Day 323- Barry McGee- Outside the Art World

It’s Day 323 and I worked on today’s piece a bit last night and this morning.  I spent most of my afternoon running errands and getting soaked in the rain.  Now I have to do stuff at home before heading out to improv class tonight.  I worked really hard on today’s piece and I am very happy with the result!  Join me in honoring Barry McGee today. 🙂

Barry McGee

Barry McGee

Barry McGee

Barry McGee

Barry McGee (born 1966 in San Francisco) is a painter and graffiti artist. He is also known by monikers such as Ray FongLydia FongBernon VernonP.KinRay VirgilTwist and further variations of Twist, such as TwisterTwistyTwisto and others.

McGee graduated from El Camino High School in South San Francisco, California. He later graduated from the San Francisco Art Institute in 1991 with a concentration in painting and printmaking.

McGee rose out of the Mission School art movement and graffiti boom in the San Francisco Bay Area during the early nineties. His

Barry McGee Installation SF MoMa.

Barry McGee Installation SF MoMa.

work draws heavily from a pessimistic view of the urban experience, which he describes as, “urban ills, overstimulations, frustrations, addictions & trying to maintain a level head under the constant bombardment of advertising”.

McGee’s paintings are very iconic, with central figures dominating abstracted backgrounds of drips, patterns and color fields. He has also painted portraits of street characters on their own empty bottles of liquor, painted flattened spray cans picked up at train yards and painted wrecked vehicles for art shows.

Barry McGee- Bottle

Barry McGee- Bottle

McGee has had numerous shows in many kinds of galleries and was also an artist in residence at inner-city McClymonds High School in Oakland, California in the early 1990s.

He was married to the artist Margaret Kilgallen, who died of cancer in 2001. The couple has a daughter named Asha.

The market value of his work rose considerably after 2001 as a result of his being included in the Venice Biennale and other major exhibitions. As a result, much of his San Francisco street art has been scavenged or stolen.

McGee was highly influential on the urban art scene that followed in his wake. He popularized use of paint drips in urban-influenced graphic design, as well as the gallery display technique of clustering paintings. These clustered compositions of pictures are based on similar installations he saw in Catholic churches whilst working in Brazil.

He also was an early participant in the practice of painting directly on gallery walls, imitating the intrusive

Barry McGee- Untitled

Barry McGee- Untitled

nature of graffiti. His use of chisel tip markers has heavily influenced sticker art and graffiti in general, which can be clearly seen in works produced by artists like sure, faust, and mecro.

McGee learned his later lowbrow style from Margaret Kilgallen, but was taught graffiti in 1989 by SR-1, mentor to both Barry McGee and artist “Dan Plasma”, and the founder of the THR graffiti crew, of which Barry was the second member.

Barry McGee

Barry McGee

McGee was involved in a controversy regarding the Adidas Y1 HUF, a shoe for which he provided the artwork. This gave rise to a protest campaign by some Asian-Americans who claimed that the picture on the shoe’s tongue depicts a racist stereotype. McGee responded to the controversy in a March 2006 press release. He stated that the drawing was a portrait of himself as an eight-year-old child. Barry McGee is half Chinese.

In 2004, as part of an exhibit, McGee spray-painted “Smash the State” on the walls of San Francisco Supervisor Matt Gonzalez’ City Hall office (City Hall is a registered national landmark).” Gonzalez told the press that he knew his office would be repainted for the next occupant.

Quotes-

  • “The more I learned about the art world, the more my interest in what was going on outside of it increased, I didn’t have any desire to bring graffiti inside the school’s walls or anything.”
  • “Compelling art to me is a name carved into a tree. Sometimes a rock soaring through a plate of glass can
    Barry McGee

    Barry McGee

    be the most beautiful, compelling work of art I have ever seen.”

  • “I’m not a sweet person. I’m OCD, ADD, but DFW and say thank you obsessively.”

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  The most challenging part was painting the geometric pattern as precise as I could.  I got some new fancy brushes and boy, do they make a difference!

I will see you tomorrow on Day 324!

Best,

Linda

My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 318- Amy Sillman- Layer By Layer

It’s Day 318 and I’m having another difficult art day.  Just not feeling very intuitive or creative today and a little under the weather.  I am thankful that I haven’t had too many days like this throughout the past year.  Yet I persevered and did my painting.  I enjoyed the creation process, but I kept altering and jiggering the piece…overanalyzing everything going on in my brain.  I hope I captured the artist’s style…even just a little.  Her pieces are surprisingly difficult to emulate which makes them special.  Maybe on a different day I would’ve been less critical!  Join me in honoring Amy Sillman today!

Amy Sillman

Amy Sillman

Amy Sillman

Amy Sillman

Amy Sillman (born 1955) is an American painter. She lives and works in Brooklyn.

Sillman was born in Detroit, Michigan, and the winding story line of her early years led her to work in a cannery in Alaska and a feminist silkscreen factory in Chicago, and to train at New York University as a Japanese interpreter for the United Nations. She finally landed at Manhattan’s School of Visual Arts, graduating in 1979. Then she spent more than a decade content, as she has said, with “learning how to make paintings—just working, not showing.”

In a 2006 Artforum article, Jan Avgikos wrote that Sillman’s paintings “mine the edges of abstraction, meshing patches of color with bursts of chaotic line and web-like compositional scaffolding.”

