Day 360- Marcel Duchamp- You Cannot Define Art

It’s Day 360 and now I actually have 5 left to go.  I’ve been putting off today’s artist for a long time because he’s one of my favorites, but I was so nervous about tackling his style.  I’m glad that I waited until the tail end of my project because I feel like I’ve learned/experienced enough to mildly pull it off.  Please join me in honoring Marcel Duchamp today.

Marcel Duchamp

Marcel Duchamp

 

Marcel Duchamp, French  (July 28, 1887- October 2, 1968)

“You cannot define electricity. The same can be said of art. It is a kind of inner current in a human being, or something which needs no definition.”

Chess Players- Marcel Duchamp

Chess Players- Marcel Duchamp

Few artists can boast having changed the course of art history in the way that Marcel Duchamp did. Having assimilated the lessons of Cubism and Futurism, whose joint influence may be felt in his early paintings, he spearheaded the American Dada movement together with his friends and collaborators Picabia and Man Ray. By challenging the very notion of what is art, his first readymades sent shock waves across the art world that can still be felt today.

Duchamp’s ongoing preoccupation with the mechanisms of desire and human sexuality as well as his fondness for wordplay aligns his work with that of Surrealists, although he steadfastly refused to be affiliated with any specific artistic movement per se. In his insistence that art should be driven by ideas above all, Duchamp is generally considered to be the father of Conceptual art.
His refusal to follow a conventional artistic path, matched only by a horror of repetition which accounts for the

Parva Domus, Magna Quies - Marcel Duchamp

Parva Domus, Magna Quies – Marcel Duchamp

relatively small number of works Duchamp produced in the span of his short career, ultimately led to his withdrawal from the art world. In later years, Duchamp famously spent his time playing chess, even as he labored away in secret at his last enigmatic masterpiece, which was only unveiled after his death in 1968.

Coined by Duchamp, the term “readymade” came to designate mass-produced everyday objects taken out of their usual context and promoted to the status of artworks by the mere choice of the artist. A performative act as much as a stylistic category, the readymade had far-reaching implications for what can legitimately be considered an object of art.
Nude Descending a Staircase- Marcel Duchamp

Nude Descending a Staircase- Marcel Duchamp

Duchamp rejected purely visual or what he dubbed “retinal pleasure,” deeming it to be facile, in favor of more intellectual, concept-driven approaches to art-making and, for that matter, viewing. He remained committed, however, to the study of perspective and optics which underpins his experiments with kinetic devices, reflecting an ongoing concern with the representation of motion and machines common to Futurist and Surrealist artists at the time.

A taste for jokes, tongue-in-cheek wit and subversive humor, rife with sexual innuendoes, characterizes Duchamp’s work and makes for much of its enjoyment. He fashioned puns out of everyday expressions which he conveyed through visual

King and Queen surrounded by swift nudes - Marcel Duchamp

King and Queen surrounded by swift nudes – Marcel Duchamp

means. The linguistic dimension of his work in particular paved the way for Conceptual art.

Marcel Duchamp was raised in Normandy, in a family of artists. His father was mayor of Blainville and his mother raised their seven children and painted landscapes depicting the French countryside. Family time was spent playing chess, reading, painting, and playing music.
Fountain 1917, replica 1964 Marcel Duchamp 1887-1968 Purchased with assistance from the Friends of the Tate Gallery 1999

Fountain 1917, replica 1964 Marcel Duchamp 1887-1968 Purchased with assistance from the Friends of the Tate Gallery 1999

One of Marcel’s earliest artworks, Landscape at Blainville (1902), painted at age fifteen, reflected his family’s love of Claude Monet. Marcel was close to his two older brothers, and in 1904, after both had left home to become artists, he joined them in Paris to study painting at Académie Julian. His brother, Jacques Villon, supported him during his studies, and Marcel earned some income by working as a cartoonist. Duchamp’s early drawings evince his ongoing interest in visual and verbal puns.

After he withdrew from the art world, Duchamp remained a passive, if influential, presence in New York avant-garde circles until he was rediscovered in the 1950s by Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns. Duchamp’s insistence that art should be an expression of the mind rather than the eye or the hand spoke to Minimalists and Conceptual artists alike.
It ushered in a new era summed up by Joseph Kosuth’s claim that “all art (after Duchamp) is conceptual (in

Yvonne and Magdeleine Torn in Tatters- Marcel Duchamp

Yvonne and Magdeleine Torn in Tatters- Marcel Duchamp

nature) because art only exists conceptually.” The seminal concept of the mass-produced readymade was eagerly seized upon not only by Andy Warhol and other Pop artists who claimed Duchamp as their founding father but also, owing to its performative aspects, by FluxusArte Povera and Performance artists.

Portrait of Chess Players- Marcel Duchamp

Portrait of Chess Players- Marcel Duchamp

Duchamp’s radical critique of art institutions made him a cult figure for generations of artists who, like him, refused to go down the path of a conventional, commercial artistic career.

Though his work was admired for its wide-ranging use of artistic materials and mediums, it is the theoretical thrust of Duchamp’s eclectic but relatively limited output that accounts for his growing impact on successive waves of twentieth-century avant-garde movements and individual artists who openly acknowledged his influence.

On his attitude about art: “It is paradoxical. It is almost schizophrenic. On one side I worked from a very

Portrait of Dulcinea- Marcel Duchamp

Portrait of Dulcinea- Marcel Duchamp

intellectual form of activity, and on the other de-deifying everything by more materialistic thoughts.”

On the readymade: “The readymade is the consequence of the refusal which made me say: There are so many people who make pictures with their hands, that one should end up not using the hand.”

On chess: “I am still a victim of chess. It has all the beauty of art, and much more. It cannot be commercialized. Chess is much purer than art in its social position.”

Biography is from The Art Story website.

I hope you enjoy my tribute to the great Marcel Duchamp today.  I had a surprisingly relaxing time creating it today!  I wanted to incorporate his love for chess.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 361…I’m going to try and have a relaxing rest of the day now. 🙂

Best,

Linda

Strategy- Tribute to Marcel Duchamp Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Crackle paint on Canvas

Strategy- Tribute to Marcel Duchamp
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Crackle paint on Canvas

Side-View Strategy- Tribute to Marcel Duchamp Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Crackle paint on Canvas

Side-View
Strategy- Tribute to Marcel Duchamp
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Crackle paint on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Strategy- Tribute to Marcel Duchamp Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Crackle paint on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Strategy- Tribute to Marcel Duchamp
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Crackle paint on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Strategy- Tribute to Marcel Duchamp Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Crackle paint on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Strategy- Tribute to Marcel Duchamp
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Crackle paint on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Strategy- Tribute to Marcel Duchamp Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Crackle paint on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Strategy- Tribute to Marcel Duchamp
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Crackle paint on Canvas

Day 332- Georges Braque- Temporal Spaces

It’s Day 332 and I’ve been a little ahead of myself with painting because of the holidays.  I worked on this last night and finished up this morning.  I was very intimidated with today’s artist because of his painting style and I hope today’s piece helps me when I get to Duchamp!  Join me in honoring Georges Braque today. 🙂

Georges Braque

Georges Braque

Georges Braque 1882-1963

Violin and Candlestick- Georges Braque

Violin and Candlestick- Georges Braque

Georges Braque was at the forefront of the revolutionary art movement of Cubism. Braque’s work throughout his life focused on still lifes and means of viewing objects from various perspectives through color, line, and texture. While his collaboration with Pablo Picasso and their Cubist works are best known, Braque had a long painting career that continued beyond Cubism. Braque was also often dedicated to quiet periods in his studio rather than to being a personality in the art world.

Though Braque started out as a member of the Fauves, he began developing a Cubist style after meeting Pablo Picasso. While their paintings shared many similarities in palette, style and subject matter, Braque stated that unlike Picasso, his work was “devoid of iconological commentary,” and was concerned purely with pictorial space and composition.
Braque sought balance and harmony in his compositions, especially through papier colles, a pasted paper collage technique that Picasso and

Bottle of Run 1914- Georges Braque

Bottle of Run 1914- Georges Braque

Braque invented in 1912. Braque, however, took collage one-step further by gluing cut-up advertisements into his canvases. This foreshadowed modern art movements concerned with critiquing media, such as Pop art.

Braque stenciled letters onto paintings, blended pigments with sand, and copied wood grain and marble to achieve great levels of dimension in his paintings. His depictions of still lifes are so abstract that they border on becoming patterns that express an essence of the objects viewed rather than direct representations.
Georges Braque, Portugalczyk, 1911

Georges Braque, Portugalczyk, 1911

Childhood

Georges Braque was guided from a young age toward creative painting techniques. His father managed a decorative painting business and Braque’s interest in texture and tactility perhaps came from working with him as a decorator. In 1899, at age seventeen, Braque moved from Argenteuil into Paris, accompanied by friends Othon Friesz and Raoul Dufy.

Early Training

Braque’s earliest paintings were made in the Fauvist style. From 1902-1905, after giving up work as a decorator to pursue painting full-time he pursued Fauvist ideas and coordinated with Henri Matisse. He contributed his Fauvist colorful paintings to his first exhibition at the Salon des Independants in 1906. However, he was extremely affected by a visit to Pablo Picasso’s studio in 1907, to see Picasso’s breakthrough work – Les Demoiselles d’Avignon.

