Day Eighty-Eight- William Hawkins- Bold and Original

It’s Day 88 and I think I may have found my new favorite artist.  William Hawkins!  I hadn’t had him on my original list, but was researching Art Brut artists and happened to stumble across his work.  I’m inspired to buy his books and if I had the money his original artwork!  Love it.  Join me in celebrating him today.

WIlliam Hawkins

WIlliam Hawkins

As proudly inscribed on most of his paintings, William Hawkins was born in Kentucky on July 27,

William Hawkins

William Hawkins

1895, though he spent much of his adult life in and around Columbus, Ohio, where he first moved in 1916 to avoid a shotgun wedding.

One of the most highly regarded African-American self-taught artists of the twentieth century, Hawkins worked tirelessly at numerous jobs—often simultaneously—ranging from breaking horses and running numbers to industrial steel casting and truck driving. He served in the Army in World War One, working burial details in France. Hawkins began painting in the 1930s, though he only dedicated himself exclusively to art around 1979, when he was discovered by neighboring artist Lee Garrett, leading to national attention and what collectors generally describe as his mature period.

 

King Kong- William Hawkins

King Kong- William Hawkins

Tending to paint with a single brush and semigloss enamels on large plywood and Masonite surfaces, he often worked from his own black-and-white photographs of buildings and animals, boldly articulating his unique, expressionistic interpretations of architectural form, religious subjects, and nature studies in bright color and broad, patterned brushstrokes.

By the time of his death in 1990, Hawkins had amassed a body of work comprising

Two Dinosaurs Wrestling- William Hawkins

Two Dinosaurs Wrestling- William Hawkins

approximately 500 paintings and pencil drawings (not counting his lost early pieces), gradually turning toward human figuration in his final years. His highly personal visions of architecture and pop cultural themes are generally rendered in a restrained palette, sometimes including collaged found objects or images to designate depth and dimension in lieu of conventional perspective or detail.

Elk with Human Eyes- William Hawkins

Elk with Human Eyes- William Hawkins

William Hawkins is one of America’s most widely exhibited and collectable self-taught painters, and his work can be found at the American Folk Art Museum, New York; the High Museum of Art, Atlanta; the National Gallery, Washington, D.C.; and in Ohio at the Columbus Museum of Art and the Akron Art Museum.

Biography is from Fleisher-Ollman gallery website.

William Hawkins was born in Kentucky on July 27, 1895, though he spent much of his

William Hawkins

William Hawkins

adult life in and around Columbus, Ohio, where he moved in 1916 to avoid a shotgun wedding. One of the most highly regarded African American self taught artists of the twentieth century, Hawkins worked tirelessly at numerous jobs—often simultaneously—ranging from breaking horses and running numbers to industrial steel casting and truck driving. Hawkins said that he began painting in the 1930s, though he only dedicated himself exclusively to art around 1979, when he was discovered by artist Lee Garrett, leading to national attention and what collectors generally describe as his mature period.

Last Supper- William Hawkins

Last Supper- William Hawkins

Tending to paint with a single brush and semigloss enamels on large plywood and Masonite surfaces, he often worked from magazine images or his own black-and-white photographs of buildings and animals, boldly articulating his unique, expressionistic interpretations of architectural forms, religious subjects, and nature studies in bright color and broad, patterned brushstrokes.

By the time of his death in 1990, Hawkins had amassed a body of work comprising approximately 500 paintings and pencil drawings (not

Jumbo Elephant- William Hawkins

Jumbo Elephant- William Hawkins

counting his lost early pieces). His highly personal visions of architecture and pop cultural themes are generally rendered in a restrained palette, sometimes including collaged found objects or images to designate depth and dimension in lieu of conventional perspective or detail.

This biography is from a great site Foundation for Self Taught Artists.

I hope you can see why I love this artist so much.  I just took a look at his work and fell in love with concept of it.  What a neat man.

Guess I'll do a moose!

Guess I’ll do a moose!

The problem with this artist is that I had too many ideas…so I decided to just start painting and not think about it too much.  Even as I type this, I’m thinking of other things I want to add to my painting.  Sheesh…just stop and do a bigger piece later Linda. (That’s what I’m saying to myself.)

I hope you enjoy my tribute to Mr. Hawkins and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 89!  11 more tip’ a hundred.

Best, Linda

Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Close-Up 3 Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 4 Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 4
Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

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