Amy Sillman, Blue Diagram, 2009

Amy Sillman, Blue Diagram, 2009

Embracing a modernist reverence of inspired imagination, Sillman defines honesty as the most enduring quality of painting and speaks of painting as “physical, like an extension of my arm.” In a New York Times review of Sillman’s 2006 exhibition at Sikkema Jenkins & Co., Ken Johnson wrote, “The paintings are especially gratifying up close, where you can study the richly complicated textures and colors…” In 2007 Sillman completed four etchings at Crown Point Press, and of this experience, she has said, “Everything that is done in my painting was taken apart layer by layer in printmaking. You take one hundred layers apart and figure out which six will work.”

Bed- Amy Sillman

Bed- Amy Sillman

In a 2007 article in Artforum, Linda Norden wrote of Amy Sillman’s “fearless, tenacious pursuit of a painting that might accurately register the discomfort, incoherence, and absurdity that can characterize painterly experience—and experience in general,” and speaks of “her increasingly influential place among younger painters in both New York and Los Angeles, where she regularly shows, and her growing currency even among contingents of European painters.” Art critic Roberta Smith compared Sillman to similar women painters such as Elena Sisto, Margaret Curtis, and Sue Williams.

Sillman lives in Williamsburg, Brooklyn and maintains a studio in Bushwick.

Sillman began showing at the Brent Sikkema Gallery in New York in 2000. She is represented by Sikkema

Pirate- Amy Sillman

Pirate- Amy Sillman

Jenkins & Co., New York, and shows at Capitain-Petzel in Berlin, at Thomas Dane Gallery in London, and at Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects, Los Angeles. The first large scale survey of her work, curated by Helen Molesworth, premiered at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston in October 2013. The exhibition will also travel to the Aspen Art Museum and the Center for Curatorial Studies and Art in Contemporary Culture at Bard College. Her solo show “Third Person Singular,” the exhibition of a year-long project of portraiture and abstract painting, was on view at theHirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, DC, and travelled to the Tang Museum at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York, until 2009.

Sillman’s paintings are in the permanent collections of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York as well as private collections including the collection of CJ Follini and Renee Ryan.

Amy Sillman, P, 2007, courtesy of the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York.

Amy Sillman, P, 2007, courtesy of the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York.

In 1995, the same year she received an MFA from Bard College, Sillman was awarded a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship in painting and the Elaine de Kooning Memorial Fellowship in 1995. In 1999 she received fellowships from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation and the Joan Mitchell Foundation, and in 2000 was awarded aGuggenheim Fellowship. In 2012, as part of the fifth anniversary of the Brooklyn Museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, the museum presented Sillman with the First Award, a prize given to 15 women who were first in their fields.

Amy Sillman was a Guna S. Mundheim Fellow in the Visual Arts at the American Academy in Berlin, Germany, during the Spring of 2009. During the fall of 2010, she was a Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University. In May 2011, the Montserrat College of Art awarded Amy Sillman an honorary doctoral degree in fine arts.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 319.  I’m going to take the world’s longest nap now.  I hope I feel better tomorrow.  Bummed to be missing my improv rehearsal tonight.

Best,

Linda

Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 310- Ad Dekkers- Geometric Relief

It’s Day 310 and I had a great time creating today’s piece.  I worked entirely with wood pieces and made a somewhat architectural piece, working with squares and rectangles only.  It was geometrical…algebraic even! 😉  Okay, joking aside, I had a wonderful zen-esque experience.  Join me in honoring Ad Dekkers today.

Ad Dekkers

Ad Dekkers

Broken cirle in Amsterdam- Ad Dekkers

Broken cirle in Amsterdam- Ad Dekkers

Adriaan “Ad” Dekkers (Nieuwpoort, South Holland, 21 March 1938 – Gorinchem, 27 February 1974) was as Dutch artist mostly known for his reliefs involving simple geometrical forms.

Dekkers was born to Hendrik Pieter Dekkers, a school principal, and Anna Elizabeth Berdina Godtschalk. Adrian attended his father’s school and also received training as a decorative painter. Between 1954 and 1958 he studied at the Willem de Kooning Academy in

Ad Dekkers, Reliëf met zwarte driehoeken

Ad Dekkers, Reliëf met zwarte driehoeken

Rotterdam where he was mostly engaged in drawing of landscapes and still images. In February 1960 Dekkers entered military service, and in December 1961 married Machelina Hendrika van Bruggen, with whom he had one son.

Since early 1960s Dekkers became dissatisifed with painting and focused on reliefs, mostly made of plastic. By 1968 he was recognized as a master in this area and started creating monumental sculptures and reliefs in architectural environment.

Ad Dekkers - Relief met afgeschuinde blokjes

Ad Dekkers – Relief met afgeschuinde blokjes

His works became accepted at major international exhibitions, such as the Biennale de Paris in 1965, São Paulo Art Biennial in 1967 and documenta in Kassel in 1968. He also had a number of solo exhibitions in the Netherlands. After his death in 1974, his works were exhibited in Eindhoven and Düsseldorf and placed in museums in the Netherlands, Belgium, Denmark, Germany, England and the United States.

Biography is from wikipedia.

Below is from tate.org.uk.

Dutch artist, born in Nieuwpoort. Studied at the Academy in Rotterdam 1954-8.

