Day Forty-Nine- Robert Rauschenberg- “An Empty Canvas is Full”

It’s Day 49! We’re getting down to the wire on the move so life is so crazy right now.  I still was able to paint a painting!  My canvases and paints are going to be the last things to leave I guess!  Join me in paying tribute to Robert Rauschenberg today.

Robert Rauschenberg

Robert Rauschenberg

Robert Rauschenberg

Robert Rauschenberg

Robert Rauschenberg (October 22, 1925 – May 12, 2008) was an American painter and graphic artist whose early works anticipated the pop art movement. Rauschenberg is well known for his “Combines” of the 1950s, in which non-traditional materials and objects were employed in innovative combinations. Rauschenberg was both a painter and a sculptor and the Combines are a combination of both, but he also worked with photography, printmaking, papermaking, and performance.  He was awarded the National Medal of Arts in 1993.  He became the recipient of the Leonardo da Vinci World Award of Arts in 1995 in recognition of his more than 40 years of fruitful artmaking.

Rauschenberg lived and worked in New York City as well as on Captiva Island, Florida until his

Canyon- Robert Rauschenberg 1959

Canyon- Robert Rauschenberg 1959

death from heart failure on May 12, 2008.

Rauschenberg was born as Milton Ernest Rauschenberg in Port Arthur, Texas, the son of Dora Carolina (née Matson) and Ernest R. Rauschenberg.  His father was of German and Cherokee ancestry and his mother of Anglo-Saxon descent. His parents wereFundamentalist Christians.  Rauschenberg studied at the Kansas City Art Institute and the Académie Julian in Paris, France, where he met the painter Susan Weil. In 1948 Rauschenberg and Weil decided to attend Black Mountain College in North Carolina.

Water Stop 1968 by Robert Rauschenberg

Water Stop 1968 by Robert Rauschenberg

Josef Albers, a founder of the Bauhaus, became Rauschenberg’s painting instructor at Black Mountain. Albers’ preliminary courses relied on strict discipline that did not allow for any “uninfluenced experimentation”. Rauschenberg described Albers as influencing him to do “exactly the reverse” of what he was being taught.

From 1949 to 1952 Rauschenberg studied with Vaclav Vytlacil and Morris Kantor at the Art Students League of New York, where he met fellow artists Knox Martin and Cy Twombly.

Rauschenberg married Susan Weil in 1950. Their only child, Christopher, was born July 16, 1951. They divorced in 1953.  According

Robert Rauschenberg

Robert Rauschenberg

to a 1987 oral history by the composer Morton Feldman, after the end of his marriage, Rauschenberg had romantic relationships with fellow artists Cy Twombly and Jasper Johns.  An article by Jonathan D. Katz states that Rauschenberg’s affair with Twombly began during his marriage to Susan Weil.

Rauschenberg died on May 12, 2008, on Captiva Island, Florida. He died of

Untitled- Robert Rauschenberg

Untitled- Robert Rauschenberg

heart failure after a personal decision to go off life support.  Rauschenberg is survived by his partner of 25 years, artist Darryl Pottorf, his former assistant. Rauschenberg is also survived by his son, photographer Christopher Rauschenberg, and his sister, Janet Begneaud.

Rauschenberg’s approach was sometimes called “Neo Dadaist,” a label he shared with the painter Jasper Johns. Rauschenberg was quoted as saying that he wanted to work “in the gap between art and life” suggesting he questioned the distinction between art objects and everyday objects, reminiscent of the issues raised by the “Fountain”, by Dada pioneer, Marcel Duchamp. At the same time, Johns’ paintings of numerals, flags, and the like, were reprising Duchamp’s message of the role of the observer in creating art’s meaning.

Robert Rauschenberg

Robert Rauschenberg

Alternatively, in 1961, Rauschenberg took a step in what could be considered the opposite direction by championing the role of creator in creating art’s meaning. Rauschenberg was invited to participate in an exhibition at the Galerie Iris Clert, where artists were to create and display a portrait of the owner, Iris Clert. Rauschenberg’s submission consisted of a telegram sent to the gallery declaring “This is a portrait of Iris Clert if I say so.”

From the fall of 1952 to the spring of 1953 Rauschenberg traveled through Europe and North Africa with his fellow artist and partner Cy Twombly. In Morocco, he created collages and boxes out of trash. He took them back to Italy and exhibited them at galleries in Rome and Florence. A lot of them sold; those that did not he threw into the river Arno.  From his stay, 38 collages survived.  In a famously cited incident of 1953, Rauschenberg erased a drawing by de Kooning, which he obtained from his colleague for the express purpose of erasing it as an artistic statement. The result is titled Erased de Kooning Drawing.

By 1962, Rauschenberg’s paintings were beginning to incorporate not only found objects but found images as well – photographs transferred to the canvas by means of the silkscreen process. Previously used only in commercial applications, silkscreen allowed Rauschenberg to address the multiple reproducibility of images, and the consequent flattening of experience that implies. In this respect, his work is contemporaneous with that ofAndy Warhol, and both Rauschenberg and Johns are frequently cited as important forerunners of American Pop Art.

In 1966, Billy Klüver and Rauschenberg officially launched Experiments in Art and Technology (E.A.T.) a non-profit organization

Black Paintings- Robert Rauschenberg

Black Paintings- Robert Rauschenberg

established to promote collaborations between artists and engineers.

In 1969, NASA invited Rauschenberg to witness the launch of Apollo 11. In response to this landmark event, Rauschenberg created his Stoned Moon Series of lithographs. This involved combining diagrams and other images from NASA’s archives with photographs from various media outlets, as well as with his own work.

Black Paintings- Robert Rauschenberg

Black Paintings- Robert Rauschenberg

As of 2003 he worked from his home and studio in Captiva, Florida. His first project on Captiva Island was a 16.5-meter-long silkscreen print called Currents (1970), made with newspapers from the first two months of the year, followed by Cardboards (1970–71) and Early Egyptians (1973–74), the latter of which is a series of wall reliefs and sculptures constructed from used boxes. He also printed on textiles using his solvent-transfer technique to make the Hoarfrosts (1974–76) and Spreads (1975–82), and in the Jammers(1975–76), created a series of colorful silk wall and floor works. Urban Bourbons (1988–95) focused on different methods of transferring images onto a variety of reflective metals, such as steel and aluminum. In addition, throughout the 1990s, Rauschenberg continued to utilize new materials while still working with more rudimentary techniques, such as wet fresco, as in theArcadian Retreat (1996) series, and the transfer of images by hand, as in the Anagrams (1995–2000). As part of his engagement with the latest technological innovations, he began making digital Iris prints and using biodegradable vegetable dyes in his transfer processes, underscoring his commitment to caring for the environment.

Read more of his extensive biography at wikipedia.

I had to dig out old Korean newspaper that my dad packed some stuff in with!  We don't really have newspapers sitting around anymore.

I had to dig out old Korean newspaper that my dad packed some stuff in with! We don’t really have newspapers sitting around anymore.

My specific piece is inspired by a combination of his different art styles.  I was inspired by his

Black, black, black...

Black, black, black…

collage neo-dada pieces that had the moon landing and photos of Kennedy, but also by his Black Paintings.  I combined them and this is what I came up with!  This is one of my sadder and reflective pieces.  I immediately thought of the death of one of my favorite actors Philip Seymour Hoffman and thought I’d pay tribute to him as well as Rauschenberg.

I was so happy to find a huge wad of Korean newspapers and the Stars & Stripes Korea paper that my dad used to package some stuff and send to me.  I layered on so many pieces of newspaper for this piece!  It was fun.  I also used an old wooden/foam board piece instead of a canvas…so it’s slightly bigger than my normal paintings.

Well, I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 50! Whew X 1000!

<3, Linda

Layering and layering and layering...

Layering and layering and layering… 

I love how the paper folds and creases as I paint!

I love how the paper folds and creases as I paint!

Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

Side-View Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

Side-View
Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

Close-Up 1 Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

Close-Up 1
Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

Close-Up 2 Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

Close-Up 2
Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

Close-Up 3 Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

Close-Up 3
Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

 

 

Close-Up 4 Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

Close-Up 4
Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

 

 

 

 

 

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