After this encounter, the two artists forged an intimate friendship and artistic camaraderie. “We would get

Baluster and Skull- Georges Braque

Baluster and Skull- Georges Braque

together every single day,” Braque said, “to discuss and assay the ideas that were forming, as well as to compare our respective works”. The drastic change in Braque’s painting style can be directly attributed to Picasso. Once he understood Picasso’s goals, Braque aimed to strengthen “the constructive elements in his works while foregoing the expressive excesses of Fauvism”. His landscape paintings in which scenes were distilled into basic shapes and colors inspired French art critic, Louis Vauxcelles, to coin the term Cubism by describing Braque’s work as “bizarreries cubiques.”

Braque and Picasso worked in synchronicity until Braque’s return from war in 1914. When Picasso began to paint figuratively, Braque felt his friend had betrayed their Cubist systems and rules, and continued on his own. However, he continued to remain influenced by Picasso’s work, especially in regards to papier colles, a collage technique pioneered by both artists using only pasted paper. His collages featured geometric shapes interrupted by musical instruments, grapes, or furniture. These were so three-dimensional that they are considered important in the development of Cubist sculpture. By 1918, Braque felt he had sufficiently explored papier colles, and returned to still life painting.

Musical Instruments 1908- Georges Braque

Musical Instruments 1908- Georges Braque

Viewers noted a more limited palette at Braque’s first post-war solo show in 1919. Yet he steadfastly adhered to Cubist rules about depicting objects from multi-faceted perspectives in geometrically patterned ways. In this, he continued as a true Analytical Cubist longer than did Picasso, whose style, subject matter and palettes changed continuously. Braque was most interested in showing how objects look when viewed over time in different temporal spaces and pictorial planes. As a result of his dedication to depicting space in various ways, he naturally gravitated towards designing sets and costumes for theater and ballet performances, doing this throughout the 1920s.

In 1929, Braque took up landscape painting once again, using new, bright colors influenced by Picasso and Matisse. Then in the 1930s, Braque began to portray Greek heroes and deities, though he claimed the subjects were stripped of their symbolism and ought to be viewed through a purely formal lens.

He called these works exercises in calligraphy, possibly because they were not strictly about figures but more about sheer line and shape. In the latter half of the 1930s, Braque embarked on painting his Vanitas series, through which he existentially considered death and suffering. Growing increasingly obsessed with the

Still Life with Clarinet 1927- Georges Braque

Still Life with Clarinet 1927- Georges Braque

physicality of his paintings, he explored the ways in which brushstrokes and paint qualities could enhance his subject matter.

The objects used in his still lifes were highly personal to Braque, however, he did not reveal these meanings. Skulls, for example, were objects he painted repeatedly at the onset of World War II. In 1944, when World War II ended, Braque began to embrace lighter subjects like flowers, billiard tables, and garden chairs.

His final series of eight canvases made from 1948-1955, each titled Atelier, or Studio, depicted imagery that represented the artist’s inner thoughts on each object rather than clues to the outside world. At the very end of his life, Braque painted birds repeatedly, as the perfect symbol of his obsession with space and movement.

Woman with a Guitar 1913- Georges Braque

Woman with a Guitar 1913- Georges Braque

Braque is remembered as a progenitor of Cubism, who was both rational and sensuous in his still life paintings. He was a classic painter in this sense, and has influenced the likes of Jim Dine andWayne Thiebaud, who focused on still life painting. Braque is also a celebrated colorist, and can be traced through contemporary art to those painters who work with color in similar ways. Perhaps Braque is most remembered for his use of collage, as many contemporary artists, from sculptors like Jessica Stockholder to painters like Mark Bradford, apply paper to their works as a means to comment on society and its products.

“To work from nature is to improvise.”

“One must not imitate what one wants to create.”

“One must beware of an all-purpose formula that will serve to interpret the other arts as well as reality, and that instead of creating will only produce a style, or rather a stylization.”

Biography is from www.artstory.org.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  It was a very educational experience and interesting as well!  I wish I had more time to work on it.  It’s not perfect, but I think I did well.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 333.

Best,

Linda

Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Side-View Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Side-View
Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Day 238- Mimmo Rotella- The Poster Ripper

It’s Day 238 and I had a bit of a hectic day so I decided to do something fun and maybe quick…a décollage!  Please join me in honoring Mimmo Rotella today!

Mimmo Rotella

Mimmo Rotella

Marilyn 1963- Mimmo Rotella

Marilyn 1963- Mimmo Rotella

Mimmo Rotella was born in Catanzaro on the 7th of October 1918, the son of a milliner. Following high school he moved to Naples where he began art studies (in 1941 he went to Rome after having obtained a post at the Ministry of Postal and Telecommunication Services). He did not stay long in the capital, however: on being called up he joined the course in the Officer-training School in Nocera. From here he was sent to the School for Non-commissioned Officers in Caserta (Campania). In 1944 he left the armed forces and then obtained his diploma at the Naples Art Academy. From 1944 until 1945 he taught draftsmanship at his city’s Institute for Surveyors.

In 1945 he moved to Rome: following his figurative beginnings and first experimentations he elaborated a manner of pictorial expression of neo-geometrical matrix. His participation in exhibitions began in 1947 at the Mostra Sindacale di Arti Figurative. He also took part in all the annual exhibitions of the Art Club up until 1951, both in Rome and Turin. As an alternative expressive method 1949 saw him invent phonetic poetry which the artist called ‘epistaltic’ (a neologism lacking sense): this was a collection of words (also invented ones), whistles, sounds, numbers and onomatopoeic reiterate. In the same year he wrote its Manifesto which in 1955 was published by Leonardo Sinisgalli in “Civiltà delle Macchine”. His first one-man exhibition, with abstract-geometrical works, was held in 1951 at the Galleria Chiurazzi in Rome (an exhibition which enjoyed little favour on the part of criticism).

Also in 1951 he had his first contact with French artists, exhibiting in Paris at the “Salon des Realistes Nouvelles”. For the period bridging

Casablanca- Mimmo Rotella

Casablanca- Mimmo Rotella

1951-1952 he obtained a scholarship on the part of the Fullbright Foundation, thanks to which he was able to sojourn in the United States at the University of Kansas City with the appointment as Artist in Residence. Here he created a large mural composition and recorded phonetic poems with the accompaniment of percussion instruments. At Harvard University in Boston he held a performance of phonetic poetry and recorded other pieces for the Library of Congress in Washington.

In 1952 he also held a second one-man exhibition at the Rockhill Nelson Gallery in Kansas City. His sojourn in the United States offered the possibility of getting to know the works of the protagonists of the new art currents: Rauschenberg, Oldenburg, Twombly, Pollock and Kline.

Following his return to Rome in 1953 he experienced a drawn-out crisis during which he interrupted his pictorial production. Convinced that everything in art had already been done he improvised what he himself has defined as “Zen illumination”: in short, the discovery of the advertising poster as artistic expression, as the message of the city. This saw the origin of the décollage – initially the collage – by way of glueing pieces of posters ripped off on the street onto canvas. Here Rotella adopted the collage as used by the cubists, ‘contaminating’ it with the dadaist and desecrating matrix of the objet trouvé. In Rome he showed the ‘torn poster’ for the first time in an exhibition entitled “Esposizione d’arte attuale” (1955).

Mimmo Rotella

Mimmo Rotella

He carried out the so-called “double décollage”: that is, the poster firstly removed from the wall and then torn up in the studio. In this period he also made use of the retros d’affiche, using the verso of the posters with the result obtained of non-figurative and monochrome works.

He began to receive acknowledgements in 1956 with the Graziano Award, followed in 1957 by the Battistoni e della Pubblica Istruzione Award. With the Cinecittà series of 1958 he chose both the figures and faces of film posters, orientating his production towards works of a more figurative type.

Already recognized by criticism at the close of the 1950’s as being an exponent of the “Young Roman Painting, Rotella was labelled as the ‘poster ripper’ or the ‘painter of glued paper’. At night, armed with a penknife, he not only ripped off posters but also pieces of the metal sheeting and zinc of the mounting frames of the billboard zones of the Rome City Council. In 1958 he was visited in Rome by the French critic Pierre Restany, a meeting which was to lead to a long friendship. In the same year he was included in the Roman exhibition entitled “Nuove tendenze dell’arte italiana”, organized by Lionello Venturi and held in the seat of the Rome-New York Art Foundation. In 1959 one of his works was reproduced in the review “Azimuth”, founded in Milan by Enrico Castellani and Piero Manzoni.

The curiosity on the part of the public for the artist’s extravagances, for a person who decidedly led a bohémien life, was crystallized in 1960 by way of a short film directed by Enzo Nasso dedicated to the Pittori arrabbiati [Angry Painters]. Here Rotella directed the ‘soundtrack’.

In 1960 he ‘joined’ the Nouveau Réalisme group (although he did not sign its manifesto). The theoretician of this movement was Pierre

Lo Spettacolo- Mimmo Rotella

Lo Spettacolo- Mimmo Rotella

Restany and included – amongst others – names like Klein, Tinguely, César, Spoerri, Arman and Christo. The group also included the French artists Hains, Villeglé and Dufrêne who in fact also worked on the collage, albeit in an autonomous way. By working in the most total isolation Rotella had anticipated the path of his French colleagues who were only exhibited for the first time in 1957 at the Galerie Colette Allendy in Paris.

Together with his décollages Rotella also created assemblages of objects bought from junk dealers: bottle caps and stoppers, pieces of rope, twine etc.  American Pop Art and Abstract Expressionism, together with the Informal and the spatial and matteric research works carried out in Italy at the time by Fontana and Burri, played an important role in directing Rotella’s pictorial orientation. In 1960 he met De Kooning and Rothko in Rome.  In 1961 he took part in the historical Parisian exhibition entitled “A 40° au-dessus de Dada”, supervised by Pierre Restany. In 1962 he talked about his own artistic operations at the School of Visual Arts in New York. In 1964 he was invited to take part in the Venice Biennial.

Mimmo Rotella

Mimmo Rotella

While the press increasingly more talked about the phenomenon of Affichisme Rotella moved to Paris where he began to elaborate a procedure of serial production by way of the projection of images in the negative on emulsified canvas. This operation was to be given the definition of Reportage by the artist or, and more specifically, Mec-Art in 1965 together with the art critic Otto Hanh and the painter Alain Jaquet. The same year saw his Parisian exhibition at the Galerie J.

Using typographical products, between 1967 and 1973 he created his Art-typo works, printing proofs freely chosen and reproduced on canvas. With this procedure he amused himself in insetting and superimposing advertising images: «I inverted my old approach: first I tried to disintegrate, now I try to reintegrate that matter, that reality».

At the beginning of the 1970’s he carried out a number of works by directly acting on the advertising pages of magazines with the use of solvents, reducing these either to the state of the imprint (frottage) or quite simply cancelling them (effaçage). Two years later, in 1972, he published an audacious autobiography titled “Autorotella”.

The “Plastiforme” were created in 1975: ripped posters placed on a polyurethane support with the intention of giving them tridimensionality.
In the same year he recorded his first Italian LP of phonetic poems, presented by Alfredo Todisco. In 1976 he took part in the International Recital of Sound Poetry – Poetry Action at the Atelier Annick Le Moine. Another experimentation carried out in those years was that of rolling up posters and closing them in plexiglass cubes.

On having left Paris in order to set up home and studio in Milan (1980), during the 1980’s he elaborated his “Blanks” or coperture d’affiches :

Minuit- Mimmo Rotella

Minuit- Mimmo Rotella

zeroed advertising posters covered with white sheets of paper – as happens for posters that are replaced or have finished their billboard lease – following a conceptual operation. 1984 saw him once again using brushes and acrylic colours in order to create the second cycle of works dedicated to the cinema: Cinecittà 2.

In 1986 he visited Cuba, exhibiting his works at the Havana University. During his stay he also took part in a performance: the laceration of posters in the Square of the city. During the same year he held a series of talks at the Domus Academy in Milan.

He then created his sovrapitture (overpaintings), inspired by the up-to-date theme of graffiti, pictorially intervening on the advertising posters that were torn and then glued on canvas (and from 1987 also ripped posters glued on a support of sheet metal). He drew anonymous writings, like the ones it is possible to read on city walls: signs, love notes and political slogans/epithets in a double message.

Mimmo Rotella

Mimmo Rotella

In 1990 he took part in the “Art et Pub” exhibition held at the Centre Pompidou in Paris and in the “High and Low” exhibition held in New York at the Museum of Modern Art.  In 1991 he married the young Russian economist, Inna Agarounova, who in 1993 gave birth to Asya.
In 1992 he was conferred the title of Officiel des arts et des Lettres by the French Minister of Culture, Jack Lang.

In 1994 he was invited to take part in “Italian Metamorphosis” held at the Guggenheim Museum in

Mimmo Rotella

Mimmo Rotella

New York. In 1996 he took part in “Face … l’Histoire” at the Centre Pompidou and in the exhibition entitled “Halls of Mirrors” held at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles (an exhibition that was to tour the world, Rome included). 1996 also saw the Internet inauguration of a one-man exhibition which was diffused online – the first event of its kind in Italy.

In 1997 Rotella dedicated the cycle of works entitled “Felliniana” to the films by Federico Fellini.  In 1999 the Mayor of his natal city, Sergio Abramo, signed a City Council order authorizing Rotella to freely remove posters in Catanzaro and its environs.

Biography above is from Ro Gallery’s website.

I decided to use Marilyn Monroe movie posters for my piece today since after researching the artist I noticed he used her a lot.  I really enjoyed creating today’s piece.  There was something very relaxing about ripping the paper and adhering it in patterns on the canvas.  I hope you enjoy my piece today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 239!

Best,
Linda

Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View
Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

photo 2 photo 3 photo 4 photo 5

Day 233- Daniel Spoerri- Eat Art

It’s Day 233 and I had a great time doing today’s piece.  I got a little overwhelmed because I had too many ideas of what I wanted to do.  Join me in honoring Daniel Spoerri today!

Daniel Spoerri

Daniel Spoerri

Assemblage, 1990, assemblage sur bois- Daniel Spoerri

Assemblage, 1990, assemblage sur bois- Daniel Spoerri

Daniel Spoerri (born 27 March 1930 in Galați) is a Swiss artist and writer born in Romania. Spoerri is best known for his “snare-pictures,” a type of assemblage or object art, in which he captures a group of objects, such as the remains of meals eaten by individuals, including the plates, silverware and glasses, all of which are fixed to the

Daniel Spoerri

Daniel Spoerri

table or board, which is then displayed on a wall. He also is widely acclaimed for his book, Topographie Anécdotée* du Hasard (An Anecdoted Topography of Chance), a literary analog to his snare-pictures, in which he mapped all the objects located on his table at a particular moment, describing each with his personal recollections evoked by the object.

Spoerri was born Daniel Isaac Feinstein, on 27 March 1930, in Galați, Romania. Although his father, Isaac Feinstein, had converted to Christianity, after Romania entered the War on the side of Nazi Germany he was arrested and killed in 1941. His mother, born Lydia Spoerri, was Swiss and was therefore able to emigrate with her family of 6 children to Switzerland in 1942. There, he was adopted by his maternal uncle and registered as Daniel Spoerri, a name he has retained.

In the 1950s he was active in dance, studying classical dance with Olga Preobrajenska and in 1954 becoming the lead dancer at the State

Daniel Spoerri

Daniel Spoerri

Opera of Bern, Switzerland. He later staged several avant-garde plays including Ionesco’s The Bald Soprano and Picasso’s surrealist Desire Trapped by the Tail. During that period he met a number of Surrealist artists, including Jean Tinguely, Marcel Duchampand Man Ray, and also a number of artists subsequently associated with the Fluxus movement, including Robert Filliou, Dieter Roth and Emmett Williams. In the late 1950s, Spoerri married Vera Mertz.

Kichka's Breakfast- Daniel Spoerri

Kichka’s Breakfast- Daniel Spoerri

In 1959 Spoerri founded Editions MAT (“Multiplication d’art Transformable”), a venture which produced and sold copies of three-dimensional constructed artworks by artists such as Marcel Duchamp, Dieter Roth, Jean Tinguely and Victor Vasarely. One of the best known works produced by Editions MAT was Man Ray’s Indestructible Object. Spoerri is credited with coining the term “multiples” for such works.

In 1960, Spoerri made his first “snare-picture”. Spoerri later explained snare-pictures as follows: “objects found in chance positions, in order or disorder (on tables, in boxes, drawers, etc.) are fixed (‘snared’) as they are. Only the plane is changed: since the result is called a picture,

Daniel Spoerri

Daniel Spoerri

what was horizontal becomes vertical. Example: remains of a meal are fixed to the table at which the meal was consumed and the table hung on the wall.” His first “snare-picture”,

Daniel Spoerri

Daniel Spoerri

Kichka’s Breakfast was created from his girlfriend’s leftover breakfast. The piece is now in the collection in the Museum of Modern Art in New York.  One snare-picture, made in 1964, consists of the remains of a meal eaten by Marcel Duchamp.  This work holds the auction price record for Spoerri, selling for €136,312 ($200,580) in January 2008, distantly followed by another snare-picture from 1972, which sold for €44,181 ($69,860) in April 2008.

Spoerri was one of the original signers of the manifesto creating the Nouveau réalisme (New Realism) art movement, an avant garde endeavor begun in 1960. His use of everyday life as the main subject-matter of his art reflects his involvement in the New Realism movement.

Spoerri is also closely associated with the Fluxus art movement, a movement formed in the early 1960s, “characterized by a strongly Dadaist attitude, [whose] participants were a divergent group of individualists whose most common theme was their delight in spontaneity and humor.”  It has been said that his Anecdoted Topography of Chance “seems perfectly to embody aspects of its spirit.”

A major theme of Spoerri’s artwork is food, and he has called this aspect of his work “Eat Art.”

Daniel Spoerri

Daniel Spoerri

Daniel Spoerri

Daniel Spoerri

This is seen not only in his snare-pictures of eaten meals, but in a variety of other contexts. For example, in 1961 he sold in an art-gallery in Copenhagen store-bought canned food which he had signed and rubber-stamped “Attention: Work of Art.” In 1963, he enacted a sort of performance art called Restaurant de la Galerie J in Paris, for which he cooked on several evenings. Art-critics took over the role of waiters, playing on the idea of the critic bringing the art to the consumers and giving them an understanding of the work. On June 18, 1968, Spoerri opened the Restaurant Spoerri in Düsseldorf, and on September 18, 1970, he opened the Eat-Art-Gallery upstairs. He also published in 1970 a diary of his life on the Greek island of Symi, in which he included numerous recipes of the dishes he ate there. Originally titled A Gastronomic Itinerary, it was later republished under the title Mythology & Meatballs.

Partial biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you like my piece I did in honor of Mr. Spoerri today.  I decided to keep in simple because of the scale of my canvas (which is much smaller…inches!) and lack of materials.  For instance, I can’t adhere an actual plate, wine bottle etc. onto a 10 inch canvas.  Anyways, I really liked what I did and I hope you do too!

Best, Linda

A Light Snack- Tribute to Daniel Spoerri Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

A Light Snack- Tribute to Daniel Spoerri
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View A Light Snack- Tribute to Daniel Spoerri Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View
A Light Snack- Tribute to Daniel Spoerri
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 A Light Snack- Tribute to Daniel Spoerri Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
A Light Snack- Tribute to Daniel Spoerri
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 A Light Snack- Tribute to Daniel Spoerri Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
A Light Snack- Tribute to Daniel Spoerri
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 A Light Snack- Tribute to Daniel Spoerri Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
A Light Snack- Tribute to Daniel Spoerri
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

 

 

Day 211- Jean (Hans) Arp- All Art is but Dream and Nature

It’s Day 211 and today’s piece seemed simple when I was beginning to plan it and then as I started to create it it began to get difficult.  Then I remembered that the artist created some of his pieces using automatism and then I just let the piece create itself.  I like how it turned out.  Join me in honoring Jean (Hans) Arp today!

Jean Arp

Jean Arp

Jean Arp, Configuration 1927

Jean Arp, Configuration 1927

Jean Arp / Hans Arp (16 September 1886 – 7 June 1966) was a German-French, or Alsatian, sculptor, painter, poet and abstract artist in other media such as torn and pasted paper.

When Arp spoke in German he referred to himself as “Hans”, and when he spoke in French he referred to himself as “Jean”. Many people believe that he was born Hans and later changed his name to Jean, but this is not the case.

Arp was born in Strasbourg as the son of a French mother and a German father, during the period

Arp Abstract (From The Dada Almanac)

Arp Abstract (From The Dada Almanac)

following the Franco-Prussian War when the area was known as Alsace-Lorraine (Elsass-Lothringen in German) after France had ceded it to Germany in 1871. Following the return of Alsace to France at the end of World War I, French law determined that his name become Jean.

In 1904, after leaving the École des Arts et Métiers in Strasbourg, he went to Paris where he published his poetry for the first time. From 1905 to 1907, Arp studied at the Kunstschule in Weimar, Germany and in 1908 went back to Paris, where he attended the Académie Julian. Arp was a founder-member of the Moderne Bund in Lucerne, participating in their exhibitions from 1911 to 1913.

Jean Arp, De continent qui aurait ..., Executed circa 1964-1966. Painted wood relief, 37 x 34.5 cm.In 1912, he went to Munich, called on Wassily Kandinsky, the influential Russian painter and art theorist, was encouraged by him in his researches and exhibited with the Der Blaue Reiter group. Later that year, he took part in a major exhibition in Zürich, along with Henri Matisse, Robert Delaunay and Kandinsky. In Berlin in 1913, he was taken up by Herwarth Walden, the dealer and magazine editor who was at that time one of the most powerful figures in the European avant-garde.

In 1915 he moved to Switzerland to take advantage of Swiss neutrality. Arp later told the story of how, when he was notified to report to the German consulate, he avoided being drafted into the German Army: he took the paperwork he had been given and, in the first blank, wrote the date. He then wrote the date in every other space as well, then drew a line beneath them and carefully added them up. He then took off all his clothes and went to hand in his paperwork.

Arp was a founding member of the Dada movement in Zürich in 1916. In 1920, as Hans Arp,

Jean Arp original original woodcut "Soleil Recercle"

Jean Arp original original woodcut “Soleil Recercle”

along with Max Ernst, and the social activist Alfred Grünwald, he set up the Cologne Dada group. However, in 1925 his work also appeared in the first exhibition of the surrealist group at the Galérie Pierre in Paris.

In 1926, Arp moved to the Paris suburb of Meudon. In 1931, he broke with the Surrealist movement to found Abstraction-Création, working with the Paris-based group Abstraction-Création and the periodical, Transition. Beginning in the 1930s, the artist expanded his efforts from collage and bas-relief to include bronze and stone sculptures. He produced several small works made of multiple elements that the viewer could pick up, separate, and rearrange into new configurations.

Overturned blue shoe with two heels under a black vault 1925 by Jean Arp

Overturned blue shoe with two heels under a black vault 1925 by Jean Arp

Throughout the 1930s and until the end of his life, he wrote and published essays and poetry. In 1942, he fled from his home in Meudon to escape German occupation and lived in Zürich until the war ended.

Arp visited New York City in 1949 for a solo exhibition at the Buchholz Gallery. In 1950, he was invited to execute a relief for the Harvard University Graduate Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts and would also be commissioned to do a mural at the UNESCO building inParis.

In 1958, a retrospective of Arp’s work was held at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, followed by an exhibition at the Musée National d’Art Moderne, Paris, France, in 1962. Organized by the Minneapolis Institute of Arts and the Wurttembergischer Kunstverein of Stuttgart, a 150-piece exhibition titled “The Universe of Jean Arp” concluded an international six-city tour at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in 1986.

The Musée d’art moderne et contemporain of Strasbourg houses many of his paintings and sculptures.

Egg Board- Jean Arp

Egg Board- Jean Arp

Constellation According to the Laws of Chance circa 1930 Jean Arp (Hans Arp) 1886-1966 Bequeathed by E.C. Gregory 1959 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T00242

Constellation According to the Laws of Chance circa 1930 Jean Arp (Hans Arp) 1886-1966 Bequeathed by E.C. Gregory 1959 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T00242

Arp and his first wife, the artist Sophie Taeuber-Arp, became French nationals in 1926. In the 1930s, they bought a piece of land in Clamart and built a house at the edge of a forest. Influenced by the Bauhaus, Le Corbusier and Charlotte Perriand, Taeuber designed it. She died in Zürich in 1943. After living in Zürich, Arp was to make Meudon his primary residence again in 1946.

Arp married the collector Marguerite Hagenbach (1902–1994), his long-time companion, in 1959. He died in 1966, in Basel, Switzerland.

Biography is from wikipedia.

The man who speaks and writes about art should refrain from censuring or pontificating. He will thus avoid doing anything foolish, for in the presence of primordial depth all art is but dream and nature.- Jean Arp

I hope you enjoy my piece today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 212!  Best, Linda

Nuit Sonne- Tribute to Jean (Hans) Arp Linda Cleary 2014 Wood Cutouts & Acrylic on Canvas

Nuit Sonne- Tribute to Jean (Hans) Arp
Linda Cleary 2014
Wood Cutouts & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Nuit Sonne- Tribute to Jean (Hans) Arp Linda Cleary 2014 Wood Cutouts & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Nuit Sonne- Tribute to Jean (Hans) Arp
Linda Cleary 2014
Wood Cutouts & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Nuit Sonne- Tribute to Jean (Hans) Arp Linda Cleary 2014 Wood Cutouts & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Nuit Sonne- Tribute to Jean (Hans) Arp
Linda Cleary 2014
Wood Cutouts & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Nuit Sonne- Tribute to Jean (Hans) Arp Linda Cleary 2014 Wood Cutouts & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Nuit Sonne- Tribute to Jean (Hans) Arp
Linda Cleary 2014
Wood Cutouts & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Nuit Sonne- Tribute to Jean (Hans) Arp Linda Cleary 2014 Wood Cutouts & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Nuit Sonne- Tribute to Jean (Hans) Arp
Linda Cleary 2014
Wood Cutouts & Acrylic on Canvas

Day 177- Herbert Bayer- The Total Artist

It’s Day 177 and I’m a little behind in getting stuff done.  I need to finish this blog, send out a chapter for my writing group and do a couple other things too.  My hubby is out of town til Sunday…I already miss him!  But I got my painting done so join me in honoring Herbert Bayer today.  He was a prolific artist so it was challenging choosing what style I wanted to capture.  I think I did okay though.

Herbert Bayer- Self Portrait 1932

Herbert Bayer- Self Portrait 1932

"Lonesome Big City Dweller," 1932, Herbert Bayer

“Lonesome Big City Dweller,” 1932, Herbert Bayer

Herbert Bayer (April 5, 1900 – September 30, 1985) was an Austrian and American graphic designer, painter, photographer, sculptor, art director, environmental and interior designer, and architect, who was widely recognized as the last living member of the Bauhaus and was instrumental in the development of the Atlantic Richfield Company’s corporate art collection until his death in 1985.

Born in 1900, Bayer apprenticed under the artist Georg Schmidthammer in Linz. Leaving the

Herbert Bayer, iconograph of a day, 1978

Herbert Bayer, iconograph of a day, 1978

workshop to study at the Darmstadt Artists’ Colony, he became interested in Walter Gropius’s Bauhaus manifesto. After Bayer had studied for four years at the Bauhaus under such teachers as Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee and László Moholy-Nagy, Gropius appointed Bayer director of printing and advertising.