Ad Dekkers Verschoven Kwadraten 1965

Ad Dekkers Verschoven Kwadraten 1965

Began to make reliefs in 1961 influenced partly by Mondrian, built out of layers of flat geometric shapes and with asymmetrical compositions. Then abandoned the use of colour and began to work entirely in white.

Ad Dekkers, Variaties op cirkels IV

Ad Dekkers, Variaties op cirkels IV

First one-man exhibition with Jan van Munster at the Galerie De Drie Hendricken, Amsterdam, 1963. From about 1965 his reliefs became more systematic and linear, constructed out of fewer planes or with lines cut into a flat surface; they were often based on the transformation of one regular geometric shape into another, such as a square into a circle. Also made some three-dimensional sculptures from 1968. Died in Gorinchem.

~

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I think the one thing I should’ve done more was sanding down the wood pieces, but I like my design.  I wanted to capture his style, but also retain something unique.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 311!

Best,

Linda

Rechthoeken En Vierkanten- Tribute to Ad Dekkers Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Wood Panel

Rechthoeken En Vierkanten- Tribute to Ad Dekkers
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Wood Panel

Side-View Rechthoeken En Vierkanten- Tribute to Ad Dekkers Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Wood Panel

Side-View
Rechthoeken En Vierkanten- Tribute to Ad Dekkers
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Wood Panel

Close-Up 1 Rechthoeken En Vierkanten- Tribute to Ad Dekkers Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Wood Panel

Close-Up 1
Rechthoeken En Vierkanten- Tribute to Ad Dekkers
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Wood Panel

Close-Up 2 Rechthoeken En Vierkanten- Tribute to Ad Dekkers Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Wood Panel

Close-Up 2
Rechthoeken En Vierkanten- Tribute to Ad Dekkers
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Wood Panel

Close-Up 3 Rechthoeken En Vierkanten- Tribute to Ad Dekkers Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Wood Panel

Close-Up 3
Rechthoeken En Vierkanten- Tribute to Ad Dekkers
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Wood Panel

Day 298- Pedro Calapez- Extending Past the Edges

It’s Day 298 and I’m having a big painting day.  I’m trying to get a little ahead and plan a bit this week.  My schedule has been a little busy and will stay that way until the holidays get started.  And then I’ll be busy in a whole new way!  Join me in honoring Pedro Calapez today.

Pedro Calapez

Pedro Calapez

Pedro Calapez ESTUDIO PARA PINTURA SIN TÍTULO 11 Acrylic on cardboard

Pedro Calapez
ESTUDIO PARA PINTURA SIN TÍTULO 11
Acrylic on cardboard

Pedro Calapez was born 1953 in Lisbon where he lives and works. He began his studies in civil engineering but changed later to the Escola de Belas Artes (School of Fine Arts). While attending Belas Artes he worked as a professional photographer until 1985, when he was able to dedicate himself exclusively to painting.

Pedro Calapez is internationally exhibiting since the 80’s and has presented his

Gallery Installation- Pedro Calapez

Gallery Installation- Pedro Calapez

work in many important museums and galleries. He has participated 1986 at the Venice Biennale and 1987 and 1991 at the São Paulo Biennale. In the german speaking part of Europe, his work was shown 1999 at the Kunstmuseum Bonn in the exhibition “Tage der Dunkelheit und des Lichts”.

Expansion rather than concentration, is an obvious driving power in the artistic language of Pedro Celapez, who is working in the field between drawing and painting, figurative expression and abstraction.

horizonte bloqueado | 2013 | acryl on canvas- Pedro Calapez

horizonte bloqueado | 2013 | acryl on canvas- Pedro Calapez

He often divides his multiple-part image compositions puzzle-like on strictly geometric surfaces and within those are ruling the most expressive gestures and mediterranean colors. Pedro Calapez is creating on individual aluminium boards images of large painted ribbons and surfaces, placing strong primary colors near muddy shades that are defining, layer after layer, the painted space.

But not only each board might appear in a severe struggle, but as well the different parts of the whole composition can be of distinct depth. The several painted boards invade more or less deeply the exhibition space and are forming a relief-like macro mosaic and as in a magnetic field, the individual components are attracting or rejecting each other.

Sometimes few painted boards are creating tension and form, but other works are

Pedro Calapez, Bareira J, painted aluminium

Pedro Calapez, Bareira J, painted aluminium

compositions of twenty or more image bodies with different sizes and suddenly a mediterranean color spectrum opens the view to the southern brightness.

“My major concern is always the discussion of the edges of painting. I want the picture to extend beyond those. In a determined space my paintings together form a single piece that I cannot imagine being broken up in different walls.

Untitled- Pedro Calapez

Untitled- Pedro Calapez

Each painting goes beyond itself, each wall is a painting by itself; this does not allow the gaze to be fixed, it is all around. The fact is that your look dominates the reason why you keep looking at a painting; the eye takes over control of the way in which we look at a picture. Reason invokes a discourse made up of these fragments of vision. You penetrate/enter the painting by the invoking of its own details. It is not the general idea of a painting that is important, but the small stroke or line. What is important is the particular, the detail.” Pedro Calapez

Biography is from arthobler.com.

I hope you enjoy my piece for today!  I really loved looking at today’s artist’s paintings.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 299…almost to 300!  Then only 65 days to go.  Whew!

Best,

Linda

Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 296- Conrad Marca-Relli- Broken Surfaces

It’s Day 296 and I really enjoyed today’s tribute piece.  I am still happy from my improv show last night today as well.  Join me in honoring Conrad Marca-Relli today.

Conrad Marca-Relli

Conrad Marca-Relli

Conrad Marca-Relli, the Woman of Samura (1958)

Conrad Marca-Relli, the Woman of Samura (1958)

Conrad Marca-Relli (born Corrado Marcarelli; June 5, 1913 Boston – August 29, 2000 Parma) was an American artist who belonged to the early generation of New York School Abstract Expressionist artists whose artistic innovation by the 1950s had been recognized across the Atlantic, including Paris. New York School Abstract Expressionism, represented by Jackson Pollock,Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline, Marca-Relli and others became a leading art movement of the postwar era.

Marcarelli (he changed the spelling later in life) was born in Boston and, with his father

Untitled Collage- Conrad Marca-Relli

Untitled Collage- Conrad Marca-Relli

Cosimo, brother Ettore, and sisters Dora and Ida, moved to New York City when he was 13. In 1930 he studied at the Cooper Union for a year. He later supported himself by working for the Works Progress Administration, first as a teacher and then with mural painting divisions of the Federal Art Project during this period he won the Logan Medal of the arts. He served in the US Army military service during World War II (1941–1945).

Marca-Relli taught at Yale University from 1954 to 1955 and from 1959 to 1960, and at the University of California at Berkeley. In 1953, he bought a house near Jackson Pollock’s home in Springs, East Hampton. As his career progressed, he increasingly distanced himself from the New York School.

Conrad Marca-Relli

Conrad Marca-Relli

He lived and worked in many countries around the world, moving to Parma, Italy with his wife, Anita Gibson, whom he married in 1951. Conrad Marca-Relli died on August 29, 2000, in Parma, at the age of 87.

After the war Marca-Relli joined the “Downtown Group” which represented group of artists who found studios in lower Manhattan in the area bounded by 8th and 12th street between First and Sixth Avenues during the late 1940s and early 1950s. During the late 1940s and early 1950s, he was actively involved in the avant-garde art world in Greenwich Village. These artists were called the “Downtown Group” as opposed to the “Uptown Group” established during the war at The Art of This Century Gallery.

His first one-man show was in New York City in 1948. In 1949 Marca-Relli was

Conrad Marca-Relli

Conrad Marca-Relli

among the founders of the “Artists’ Club” located at 39 East 8th Street. He was selected by his fellow artists to show in the Ninth Street Show held on May 21-June 10, 1951. The show was located at 60 East 9th Street on the first floor and the basement of a building which was about to be demolished.

The artists celebrated not only the appearance of the dealers, collectors and museum people on the 9th Street, and the consequent exposure of their work but they celebrated the creation and the strength of a living community of significant dimensions.

Conrad Marca-Relli

Conrad Marca-Relli

Conrad Marca-Relli was among the 24 out of a total 256 New York School artists included in the Ninth Street Show and in all the following New York Painting and Sculpture Annuals from 1953 to 1957. These Annuals were important because the participants were chosen by the artists themselves.

Marca-Relli’s early cityscapes, still lifes, circus themes and architectural motifs are reminiscent of Italian surrealist painter Giorgio de Chirico. Throughout his career, Marca-Relli created monumental-scale collages. He combined oil painting and collage, employing intense colors, broken surfaces and expressionistic spattering. He also experimented with metal and vinyl materials. Over the years the collages developed an abstract simplicity, evidenced by black or somber colors and rectangular shapes isolated against a neutral backdrop.

In 1967, the Whitney Museum of American Art gave him a retrospective show.

The Dressmaker- Conrad Marca-Relli

The Dressmaker- Conrad Marca-Relli

The Archivio Marca-Relli, which was established by the artist and Galleria d’arte Niccoli in Parma in 1997, collects informations about Conrad Marca-Relli and archives his work for a future general catalogue.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  Marca-Relli’s artwork and collages are so inspiring that I became a little overwhelmed with what exactly I wanted to do.  I knew I wanted to do a collage…but what colors? What materials?  I am happy with how it turned out. I will see you tomorrow on Day 297!

Best,

Linda

L'inverno è Vicino- Tribute to Conrad Marca-Relli Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

L’inverno è Vicino- Tribute to Conrad Marca-Relli
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View L'inverno è Vicino- Tribute to Conrad Marca-Relli Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View
L’inverno è Vicino- Tribute to Conrad Marca-Relli
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 L'inverno è Vicino- Tribute to Conrad Marca-Relli Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
L’inverno è Vicino- Tribute to Conrad Marca-Relli
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 L'inverno è Vicino- Tribute to Conrad Marca-Relli Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
L’inverno è Vicino- Tribute to Conrad Marca-Relli
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 L'inverno è Vicino- Tribute to Conrad Marca-Relli Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
L’inverno è Vicino- Tribute to Conrad Marca-Relli
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Day 291- Esteban Vicente- Concrete Improvisations

It’s Day 291 and I’m full of inspiration today.  I want to play music, edit videos and more.  But first I need to post this blog!  Please join me in honoring Esteban Vicente today.  I needed a break from self-portraits and anything insanely difficult.  Enjoy!

Esteban Vicente

Esteban Vicente

Esteban Vicente

Esteban Vicente

Esteban Vicente Pérez (January 20, 1903 – January 10, 2001), was an American painter born in Turégano, Spain. He was one of the first generation of New York School abstract expressionists.

Esteban Vicente was born in Turégano, Spain on January 20, 1903. His mother, Sofia Pérez y Álvarez came from an Asturian family and was born in Valladolid. His father, Toribio Vicente Ruiz, came from a military family near Salamanca and was an army officer. Esteban Vicente had two sisters and three brothers. He was the third child and second son. Vicente’s father resigned his commission and moved his family to the capital, Madrid, where he worked as a buildings administrator for the Banco de Españaso that the children could be educated at good Jesuit schools. Vicente was taken to the Museo del Prado by his father, an art enthusiast, almost every Sunday from the time he was four years old and began to draw when he was sixteen. He was expected to follow family tradition and join the army. After three months in military school he decided to become an artist.

Vicente enrolled at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes in Madrid in 1921 intending to study sculpture. He completed his training in 1924. Commenting on his experience at the Academy he said “It doesn’t give you any

Collage with Yellow, Blue and Orange- Esteban Vicente

Collage with Yellow, Blue and Orange- Esteban Vicente

ideas about anything. It gives you tools, and teaches you about materials. Academic training is safe. It prepares you to be against.”

He had his first one-man exhibition in Madrid in 1928, after which he left for Paris and did not return to Spain until 1930. In 1935 he married Estelle Charney, an American whom he had met in Paris. After the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War in 1936 Vicente, supporting the Loyalist forces, painted camouflage in the mountains outside Madrid for a few months. Later that year he and his wife moved to New York. The (Loyalist) Spanish Ambassador to the U.S. set him up as a Vice Consul in Philadelphia, a position which supported his family for three years. Vicente had ample time to continue with his art and had his first one-man show in New York at the Kleeman Gallery in 1937. After the fall of the Spanish Republic in 1939 he returned to New York City. During World War II he supported himself with portrait commissions and by teaching Spanish. A 1945 exhibition in Puerto Rico led in 1946 to a position at the University of Puerto Rico teaching painting. After his return to New York in 1947 he established relationships with most of the members of the nascent New York School, participating in their seminal exhibitions at the Kootz Gallery in 1950, in the 9th Street Art Exhibition in 1951 and in exhibitions at the Sidney Janis Gallery and Charles Egan Gallery. Subsequently he was represented by the Leo Castelli, André Emmerich[6] and Berry-Hill Galleries in New York City. He was a founding member of the New York Studio School, where he taught for 36 years. Although he never exhibited in Spain during the rule of Francisco Franco, in 1998 the Spanish government opened the Esteban Vicente Museum of Contemporary Art in Segovia.

Esteban Vicente. Black, Grey, and Green. 1961. Reina Sofía Museum, Madrid.

Esteban Vicente. Black, Grey, and Green. 1961. Reina Sofía Museum, Madrid.

Vicente maintained a house and studio in Bridgehampton, New York from 1964. His marriage to Estelle Charney ended in divorce in 1943. Their daughter Mercedes, died at aged six. A second marriage, to Maria Teresa Babin, also ended in divorce. Vicente died in Bridgehampton on January 10, 2001. He was survived by his third wife, Harriet Peters, whom he married in 1961.

He has been honored as a renowned artist and child advocate by a New York City Bronx School Public School 170, a Kindergarten to Second Grade school has been

Esteban Vicente: "Noon," 1982; Lithograph, 21-3/4 x 29-1/2 inches.

Esteban Vicente: “Noon,” 1982; Lithograph, 21-3/4 x 29-1/2 inches.

named the Esteban Vicente school. A family member has incorporated Art programs into the schools. Students’ talents emerge as they are exposed to the culture. At PS 170 students learn about Esteban Vicente and his style, color and design. Examples of his work adorn the walls of the school.

Vicente has a museum devoted to him in Segovia, Spain, the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo Esteban Vicente, and a street named after him in Turégano.

Esteban Vicente

Esteban Vicente

In March 2011 the Grey Art Gallery at New York University exhibited Concrete Improvisations: Collages and Sculpture by Esteban Vicente. In addition to 60 paper collages, the exhibit included 20 of Vicente’s small-scale assemblages called divertimentos (toys), composed from pieces of found wood and covered with white plaster, with others composed of plastic and wood with architectonic elements.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece for today.  Again, it was more challenging than I always think paintings like these will be.  I try my hardest and they are always inspired by the artist’s paintings whether or not they turn out exactly how they look in my mind. 🙂  I will see you tomorrow on Day 292!

Best,

Linda

Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Yellow, Red, Blue- Tribute to Esteban Vicente
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 286- Lynne Drexler- …Nature clarifies you to yourself…

It’s Day 286 and I really really enjoyed doing today’s piece.  I fell in love with the artist’s paintings.  Join me in honoring Lynne Drexler today.  I spent so long attempting to find a photo of the artist, but couldn’t!  Very strange.

Lynne Drexler Book

Lynne Drexler Book

Orientalia- Lynne Drexler

Orientalia- Lynne Drexler

Lynne Drexler (1928 – 1999) was an American abstract and representational artist, who was a painter and photographer.

Lynne Drexler was born and raised in the Newport News, Virginia area. Her parents were Lynne P. and Norman E. Drexler, who was a manager at a public utility. At the age of 11 she was an only

Felled Tree- Lynne Drexler

Felled Tree- Lynne Drexler

child and had been living in Raleigh Terrace, Elizabeth City (now Hampton), Virginia. She began painting as a child. Later, Drexler took art classes in Virginia at the Richmond Professional Institute and at the College of William and Mary.

She moved to New York City in the mid to late 1950s to further her study art under Robert Motherwell at Hunter College and Hans Hofmann, under their tutelage she developed an interest in Abstract Expressionism.  Motherwell taught her composition and draftsmanship techniques and the philosophy “that to be an artist meant first and foremost that one had to create work worthy of attention”. Her tendency to create vibrant paintings using a free brush stroke was influenced by Hofman and the work of Henri Matisse.  Hofman also introduced the notion that composition is influenced by color, which he called the “push-pull” concept.

Lynne Drexler

Lynne Drexler

In the late 1950s she was an abstract expressionist and was “counted among an important group of women artists whose figural and landscape works were often overlooked during the heyday of post-abstract expressionist modernism – artists such as Jane Freilicher, Lois Dodd, and Jane Wilson.”

She was a devotee of classical music, attending up to 3 opera performances each week, and

Blued- Lynne Drexler

Blued- Lynne Drexler

would often go to opera and symphony performances with a sketchpad and colored crayons in hand to make sketches inspired by the music. Drexler’s Pattern and Decoration embroidery and patchwork influenced some of her later works, similar designs often appeared in her painting’s backgrounds.

In 1961 Drexler met fellow artist John Hultberg at The Artist’s Club in New York. Artists there discussed abstract expressionism and it was there she met accomplished artists. Through their connections she had her first solo exhibition of 11 works at Tanager Gallery. Drexler and Hultberg were married and for three years traveled and lived in Mexico, the West Coast and Hawaii. They then lived at New York’s Chelsea Hotel in the late 1960s.  For six months, Drexler had a case of colorblindness and developed a severe case of depression.

Early Spring- Lynne Drexler

Early Spring- Lynne Drexler

Seeking a relaxing environment, the couple bought a house off the coast of Maine on Monhegan Island in 1971 and split their time between New York City and Maine, particularly spending the summers at their island house.

By 1983, Drexler moved year-around and permanently near Lighthouse Hill on Monhegan Island, an artists’ haven off the coast of Maine, where she had spent most summers since 1963. The island people and landscape were the subject of many of her paintings from that time. Drexler’s paintings became less strictly abstract and exhibited a synthesis of abstract and representational influences.

Drexler died December 30, 1999, living two years longer than expected battling cancer.

The first comprehensive exhibit of her work – showcasing over fifty paintings,

photographic images and textiles – ran at the Monhegan Museum in August and September 2008. It then ran at the Portland Museum of Art from December 6, 2008 through March 1, 2009. The exhibition was organized by the Monhegan Historical and Cultural Museum Association.  In 2010 her works were shown at the Portland Museum in 2010 until March 1 and from April 17 to June 5 at the McCormick Gallery in Chicago.

Biography is from wikipedia.

Flower Bushes- Tribute to Lynne Drexler Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Flower Bushes- Tribute to Lynne Drexler
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Flower Bushes- Tribute to Lynne Drexler Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Flower Bushes- Tribute to Lynne Drexler
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Flower Bushes- Tribute to Lynne Drexler Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Flower Bushes- Tribute to Lynne Drexler
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Flower Bushes- Tribute to Lynne Drexler Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Flower Bushes- Tribute to Lynne Drexler
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Flower Bushes- Tribute to Lynne Drexler Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Flower Bushes- Tribute to Lynne Drexler
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 283- Robert Natkin- Advanced Abstractions

It’s Day 283 and I just got back from my good friend Josiah’s art show where he painted a painting a day for a year last year.  He was my initial inspiration for this very project.  It was wonderful to see all his paintings and get to buy one and a book that features all his work!  What an inspiration!  I also enjoyed today’s piece.  Join me in honoring Robert Natkin today.  Biography is from his obituary in The Independent.  I will include that link below.

Robert Natkin

Robert Natkin

Robert Natkin

Robert Natkin

Robert Natkin was an artist who will be remembered for his vibrant paintings, composed of floating shapes or lines of colour on expansive canvases.

Placing his work into the context of the contemporary art world, the critic Robert Hughes observed: “The high-concept, low-content installations and “shock art” camp that fill today’s galleries and museums may serve as interesting sociological studies, but they fail, ultimately, to sustain us.” By contrast, he noted that “Natkin’s paintings, despite their look of deceptive serenity, challenge the viewer to travel inward, and spark an intimacy that is long-lasting and transforming.”

Natkin was born in Chicago in 1930 to a Russian-Jewish immigrant family. From

Krystal Nacht 1996, acrylic on canvas, 71 1/2 x 84 inches- Robert Natkin

Krystal Nacht
1996, acrylic on canvas, 71 1/2 x 84 inches- Robert Natkin

1948 to 1952 he studied at the city’s Art Institute, where he discovered the Abstract Expressionist movement from an article on Jackson Pollock in the pages of Life magazine.

After short periods living in New York and San Francisco in the early fifties,he moved back to Chicago in 1953 and four years later married the artist Judith Dolnick. Finding and converting a vacant shop, the couple created their Wells Street Gallery in the Old Town area of the city.

Robert Natkin/They’ll Be Some Changes Made

Robert Natkin/They’ll Be Some Changes Made

Although initially intended as a space for emerging artists like themselves to exhibit, over the next two years the gallery became known for its cutting-edge shows including more established artists, such as the abstract expressionist photographer Aaron Siskind. The local newspaper remarked admiringly at the time of this “…avant-garde exhibition place filled with the most advanced abstractions in town.”

On relocating to New York in 1959, he came under the influence of the older Dutch-

Robert Natkin

Robert Natkin

American artist Willem de Kooning, whose pure abstract paintings, such as Bolton Landing (1957), would dramatically change the direction of his work. Natkin’s painting of this period, Dutch View (1959), is an example of this style, whose title pays dual homage to van Gogh’s use of colours and de Kooning’s palette knife painting technique.

He made his first trip to Europe in 1968 for the group show Timeless Paintings from the USA at the Paul Facchetti Gallery in Paris; the other artists included Lester Johnson, Harry Nadler, Frank Roth and William Wiley. Facchetti had 16 years earlier bravely introduced Jackson Pollock’s work to the French public.

A group of paintings from this era, the Field Mouse series (1967-1971), were inspired by Paul Klee’s use of dots and textures and Ezra Pound’s translation from a Chinese poem: “And the days are not full enough / And the nights are not full enough / And life goes by / Like a field mouse / Running through the grass not touching”. One can sense in the paintings from this series, and the words which inspired them, echoes of Natkin’s own busy life, at the peak of its creative activity. This same period also saw a move from the city to the peaceful countryside of West Redding, Connecticut.

British art lovers were able to appreciate Natkin’s work for the first time in 1974 at an exhibition organised by the Festival Gallery and the Holburne of Menstrie Museum in Bath, where the British art critic Peter Fuller first encountered Natkin’s paintings.

Robert Natkin

Robert Natkin

In 1979 Fuller and the film director Mike Dibb collaborated with Natkin on the BBC documentary Somewhere over the Rainbow which examined the relationship between art and psychoanalysis, shaped by Fuller’s own experiences of analysis. He suggested that the illusion of space within Natkin’s work, an ambiguity between “inside” and “outside”, could parallel a stage in our personal development “when it was difficult to differentiate between ‘self’ and ‘not-self’ “.

Fuller’s son, Laurence, remembers Natkin as: “…the only abstract painter to penetrate my father’s vision. My recollection of him was that of a charismatic and welcoming presence, with a vulnerability in his willingness and enthusiasm to engage people in his work. When I was three years old he met us at our hotel, in the busy bustling lobby, full of New Yorkers on their way to somewhere. He spread out a large canvas on the floor, his latest painting, and said ‘what do you think Laurence?’ His passion was endearing and his work inspiring.”

Peter Fuller’s monograph on the artist was published in 1981 and Natkin went on to write for the magazine Modern Painters, founded in

Ballad- Robert Natkin

Ballad- Robert Natkin

1988. He gave the 1992 Peter Fuller memorial lecture at the Tate Gallery on the theme of Subject Matter and Abstraction in Exile.

The exhibition The Wells Street Gallery Revisited: Then and Now opened in January this year at the Lesley Heller Workspace in New York and provided a welcome retrospective of the Chicago School group of artists of the late 1950s and that vanguard gallery created by Dolnick and Natkin.

Robert Joseph Natkin, artist: born Chicago, Illinois 7 November 1930; married 1957 Judith Dolnick (one son, one daughter); died Danbury, Connecticut 20 April 2010.

Biography is from www.independent.co.uk.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I enjoyed creating it.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 284!

Best,

Linda

Sonata- Tribute to Robert Natkin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Sonata- Tribute to Robert Natkin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Sonata- Tribute to Robert Natkin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Sonata- Tribute to Robert Natkin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Sonata- Tribute to Robert Natkin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Sonata- Tribute to Robert Natkin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Sonata- Tribute to Robert Natkin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Sonata- Tribute to Robert Natkin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Sonata- Tribute to Robert Natkin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Sonata- Tribute to Robert Natkin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 280- Lenz Klotz- Oscillating Lines

It’s Day 280 and I enjoyed today’s painting.  The challenging part was finding an extensive biography of the artist!  Join me in honoring Lenz Klotz today.

Lenz Klotz

Lenz Klotz

Lenz Klotz

Lenz Klotz

Lenz Klotz (* 1925 in Chur ) is a Swiss artist .

After receiving the teacher diploma of the cantonal teacher’s college in 1945, he ordered Churchill in the years 1945-1950 the graphical estate of Ernst Ludwig Kirchner.  

From 1951 to 1989 he was a specialist teacher at the School of Applied Art Basel (now Basel

Wuppel II- Lenz Klotz

Wuppel II- Lenz Klotz

School of Design). To his seventieth birthday two exhibitions were in 1995 in the Kunsthalle Basel and the Basel Art Museum organized.

Biography above is from the German wikipedia.

Inspired by Wassily Kandinsky and Paul Klee, Lenz Klotz developed a unique visual language of intersecting and oscillating lines, forming two-dimensional geometric figures reminiscent of calligraphy, musical scores, and other lyrical forms of notation.

Lenz Klotz

Lenz Klotz

As invested in drawing, etching, and lithography as in painting, Klotz relied on both line and vivid color, often simultaneously.

Although purely abstract, his work nonetheless indicates human narratives and

Flugfeld- Lenz Klotz

Flugfeld- Lenz Klotz

experiences, both in its visual recalling of man-made systems and symbols and with its playful titles like Not only for illiterates (1961) or That’s Enough (2001).

Bio above is from www.artsy.com.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I enjoyed creating it and I will see you tomorrow on Day 281!

Best,

Linda

Yes, Stars- Tribute to Lenz Klotz Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Pen on Canvas

Yes, Stars- Tribute to Lenz Klotz
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Pen on Canvas

Side-View Yes, Stars- Tribute to Lenz Klotz Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Pen on Canvas

Side-View
Yes, Stars- Tribute to Lenz Klotz
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Yes, Stars- Tribute to Lenz Klotz Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Yes, Stars- Tribute to Lenz Klotz
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Yes, Stars- Tribute to Lenz Klotz Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Yes, Stars- Tribute to Lenz Klotz
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Yes, Stars- Tribute to Lenz Klotz Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Yes, Stars- Tribute to Lenz Klotz
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Pen on Canvas

 

Day 279- Italo Valenti- Narrative Dimensions

It’s Day 279 and I’m running around getting things done before going out and having dinner with my in-laws that are in town.  I haven’t done a collage piece in a while so I did one today.  Join me in honoring Italo Valenti today.  I had to translate his biography from Italian.

Italo Valenti

Italo Valenti

Italo Valenti Archétypes, 1971 38 1/2 in. x 39 1/4in. Painted paper on pavatex - See more at: http://www.bechtler.org/collection#sthash.CVAeIPcI.dpuf

Italo Valenti
Archétypes, 1971
38 1/2 in. x 39 1/4in. Painted paper on pavatex
– See more at: http://www.bechtler.org/collection#sthash.CVAeIPcI.dpuf

Italo Valenti (Milan, April 29, 1912 – Ascona, September 6, 1995) was an Italian painter.

“And it’s probably indulge in this aimless, in these pauses of silence, which one has

Italo Valenti

Italo Valenti

the feeling of being closer to themselves, that is, more spontaneous. In living in this world of the unusual, where things often live concealed or lost outside and inside of us, is perhaps the natural phenomenon of forgetting, working almost automatically.”
(Italo Valenti)

He was born in Milan April 29, 1912, the son of wealthy merchants. His was a happy childhood, even in the absence of parents, passed in the house Milan welcomed by the fairy tales of his grandmother who will be a constant source of inspiration for his art. At seven he moved to Vicenza; in the Venetian city attended the School of Arts and Crafts and began working at a goldsmith.

Italo Valenti

Italo Valenti

It was the theosophist Free Augenti to him to discover that all the arts are in connection with each other. He held his first solo exhibition in Valdagno in 1932 he enrolled at the Academy of Venice and then at the Academy of Brera where he studied with Aldo Carpi and Eve Tea. At this date also the first trip to Paris and Belgium to the discovery of Cézanne, and painting impressionist and post-impressionist.

In 1937 he entered the Corrente movement with Sassu, Luciano Anceschi, Guttuso, Fontana, Birolli, Cassinari, Raffaele De Grada, Treccani, Benjamin Joppa, Salvatore Quasimodo, Migneco, Morlotti, Vittorio Sereni and others, which referred to civil

Valenti Italo Collage

Valenti Italo Collage

and social expressionist art to overcome the provincialism and the rhetoric of Italian art. The participation of Valenti activity of the group was intense: the distinctive feature of his figurative painting was to be found in the sleepy and dreamy lyricism that made mention of “primitivism fantastic,” already stretched to the stylization of the figure that will land as a result of abstract forms.

"Eurydike"- Italo Valenti

“Eurydike”- Italo Valenti

In 1938 he began his teaching career at the School of nude di Brera, where he taught until 1952, when he moved permanently to Switzerland, Locarno. Here he came in contact with the group of artists that were present at that time in Ascona (Jean Arp, Ben Nicholson, Remo Rossi and Julius Bissier) and this led to a gradual rethinking of his painting: the narrative dimension, more properly figurative, was progressively less as he said more research on the effects of color and space that led him to a phase of “lyrical abstraction informal.”

The themes of the dream “primitivism fantastic” were still present: the magicians, the series of cerfs ruffles, the moons, the theaters, the stations of vessels; but the style was completely different:

Italo Valenti

Italo Valenti

the composition was shattered into triangles, trapezoids, rhombuses, primordial symbols and enigmatic with their own “thoughtful lightness.”

It is among the painters that the entrepreneur Giuseppe Verzocchi contacted for its collection of works on the theme of the work: between 1949 and 1950, Valenti realized locomotives (1949-1950), under which, together with the self, is now preserved Collection Verzocchi, at the Pinacoteca Civica of Forlì.

His painting is more pure, clean, composed of a few elements that float in an abstract vacuum. So are created abstract collages of the last artistic production, in which the boyish, the fantastic, dreamlike find their final equilibrium with the symbolic, the enigmatic abstraction, in a vital synthesis and final. In 1985 he was hit by stroke which deprives him of speech and the use of his right arm. For this reasons, the collages that follow belong to what he calls the “era of the left hand.” He died September 6, 1995 in Ascona.

Biography is from Italian wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 279.

Best,

Linda

Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View
Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas