Day 364- Karli Donna Young- Detach This Part

It’s Day 364 and I’m so happy and excited to do a tribute in honor of my very best friend who happens to be a great artist as well.  I’m so lucky to live with her and see her art everyday AND see her create her art.  Please join me in honoring Karli Donna Young today!

Karli Donna Young

Karli Donna Young

1921- Karli Donna Young

1921- Karli Donna Young

In the beginning there was Me, Carley Young, born and raised in a small town just outside of Vancouver, Canada. Growing up I loved horror movies, Stephen King novels, cartoons and making stuff out of other stuff (a gift from my mother, a crafty person in her own right).

I was an only child early on and spent lots of time pretending I lived inside of a John Bellairs book. I started painting in high school, but it didn’t really stick.

Me Me Me- Karli Donna Young

Me Me Me- Karli Donna Young

I couldn’t focus on just one thing. I tried sewing and knitting, photography and writing poetry. Again, nothing really stuck. I wanted to do too many things all at once. That’s still kinda true.

My mom says, lovingly, that I am like a lump of coal….there is a diamond in there somewhere, I just need to apply the appropriate pressure and time. I think she’s right.

Detach This Part- Karli Donna Young

Detach This Part- Karli Donna Young

I don’t want to be ONE thing. I want to be ALL the things. A painter, a quilter, a photographer and a ukulele superstar. I want to build furniture and sew dresses, paint signs and tap dance.

It’s hard to say why I make art, or why I make art the way that I do. I think I like to make things that are aesthetically pleasing to me or things that tap into

That Dream I had that One Time- Karli Donna Young

That Dream I had that One Time- Karli Donna Young

my own sense of nostalgia. I am in love with my childhood and all the magic that it holds for me.

I think that love comes through in all the things that I do, artistic or otherwise. I guess I just like to stand back once a project is complete, point and say “I MADE THAT”. I like the sense of accomplishment.

Drippy Painting- Karli Donna Young

Drippy Painting- Karli Donna Young

Oh, and I like to put glitter on everything.

I currently live on top of a big hill in El Cerrito, CA. where I ride bikes, make art, play ukulele and pretend I live inside a John Bellairs book.

~

Yay! I had so much fun doing today’s penultimate piece.  Glitter and great colors.  How lucky was I to be able to ask the artist herself throughout my creation any questions I had while creating my piece?  She also accompanied me to the art store to buy supplies this morning!  Including some oils for tomorrow’s Bob Ross tribute!  The FINAL painting!  I will see you then…on Day 365!  Woweeeee!

Best,

Linda

Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Side-View Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Side-View
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

 

Day 359- Paul Duhem- Locked Doors

It’s Day 359 and it’s Christmas Day!  Merry Christmas to you all.  I had a great time doing today’s piece and now I have to cook a bunch of food for my husband, brother and myself and try to have a nice relaxing day.  Please join me in honoring Paul Duhem today!  I wanted to honor his style, but also honor today’s holiday. 🙂

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem was born in Blandain, Belgium. He left school at 14 and worked as a farmhand for various agricultural concerns. During the Second World War he went to Germany, where he laid rails for the railways. Going to France at the end of the war, he was arrested for his collaboration with the Germans. But not being in full possession of all his faculties, he was transferred from prison to a psychiatric hospital before being employed as a labourer in farms in the region.

In 1977 he was admitted to a home where he did horticulture. Twelve years later, at the age of 70, Paul Duhem started to draw within the framework of a

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

workshop. He devoted himself to this activity, continuing until he died.

The human figure is a recurrent motif in his compositions. He drew the same face, which can be interpreted as a self-portrait, over and over again in an obsessive manner, declining it in series, introducing subtle variations in shape, rhythm and color.

Biography above is from Art Brut.com’s website.

Paul Duhem had been institutionalized for more than 40 years and was well into his seventies when he established a grueling quota for himself. He made up his mind that he wanted to produce six artworks a day, every day, for the remainder

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

of his life. Each morning after taking breakfast at a hospital for mental patients in southern Belgium, he brought out his crayons and jars of paint and crayons and, in the three or four hours before lunch, produced three new drawings. Then, in the hours between lunch time and dinner, he turned out three more works. Duhem’s subjects mostly took just two forms — a sad-eyed homme whom everybody understood to be Paul himself, and also the locked doors that he encountered everywhere in the mental institution.

Duhem was born in Blandain, a farming region. Because his parents were too poor to care for all their children, he was mostly

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

raised by grandparents. He attended school until his fourteenth year, and then left to work on a farm. Duhem was serving in the Belgium Army during World War II when, after being wounded and suffering shell shock, he was taken captive and held for two years in a German concentration camp.

Duhem finally resumed the life of a farmhand, but the war and prison years had taken a toll on his mentalstability. Diagnosed as schizophrenic, he was admitted to a mental institution in 1977. Because of his years as a farm worker, Duhem was given assignments as a gardener and groundskeeper at the institution.

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

In 1990, after beginning to show fragility of health, he was retired as a day worker. Soon after, he started producing colored drawings, at first turning out works with a variety of subjects, including birds, floral still-lifes and windmills, and then gradually limited his art to his own visage and the locked doors. He was 81 when he died in the summer of 1999.

Duhem’s work is widely admired art brut enthusiasts today, and is to be found

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

in nearly every significant museum collection of art brut in Europe. A large Paul Duhem museum show was presented in Brussels in 2001. The show then traveled to museums in France and The Netherlands.

Biography is from Dean Jensen Gallery’s website.
I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I had a great time painting it.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 360.  Then only 5 paintings left.  I can hardly believe it.
Best,
Linda
Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 358- Mark Ryden- “True Magic is All Around Us”

It’s Day 358 and I can’t believe my project is coming to an end.  It’s also Christmas eve and I think my plan is to try and relax tonight!  My arm is hurting and last night we had a holiday get together with friends.  I’m ready to give my elbow a huge rest in the new year!  BUT today I spent a large portion of my day tackling my painting.  It was extremely challenging and difficult.  One of my favorite artists and one of the most difficult in my opinion regarding his style and the materials I dealt with.  Please join me in honoring Mark Ryden today.

Mark Ryden

Mark Ryden

Mark Ryden

Mark Ryden

Mark Ryden (born January 20, 1963) is an American painter, part of the Lowbrow (or Pop Surrealist) art movement. He was dubbed “the god-father of pop surrealism” by Interview Magazine. Ryden’s aesthetic is developed from subtle amalgams of many sources: from Ingres, David and other French classicists to Little Golden Books. Ryden also draws his inspiration from anything that will evoke mystery; old toys, anatomical models, stuffed animals, skeletons and religious ephemera found in flea markets.

Ryden was born in Medford, Oregon on January 20, 1963, but raised in Southern California. Ryden is the son of Barbara and Keith Ryden. His

Mark Ryden

Mark Ryden

father made a living painting, restoring and customizing cars.  He has two sisters and two brothers, one a fellow artist named Keyth Ryden, who works under the name KRK. Ryden graduated from the Art Center College of Design inPasadena, in 1987.

From 1988 to 1998 Ryden made his living as a commercial artist. During this period Ryden created numerous album covers including, Michael Jackson’s Dangerous, Red Hot Chili Peppers’ One Hot Minute, and Aerosmith’s Love in an Elevator.

Fur Girl- Mark Ryden

Fur Girl- Mark Ryden

Also during this time, Ryden created book covers including Stephen King’s novel Desperation and The Regulators. Ryden made a living as a commercial artist until his work was taken up by Robert Williams, a former member of the Zap Comix collective, who in 1994 put it on the cover of Juxtapoz, a magazine devoted to “lowbrow art”.

Ryden’s solo debut show entitled “The Meat Show” was in Pasadena, California in 1998. Meat is a reoccurring theme in Ryden’s work. Ryden observes the disconnect in our contemporary culture between meat we use for food and the living, breathing creature it comes from. “I suppose it is this contradiction that

Mark Ryden

Mark Ryden

brings me to return to meat in my art.” According to Ryden, meat is the physical substance that makes all of us alive and through which we exist in this reality. All of us are wearing our bodies, which are like a garment of meat.

A midcareer retrospective, “Wondertoonel,” which refers to a cabinet of curiosities or Wunderkammer (“wonder-room”), was co-organized in 2004 by the Frye Museum in Seattle and the Pasadena Museum of California Art. It was the best attended exhibition since the Frye Art Museum opened in 1952, and also broke attendance records in Pasadena. Debra Byrne, curator at the Frye at the time of Ryden’s exhibition, placed Ryden’s work in the camp of the

Yoshi the Forest Spirit- Mark Ryden

Yoshi the Forest Spirit- Mark Ryden

carnivalesque—a strain of visual culture rooted in such works as Hieronymous Bosch’s Garden of Earthly Delights. According to the Russian author and literary critic Mikhail Bakhtin (1895–1975), there are three forms of carnivalesque art—the ritualized spectacle, the comic composition and various genres of billingsgate (foul language)—all three of which are interwoven in Ryden’s work.

In 2007, “The Tree Show” opened at the Michael Kohn Gallery, Los Angeles. In this show Ryden explores the modern human experience of nature.  Ryden explains “Some people look at these massive trees and feel a sort of spiritual awe looking at them, and then other people just want to cut them up and sell them, they only see a commodity”. Ryden has created limited editions of his art to raise money for the Sierra Club and Nature Conservancy.

In 2009, Ryden’s exhibition “The Snow Yak Show” was shown at the Tomio Koyama Gallery in Tokyo. In this

The Butcher Bunny- Mark Ryden

The Butcher Bunny- Mark Ryden

exhibition Ryden’s compositions were more serene and suggestive of solitude, peacefulness and introspection.

In 2010, “The Gay 90’s: Old Tyme Art Show” debuted at Paul Kasmin Gallery in New York. The central theme the show referenced the idealism and sentimentalism of the 1890s while addressing the role of kitsch and nostalgia in our current culture. Here Ryden explores the line between attraction and repulsion to kitsch. According to The New York Times, “Ryden’s pictures hint at the psychic stuff that pullulates beneath the sentimental, nostalgic and naïve surface of modern kitsch.”

Ryden’s “The Tree of Life” painting was included in the exhibition “The Artist’s Museum, Los Angeles Artists 1980-2010” at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA). The exhibition showcased artists who have helped shape the artistic dialogue in Los Angeles since the founding of MOCA over 30 years ago. Ryden hung on the same wall as Robert Williams.

Mark Ryden

Mark Ryden

On May 13, 2014, Ryden released an album entitled ‘The Gay Nineties Old Tyme Music: Daisy Bell,’ that features Tyler the Creator,Weird Al, Katy Perry, Stan Ridgway of Wall Of Voodoo, and Danny Elfman, Mark Mothersbaugh of Devo, Nick Cave, Kirk Hammettof Metallica, and Everlast, all giving a different rendition of the same song, Daisy Bell (Bicycle Built for Two). The proceeds from the signed and limited edition record, benefited Little Kids Rock, a nonprofit that supports musical education in disadvantaged elementary schools.

Ryden has two children, Rosie and Jasper. In 2009 he married artist Marion Peck in the Pacific Northwest rainforest. He currently lives in Eagle Rock, California, where he shares a studio with his wife.

Biography is from wikipedia.

“There is a very dark and painful side to life, but that is natural. People in our culture think they should never be unhappy. They think that being unhappy is unnatural. They try to make it go away. They take pills or they go to therapy to “fix” themselves. They blame themselves or others for their suffering. We need to understand that sadness is as much a part of life as joy. It would be easy just to get bitter and cold while focusing on the dark side, but there is also an amazing, wonderful side of life. If you look for it, there is true magic all around us. Maybe that sounds trite to the hardened, self-protective modern ego, but there is magiv in this miraculous life. If you open yourself up, you do make yourself vulnerable to pain but the deeper the pain you experience, the deeper joy you have.”   ― Mark Ryden

I decided to do a simple Mark Ryden tribute…painting on the wood was a little more challenging than I expected.  Again, I’m using acrylics and not oils so blending was hard and I don’t think I primed and prepped the wood as good I as I could’ve.  His paintings have such a soft look to them which for me is especially hard to emulate.  But I did something!  I think it turned out okay.  🙂  I’m sad, but also kind of excited to have this project end soon.  I think my body and brain need a rest and to get back to doing some of my other passions…like writing!

I will see you tomorrow on Day 359!  Best, Linda

Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Side-VIew Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Side-VIew
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 1 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 1
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 2 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 2
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 3 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 3
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

 

Day 354- Mark P. Wilson- For Your Amusement

It’s Day 354 and I am so excited to pay tribute to another close buddy of mine…one of my bestest friends!  I’ve known him for years and we used to draw together all the time when I lived in Seattle and I couldn’t believe how hard I laughed at the characters he used to come up with.  I am constantly pushing him to do more art, draw comics and eventually make cartoons because I truly believe it’s one of his greatest talents.  Please join me in honoring Mark P. Wilson today!  I asked him to write his own biography as well.  It’s kind of short and I also wanted to pack his art into it.  Hope you don’t mind!

Mark P. Wilson

Mark P. Wilson

Magical Unicorn Tea Party- Mark P. Wilson

Magical Unicorn Tea Party- Mark P. Wilson

Biography, huh?  Well, I was born in March 13, 1976 and raised in Cedar Falls, IA.  I watched a ton of cartoons growing up and always enjoyed them all, even the crappy 70s low budget corner cutting ones and the weird asian import ones with bad dubbing.  I also really love the really old ones the Ub Iwerks, Max Fleischer, and Silly Symphonies stuff.

When Pee-wee’s Playhouse came out, I totally freaked out and was an obsessive fan.  Loved reading comics

Space Gramps- Mark P. Wilson

Space Gramps- Mark P. Wilson

(from Donald Duck and Harvey comics to Archie comics to superhero stuff) and satire magazines like Mad and Cracked and was very inspired by my older brothers attempts at this style of satire, which consisted mostly of poop jokes.

My Uncle Bruce was an abstract painter and his pieces hung around our house.  They were an influence throughout my childhood.  Also, our Grandma used to wear these wigs to work and she gave her old clothes and wigs to my mom for dress-up clothes for the daycare and those got a ton of use and appear in many of our movies as well.  I think that inspire some of the outfits my characters wear.

Mark P. Wilson

Mark P. Wilson

I was also really into sugar cereal mascots and marketing and McDonald land and all that Sid and Marty Krofft stuff.  I liked making up continued stories using these characters that seemed so obviously limited and disposable in nature.   I think my work is very crude/unpolished but the ideas are fun and the emotion comes through.  I tend to use bold black lines and bright colors because I’m a big fan of stain-glass windows.  I try to make my work have that same luminescent feel.