In the spirit of reductive minimalism, Bayer developed a crisp visual style and adopted use of all-lowercase, sans serif typefaces for most Bauhaus publications. Bayer is one of several typographers of the period including Kurt Schwitters and Jan Tschichold who experimented with the creation of a simplified more phonetic-based alphabet. From 1925 to 1930 Bayer designed a geometric sans-serif Proposal for a Universal Typeface that existed only as a design and was never actually cast into real type. These designs are now issued in digital form as Bayer Universal. The design also inspired ITC Bauhaus and Architype Bayer, which bears comparison with the stylistically related typeface Architype Schwitters.

Herbert Bayer

Herbert Bayer

In 1928, Bayer left the Bauhaus to become art director of Vogue magazine’s Berlin office. He remained in Germany far later than most other progressives. In 1936 he designed a brochure for the Deutschland Ausstellung, an exhibition for tourists in Berlin during the 1936 Olympic Games – the brochure celebrated life in the Third Reich, and the authority of Hitler. However, in 1937, works of Bayer’s were included in the Nazi propaganda exhibition “Degenerate Art”, upon which he left Germany. Upon fleeing Germany, he traveled in Italy.

In 1938 Bayer settled in New York City where he had a long and distinguished career in nearly every aspect of the graphic arts.

In 1944 Bayer married Joella Syrara Haweis, the daughter of poet and Dada artist Mina Loy. The same year, he became a U.S. citizen.

In 1946 the Bayers relocated. Hired by industrialist and visionary Walter Paepcke, Bayer moved to Aspen, Colorado as Paepcke promoted skiing as a popular sport. Bayer’s architectural work in the town included co-designing the Aspen Institute and restoring the Wheeler Opera House, but his production of promotional posters identified skiing with wit, excitement, and glamour.

In 1959, he designed his “fonetik alfabet”, a phonetic alphabet, for English. It was sans-serif

Chromatic Circles - Wool-Pile Wall Hanging by Herbert Bayer

Chromatic Circles – Wool-Pile Wall Hanging by Herbert Bayer

and without capital letters. He had special symbols for the endings -ed-ory-ing, and -ion, as well as the digraphs “ch”, “sh”, and “ng”. An underline indicated the doubling of a consonant in traditional orthography.

While living in Aspen, Bayer had a chance meeting with the eccentric oilman, outdoorsman and visionary ecologist, Robert O. Anderson. When Anderson saw the ultra-modern, Bauhaus-inspired home that Bayer had designed & built in Aspen, he walked up to the front door and introduced himself. It was the beginning of a lifelong friendship between the two men and instigated Anderson’s insatiable passion for enthusiastically collecting contemporary art.

With Anderson’s eventual formation of the Atlantic Richfield Company, and as his personal art collection quickly overflowed out of his New Mexico ranch and other homes,ARCO soon held the unique distinction of possessing the world’s largest corporate art collection, under the critical eye and sharp direction of Bayer as ARCO’s Art and Design Consultant.

Overseeing acquisitions for ARCO Plaza, the newly built (1972) twin 51-story office towers in Los Angeles that served as the new company’s corporate headquarters, Bayer was also responsible for the ARCO logo and designing all corporate branding related to the company. Prior to the completion of ARCO Plaza, Anderson commissioned Bayer to design a monumental sculpture-fountain to be installed between the dark green granite towers. Double Ascension still stands between the twin skyscrapers.

Herbert Bayer- Bazaar Cover Design

Herbert Bayer- Bazaar Cover Design

Under Bayer’s direction, ARCO’s art collection grew to nearly 15,000 works nationwide, managed by Atlantic Richfield Company Art Collection staff. ARCO’s collection was eclectic, and consisted of an extremely wide range of media & styles; ranging from contemporary and earlier paintings, sculpture, works on paper (including drawings, watercolors and signed original lithographs, etchings and serigraphs) and signed photographs to tribal and ethnic art from many cultures, as well as historic prints and artifacts, all displayed throughout ARCO’s buildings in Los Angeles and several other cities. Three years after ARCO was taken over by BP in 2000, that company’s then-chairman, Lord Brown, personally ordered ARCO’s art collection liquidated. It was sold through Christie’s and LA Modern Auctions.

Bayer made provisions to donate, after his death, a collection of his works which had been housed in

Post 9, Kay – Herbert Bayer

Post 9, Kay – Herbert Bayer

ARCO’s conference center in Santa Barbara to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The works are currently on loan to the Denver Art Museum. He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1979.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I tried to put a bunch of different pieces here to show my challenge on what I should paint.  I decided to do a combination of collage/photomontage and color blocks.  I hope you enjoy my piece and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 178!  Best, Linda

Eye See- Tribute to Herbert Bayer Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media/Acrylic on Canvas

Eye See- Tribute to Herbert Bayer
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media/Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Eye See- Tribute to Herbert Bayer Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media/Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Eye See- Tribute to Herbert Bayer
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media/Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Eye See- Tribute to Herbert Bayer Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media/Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Eye See- Tribute to Herbert Bayer
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media/Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Eye See- Tribute to Herbert Bayer Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media/Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Eye See- Tribute to Herbert Bayer
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media/Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Eye See- Tribute to Herbert Bayer Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media/Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Eye See- Tribute to Herbert Bayer
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media/Acrylic on Canvas

DAY ONE-HUNDRED!- Raoul Hausmann- New Visions

It’s Day 100 and I’m scrambling around to get stuff done!  Join me in celebrating my 100th painting and today’s artist…Raoul Hausmann!  I love this guy…

Raoul Hausmann

Raoul Hausmann

Raoul Hausmann

Raoul Hausmann

Raoul Hausmann (July 12, 1886 – February 1, 1971) was an Austrian artist and writer. One of the key figures in Berlin Dada, his experimental photographic collages, sound poetry and institutional critiques would have a profound influence on the European Avant-Garde in the aftermath of World War I.

Raoul Hausmann was born in Vienna but moved to Berlin with his parents at the age of 14, in 1901. His earliest art training was from his father, a professional conservator and painter. He met Johannes Baader, an eccentric architect and another future member of Dada, in 1905. At around the same time he met Elfride Schaeffer, a violinist, whom he married in 1908, a year after the birth of their daughter, Vera. That same year Hausmann enrolled at a private Art School in Berlin, where he remained until 1911.

After seeing Expressionist paintings in Herwarth Walden’s gallery Der Sturm in 1912,

Raoul Hausmann

Raoul Hausmann

Hausmann started to produce Expressionist prints in Erich Heckel’s studio, and became a staff writer for Walden’s magazine, also called Der Sturm, which provided a platform for his earliest polemical writings against the art establishment. In keeping with his Expressionist colleagues, he initially welcomed the war, believing it to be a necessary cleansing of a calcified society, although being an Austrian citizen living in Germany he was spared the draft.

Hausmann met Hannah Höch in 1915, and embarked upon an extramarital affair that produced an ‘artistically productive but turbulent bond’ that would last until 1922. In 1916 Hausmann met two more people who would become important influences on his subsequent career; the psychoanalyst Otto Gross who believed psychoanalysis to be the preparation for revolution, and the anarchist writer Franz Jung. By now his artistic circle had come to include the writer Salomo Friedlaender, Hans Richter, Emmy Hennings and members of Die Aktion magazine, which, along with Der Sturm and the anarchist paper Die Freie Straße published numerous articles by him in this period.

‘The notion of destruction as an act of creation was the point of departure for Hausmann’s Dadasophy, his theoretical contribution to Berlin Dada.’

Raoul Hausmann

Raoul Hausmann

When Richard Huelsenbeck, a 24 year old medical student who was a close friend of Hugo Ball and one of the founders of Zurich Dada, returned to Berlin in 1917, Hausmann was one of a group of young disaffected artists that began to form the nucleus of Berlin Dada around him. Huelsenbeck delivered his “First Dada Speech in Germany”, January 22, 1918 at the fashionable art dealer IB Neumann’s gallery, Kurfurstendamm Berlin. Over the course of the next few weeks, Hausmann, Huelsenbeck,George Grosz, John Heartfield, Jung, Höch, Walter Mehring and Baader started the Club Dada. The first event staged was an evening of poetry performances and lectures against the backdrop of a retrospective of paintings by the establishment artist Lovis Corinth at the Berlin Sezession, April 12, 1918. Amongst the contributors, Huelsenbeck recited the Dada Manifesto, Grosz danced a “Sincopation” homaging Jazz, whilst Hausmann ended the evening by shouting his manifesto The New Material In Painting at the by-now near riotous audience;

“The threat of violence hung in the air. One envisioned Corinth’s pictures torn

Raoul Hausmann

Raoul Hausmann

to shreds with chair legs. But in the end it didn’t come to that. As Raoul Hausmann shouted his programmatic plans for dadaist painting into the noise of the crowd, the manager of the sezession gallery turned the lights out on him.”

Raoul Hausmann

Raoul Hausmann

The call for new materials in painting bore fruit later the same year when Hausmann and Höch holidayed on the Baltic Sea. The guest room they were staying in had a generic portrait of soldiers, onto which the patron had glued photographic portrait heads of his son five times.

“It was like a thunderbolt: one could – I saw it instantaneously – make pictures, assembled entirely from cut-up photographs. Back in Berlin that september, I began to realize this new vision, and I made use of photographs from the press and the cinema.” Hausmann, 1958

The photomontage became the technique most associated with Berlin Dada, used extensively by Hausmann, Höch, Heartfield, Baader and Grosz, and would prove a crucial influence on Kurt Schwitters, El Lissitsky and Russian Constructivism. It should also be pointed out that Grosz, Heartfield and Baader all laid claim to having invented the technique in later memoirs, although no works have surfaced to justify these claims.

At the same time, Hausmann started to experiment with sound poems he called “phonemes” and “poster poems”, originally created by the

Raoul Hausmann

Raoul Hausmann

chance lining up of letters by a printer without Hausmann’s direct intervention. Later poems used words which were reversed, chopped up and strung out, then either typed out using a full range of typographical strategies, or performed with boisterous exuberance. Schwitters’ Ursonate was directly influenced by a performance of one of Hausmann’s poems, “fmsbwtazdu”, at an event in Prague in 1921.

He died on February 1, 1971, in Limoges.

Partial biography from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my painting/collage/photomontage tribute today.  I did because it’s piece 100 and dedicated to that!

I will see you tomorrow on Day 101!  Best, Linda

Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on canvas

Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on canvas

Side-View Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on canvas

Side-View
Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on canvas

Close-Up 1 Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on canvas

Close-Up 1
Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on canvas

Close-Up 2 Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on canvas

Close-Up 2
Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on canvas

Close-Up 3 Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on canvas

Close-Up 3
Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on canvas

Close-Up 4 Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on canvas

Close-Up 4
Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on canvas

Close-Up 5 Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on canvas

Close-Up 5
Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on canvas

Day Seventy-Nine- Kurt Schwitters- Inner Merz

It’s Day 79 and my roof is officially done!  And I have a brief respite until the exterior painters paint the outside of the house.  Our house is going to look so cute!  I am however suffering a bunch from my costochondritis (benign chest inflammation) and I think I want to go to the doctor to check myself out (just in case).  My anxiety from this condition is going crazy.  I think the stress from the move and all this mayhem is starting to manifest itself physically.  Not to mention all the tragedy from the last year.  Other than that, I’ve been painting a ton of large canvases (fun!) and today I am honoring Kurt Schwitters.

Kurt Schwitters

Kurt Schwitters

Das Und Bild- Kurt Schwitters

Das Und Bild- Kurt Schwitters

Kurt Schwitters was born on 20 June 1887, at No.2 Rumannstraße, Hanover, the only child of Edward Schwitters and his wife Henriette (née Beckemeyer). His parents were proprietors of a ladies’ clothes shop. They sold the business in 1898, using the money to buy five properties in Hanover which they rented out, allowing the family to live off the income for the rest of Schwitters’ life in Germany. In 1901 the family moved to Waldstraße (later Waldhausenstraße) 5, future site of the Merzbau. The same year, Schwitters suffered his first epileptic seizure, a condition that would exempt him from military service in World War I until the last stages of the conflict, when conscription began to be applied to a far wider section of the population.

After studying art at the Dresden Academy alongside Otto Dix and George Grosz, (although

1947 The Holy Night by Antoni Allegri, known as Corregio, worked through by Kurt Schwitters

1947 The Holy Night by Antoni Allegri, known as Corregio, worked through by Kurt Schwitters

Schwitters seems to have been unaware of their work, or indeed of contemporary Dresden artists Die Brücke), 1909–15, Schwitters returned to Hanover and started his artistic career as apost-impressionist. In 1911 he took part in his first exhibition, in Hanover. As the First World War progressed his work became darker, gradually developing a distinctive expressionist tone.

Schwitters spent the last one and half years of the war working as a technical draftsman in a factory just outside Hanover. He was drafted into the 73rd Hanoverian Regiment in March 1917, but exempted as unfit in June of the same year. By his own account, his time as a draftsman influenced his later work, using machines as metaphors of human activity.

“In the war [at the machine factory at Wülfen] I discovered my love for the wheel and recognized that machines are abstractions of the human spirit.”

Das Bumerbild- Kurt Schwitters 1920

Das Bumerbild- Kurt Schwitters 1920

He married his cousin Helma Fischer on 5 October 1915. Their first son, Gerd, died within a week of birth, 9 September 1916; their second, Ernst, was born on 16 November 1918, and was to remain close to his father for the rest of his life, up to and including a shared exile in Britain together.

In 1918, his art was to change dramatically as a direct consequence of Germany’s economic, political, and military collapse at the end of the First World War.

“In the war, things were in terrible turmoil. What I had learned at the academy was of no use to me and the useful new ideas were still unready…. Everything had broken down and new things had to be made out of the fragments; and this is Merz. It was like a revolution within me, not as it was, but as it should have been.”

Schwitters was to come into contact with Herwarth Walden after exhibiting expressionist paintings at the Hanover Secession in

Kurt Schwitters

Kurt Schwitters

February 1918. He showed two Abstraktionen (semi-abstract expressionist landscapes) at Walden’s gallery Der Sturm, Berlin, June 1918, which led directly to meetings with members of the Berlin Avant-garde, including Raoul Hausmann, Hannah Höch, and Hans Arp in the autumn of 1918.

“[I remember] the night he introduced himself in the Café des Westens. “I’m a painter,” he said, “and I nail my pictures together.” Raoul Hausmann

Kurt Schwitters

Kurt Schwitters

Whilst Schwitters still created work in an expressionist style into 1919 (and would continue to paint realist pictures up to his death in 1948), the first abstract collages, influenced in particular by recent works by Hans Arp, would appear in late 1918, which Schwitters dubbed Merz after a fragment of found text from the sentence Commerz Und Privatbank in his picture Das Merzbild, Winter 1918–19.  By the end of 1919 he’d become famous, after his first one-man exhibition at Der Sturm gallery, June 1919, and the publication that August of the poem An Anna Blume (usually translated as ‘To Anna Flower’, or ‘To Eve Blossom’), a dadaist non-sensical love poem. As Schwitters’s first overtures to Zurich and Berlin Dada made explicit mention of Merz pictures,  there are no grounds for the widespread claim that he invented Merz because he was rejected by Berlin Dada.

Schwitters asked to join Berlin Dada either in late 1918 or early 1919, according to the memoirs of Raoul Hausmann. Hausmann claimed thatRichard Huelsenbeck rejected the application because of Schwitters’ links to Der Sturm and to Expressionism in general, which were seen by the Dadaists as hopelessly romantic and obsessed with aesthetics. Ridiculed by Huelsenbeck as ‘the Caspar David Friedrich of the Dadaist Revolution’, he would reply with an absurdist short story Franz Mullers Drahtfrühling, Ersters Kapitel: Ursachen und Beginn der grossen glorreichen Revolution in Revon published in Der Sturm (xiii/11, 1922), which featured an innocent bystander who started a revolution ‘merely by being there’.

Hausmann’s anecdote about Schwitters asking to join Berlin Dada is, however, somewhat dubious, for there is well-documented

Carnival 1947- Kurt Schwitters

Carnival 1947- Kurt Schwitters

evidence that Schwitters and Huelsenbeck were on amicable terms at first. When they first met in 1919, Huelsenbeck was enthusiastic about Schwitters’s work and promised his assistance, while Schwitters reciprocated by finding an outlet for Huelsenbeck’s Dada publications. When Huelsenbeck visited him at the end of the year, Schwitters gave him a lithograph (which he kept all his life) and though their friendship was by now strained, Huelsenbeck wrote him a conciliatory note. “You know I am well-disposed towards you. I think too that certain disagreements we have both noticed in our respective opinions should not be an impediment to our attack on the common enemy, the bourgeoisie and philistinism.”  It was not until mid-1920 that the two men fell out, either because of the success of Schwitters’s poem ‘An Anna Blume’ (which Huelsenbeck considered unDadaistic) or because of quarrels about Schwitters’ contribution to Dadaco, a projected Dada atlas edited by Huelsenbeck. It is unlikely that Schwitters ever considered joining Berlin Dada, however, for he was under contract to Der Sturm, which offered far better long-term opportunities than Dada’s quarrelsome and erratic venture. If Schwitters contacted Dadaists at this time, it was generally because he was searching for opportunities to exhibit his work,

Though not a direct participant in Berlin Dada’s activities, Schwitters employed Dadaist ideas in his work, used the word itself on

Merz Collage- Kurt Schwitters

Merz Collage- Kurt Schwitters

the cover of An Anna Blume, and would later give Dada recitals throughout Europe on the subject with Theo van Doesburg, Tristan Tzara, Hans Arp and Raoul Hausmann. In many ways his work was more in tune with Zürich Dada’s championing of performance and abstract art than Berlin Dada’s agit-prop approach, and indeed examples of his work were published in the last Zürich Dada publication, Der Zeltweg, November 1919, alongside the work of Arp and Sophie Tauber. Whilst his work was far less political than key figures in Berlin Dada, such as George Grosz and John Heartfield, he would remain close friends with various members, including Hannah Höch and Raoul Hausmann, for the rest of his career.

In 1922 Theo van Doesburg organised a series of Dada performances in the Netherlands. Various members of Dada were invited to

Kurt Schwitters

Kurt Schwitters

join, but declined. Eventually the programme comprised acts and performances by Theo Van Doesburg, Nelly van Doesburg as Petrò Van Doesburg, Kurt Schwitters and sometimes Vilmos Huszàr. The Dada performances took place in various cities, amongst which Amsterdam, Leiden, Utrecht and The Hague. Schwitters also performed on solo evenings, one of which took place in April 1923 in Drachten, Friesland. Schwitters later on visited Drachten quite frequently, staying with a local painter, Thijs Rinsema. Schwitters created several collages there, probably together with Thijs Rinsema. Their collages can sometimes hardly be distinuished from each other.

The Proposal 1942- Kurt Schwitters

The Proposal 1942- Kurt Schwitters

Merz has been called ‘Psychological Collage’. Most of the works attempt to make coherent aesthetic sense of the world around Schwitters, using fragments of found objects. These fragments often make witty allusions to current events. (Merzpicture 29a, Picture with Turning Wheel, 1920 for instance, combines a series of wheels that only turn clockwise, alluding to the general drift Rightwards across Germany after the Spartacist Uprising in January that year, whilst Mai 191(9), alludes to the strikes organized by the Bavarian Workers’ and Soldiers’ Council.) Autobiographical elements also abound; test prints of graphic designs; bus tickets; ephemera given by friends. Later collages would feature proto-pop mass media images. (En Morn, 1947, for instance, has a print of a blonde young girl included, prefiguring the early work of Eduardo Paolozzi, whilst many works seem to have directly influenced Robert Rauschenberg, who said after seeing an exhibition of Schwitters’ work at the Sidney Janis Gallery, 1959, that “I felt like he made it all just for me.”)

Whilst these works were usually collages incorporating found objects, such as bus tickets, old wire and fragments of newsprint,

Kurt Schwitters

Kurt Schwitters

Merz also included artists’ periodicals, sculptures, sound poems and what would later be called “installations”. Schwitters was to use the term Merz for the rest of the decade, but, as Isabel Schulz has noted, ‘though the fundamental compositional principles of Merz remained the basis and centre of [Schwitters’] creative work […] the term Merz disappears almost entirely from the titles of his work after 1931’.

Kurt Schwitters

Kurt Schwitters

In March 1947, Schwitters decided to recreate the Merzbau and found a suitable location in a barn at Cylinders Farm, Elterwater, which was owned by Harry Pierce, whose portrait Schwitters had been commissioned to paint. Having been forced by a lack of other income to paint portraits and popularist landscape pictures suitable for sale to the local residents and tourists, Schwitters received notification shortly before his 60th birthday that he had been awarded a £1,000 fellowship to be transferred to him via the Museum of Modern Art in New York in order to enable him to repair or re-create his previous Merz constructions in Germany or Norway. Instead he used it for the “Merzbarn” in Elterwater. Schwitters worked on the Merzbarn daily, travelling the five miles between his home and the barn, except for when illness kept him away. On 7 January 1948 he received the news that he had been granted British citizenship. The following day, on 8 January, Schwitters died from acute pulmonary edema and myocarditis, in Kendal Hospital.

He was buried on 10 January at St. Mary’s Church, Ambleside. His grave was unmarked until 1966 when a stone was erected with the inscription Kurt Schwitters – Creator of Merz. The stone remains as a memorial even though his body was disinterred and reburied in the Engesohde Cemetery in Hanover in 1970, the grave being marked with a marble copy of his 1929 sculptureDie Herbstzeitlose.

This is just an excerpt from a very extensive biography from wikipedia.

I decided to do a collage mixed media piece in honor of Kurt Schwitters.  I had fun piecing together the various things I wanted to paste onto the canvas…including a black feather!  I hope you enjoy my tribute to this wonderful man who was a big part of starting an art movement that’s still celebrated and used today by so many people.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 80!  Best, Linda

Yes Und?- Tribute to Kurt Schwitters Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Yes Und?- Tribute to Kurt Schwitters
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View Yes Und?- Tribute to Kurt Schwitters Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View
Yes Und?- Tribute to Kurt Schwitters
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Yes Und?- Tribute to Kurt Schwitters Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Yes Und?- Tribute to Kurt Schwitters
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Yes Und?- Tribute to Kurt Schwitters Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Yes Und?- Tribute to Kurt Schwitters
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Yes Und?- Tribute to Kurt Schwitters Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Yes Und?- Tribute to Kurt Schwitters
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 4 Yes Und?- Tribute to Kurt Schwitters Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 4
Yes Und?- Tribute to Kurt Schwitters
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

 

 

 

 

 

 

Day Forty-Nine- Robert Rauschenberg- “An Empty Canvas is Full”

It’s Day 49! We’re getting down to the wire on the move so life is so crazy right now.  I still was able to paint a painting!  My canvases and paints are going to be the last things to leave I guess!  Join me in paying tribute to Robert Rauschenberg today.

Robert Rauschenberg

Robert Rauschenberg

Robert Rauschenberg

Robert Rauschenberg

Robert Rauschenberg (October 22, 1925 – May 12, 2008) was an American painter and graphic artist whose early works anticipated the pop art movement. Rauschenberg is well known for his “Combines” of the 1950s, in which non-traditional materials and objects were employed in innovative combinations. Rauschenberg was both a painter and a sculptor and the Combines are a combination of both, but he also worked with photography, printmaking, papermaking, and performance.  He was awarded the National Medal of Arts in 1993.  He became the recipient of the Leonardo da Vinci World Award of Arts in 1995 in recognition of his more than 40 years of fruitful artmaking.

Rauschenberg lived and worked in New York City as well as on Captiva Island, Florida until his

Canyon- Robert Rauschenberg 1959

Canyon- Robert Rauschenberg 1959

death from heart failure on May 12, 2008.

Rauschenberg was born as Milton Ernest Rauschenberg in Port Arthur, Texas, the son of Dora Carolina (née Matson) and Ernest R. Rauschenberg.  His father was of German and Cherokee ancestry and his mother of Anglo-Saxon descent. His parents wereFundamentalist Christians.  Rauschenberg studied at the Kansas City Art Institute and the Académie Julian in Paris, France, where he met the painter Susan Weil. In 1948 Rauschenberg and Weil decided to attend Black Mountain College in North Carolina.

Water Stop 1968 by Robert Rauschenberg

Water Stop 1968 by Robert Rauschenberg

Josef Albers, a founder of the Bauhaus, became Rauschenberg’s painting instructor at Black Mountain. Albers’ preliminary courses relied on strict discipline that did not allow for any “uninfluenced experimentation”. Rauschenberg described Albers as influencing him to do “exactly the reverse” of what he was being taught.

From 1949 to 1952 Rauschenberg studied with Vaclav Vytlacil and Morris Kantor at the Art Students League of New York, where he met fellow artists Knox Martin and Cy Twombly.

Rauschenberg married Susan Weil in 1950. Their only child, Christopher, was born July 16, 1951. They divorced in 1953.  According

Robert Rauschenberg

Robert Rauschenberg

to a 1987 oral history by the composer Morton Feldman, after the end of his marriage, Rauschenberg had romantic relationships with fellow artists Cy Twombly and Jasper Johns.  An article by Jonathan D. Katz states that Rauschenberg’s affair with Twombly began during his marriage to Susan Weil.

Rauschenberg died on May 12, 2008, on Captiva Island, Florida. He died of

Untitled- Robert Rauschenberg

Untitled- Robert Rauschenberg

heart failure after a personal decision to go off life support.  Rauschenberg is survived by his partner of 25 years, artist Darryl Pottorf, his former assistant. Rauschenberg is also survived by his son, photographer Christopher Rauschenberg, and his sister, Janet Begneaud.

Rauschenberg’s approach was sometimes called “Neo Dadaist,” a label he shared with the painter Jasper Johns. Rauschenberg was quoted as saying that he wanted to work “in the gap between art and life” suggesting he questioned the distinction between art objects and everyday objects, reminiscent of the issues raised by the “Fountain”, by Dada pioneer, Marcel Duchamp. At the same time, Johns’ paintings of numerals, flags, and the like, were reprising Duchamp’s message of the role of the observer in creating art’s meaning.

Robert Rauschenberg

Robert Rauschenberg

Alternatively, in 1961, Rauschenberg took a step in what could be considered the opposite direction by championing the role of creator in creating art’s meaning. Rauschenberg was invited to participate in an exhibition at the Galerie Iris Clert, where artists were to create and display a portrait of the owner, Iris Clert. Rauschenberg’s submission consisted of a telegram sent to the gallery declaring “This is a portrait of Iris Clert if I say so.”

From the fall of 1952 to the spring of 1953 Rauschenberg traveled through Europe and North Africa with his fellow artist and partner Cy Twombly. In Morocco, he created collages and boxes out of trash. He took them back to Italy and exhibited them at galleries in Rome and Florence. A lot of them sold; those that did not he threw into the river Arno.  From his stay, 38 collages survived.  In a famously cited incident of 1953, Rauschenberg erased a drawing by de Kooning, which he obtained from his colleague for the express purpose of erasing it as an artistic statement. The result is titled Erased de Kooning Drawing.

By 1962, Rauschenberg’s paintings were beginning to incorporate not only found objects but found images as well – photographs transferred to the canvas by means of the silkscreen process. Previously used only in commercial applications, silkscreen allowed Rauschenberg to address the multiple reproducibility of images, and the consequent flattening of experience that implies. In this respect, his work is contemporaneous with that ofAndy Warhol, and both Rauschenberg and Johns are frequently cited as important forerunners of American Pop Art.

In 1966, Billy Klüver and Rauschenberg officially launched Experiments in Art and Technology (E.A.T.) a non-profit organization

Black Paintings- Robert Rauschenberg

Black Paintings- Robert Rauschenberg

established to promote collaborations between artists and engineers.

In 1969, NASA invited Rauschenberg to witness the launch of Apollo 11. In response to this landmark event, Rauschenberg created his Stoned Moon Series of lithographs. This involved combining diagrams and other images from NASA’s archives with photographs from various media outlets, as well as with his own work.

Black Paintings- Robert Rauschenberg

Black Paintings- Robert Rauschenberg

As of 2003 he worked from his home and studio in Captiva, Florida. His first project on Captiva Island was a 16.5-meter-long silkscreen print called Currents (1970), made with newspapers from the first two months of the year, followed by Cardboards (1970–71) and Early Egyptians (1973–74), the latter of which is a series of wall reliefs and sculptures constructed from used boxes. He also printed on textiles using his solvent-transfer technique to make the Hoarfrosts (1974–76) and Spreads (1975–82), and in the Jammers(1975–76), created a series of colorful silk wall and floor works. Urban Bourbons (1988–95) focused on different methods of transferring images onto a variety of reflective metals, such as steel and aluminum. In addition, throughout the 1990s, Rauschenberg continued to utilize new materials while still working with more rudimentary techniques, such as wet fresco, as in theArcadian Retreat (1996) series, and the transfer of images by hand, as in the Anagrams (1995–2000). As part of his engagement with the latest technological innovations, he began making digital Iris prints and using biodegradable vegetable dyes in his transfer processes, underscoring his commitment to caring for the environment.

Read more of his extensive biography at wikipedia.

I had to dig out old Korean newspaper that my dad packed some stuff in with!  We don't really have newspapers sitting around anymore.

I had to dig out old Korean newspaper that my dad packed some stuff in with! We don’t really have newspapers sitting around anymore.

My specific piece is inspired by a combination of his different art styles.  I was inspired by his

Black, black, black...

Black, black, black…

collage neo-dada pieces that had the moon landing and photos of Kennedy, but also by his Black Paintings.  I combined them and this is what I came up with!  This is one of my sadder and reflective pieces.  I immediately thought of the death of one of my favorite actors Philip Seymour Hoffman and thought I’d pay tribute to him as well as Rauschenberg.

I was so happy to find a huge wad of Korean newspapers and the Stars & Stripes Korea paper that my dad used to package some stuff and send to me.  I layered on so many pieces of newspaper for this piece!  It was fun.  I also used an old wooden/foam board piece instead of a canvas…so it’s slightly bigger than my normal paintings.

Well, I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 50! Whew X 1000!

<3, Linda

Layering and layering and layering...

Layering and layering and layering… 

I love how the paper folds and creases as I paint!

I love how the paper folds and creases as I paint!

Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

Side-View Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

Side-View
Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

Close-Up 1 Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

Close-Up 1
Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

Close-Up 2 Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

Close-Up 2
Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

Close-Up 3 Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

Close-Up 3
Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

 

 

Close-Up 4 Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

Close-Up 4
Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

 

 

 

 

 

Day Twenty-Eight- Hannah Höch- Blurring Boundaries

It’s Day 28 and I’ve got to be honest with you.  I’ve started packing up my house and so fitting in painting has been difficult.  BUT, I’m not giving up.  It’s not an option! 🙂  I was excited to see that Hannah Höch was today’s artist.

Hannah Hoch

Hannah Hoch

Hannah Höch (November 1, 1889 – May 31, 1978) was a German Dada artist. She is best known for her work of the Weimar period, when she was one of the originators of photomontage.

Grotesque (1963)

Grotesque (1963)

Hannah Höch was born Anna Therese Johanne Höch in Gotha, Germany. From 1912 to

Bouquet of Eyes- Hannah Hoch

Bouquet of Eyes- Hannah Hoch

1914 she studied at the College of Arts and Crafts in Berlin under the guidance of Harold Bergen. She chose the curriculum glass design and graphic arts, rather than fine arts, to please her father. In 1914, at the start of World War I, she left the school to work with the Red Cross. In 1915 she returned to school, entering the graphics class of the National Institute of the Museum of Arts and Crafts. Also in 1915, Höch began an influential friendship with Raoul Hausmann, a member of the Berlin Dada movement. Höch’s involvement with the Berlin Dadaists began in earnest in 1919. After her schooling, she worked in the handicrafts department for Ullstein Verlag (The Ullstein Press), designing dress and embroidery patterns for Die Dame (The Lady) and Die Praktische Berlinerin (The Practical Berlin Woman). The influence of this early work and training can be seen in her later work involving references to dress patterns and textiles. From 1926 to 1929 she lived and worked in the Netherlands. Höch made many influential friendships over the years, with Kurt Schwitters and Piet Mondrian among others. Höch, along with Hausmann, was one of the first pioneers of the art form that would come to be known as photomontage.

Platonic Love- Hannah Hoch

Platonic Love- Hannah Hoch

After her involvement with Hausmann ended in 1922, she was involved with women and had a relationship from 1926 to 1929 with the Dutch writer and linguist Til Brugman. She supported reproductive rights for women; she had two abortions during her involvement with Hausmann.

While the Dadaists “paid lip service to women’s emancipation,” they were clearly reluctant to

The Flirt 1926

The Flirt 1926

include a woman among their ranks. Hans Richterdescribed Höch’s contribution to the Dada movement as the “sandwiches, beer and coffee she managed somehow to conjure up despite the shortage of money.” Raoul Hausmann even suggested that Höch get a job to support him financially. Höch was the lone woman among the Berlin Dada group, although Sophie Täuber, Beatrice Wood, and Baroness Else von Freytag-Loringhoven were also important, if overlooked, Dada figures. Höch references the hypocrisy of the Berlin Dada group and German society as a whole in her photomontage, Da-Dandy.

Höch’s time at Verlang working with magazines targeted to women made her acutely aware of the difference between women in media and reality, even as the workplace provided her with many of the images that served as raw material for her own work. She was also critical of marriage, often depicting brides as mannequins and children, reflecting the socially pervasive idea of women as incomplete people with little control over their lives. Höch considered herself a part of the women’s movement in the 1920s, as shown in her depiction of herself in Schnitt mit dem Küchenmesser DADA durch die letzte weimarer Bierbauchkulturepoche Deutschlands (1919–20). Her pieces also

Dada Dandy- Hannah Hoch

Dada Dandy- Hannah Hoch

commonly combine male and female traits into one unified being. During the era of the Weimar Republic, “mannish women were both celebrated and castigated for breaking down traditional gender roles.” Her androgynous characters may also have been related to her bisexuality and attraction to masculinity in women (that is, attraction to the female form paired with stereotypically masculine characteristics).

Höch spent the years of the Third Reich in Berlin, Germany, keeping a low profile. She lived

Cut with the Kitchen Knife: Dada Through the Last Weimar Beer-belly Cultural Epoch of Germany" (1919)

Cut with the Kitchen Knife: Dada Through the Last Weimar Beer-belly Cultural Epoch of Germany” (1919)

in Berlin-Heiligensee, a remote area in the outskirts of Berlin, hiding in a small garden house. She married businessman and pianist Kurt Matthies in 1938 and divorced him in 1944.Though her work was not acclaimed after the war as it had been before the rise of the Third Reich, she continued to produce her photomontages and exhibit them internationally until her death in 1978, in Berlin. Her house and garden can be visited at the annual Day of the Memorial (Tag des offenen Denkmals).

Read more of her biography here at wikipedia.

"Hochfinanz" (High Finance) - Hannah Hoch

“Hochfinanz” (High Finance) – Hannah Hoch

I thought my tribute to her came out okay.  I wish that I had more time to work on it.  I wish I filled the canvas entirely.  You would

Hannah Höch, Russian Dancer/My Double, 1928

Hannah Höch, Russian Dancer/My Double, 1928

think that doing a photomontage/Dadaist collage would be easy, but it wasn’t.  I spent a good amount of time sifting through photographs on the computer and trying to visualize cutting them apart and putting them together in the right way.  It was also pretty difficult to paste everything down gracefully.  I felt like a little kid using glue for the first time.  I also printed the photos out with an ink-jet printer onto regular paper so I had to be careful the ink didn’t bleed because of the glue and mod-podge.  I primed the photos with enamel before glossing it over one last time.  My hands were sticky and pretty gross after.  I decided to keep this one simple and of course I wanted to do a self-portrait.  I used her self-portrait for inspiration.

Please enjoy the first of the Dadaists tributes that I’ve created.  I can’t wait for the next Dada/photomontage/collage artist I get to.  I will make sure to do something more involved.  For now I’m just satisfied, but not exactly excited about how it turned out.

I’m giving myself an emotional break and not beating myself up too much because this next month is going to be insane!

See you tomorrow on Day 29!  The month is almost over even though it feels like it just started!

xoxo, Linda

It's for you- Tribute to Hannah Hoch Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Paper/glue on canvas

It’s for you- Tribute to Hannah Hoch
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Paper/glue on canvas

Side- View It's for you- Tribute to Hannah Hoch Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Paper/glue on canvas

Side- View
It’s for you- Tribute to Hannah Hoch
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Paper/glue on canvas

Close-Up 1 It's for you- Tribute to Hannah Hoch Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Paper/glue on canvas

Close-Up 1
It’s for you- Tribute to Hannah Hoch
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Paper/glue on canvas

Close-Up 2 It's for you- Tribute to Hannah Hoch Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Paper/glue on canvas

Close-Up 2
It’s for you- Tribute to Hannah Hoch
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Paper/glue on canvas