 1881), and with whom he had already had a child, Pierre, in 1885. After his marriage, Renoir painted many scenes of his wife and daily family life including their children and their nurse, Aline’s cousin Gabrielle Renard. The Renoirs had three sons, Jean Renoir became a filmmaker of note, Pierre Renoir, became a stage and film actor.

The Two Sister on the Terrace- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

The Two Sister on the Terrace- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Around 1892, Renoir developed rheumatoid arthritis. In 1907, he moved to the warmer climate of “Les Collettes,” a farm at Cagnes-sur-Mer, close to the Mediterranean coast. Renoir painted during the last twenty years of his life even when he was wheelchair-bound and arthritis severely limited his movement. He developed progressive deformities in his hands and ankylosis of his right shoulder, requiring him to change his painting technique. It has often been reported that in the advanced stages of his arthritis, he painted by having a brush strapped to his paralyzed fingers, but this is erroneous; Renoir remained able to grasp a brush, although he required an assistant to place it in his hand. The wrapping of his hands with bandages, apparent in late photographs of the artist, served to prevent skin irritation.

In 1919, Renoir visited the Louvre to see his paintings hanging with those of the old masters. During this period, he created sculptures by cooperating with a young artist,Richard Guino, who worked the clay. Due to his limited joint mobility, Renoir also used a moving canvas, or picture roll, to facilitate painting large works.

Renoir’s portrait of Austrian actress Tilla Durieux (1914) contains playful flecks of vibrant color on her shawl that offset the classical pose of the actress and highlight Renoir’s skill just 5 years before his death.

Renoir died in the village of Cagnes-sur-Mer, Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur, on 3 December 1919.

Renoir’s paintings are notable for their vibrant light and saturated colour, most often focusing on people in intimate and candid compositions. The female nude was one of his primary subjects. In characteristic Impressionist style, Renoir suggested the details of a scene through freely brushed

La Roge- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

La Roge- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

touches of color, so that his figures softly fuse with one another and their surroundings.

His initial paintings show the influence of the colorism of Eugène Delacroix and the luminosity of Camille Corot. He also admired the realism of Gustave Courbet and Édouard Manet, and his early work resembles theirs in his use of black as a color. Renoir admired Edgar Degas’ sense of movement. Another painter Renoir greatly admired was the 18th-century master François Boucher.[14]

A fine example of Renoir’s early work and evidence of the influence of Courbet’s realism, is Diana, 1867. Ostensibly a mythological subject, the painting is a naturalistic studio work; the figure carefully observed, solidly modeled and superimposed upon a contrived landscape. If the work is a ‘student’ piece, Renoir’s heightened personal response to female sensuality is present. The model was Lise Tréhot, the artist’s mistress at that time, and inspiration for a number of paintings.

In the late 1860s, through the practice of painting light and water en plein air (outdoors), he and his friend Claude Monet discovered that the color of shadows is not brown or black, but the reflected color of the objects surrounding them; an effect today known as diffuse reflection. Several pairs of paintings exist in which Renoir and Monet worked side-by-side, depicting the same scenes (La Grenouillère, 1869).

A Girl with a Watering Can, 1876- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

A Girl with a Watering Can, 1876- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

One of the best known Impressionist works is Renoir’s 1876 Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette (Bal du moulin de la Galette). The painting depicts an open-air scene, crowded with people at a popular dance garden on the Butte Montmartre close to where he lived. The works of his early maturity were typically Impressionist snapshots of real life, full of sparkling color and light. By the mid-1880s, however, he had broken with the movement to apply a more disciplined formal technique to portraits and figure paintings, particularly of women, as in The Bathers, created during 1884–87. It was a trip to Italy in 1881, when he saw works by Raphael and other Renaissance masters, that convinced him that he was on the wrong path, and for the next several years he painted in a more severe style in an attempt to return to classicism. Concentrating on his drawing and emphasizing the outlines of figures, this is sometimes called his “Ingres period”.

After 1890 he changed direction again. To dissolve outlines, as in his earlier work, he returned to thinly brushed color. From this period onward he concentrated on monumental nudes and domestic scenes, fine examples of which are Girls at the Piano, 1892, and Grandes Baigneuses, 1887. The latter painting is the most typical and successful of Renoir’s late, abundantly fleshed nudes.

A prolific artist, he created several thousand paintings. The warm sensuality of Renoir’s style made his paintings some of the most well-known and frequently-reproduced works in the history of art. The single largest collection of his works—181 paintings in all—is at the Barnes Foundation, in Philadelphia.

Biography is from wikipedia.

“The pain passes, but the beauty remains.”
― Pierre-Auguste Renoir

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  It was quite a challenge, but I think I pulled it off. 🙂 It’s a self-portrait of myself as a child. I will see you tomorrow on Day 354.

Best,

Linda

Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 352- Alice Neel- “Art is Art”

It’s Day 352 and it was fun painting today’s piece.  I’m not sure if I got the artist’s style quite right, but I did choose quite the awkward photo to paint…so hopefully I captured the artist’s spirit.  Please join me in honoring Alice Neel today.  She was such a great artist.  I love the subjects of her pieces and in my opinion I thought she was way ahead of her time with her style and content.

Alice Neel

Alice Neel

Geoffrey Hendricks and Brian, 1978- Alice Neel

Geoffrey Hendricks and Brian, 1978- Alice Neel

Alice Neel (January 28, 1900 – October 13, 1984) was an American visual artist, who was particularly well known for oil painting and for her portraits depicting friends, family, lovers, poets, artists and strangers. Her paintings are notable for their expressionistic use of line and color, psychological acumen, and emotional intensity. Neel was called “one of the greatest portrait artists of the 20th century” by Barry Walker, curator of modern and contemporary art at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, which organized a retrospective of her work in 2010.

Alice Neel was born on January 28, 1900 in Merion Square, Pennsylvania to George Washington Neel, an accountant for the Pennsylvania Railroad, and Alice Concross Hartley Neel. In mid-1900, her family moved to the rural town of Colwyn, Pennsylvania. She was the third of four children. She was raised into a straight-laced middle-class family during a time when there were limited expectations and opportunities for women. Her mother had said to her, “I don’t know what you expect to do in the world, you’re only a girl.

In 1918, after graduating High School, she took the Civil Service exam and got a high-paying clerical position in order to help support her parents. After three years of work, taking art classes by night in Philadelphia, Neel enrolled in the Fine Art program at the Philadelphia School of Design for

Self-Portrait- Alice Neel

Self-Portrait- Alice Neel

Women (now Moore College of Art) in 1921. She graduated in 1925.  Neel often said that she chose to attend an all-girls school so as not to be distracted from her art by the temptations of the opposite sex.

She met an upper-class Cuban painter in 1924 named Carlos Enríquez at the Chester Springs summer school run by PAFA. They were wed on 1 June 1925 in Colwyn, Pennsylvania. After marrying Neel eventually moved to Havana to live with Enríquez’s family. In Havana, Neel was embraced by the burgeoning Cuban avant-garde, a set of young writers, artists and musicians. In this environment Neel developed the foundations of her lifelong political consciousness and commitment to equality.  During this time, she had 7 servants and lived in a mansion.

Nancy And Olivia- Alice Neel

Nancy And Olivia- Alice Neel

Neel’s daughter, Santillana, was born on 26 December 1926 in Havana. In 1927, though, the couple returned to the United States to live in New York. Just a month before Santillana’s first birthday, she died of diphtheria. The trauma caused by Santillana’s death infused the content of Neel’s paintings, setting a precedent for the themes of motherhood, loss, and anxiety that permeated her work for the duration of her career.

Shortly following Santillana’s death, Neel became pregnant with her second child. On 24 November 1928, Isabella Lillian (called Isabetta) was born in New York City. Isabetta’s birth was the inspiration for Neel’s “Well Baby Clinic”, a bleak portrait of mothers and babies in a maternity clinic more reminiscent of an insane asylum than a nursery.

In the spring of 1930, Carlos had given the impression that he was going overseas to look for a place to life in

Andy Warhol- Alice Neel

Andy Warhol- Alice Neel

Paris. Instead, he returned to Cuba, taking Isabetta with him. Mourning the loss of her husband and daughter, Neel suffered a massive nervous breakdown, was hospitalized, and attempted suicide. She was placed in the suicide ward of the Philadelphia General Hospital.

Even in the insane asylum, she painted. Alice loved a wretch. She loved the wretch in the hero and the hero in the wretch. She saw that in

all of us, I think.

— Ginny Neel, Alice’s daughter-in-law

Abe's Grandchildren- Alice Neel

Abe’s Grandchildren- Alice Neel

Deemed stable almost a year later, Neel was released from the sanatorium in 1931 and returned to her parents’ home. Following an extended visit with her close friend and frequent subject, Nadya Olyanova, Neel returned to New York.

There Neel painted the local characters, including Joe Gould, whom she famously depicted in 1933 with multiple penises, which represented his inflated ego and “self-deception” about who he was and his unfulfilled ambitions. The painting, a rare survivor of her early works, has been shown at Tate Modern.

During the Depression, Neel was one of the first artists to work for the Works Progress Administration. At the end of 1933, Neel was hired to make a painting every six weeks. She had been living in poverty. She had an affair with a man named Kenneth Doolittle who was a heroin addict and a sailor. In 1934, he set afire 350 of her watercolors, paintings and drawings.  At this time, her husband Carlos proposed to reunite, although in the end the couple neither reunited nor officially filed for divorce.

Her world was composed of artists, intellectuals, and political leaders of the Communist Party, all of whom became

The De Vegh Twins, 1975- Alice Neel

The De Vegh Twins, 1975- Alice Neel

subjects for her paintings.  Her work glorified subversion and sexuality, depicting whimsical scenes of lovers and nudes, like a watercolor she made in 1935, Alice Neel And John Rothschild In The Bathroom, which showed the naked pair peeing. In the 1930s Neel gained a degree of notoriety as an artist, and established a good standing within her circle of downtown intellectuals and Communist Party leaders. While Neel was never an official Communist Party member, her affiliation and sympathy with the ideals of Communism remained constant.

Babies- Alice Neel

Babies- Alice Neel

In 1939 Neel gave birth to her first son, Richard, the child of Jose Santiago, a Puerto Rican night-club singer whom Neel met in 1935. Neel moved to Spanish Harlem.  She began painting her neighbors, particularly women and children. José left Neel in 1940.

Neel’s second son, Hartley, was born in 1941 to Neel and her lover, the communist intellectual Sam Brody. During this Forties, Neel made illustrations for the Communist publication, Masses & Mainstream, and continued to paint portraits from her uptown home. However, in 1943 the Works Progress Administration ceased working with Neel

, which made it harder for the artist to support her two sons. During this time Neel would shoplift and was on welfare to help make ends meet. Between 1940 and 1950, Neel’s art virtually disappeared from galleries, save for one solo show in 1944. In the 1950s, Neel’s friendship with Mike Goldand his admiration for her social realist work garnered her a show at the Communist-inspired New Playwrights Theatre. In 1959, Neel even made a film appearance after the director Robert Frank asked her to appear alongside a young Allen Ginsberg in his classic Beatnik film, Pull My Daisy. The following year, her work was first reproduced in ARTnews magazine.

Toward the end of the 1960s, interest in Neel’s work intensified. The momentum of the women’s movement led to increased attention, and Neel became an icon for feminists. In 1970, she was commissioned to paint the feminist activist Kate Millett for the cover of Time magazine. Millett refused

White Chapel- Alice Neel

White Chapel- Alice Neel

to sit for Neel; consequently, the magazine cover was based off a photograph.

By the mid-1970s, Neel had gained celebrity and stature as an important American artist. In 1979, President Jimmy Carter presented her with a National Women’s Caucus for Artaward for outstanding achievement. Neel’s reputation was at its height at the time of her death in 1984.

Neel’s life and works are featured in the documentary Alice Neel, which premiered at the 2007 Slamdance Film Festival and was directed by her grandson, Andrew Neel. The film was given a New York theatrical release in April of that year.

In 1974, Neel’s work was given a retrospective exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art, and posthumously, in the summer of 2000, also at the Whitney. The first exhibition dedicated to Neel’s works

Alice Neel

Alice Neel

in Europe was held in London in 2004 at the Victoria Miro Gallery. Jeremy Lewison, who had worked at the Tate, was the curator of the collection. In 2001 the Philadelphia Museum of Art organized a retrospective of her art entitled Alice Neel. She was the subject of a retrospective entitled Alice Neel: Painted Truths organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston in Texas, which was on view from March 21-June 15, 2010. The exhibition traveled to Whitechapel Gallery, London, and Moderna Museet Malmö, Malmö, Sweden. In 2013, the first major presentation of the artist’s watercolors and drawings was on view at Nordiska Akvarellmuseet in Skärhamn, Sweden.

Biography is from wikipedia.

When I was in my studio I didn’t give a damn what sex I was… I thought art is art. (Alice Neel)

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  It was taken from a real life awkward photo.  I feel like if I had more time I could’ve perfected her style a bit more, but that’s okay.  I enjoyed it and I will see you tomorrow on Day 352.

Best,

Linda

 

Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Side-View Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Side-View
Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Day 313- Francisco De Goya- Light and Shadow

It’s Day 313 and I’m nervous because I’m paying tribute to one of my favorite painters today and there’s no way I’m going to paint exactly like him…but I tried and accomplished it somewhat.  I decided to focus on his “Black Paintings” series because of the intrigue and style.  I thought I could capture those a little easier since I only have one day!  I’m also working with acrylics and crackle paint and not oils so that’s another constraint.  Other than that I like how my piece turned out.  Join me in honoring Francisco De Goya today!

Self-Portrait at 69 years- Francisco De Goya

Self-Portrait at 69 years- Francisco De Goya

Don Manuel Osorio Manrique de Zuniga(oil on canvas)- Francisco De Goya

Don Manuel Osorio Manrique de Zuniga(oil on canvas)- Francisco De Goya

Francisco de Goya y Lucientes was born on March 30, 1746, in Fuendetodos, a village in northern Spain. The family later moved to Saragossa, where Goya’s father worked as a gilder. At about 14 young Goya was apprenticed to Jose Luzan, a local painter. Later he went to Italy to continue his study of art.

On returning to Saragossa in 1771, he painted frescoes for the local cathedral. These works, done

Old Men- Francisco De Goya

Old Men- Francisco De Goya

in the decorative rococo tradition, established Goya’s artistic reputation. In 1773 he married Josefa Bayeu, sister of Saragossa artist Francisco Bayeu. The couple had many children, but only one–a son, Xavier–survived to adulthood.

From 1775 to 1792 Goya painted cartoons (designs) for the royal tapestry factory in Madrid. This was the most important period in his artistic development. As a tapestry designer, Goya did his first genre paintings, or scenes from everyday life.

Lucientes- Francisco De Goya

Lucientes- Francisco De Goya

The experience helped him become a keen observer of human behavior. He was also influenced by neoclassicism, which was gaining favor over the rococo style. Finally, his study of the works of Velazquez in the royal collection resulted in a looser, more spontaneous painting technique.

At the same time, Goya achieved his first popular success. He became established as a portrait painter to the Spanish aristocracy. He was elected to the Royal Academy of San Fernando in 1780, named painter to the king in 1786, and made a court painter in 1789.

A serious illness in 1792 left Goya permanently deaf. Isolated from others by his deafness, he became increasingly occupied with the fantasies and inventions of his imagination and with critical and satirical observations of mankind. He evolved a bold, free new style close to caricature. In 1799 he

Satan Devouring His Son- Francisco De Goya

Satan Devouring His Son- Francisco De Goya

published the Caprichos, a series of etchings satirizing human folly and weakness. His portraits became penetrating characterizations, revealing their subjects as Goya saw them. In his religious frescoes he employed a broad, free style and an earthy realism unprecedented in religious art.

Monk Talking to an Old Woman- Francisco De Goya

Monk Talking to an Old Woman- Francisco De Goya

Goya served as director of painting at the Royal Academy from 1795 to 1797 and was appointed first Spanish court painter in 1799. During the Napoleonic invasion and the Spanish war of independence from 1808 to 1814, Goya served as court painter to the French. He expressed his horror of armed conflict in The Disasters of War, a series of starkly realistic etchings on the atrocities of war. They were not published until 1863, long after Goya’s death.

Upon the restoration of the Spanish monarchy, Goya was pardoned for serving the French, but his work was not favored by the new king. He was called before the Inquisition to explain his earlier portrait of The Naked Maja, one of the few nudes in Spanish art at that time.

In 1816 he published his etchings on bullfighting, called the Tauromaquia. From

Witches' Sabbath- Francisco De Goya

Witches’ Sabbath- Francisco De Goya

1819 to 1824 Goya lived in seclusion in a house outside Madrid. Free from court restrictions, he adopted an increasingly personal style. In the Black Paintings, executed on the walls of his house, Goya gave expression to his darkest visions. A similar nightmarish quality haunts the satirical Disparates, a series of etchings also called Proverbios.

Old Men Eating Soup- Francisco De Goya

Old Men Eating Soup- Francisco De Goya

In 1824, after the failure of an attempt to restore liberal government, Goya went into voluntary exile in France. He settled in Bordeaux, continuing to work until his death there on April 16, 1828. Today many of his best paintings hang in Madrid’s Prado art museum. (From WebMuseum)

Biography is from www.franciscodegoya.net.

I’m sure if you’re not familiar with Goya’s art it would seem gloomy, but keep in mind that I’m focusing on his black paintings…which I read somewhere that he never really intended on people seeing.  I love the story of these paintings and I think they are very haunting and wonderful!  I hope you enjoy my piece for today and I will see you tomorrow on Day 314!

Best,

Linda

 

Please Don't Kill Me- Tribute to Francisco De Goya Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Crackle Paint on Canvas

Please Don’t Kill Me- Tribute to Francisco De Goya
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Crackle Paint on Canvas

Side-View Please Don't Kill Me- Tribute to Francisco De Goya Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Crackle Paint on Canvas

Side-View
Please Don’t Kill Me- Tribute to Francisco De Goya
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Crackle Paint on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Please Don't Kill Me- Tribute to Francisco De Goya Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Crackle Paint on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Please Don’t Kill Me- Tribute to Francisco De Goya
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Crackle Paint on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Please Don't Kill Me- Tribute to Francisco De Goya Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Crackle Paint on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Please Don’t Kill Me- Tribute to Francisco De Goya
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Crackle Paint on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Please Don't Kill Me- Tribute to Francisco De Goya Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Crackle Paint on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Please Don’t Kill Me- Tribute to Francisco De Goya
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Crackle Paint on Canvas