I think that I make art now for the same reason that I started doing it, to amuse myself and others.    I moved to Seattle

Karmic Vortex- Mark P. Wilson

Karmic Vortex- Mark P. Wilson

when I was 19 and eventually met Linda Cleary there and she showed me Michael Kupperman’s work and forced me to do a bunch of drawings and that started setting some things in motion.

I need to work more consistently, recently I’ve been into the idea of animating some of these creatures and hopefully that will actually happen (I have the software).

I currently live in Seoul, Korea and teach kindergarten.  I love encouraging

Mark P. Wilson

Mark P. Wilson

the kids with art projects inspired by their individual creativity.  In Korea there tends to be an element of conformity and I try to get the kids to trust their own artistic instincts.

~

I hope you enjoy my tribute today.  I had a ton of fun painting it.  It brought back memories and inspired me to get back into doodling and creating some fun absurd characters.

I will see you tomorrow on Day 355!  Only 10 more left!

Best,
Linda

How 2 Be Cool- Tribute to Mark P. Wilson Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Pen and Ink on Canvas

How 2 Be Cool- Tribute to Mark P. Wilson
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Pen and Ink on Canvas

Side-View How 2 Be Cool- Tribute to Mark P. Wilson Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Pen and Ink on Canvas

Side-View
How 2 Be Cool- Tribute to Mark P. Wilson
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Pen and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 1 How 2 Be Cool- Tribute to Mark P. Wilson Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Pen and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 1
How 2 Be Cool- Tribute to Mark P. Wilson
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Pen and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 2 How 2 Be Cool- Tribute to Mark P. Wilson Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Pen and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 2
How 2 Be Cool- Tribute to Mark P. Wilson
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Pen and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 3 How 2 Be Cool- Tribute to Mark P. Wilson Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Pen and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 3
How 2 Be Cool- Tribute to Mark P. Wilson
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Pen and Ink on Canvas

 

 

 

Day 348- Robert Yellowhair- Vibrant Navajo Art

It’s Day 348 and I am excited about today’s artist that was recommended by my daddy-in-law Andy Lavin.  The story of how he acquired his Yellowhair painting is below.  Please join me in honoring Robert Yellowhair today!

Robert Yellowhair

Robert Yellowhair

Robert Yellowhair

Robert Yellowhair

A full blooded Navajo, Yellowhair was born Aug. 8, 1937 in a hogan at Na-Ah-Tee Canyon, 35 miles north of Holbrook, Arizona. Yellowhair would frequent the trading post with his father, and this was the site of his first art show. Waiting patiently one day he found some colored rock, he began sketching on a nearby wall. His audience was some of the older Navajos, who were giving him advice on every subject he drew. They were his teachers, critics as well as his teachers. Soon he would have to mstand on his horse to reach the blank areas of the barn. Today some of those barn drawings are still visible. In the early 1950’s the trader Charley McGee gave Yellowhair his first watercolor set. A few days later he sold his first painting to McGee for 50 cents.

Considered one of the Navajo nation’s finest painters. His award-winning work is featured in many fine southwestern galleries, and one of his pieces can found in the White House.

The distinguishing hallmark of Yellowhair’s work is the fresh, clean, vibrant color and the intricate detail which gives his paintings a three dimensional quality.

His love of art began at an early age. As a youngster, while waiting for his father outside the trading post, he began sketching on the side of a rusty old tin barn. Soon the entire side of the old building was filled with his sketches.

Yellowhair attended the Carson Indian School in Carson, Nevada, and there fell in love with the paintings of

Robert Yellowhair

Robert Yellowhair

Charles Russell. He spent hours studying the reproductions and in 1955 began to paint seriously, hoping to someday emulate the man who had impressed him so.

His primary medium is oil on canvas. His style is realistic impressionism and he is very accomplished at this. Yellowhair certainly achieved his goal of emulating his idol.

Biography is from his Facebook page and various pages I found online including Adobe Gallery.  Many of the photos are also from his Facebook page.

Robert Yellowhair

Robert Yellowhair

Here’s a story that my father-in-law (who recommended I do this artist!) sent to me about acquiring his Robert Yellowhair painting.

I am not really an art collector, so buying this painting was an impulse purchase for sure and this story only proves this point.

We had moved to Arizona so I could get my MBA from Arizona State University in the summer of 1976.  I had moved out in advance of Ann and the boys in July to set up our new home and get acclimated to Arizona.  They joined me later that summer once Matthew was old enough to travel.  He was all of 6 weeks old.

Our plan was to for me to complete the degree in a year and then move back to our home in Ohio and find work.  But Ann fell in love with Arizona and we decided to sell the Ohio

Robert Yellowhair

Robert Yellowhair

house and buy a horse property in Scottsdale instead.  Of course, I still needed to find work and thankfully, Motorola was willing to give me a chance as a two way radio salesperson.  I got a car, health insurance, $11,000 base salary with a potential to make another $5,000 to $10,000 in commissions.  I was thrilled.

The good news was that I had a job, the not so good news was my sales territory was 100 miles from my house and covered some of the most unpopulated land in the Northern Arizona.  I had to leave our home every Monday early and drive two hours on back country roads just to get to the nearest part of my territory.  I stayed in the territory until Thursday evening and then drove home to my family.  I remember every turn and bump on that drive.  It was beautiful, but could be treacherous especially in the winter.  This was mountain country and really in the middle of nowhere.

The most central town with some amenities was Show Low Arizona.  This was the quintessential western cowboy town.  The name of the town was a result of two ranchers not being able to

The art studio at casa de Yellowhair

The art studio at casa de Yellowhair

decide who should be the mayor so they decided to draw cards with who drew the low card being declared the winner.  In other words, “show low” and you win.  I did not make this up.

I stayed at one of the two motels in Show Low, the Paint Pony.  It was newer, but did not have a restaurant so I ate breakfast and dinner every day at the other motel across the street.  Both motels, the bank, one of the gas stations, and several other businesses where owned by the same pioneer family and the matriarch used hang out at the restaurant all the time.  She seemed ancient to me, but probably was not much older then 60 and she would tell tales and gossip with all the regulars.  Everyone called her Mama.

Robert Yellowhair

Robert Yellowhair

The motel had a very nice collection of Indian art, baskets, pottery, etc. and I always wondered how such a simple place could have such beautiful things.  Then one day as I was eating breakfast an older Indian gentleman walked in with some pottery and went directly to see Mama.  She spoke with him briefly, some money changed hands and a few pieces of pottery were added to the collection.

That evening over dinner, I asked Mama about the transaction and she explained that every once in a while one of the Indian artist from the nearly Hopi and Navajo reservation would drop by to offer her some art.  She said that they knew to only come if they were willing to give it up for a good price.  I told her that I might be interested and could she let me know if such an opportunity came by again.  She said she would and I left hoping I could “steal” a great piece of art.

Now I didn’t know anything about Native American art but I had been to the galleries in Scottsdale, and I knew that some

Detail of Robert Yellowhair painting

Detail of Robert Yellowhair painting

of it brought a very handsome price and it sure looked like the same stuff Mama had in her motel, so I was pretty excited about the prospects.  I felt that since I was a regular customer and someone she would see over and over again, that she would not try to play me for a rube, but the thought did cross my mind.  Then sure enough, a few weeks later, Mama approached me and let me know that she had heard from an artist who was a little hard up for cash and wanted to sell her some paintings.  She told me to be at the restaurant at 8:00 that night and she would introduce me to Robert Yellowhair.

Robert Yellowhair

Robert Yellowhair

The Navajo and Hope reservations were part of my territory and I even had a famous artist as a customer, Charles Laloma.  Charles was a Hopi and so was Robert, so I was hoping for something special.  Robert looked the part, kind of big and round with a inscrutable expression.

A man of few  words, but nice enough.  He showed me four painting and I choose the one you have seen.  I asked him to write a description on the back of the painting and to sign it and he

Robert Yellowhair

Robert Yellowhair

graciously obliged.  I gave him some cash.  It could not have been much since I didn’t have much at the time, but he seemed satisfied and Mama thought it was a good deal so I was happy.

The painting is probably not worth much, but the experience was special to me.  I felt like I became part of a place that I would not likely ever be again and had just a little brush with the history of Arizona.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today and my father-in-law’s lovely story!  It was such a challenging painting because Yellowhair’s art is so vibrant and detailed.  I’m still contemplating sending a message to him to let him know that I did a tribute…but it always makes me nervous even though I know most people would be honored.  I probably will!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 349.  The countdown begins!  Only 17 left…

Best,

Linda

Navajo Dancers- Tribute to Robert Yellowhair Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Navajo Dancers- Tribute to Robert Yellowhair
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Navajo Dancers- Tribute to Robert Yellowhair Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Navajo Dancers- Tribute to Robert Yellowhair
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Navajo Dancers- Tribute to Robert Yellowhair Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Navajo Dancers- Tribute to Robert Yellowhair
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Navajo Dancers- Tribute to Robert Yellowhair Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Navajo Dancers- Tribute to Robert Yellowhair
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Navajo Dancers- Tribute to Robert Yellowhair Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Navajo Dancers- Tribute to Robert Yellowhair
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

 

Day 346- Kelly Moore- Absurdity is My Friend

It’s Day 346 and I have an improv show tonight and things to get done today…so I’ve finished my painting and I

Kelly Moore

Kelly Moore

am excited to honor today’s artist.  Please join me in honoring Kelly Moore today!  I’ve compiled information about him from various sites.

Kelly Moore

Kelly Moore

Kelly Moore is a Self Taught Artist who has no formal training or education in art. His Original, Expressive work has been referred to as Outsider Art, Art Brut, Raw Art and Visionary Art. His intuitive style and technique reflects a raw, primitive quality that is frequently juxtaposed with a startling innocence.

From the website- www.artistaday.com

Toxic Alternatives-Kelly Moore

Toxic Alternatives-Kelly Moore

i paint at the flea market

on the tesuque reservation in new mexico.

and i am a completely self taught full time artist.

Massacre- Kelly Moore

Massacre- Kelly Moore

folks have described my work

as art brut, folk and even outsider art

personally

i think i am my own

genre of art

i am a flea market artist

From his website. www.kellymoore.net.

Review of Absurdity is My Friend available on amazon.com.

Aliens- Kelly Moore

Aliens- Kelly Moore

This is a well produced book outlining the work of self-taught artist Kelly Moore from New Mexico, where he shows his work at the local Tesuque Pueblo Market. Large color reproductions fill the volume and are accompanied by Moore’s poems and photographs of his desert environment and surrounding landscape.

His colourful paintings are composed of a whole variety of strange figures and beasts often in a carnival

Desert Light- Kelly Moore

Desert Light- Kelly Moore

procession across the surface or set within a distant landscape.

Other compositions are more involved with lettering, swirling, colors, thick impasto and dark surrounding atmosphere, while others show different series of strange figures, including ghosts, or ornamental beasts lined up in rows before one’s eyes. An attractive book which is an impressive documentation of Moores work. –Raw Vision Magazine

ABSURDLY MOVING ART

I met absurdity out West and now he’s a friend of mine. I stole that,

Brave- Kelly Moore

Brave- Kelly Moore

actually, from the title of a book published by an artist we discovered at a flea market outside Santa Fe. What’s absurd is that Kelly Moore isn’t as well known as Thornton Dial or Howard Finster. He’s so outside art that he actually makes art outside – almost year round, in his Tesuque Flea Market “stall.” He bungie-cords this three-sided gallery closed during the week, more to keep out the snow or desert summer heat than thieves.

If it was just the wack-factor, I probably wouldn’t be writing a blog about this guy. We have plenty of crazy right here in Beaufort, South Carolina. But Kelly Moore’s work stopped me cold and it was 97 degrees out at the time with forest fires burning on two sides. He was adding the finishing touches to an unframed canvass in the one triangle of shade inside his flea market stall, listening to Sixto Rodriguez on a battery-powered CD player.

“You ever hear this guy?” said the painter. “He blows my mind.” I had, actually, just a few days earlier when I

Billy the Kid- Kelly Moore

Billy the Kid- Kelly Moore

watched “Searching for Sugarman.” Rodriguez gives away the money he earns — now that he’s been rediscovered. Kelly Moore gave me a copy of his book of paintings and poems.

He writes with even less punctuation and spell check that Word autocorrects for – stream of consciousness from a mind determined to swim against the stream. Describing his painting is more difficult. There’s something so personal, and gripping about the unrestrained figures, dreams and animals he paints that it’s impossible to art-speak it away. He tries, mostly in self-deprecating quips about failure and rejection.

"Dead Cowboy Totem" by New Mexico flea market artist Kelly Moore

“Dead Cowboy Totem” by New Mexico flea market artist Kelly Moore

He wanted me to be sure to mention his body odor and his three-photo-only policy for not sucking away his soul. He scuffed the dust off a metal sewer cover that a friend sent him from New Orleans after the hurricane – in case I needed a portal to get the hell away from him in a hurry. It was not-so-subtle satire from a man rebuffed for not being native enough, primitive enough, awe-struck-by-art-schools enough for the outsider art word to champion.

So I will, for what it’s worth. I’m not an art scholar but I’ve been lucky enough to look at art around the world. With Kelly’s work, I didn’t even have to leave this country to be transported. It lifted me out of the representational, the familiar, the pretty and took me on darker dreams to wilder places. Great art is like that. It’s a connection that transcends language or culture, whether you live in a camper or a castle or paint in a studio or a shed in the desert.

Above is from Teresa Bruce Books Blog, Right Brain Safari.

I hope you enjoy my tribute piece today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 347!  I’m definitely buying his book!  And you should too!

Best,

Linda

Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 341- Len Jessome- Need To Create

It’s Day 341 and I really had a great time with today’s painting.  I love the style and somewhat therapeutic effect it had on me.  Please join me in honoring Len Jessome today.  I couldn’t find a photo of him online so I decided to use a self portrait.

Autoportrait- Len Jessome

Autoportrait- Len Jessome

Jesus wouldn't like it - Len Jessome

Jesus wouldn’t like it – Len Jessome

Canadian artist , Leonardo Jessome was born in 1963 in Hamilton, where he lives and works. He left his career in 2000 to devote himself full time to his artistic activity.  Its very singular work is already present in many private collections in North America and Europe.

His work is based on the human condition and man’s place in contemporary society . He painted portraits of rare intensity in a unique graphical style .

His inner demons led him naturally to the raging street art but it’s

Almost Happy- Len Jessome

Almost Happy- Len Jessome

not the bomb attack that the artist but his canvases with brushes in a raw style , powerful and free.

Biography is from Galerie Sylvie’s site.

i have a manic need to create—my work is based on the temporality and fragility of life and all the experiences life may encompass. i use whatever medium is available to express an idea. sometimes i use house paint, industrial rust paint and / or mix these with artists paints, each has a unique property and express ideas differently.
 
I Love You- Len Jessome

I Love You- Len Jessome

flowing industrial paint achieves different results than artists oil. as in life not everything mixes as perfectly as one might hope, exceptions are made to the exclusion of others. as a result my work may patina and change over time.

It is the capturing of the idea that is key. the patina records the passage of

Darkness I Wish I Was Yours- Len Jessome

Darkness I Wish I Was Yours- Len Jessome

time. the style of my work changes often, expanding my awareness and perceptions.

i like that my paintings live in many parts of the world. snippets of my thoughts and feelings scattered around this earth that will remain when i am no longer here.
Len Jessome

Len Jessome

Above is from Len Jessome’s blog.

I hope you enjoy my piece for today!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 342!
Best,
Linda
Always Lurking...-Tribute to Len Jessome Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Always Lurking…-Tribute to Len Jessome
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Always Lurking...-Tribute to Len Jessome Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Always Lurking…-Tribute to Len Jessome
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Always Lurking...-Tribute to Len Jessome Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Always Lurking…-Tribute to Len Jessome
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Always Lurking...-Tribute to Len Jessome Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Always Lurking…-Tribute to Len Jessome
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Always Lurking...-Tribute to Len Jessome Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Always Lurking…-Tribute to Len Jessome
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 337- Daniel Higgs- Art of the Cosmos

It’s Day 337 and I am a huge fan of today’s artist/musician.  His art is amazing and I love the band Lungfish.  Please join me in honoring Daniel Higgs today.

Daniel Higgs

Daniel Higgs

Whale- Daniel Higgs

Whale- Daniel Higgs

Daniel Arcus Incus Ululat Higgs is a musician and artist from Baltimore, Maryland on whose behalf superlatives are destined to fail. It’s not that his artistic output – spanning three decades, numerous albums, books of poetry and collections of drawings – simply eludes classification, it defies it.

Often we hear that a true work of art is meant to speak for itself, and with the work of Daniel Higgs the maxim rings truer than ever. His art is of the cosmos,

DANIEL HIGGS "Cryptozoomorphic Hierograms" Exhibition

DANIEL HIGGS “Cryptozoomorphic Hierograms” Exhibition

we on Earth merely lucky that it happens to be confined to our atmosphere, in our lifetime.

Higgs is known primarily for his work as the sole lyricist and frontman of the band Lungfish, a four-piece dedicated to charting, in this listener’s estimation, nothing short of the evolution of all species, known and unknown.

Daniel Higgs

Daniel Higgs

That the band has undertaken this pursuit in the guise of a humble rock outfit, in the absence of any public relations fanfare, metanarrative, or manifesto has been enough to endear them to tens of thousands. They are enshrined as one of America’s last true folk bands, and Higgs anointed as a patron saint to artistic purity.

In recent years, Higgs has released a number of solo outings that can only be described as the ultimate in isolation, worlds away from the hypnotic, communal rock of his band. On Atomic Yggdrasil

Daniel Higgs

Daniel Higgs

Tarot, Higgs weaves meditative, casually ruptured drones using acoustic and electric guitar, upright pianos, banjo and jew’s harp, recorded entirely at home on cassette recorder. He pairs the music with a series of paintings that call to mind religious iconography passed through the disfiguring surrealism of Miro.

Stay Cold- Daniel Higgs

Stay Cold- Daniel Higgs

Higgs has wedded his music and his visual art into a singular being, meant to be encountered as a conjuring force similar to that of the tarot experience. The yggdrasil is the great tree of Norse myth that connects all worlds of cosmology.

Passing into Christian folklore, the tree is said to connect heaven and earth. In his relentless pursuit of the indivisible, Higgs travels

The Hieroglyphic Ideal- Daniel Higgs

The Hieroglyphic Ideal- Daniel Higgs

up and down this spine and hatches a new transubstantiation of sound and image into life-form.

Biography is from Thrill Jockey.

I wish I had room to put more of his art!  I hope you also enjoy my tribute piece as well!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 338.

Best,

Linda

The Rebirth of Yggdrasil- Tribute to Daniel Higgs Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

The Rebirth of Yggdrasil- Tribute to Daniel Higgs
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View The Rebirth of Yggdrasil- Tribute to Daniel Higgs Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
The Rebirth of Yggdrasil- Tribute to Daniel Higgs
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 The Rebirth of Yggdrasil- Tribute to Daniel Higgs Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
The Rebirth of Yggdrasil- Tribute to Daniel Higgs
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 The Rebirth of Yggdrasil- Tribute to Daniel Higgs Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
The Rebirth of Yggdrasil- Tribute to Daniel Higgs
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 The Rebirth of Yggdrasil- Tribute to Daniel Higgs Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
The Rebirth of Yggdrasil- Tribute to Daniel Higgs
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 336- Henry Darger Jr.- In the Realms of the Unreal

It’s Day 336 and I’ve been excited to do this artist for a long time.  I knew it was going to be challenging and I think I had too many ideas that my brain got a bit jumbled.  Well, I finally did it and I think I’m pretty happy with it.  Please join me in honoring Henry Darger Jr. today!

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

Hands of Fire- Henry Darger Jr.

Hands of Fire- Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Joseph Darger, Jr. (April 12, 1892 – April 13, 1973) was a reclusive American writer and artist who worked as a hospital custodian in Chicago, Illinois. He has become famous for his posthumously discovered 15,145-page, single-spaced fantasy manuscript called The Story of the Vivian Girls, in What is Known as the Realms of the Unreal, of the Glandeco-Angelinian War Storm, Caused by the Child Slave Rebellion, along with several hundred drawings and watercolor paintings illustrating the story.

The visual subject matter of his work ranges from idyllic scenes in Edwardian interiors and tranquil flowered landscapes populated by children and fantastic creatures, to scenes of horrific terror and

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

carnage depicting young children being tortured and massacred. Much of his artwork is mixed media with collage elements. Darger’s artwork has become one of the most celebrated examples of outsider art.

Darger was born in Chicago, Illinois, to Rosa Fullman and Henry Darger, Sr. on April 12, 1892. Cook County records show that he was born at his home, located at 350 W. 24th Street. When he was four years old, his mother died of puerperal fever after having given birth to a daughter, who was given up for adoption; Henry Darger never knew his sister. One of Darger’s biographers, the art historian and psychologist John M. MacGregor, discovered that Rosa had two children before Henry, but did not discover their whereabouts.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

By Darger’s own report, his father, Henry Sr., was kind and reassuring to him, and they lived together until 1900. In that year, the crippled and impoverished Darger Sr. had to be taken to live at St. Augustine’s Catholic Mission home and his son was placed in a Catholic boys’ home. Darger Sr. died in 1905, and his son was institutionalized in the Illinois Asylum for Feeble-Minded Children in Lincoln, Illinois, with the diagnosis, according to Stephen Prokopoff, that “Little Henry’s heart is not in the right place”. According to John MacGregor, the diagnosis was actually “self-abuse” (at the time, this term was a euphemism for masturbation, rather than self-injury).

Darger himself felt that much of his problem was being able to see through adult lies and becoming a ‘smart-aleck’ as a result, which often led to his being disciplined by teachers and ganged up on by classmates. He also went through a lengthy phase of feeling compelled to make strange noises (perhaps as a result of Tourette Syndrome) which irritated others. The Lincoln asylum’s practices included forced labor and severe punishments, which Darger seems to have worked into In the Realms of the Unreal. He later said that, to be

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

fair, there were also good times there, he enjoyed some of the work, and he had friends as well as enemies. While he was there, he received word that his father had died. A series of attempted escapes ended successfully in 1908, the 16-year-old returned to Chicago and, with the help of his godmother, found menial employment in a Catholic hospital and in this fashion continued to support himself until his retirement in 1963.

Except for a brief stint in the U.S. Army during World War I, his life took on a pattern that seems to have varied little: he attended Mass daily, frequently returning for as many as five services; he collected and saved a bewildering array of trash from the streets. His dress was shabby, although he attempted to keep his clothes clean and mended. He was largely solitary; his one close friend, William Schloeder, was of like mind on the subject of protecting abused and neglected children, and the pair proposed founding a “Children’s Protective Society”, which would put such children up for adoption to loving families. Schloeder left Chicago sometime in the mid-1930s, but he and Darger stayed in touch through letters until Schloeder’s death in 1959. Darger biographer Jim Elledge suggests that Darger and Schloeder may have had a romantic relationship while Schloeder lived in Chicago.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

In 1930, Darger settled into a second-floor room on Chicago’s North Side, at 851 W. Webster Avenue, in the Lincoln Park section of the city, near the DePaul Universitycampus. It was in this room, for 43 years, that Darger imagined and wrote his massive tomes (in addition to a 10-year daily weather journal and assorted diaries) until his death in April 1973 in St. Augustine’s Catholic Mission home (the same institution in which his father had died). In the last entry in his diary, he wrote: “January 1, 1971. I had a very poor nothing like Christmas. Never had a good Christmas all my life, nor a good new year, and now… I am very bitter but fortunately not revengeful, though I feel should be how I am…”

Darger is buried in All Saints Cemetery in Des Plaines, Illinois, in a plot called “The Old People of the Little Sisters of the Poor Plot”. Darger’s headstone is inscribed “Artist” and “Protector of Children”.

In the Realms of the Unreal is a 15,145-page work bound in fifteen immense, densely typed volumes (with three of them consisting of several hundred illustrations, scroll-like watercolor paintings on paper derived from magazines and coloring books) created over six decades. The majority of the book, The Story of the Vivian Girls,

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

in What is Known as the Realms of the Unreal, of the Glandeco-Angelinian War Storm Caused by the Child Slave Rebellion, follows the adventures of the daughters of Robert Vivian, seven princesses of the Christian nation of Abbieannia who assist a daring rebellion against the evil regime of child slavery imposed by John Manley and the Glandelinians.

Children take up arms in their own defense and are often slain in battle or viciously tortured by the Glandelinian overlords. The elaborate mythology includes the setting of a large planet, around which Earth orbits as a moon (where most people are Christian and mostly Catholic), and a species called the “Blengigomeneans” (or Blengins for short), gigantic winged beings with curved horns who occasionally take human or part-human form, even disguising themselves as children. They are usually benevolent, but some Blengins are extremely suspicious of all humans, due to Glandelinian atrocities. Darger illustrated his stories using a technique of traced images cut from magazines and catalogues, arranged in large panoramic landscapes and painted in watercolours, some as large as 30 feet wide and painted on both sides. He wrote himself into the narrative as the children’s protector.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

Once released from the asylum, Darger repeatedly attempted to adopt a child, but his efforts failed. Images of children often served as his inspiration, particularly a portrait from the Chicago Daily News from May 9, 1911: a five-year-old murder victim, named Elsie Paroubek. The girl had left home on April 8 of that year telling her mother she was going to visit her aunt around the corner from her home. She was last seen listening to an organ grinder with her cousins. Her body was found a month later in a sanitary district channel near the screen guards of the powerhouse at Lockport, Illinois. An autopsy found she had probably been suffocated—not strangled, as is often stated in articles about Darger. Paroubek’s disappearance and murder, her funeral, and the subsequent investigation, were the subjects of a huge amount of coverage in the Daily News and other papers at the time.

This newspaper photo was part of a growing personal archive of clippings Darger had been gathering. There is no indication that the murder or the news photo and article had any particular significance for Darger, until one day he could not find it. Writing in his journal at the time, he began to process this forfeiture of yet another

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

child, lamenting that “the huge disaster and calamity” of his loss “will never be atoned for”, but “shall be avenged to the uttermost limit”. According to his autobiography, Darger believed the photo was among several items that were stolen when his locker at work was broken into. He never found his copy of the photograph again. Because he couldn’t remember the exact date of its publication, he couldn’t locate it in the newspaper archive. He carried out an elaborate series of novenas and other prayers for the picture to be returned.

The fictive war that was sparked by Darger’s loss of the newspaper photograph of the murdered girl, whose killer was never found, became Darger’s magnum opus. He had been working on some version of the novel before this time (he makes reference to an early draft which was also lost or stolen), but now it became an all-consuming creation.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

In The Realms of the Unreal, Elsie is imagined as Annie Aronburg, the leader of the first child slave rebellion. “The assassination of the child labor rebel Annie Aronburg… was the most shocking child murder ever caused by the Glandelinian Government” and was the cause of the war. Through their sufferings, valiant deeds and exemplary holiness, the Vivian Girls are hoped to be able to help bring about a triumph of Christianity. Darger provided two endings to the story, one in which the Vivian Girls and Christianity are triumphant and another in which they are defeated and the godless Glandelinians reign.

Darger’s human figures were rendered largely by tracing, collage, or photo enlargement from popular magazines and children’s books (much of the “trash” he collected was old magazines and newspapers, which he clipped for source material). Some of his favorite figures were the Coppertone Girl and Little Annie Rooney. He is praised for his natural gift for composition and the brilliant use of color in his watercolors. The images of daring escapes, mighty battles, and painful torture are reminiscent not only of epic films such as Birth of a Nation (which Darger might easily have seen) but of events in Catholic history; the text makes it clear that the child victims are heroic martyrs like the early saints.

One idiosyncratic feature of Darger’s artwork is its apparent transgenderism. Many of his subjects which appear

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

to be girls are shown to have penises when unclothed or partially clothed. Darger biographer Jim Elledge speculates that this represents a reflection of Darger’s own childhood issues with gender identity and homosexuality.  Darger’s second novel, Crazy House, deals with these subjects more explicitly.

In a paraphrase of the Declaration of Independence, Darger wrote of children’s right “to play, to be happy, and to dream, the right to normal sleep of the night’s season, the right to an education, that we may have an equality of opportunity for developing all that are in us of mind and heart”.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

A second work of fiction, provisionally titled Crazy House: Further Adventures in Chicago, contains over 10,000 handwritten pages. Written after The Realms, it takes that epic’s major characters—the seven Vivian sisters and their companion/secret brother, Penrod—and places them in Chicago, with the action unfolding during the same years as that of the earlier book. Begun in 1939, it is a tale of a house that is possessed by demons and haunted by ghosts, or has an evil consciousness of its own. Children disappear into the house and are later found brutally murdered. The Vivians and a male friend are sent to investigate and discover that the murders are the work of evil ghosts. The girls go about exorcising the place, but have to resort to arranging for a full-scale Holy Mass to be held in each room before the house is clean. They do this repeatedly, but it never works. The narrative ends mid-scene, with Darger having just been rescued from the Crazy House.

In 1968, Darger became interested in tracing some of his frustrations back to his childhood and began writing The History of My Life. Spanning eight volumes, the book only spends 206 pages detailing Darger’s early life before veering off into 4,672 pages of fiction about a huge twister called “Sweetie Pie”, probably based on memories of a tornado he had witnessed in 1908.

Despite Darger’s unusual lifestyle and strange behavior, he has not generally been considered mentally ill. This

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

topic is addressed in the biographical film In the Realms of the Unreal, in which Darger, while certainly described as eccentric, is also mentioned to be “in complete control of his life”. MacGregor, in the appendix to his book on Darger, speculates that the most fitting diagnosis is autism, of an Asperger syndrome type.

Darger’s landlords, Nathan and Kiyoko Lerner, came across his work shortly before his death, a day after his birthday, on April 13, 1973. Nathan Lerner, an accomplished photographer whose long career the New York Times wrote “was inextricably bound up in the history of visual culture in Chicago”, immediately recognized the artistic merit of Darger’s work. By this time Darger was in the Catholic mission St. Augustine’s, operated by the Little Sisters of the Poor, where his father had died.

The Lerners took charge of the Darger estate, publicizing his work and contributing to projects such as the 2004 documentary In the Realms of the Unreal. In cooperation with Kiyoko Lerner, Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art dedicated the Henry Darger Room Collection in 2008 as part of its permanent collection. Darger has become internationally recognized thanks to the efforts of people who knew to save his works. After Nathan Lerner’s death in 1997, Kiyoko Lerner became the sole figure in charge of both her husband’s and Darger’s estates. The U.S. copyright representative for the Estate of Henry Darger and the Estate of Nathan Lerner is the Artists Rights Society.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

Darger is today one of the most famous figures in the history of outsider art. At the Outsider Art Fair, held every January in New York City, and at auction, his work is among the highest-priced of any self-taught artist. The American Folk Art Museum, New York City, opened a Henry Darger Study Center in 2001. His work now commands upwards of $80,000.

Since his death in 1973 and the discovery of his massive opus, and especially since the 1990s, there have been many references in popular culture to Darger’s work by other visual artists including, but not limited to, artists of comics and graphic novels; numerous popular songs; a 1999 book-length poem, Girls on the Run, by John Ashbery; a multi-player online game, SiSSYFiGHT 2000, and a 2004 multimedia piece by choreographer Pat Graney incorporating Darger images. Jesse Kellerman’s 2008 novel The Genius took part of its inspiration from Darger’s story. These artists have variously drawn from and responded to Darger’s artistic style, his themes (especially the Vivian Girls, the young heroines of Darger’s massive illustrated novel), and the events in his life.

Jessica Yu’s 2004 documentary In the Realms of the Unreal details Darger’s life and artworks.

Comic book artist Scott McCloud refers to Darger’s work in his book Making Comics, while describing the danger artists encounter in the creation of a character’s back-story. McCloud says that complicated narratives can easily spin out of control when too much unseen information is built up around the characters.

Darger and his work have been an inspiration for several music artists. The Vivian Girls were an all-girl indie/punk trio from Brooklyn; “Henry Darger” is a song by Natalie Merchant on her album Motherland,

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

“Vivian Girls” is song by the band Wussy on their album Left for Dead. “The Vivian Girls Are Visited in the Night by Saint Dargarius and His Squadron of Benevolent Butterflies” is a song by Sufjan Stevens on his album The Avalanche: Outtakes and Extras from the Illinois Album, “The Story of the Vivian Girls” is a song by Comet Gain on their 2005 album City Fallen Leaves, and “Segue: In the Realms of the Unreal” is song by the band …And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead on their album So Divided, “The Vivian Girls” is a 1979 song by Snakefinger (Philip Lithman Roth) also recorded by the Monks of Doom on their album The Cosmodemonic Telegraph Company, “Vivian girls” is a song by the band Fucked Up on their album Hidden World, and “Lost girls” (about Darger’s work) is a song by Tilly and the Wall on their album Bottoms of Barrels. On their 1994 album Triple Mania II, San Diego’s industrial noise performance outfit Crash Worship reworked several Darger images and screen printed them on a copper foil foldout discfolio; as well as the insert and disc.

Darger is the subject of a radio play, Darger and the Detective, by Mike Walker performed by members of the Chicago-based Steppenwolf Theatre Company for BBC Radio 3.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I love his story so I decided to include all the the page.  I hope you enjoy my piece for today and I will see you tomorrow on Day 336.

Best,

Linda

Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr. Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Side-View Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr. Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Side-View
Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr. Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr. Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr. Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

 

Day 331- Grandma Moses- Life, A Good Day’s Work

It’s Day 331…and it’s Thanksgiving!  I thought today’s artist was perfect to pay tribute to on a holiday!  Please join me in honoring Grandma Moses today.  If only we all can find fame (for the first time or again) at the age of 80 and live til the age of 101!  I give thanks to her for pursuing such creativity later in life.

Grandma Moses

Grandma Moses

Anna Mary Robertson Moses (September 7, 1860 – December 13, 1961), better known by her nickname of “Grandma Moses,”was a renowned American folk artist. Having begun painting in earnest at the age of 78, she is often cited as an example of an individual successfully beginning a career in the arts at an advanced age. Her works have been shown and sold in the United States and abroad and have been marketed on greeting cards and other merchandise. Moses’ paintings are among the collections of many museums. The Sugaring Off was sold for US$1.2 million in 2006.

The Burning of Troy- Grandma Moses

The Burning of Troy- Grandma Moses

Moses has appeared on magazine covers, television, and in a documentary of her life. She wrote an autobiography of her life, won numerous awards and was awarded two honorary doctoral degrees.

The New York Times said of her: “The simple realism, nostalgic atmosphere and luminous color with which Grandma Moses portrayed homely farm life and rural countryside won her a wide following. She was able to capture the excitement of winter’s first snow, Thanksgiving preparations and the new, young green of oncoming spring… In person, Grandma Moses charmed wherever she went. A tiny, lively woman with mischievous gray eyes and a quick wit, she could be sharp-tongued with a sycophant and stern with an errant grandchild. ”

Starting at 12 years of age and for a total of 15 years, she was a live-in housekeeper. One of the families that she

Grandma Moses - Christmas at Home

Grandma Moses – Christmas at Home

worked for, who noticed her appreciation for their prints made by Currier and Ives, supplied her with art materials to create drawings. Moses and her husband began their married life in Virginia, where they worked on farms. In 1905 they returned to Northeastern United States and settled in Eagle Bridge, New York. The couple had five children who survived infancy. Her interest in art was expressed throughout her life, including embroidery of pictures with yarn, until arthritis made this pursuit too painful.

Born in Greenwich on September 7, 1860, Anna Mary Robertson was the third of Margaret Shanahan Robertson and Russell King Robertson’s ten children. She was raised with four sisters and five

GRANDMA MOSES The Old Checkered House in Cambridge Valley

GRANDMA MOSES The Old Checkered House in Cambridge Valley

brothers. Her father ran a flax mill and was a farmer. Moses attended a one-room school for a short period of time as a child. That school is now the Bennington Museum in Vermont which has the largest collection of her works in the United States. Moses first painted as a child, using lemon and grape juice to make colors for her “lambscapes”. Other natural materials that she used to create works of art included ground ochre, grass, flour paste, slack lime and sawdust.

She left home and began to work for a wealthy neighboring family at 12 years of age, performing chores on their farm. She continued to keep house, cook and sew for wealthy families for 15 years. One of the families that she worked for, the Whitesides, noticed her interest in their Currier and Ives prints and purchased chalk and wax crayons so that she could create her own artwork.

She was 27 when she worked on the same farm as Thomas Salmon, a “hired man”. They married and established themselves nearStaunton, Virginia where they spent nearly two decades, living and working in turn

Moving Day on the Farm- Grandma Moses

Moving Day on the Farm- Grandma Moses

on four separate local farms. To supplement the family income, Moses made potato chips and churned butter from the milk of a cow that she purchased with her savings. Later, the couple bought a farm.

Moses and her husband had five of ten children born to them survive infancy. Although she loved living in the Shenandoah Valley, in 1905 Anna and Robert moved to a farm in Eagle Bridge, New York at her husband’s urging. Thomas Moses died in 1927 of a heart attack, after which her son Forrest helped her operate the farm. She retired and moved to a daughter’s home in 1936. Anna Mary was known as either “Mother Moses” or “Grandma Moses,” and although she first exhibited as “Mrs. Moses,” the press dubbed her “Grandma Moses,” and the nickname stuck.

Grandma Moses

Grandma Moses

As a young wife and mother, Moses had been creative in her home by, for example, using housepaint to decorate a fireboard in 1918. Moses made embroidered pictures of yarn for friends and family beginning in 1932.  She also created beautiful quilted objects, a form of “hobby art” as defined by Lucy R. Lippard.

Moses had developed arthritis by the age of 76, which made embroidery painful. It was suggested to her by Celestia, her sister, that painting would be easier for her, which spurred Moses’s painting career in her late 70s.

Moses painted scenes of rural life from earlier days, which she called “old-timey” New England landscapes. Moses said that she would “get an inspiration and start painting; then I’ll forget everything, everything except how things used to be and how to paint it so people will know how we used to live.” She omitted features of modern life, like tractors and telephone poles, from her works of art.

Her early style is less individual and more realistic or primitive, despite her lack of knowledge of, or perhaps rejection of, basic perspective. Initially she created simple compositions or copied existing images. As her career advanced she created complicated, panoramic compositions of rural life.

She was a prolific painter, generating over 1,500 canvasses in three decades. Initially Moses charged $3 to $5

Grandma Moses

Grandma Moses

for a painting, depending upon its size, and as her fame increased her works were sold for $8,000 to $10,000. Her winter paintings are reminiscent of some such of the known winter paintings of Pieter Bruegel the Elder, although she had never seen his work. A German fan of her work said, “There emanates from her paintings a light-hearted optimism; the world she shows us is beautiful and it is good. You feel at home in all these pictures, and you know their meaning. The unrest and the neurotic insecurity of the present day make us inclined to enjoy the simple and affirmative outlook of Grandma Moses.”

During a visit to Hoosick Falls in 1938, Louis J. Caldor, who collected art and worked as an engineer in the state of New York, discovered paintings made by Moses in the window of a drug store. He bought their supply and ten more from her Eagle Bridge house for $3 or $5 each. The next year, three Grandma Moses paintings were included in New York’s Museum of Modern Art exhibition entitled “Contemporary Unknown American Painters”. Her first solo exhibition, “What a Farm Wife Painted,” opened in the same city in October 1940 at Otto Kallir’s Galerie St. Etienne. A meet-and-greet with the artist

Grandma Moses

Grandma Moses

and an exhibition of 50 paintings at Gimbel’s Department Store was held next on November 15. Her art displays included samples of her baked goods and preserves that won Moses prizes at the county fair. Her third solo show in as many months, was held at the Whyte Gallery, Washington, D.C. In 1944 she began to be represented by the American British Art Center and the Galerie St. Etienne, which increased her sales. Her paintings were exhibited throughout Europe and the United States over the next 20 years. Otto Kallir established the Grandma Moses Properties, Inc. for her.

Grandma Moses’s paintings were used to publicize American holidays, including Thanksgiving, Christmas and Mother’s Day. During the 1950s, Grandma Moses’s exhibitions broke attendance records around the world. Art historian Judith Stein noted: “A cultural icon, the spry, productive nonagenarian was continually cited as an inspiration for housewives, widows and retirees.” Her paintings were reproduced on Hallmark greeting cards, tiles, fabrics, and ceramics. They were also used to market products, like coffee, lipstick, cigarettes, and cameras.

n 1950, the National Press Club cited her as one of the five most newsworthy women and the National Association of House Dress Manufacturers honored her as their 1951 Woman of the Year. At age 88, Mademoiselle magazine named Grandma Moses a “Young Woman of the Year.” She was awarded two honorary

So Long Till Next Year- Grandma Moses

So Long Till Next Year- Grandma Moses

doctoral degrees. The first was bestowed in 1949 from Russell Sage College and the second two years later from the Moore College of Art and Design.

President Harry S. Truman presented her with the Women’s National Press Club trophy Award for outstanding accomplishment in art in 1949. Jerome Hill directed the 1950 documentary of her life, which was nominated for an Academy Award. In 1952, she published My Life’s History, her autobiography. In it she said “I look back on my life like a good day’s work, it was done and I feel satisfied with it. I was happy and contented, I knew nothing better and made the best out of what life offered. And life is what we make it, always has been, always will be.” In 1955, she appeared as a guest on See It Now, a television program hosted by Edward R. Murrow.

Grandma Moses

Grandma Moses

She was a Society of Mayflower Descendants and Daughters of the American Revolution member. Her 100th birthday was named by New York Governor Nelson Rockefelleras “Grandma Moses Day”. LIFE magazine celebrated her birthday by featuring her on its September 19, 1960 cover. The children’s book “Grandma Moses Story Book” was published in 1961.

Grandma Moses died on December 13, 1961 at 101 years of age in Hoosick Falls, New York at the Health Center. She is buried there at the Maple Grove Cemetery. President John F. Kennedy memorialized her: “The death of Grandma Moses removed a beloved figure from American life. The directness and vividness of her paintings restored a primitive freshness to our perception of the American scene. Both her work and her life helped our nation renew its pioneer heritage and recall its roots in the countryside and on the frontier. All Americans mourn her loss.” After her death, her work was exhibited in several large traveling exhibitions in the United States and abroad.

Biography is from wikipedia.

Painting’s not important. The important thing is keeping busy.

Grandma Moses
Keep in mind that she lived to 101!  Keep busy folks! 😉

I hope you enjoy my piece for today!  I was going to add more figures, but kind of liked the solitude after painting the little girl ice skating. 🙂  I had a nice time doing today’s tribute.  I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 332!  Hope everyone is getting stuffed with food today!  And I am grateful to all these artists that inspire me and continue to inspire me!  I am thankful for art in general for always being there for me in all ways possible.  Aren’t we lucky to live in a world so full of creativity?

Best,

Linda

Next Year's Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Next Year’s Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Next Year's Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Next Year’s Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Next Year's Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Next Year’s Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Next Year's Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Next Year’s Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Next Year's Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Next Year’s Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas