Day 298- Pedro Calapez- Extending Past the Edges

It’s Day 298 and I’m having a big painting day.  I’m trying to get a little ahead and plan a bit this week.  My schedule has been a little busy and will stay that way until the holidays get started.  And then I’ll be busy in a whole new way!  Join me in honoring Pedro Calapez today.

Pedro Calapez

Pedro Calapez

Pedro Calapez ESTUDIO PARA PINTURA SIN TÍTULO 11 Acrylic on cardboard

Pedro Calapez
ESTUDIO PARA PINTURA SIN TÍTULO 11
Acrylic on cardboard

Pedro Calapez was born 1953 in Lisbon where he lives and works. He began his studies in civil engineering but changed later to the Escola de Belas Artes (School of Fine Arts). While attending Belas Artes he worked as a professional photographer until 1985, when he was able to dedicate himself exclusively to painting.

Pedro Calapez is internationally exhibiting since the 80’s and has presented his

Gallery Installation- Pedro Calapez

Gallery Installation- Pedro Calapez

work in many important museums and galleries. He has participated 1986 at the Venice Biennale and 1987 and 1991 at the São Paulo Biennale. In the german speaking part of Europe, his work was shown 1999 at the Kunstmuseum Bonn in the exhibition “Tage der Dunkelheit und des Lichts”.

Expansion rather than concentration, is an obvious driving power in the artistic language of Pedro Celapez, who is working in the field between drawing and painting, figurative expression and abstraction.

horizonte bloqueado | 2013 | acryl on canvas- Pedro Calapez

horizonte bloqueado | 2013 | acryl on canvas- Pedro Calapez

He often divides his multiple-part image compositions puzzle-like on strictly geometric surfaces and within those are ruling the most expressive gestures and mediterranean colors. Pedro Calapez is creating on individual aluminium boards images of large painted ribbons and surfaces, placing strong primary colors near muddy shades that are defining, layer after layer, the painted space.

But not only each board might appear in a severe struggle, but as well the different parts of the whole composition can be of distinct depth. The several painted boards invade more or less deeply the exhibition space and are forming a relief-like macro mosaic and as in a magnetic field, the individual components are attracting or rejecting each other.

Sometimes few painted boards are creating tension and form, but other works are

Pedro Calapez, Bareira J, painted aluminium

Pedro Calapez, Bareira J, painted aluminium

compositions of twenty or more image bodies with different sizes and suddenly a mediterranean color spectrum opens the view to the southern brightness.

“My major concern is always the discussion of the edges of painting. I want the picture to extend beyond those. In a determined space my paintings together form a single piece that I cannot imagine being broken up in different walls.

Untitled- Pedro Calapez

Untitled- Pedro Calapez

Each painting goes beyond itself, each wall is a painting by itself; this does not allow the gaze to be fixed, it is all around. The fact is that your look dominates the reason why you keep looking at a painting; the eye takes over control of the way in which we look at a picture. Reason invokes a discourse made up of these fragments of vision. You penetrate/enter the painting by the invoking of its own details. It is not the general idea of a painting that is important, but the small stroke or line. What is important is the particular, the detail.” Pedro Calapez

Biography is from arthobler.com.

I hope you enjoy my piece for today!  I really loved looking at today’s artist’s paintings.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 299…almost to 300!  Then only 65 days to go.  Whew!

Best,

Linda

Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 289- Andy Warhol- I Want To Be Plastic

It’s Day 289 and I have been putting off today’s artist for a while because of various reasons.  I wasn’t sure if I wanted to do a self-portrait or a tribute to his earlier artwork.  I decided to go with a self-portrait!  Join me in honoring Andy Warhol today.  Even though I don’t even have to put his name for everyone to recognize his work. 🙂

Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol

Self-Portrait with Skull- Andy Warhol

Self-Portrait with Skull- Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol (/ˈwɔrhɒl/; August 6, 1928 – February 22, 1987) was an American artist who was a leading figure in the visual art movement known as pop art. His works explore the relationship between artistic expression, celebrity culture and advertisement that flourished by the 1960s. After a successful career as a commercial illustrator, Warhol became a renowned and sometimes controversial artist. The Andy Warhol Museum in his native city, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, holds an extensive permanent collection of art and archives. It is the largest museum in the United States dedicated to a single artist.

Warhol’s art encompassed many forms of media, including hand drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, silk screening, sculpture, film, and music. He was also a pioneer in computer-generated art using Amiga computers that were introduced in 1984, two years before his death. He founded Interview Magazine and was the author of numerous books,

Knives- Andy Warhol

Knives- Andy Warhol

including The Philosophy of Andy Warhol and Popism: The Warhol Sixties. He managed and produced the Velvet Underground, a rock band which had a strong influence on the evolution of punk rock music. He is also notable as a gay man who lived openly as such before the gay liberation movement. His studio, The Factory, was a famous gathering place that brought together distinguished intellectuals, drag queens, playwrights, Bohemian street people, Hollywood celebrities, and wealthy patrons.

Warhol has been the subject of numerous retrospective exhibitions, books, and feature and documentary films. He coined the widely used expression “15 minutes of fame”. Many of his creations are very collectible and highly valuable. The highest price ever paid for a Warhol painting is US$105 million for a 1963 canvas titled “Silver Car Crash (Double Disaster)”. A 2009 article inThe Economist described Warhol as the “bellwether of the art market”. Warhol’s works include some of the most expensive paintings ever sold.

Andy Warhol ( Andrej Varhola, Jr.) was born on August 6, 1928 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He was the fourth child of Andrej Varhola (Americanized as Andrew Warhola, Sr., 1889–1942) and Júlia (née Zavacká, 1892–1972), whose first child was born in their homeland and died before their move to the U.S. Andy had two older brothers, Paul (June 26, 1922 – January 30, 2014) and John Warhola (May 31, 1925 – December 24, 2010).

Details of Renaissance Paintings (Sandro Botticelli, Birth of Venus, 1482), 1984 Read more at warhol.org: http://www.warhol.org/collection/art/work/1998-1-307/#ixzz3GLUko5WK

Details of Renaissance Paintings (Sandro Botticelli, Birth of Venus, 1482), 1984
Read more at warhol.org: http://www.warhol.org/collection/art/work/1998-1-307/#ixzz3GLUko5WK

His parents were working-class Lemko emigrants from Mikó (now called Miková), located in today’s northeastern Slovakia, part of the former Austro-Hungarian Empire. Warhol’s father immigrated to the United States in 1914, and his mother joined him in 1921, after the death of Warhol’s grandparents. Warhol’s father worked in a coal mine. The family lived at 55 Beelen Street and later at 3252 Dawson Street in theOakland neighborhood of Pittsburgh. The family was Byzantine Catholic and attended St. John Chrysostom Byzantine Catholic Church. Andy Warhol had two older brothers—Pavol (Paul), the oldest, was born before the family emigrated; Ján was born in Pittsburgh. Pavol’s son, James Warhola, became a successful children’s book illustrator. About 1939, he started to collect autographed cards of film stars.

In third grade, Warhol had Sydenham’s chorea (also known as St. Vitus’ Dance), the nervous system disease that causes involuntary movements of the extremities, which is believed to be a complication of scarlet fever which causes skin pigmentation blotchiness. He became a hypochondriac, developing a fear of hospitals and doctors. Often bedridden as a child, he became an outcast at school and bonded with his mother. At times when he was confined to bed, he drew, listened to the radio and collected pictures of movie stars around his bed. Warhol later described this period as very important in the development of his personality, skill-set and preferences. When Warhol was 13, his father died in an accident.

As a teenager, Warhol graduated from Schenley High School in 1945. After graduating from high school, his intentions were to study art

Lips- Andy Warhol

Lips- Andy Warhol

education at the University of Pittsburgh in the hope of becoming an art teacher, but his plans changed and he enrolled in the Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh, where he studied commercial art. In 1949, he moved to New York City and began a career in magazine illustration and advertising. In 1949, he earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in pictorial design.

Moonwalk 1987- Andy Warhol

Moonwalk 1987- Andy Warhol

During the 1950s, Warhol gained fame for his whimsical ink drawings of shoe advertisements. These were done in a loose, blotted-ink style, and figured in some of his earliest showings at the Bodley Gallery in New York. With the concurrent rapid expansion of the record industry and the introduction of the vinyl record, Hi-Fi, and stereophonic recordings, RCA Records hired Warhol, along with another freelance artist, Sid Maurer, to design album covers and promotional materials.

Warhol was an early adopter of the silk screen printmaking process as a technique for making paintings. His earliest silkscreening in painting involved hand-drawn images though this soon progressed to the use of photographically derived silkscreening in paintings. Prior to entering the field of fine art, Warhol’s commercial art background also involved innovative techniques for image making that were somewhat related to printmaking techniques. When rendering commercial objects for advertising Warhol devised a technique that resulted in a characteristic image. His imagery used in advertising was often executed by means of applying ink to paper and then blotting the ink while still wet. This was akin to a printmaking process on the most rudimentary scale.

Warhol’s work both as a commercial artist and later a fine artist displays a casual approach to image making, in which chance plays a role

Hamburger- Andy Warhol

Hamburger- Andy Warhol

and mistakes and unintentional marks are tolerated. The resulting imagery in both Warhol’s commercial art and later in his fine art endeavors is often replete with imperfection—smudges and smears can often be found. In his book POPism Warhol writes, “When you do something exactly wrong, you always turn up something.”

He began exhibiting his work during the 1950s. He held exhibitions at the Hugo Gallery, and the Bodley Gallery in New York City and in California his first West Coast gallery exhibition was on July 9, 1962, in the Ferus Gallery of Los Angeles. The exhibition marked his West Coast debut of pop art. Andy Warhol’s first New York solo pop art exhibition was hosted at Eleanor Ward’s Stable Gallery November 6–24, 1962. The exhibit included the works Marilyn Diptych100 Soup Cans100 Coke Bottles, and 100 Dollar Bills. At the Stable Gallery exhibit, the artist met for the first time poet John Giorno who would star in Warhol’s first film, Sleep, in 1963.

Marilyn- Andy Warhol

Marilyn- Andy Warhol

It was during the 1960s that Warhol began to make paintings of iconic American objects such as dollar bills, mushroom clouds, electric chairs, Campbell’s Soup Cans, Coca-Cola bottles, celebrities such as Marilyn Monroe, Elvis Presley, Marlon Brando, Troy Donahue,Muhammad Ali, and Elizabeth Taylor, as well as newspaper headlines or photographs of police dogs attacking civil rights protesters. During these years, he founded his studio, “The Factory” and gathered about him a wide range of artists, writers, musicians, and underground celebrities. His work became popular and controversial. Warhol had this to say about Coca Cola:

What’s great about this country is that America started the tradition where the richest consumers buy essentially the same things as the poorest. You can be watching TV and see Coca-Cola, and you know that the President drinks Coca-Cola, Liz Taylor drinks Coca-Cola, and just think, you can drink Coca-Cola, too. A Coke is a Coke and no amount of money can get you a better Coke than the one the bum on the corner is drinking. All the Cokes are the same and all the Cokes are good. Liz Taylor knows it, the President knows it, the bum knows it, and you know it.

New York’s Museum of Modern Art hosted a Symposium on pop art in December 1962 during which artists like Warhol were attacked for “capitulating” to consumerism. Critics were scandalized by Warhol’s open embrace of market culture. This symposium set the tone for Warhol’s reception. Throughout the decade it became increasingly clear that there had been a profound change in the culture of the art world, and that Warhol was at the center of that shift.

A pivotal event was the 1964 exhibit The American Supermarket, a show held in Paul Bianchini’s Upper East Side gallery. The show was

Female Fashion Figure- Andy Warhol

Female Fashion Figure- Andy Warhol

presented as a typical U.S. small supermarket environment, except that everything in it—from the produce, canned goods, meat, posters on the wall, etc.—was created by six prominent pop artists of the time, among them the controversial (and like-minded) Billy Apple, Mary Inman, and Robert Watts. Warhol’s painting of a can of Campbell’s soup cost $1,500 while each autographed can sold for $6. The exhibit was one of the first mass events that directly confronted the general public with both pop art and the perennial question of what art is.

As an advertisement illustrator in the 1950s, Warhol used assistants to increase his productivity. Collaboration would remain a defining (and controversial) aspect of his working methods throughout his career; this was particularly true in the 1960s. One of the most important collaborators during this period was Gerard Malanga. Malanga assisted the artist with the production of silkscreens, films, sculpture, and other works at “The Factory,” Warhol’s aluminum foil-and-silver-paint-lined studio on 47th Street (later moved to Broadway). Other members of Warhol’s Factory crowd included Freddie Herko, Ondine, Ronald Tavel, Mary Woronov, Billy Name, and Brigid Berlin (from whom he apparently got the idea to tape-record his phone conversations).

During the 1960s, Warhol also groomed a retinue of bohemian and counterculture eccentrics upon whom he bestowed the designation “Superstars”, including Nico, Joe Dallesandro, Edie Sedgwick, Viva, Ultra Violet, Holly Woodlawn, Jackie Curtis, and Candy Darling. These people all participated in the Factory films, and some—like Berlin—remained friends with Warhol until his death. Important figures in the New York underground art/cinema world, such as writer John Giorno and film-maker Jack Smith, also appear in Warhol films of the 1960s, revealing Warhol’s connections to a diverse range of artistic scenes during this time.

Campbell Soup- Andy Warhol

Campbell Soup- Andy Warhol

Compared to the success and scandal of Warhol’s work in the 1960s, the 1970s were a much quieter decade, as he became more entrepreneurial. According to Bob Colacello, Warhol devoted much of his time to rounding up new, rich patrons for portrait commissions—including Shah of Iran Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, his wife Empress Farah Pahlavi, his sister Princess Ashraf Pahlavi, Mick Jagger,Liza Minnelli, John Lennon, Diana Ross, and Brigitte Bardot. Warhol’s famous portrait of Chinese Communist leaderMao Zedong was created in 1973. He also founded, with Gerard Malanga, Interview magazine, and published The Philosophy of Andy Warhol (1975). An idea expressed in the book: “Making money is art, and working is art and good business is the best art.”

Warhol used to socialize at various nightspots in New York City, including Max’s Kansas City; and, later in the 1970s, Studio 54. He was generally regarded as quiet, shy, and a meticulous observer. Art critic Robert Hughes called him “the white mole of Union Square.”

With his longtime friend Stuart Pivar, Warhol founded the New York Academy of Art in 1979.

Warhol had a re-emergence of critical and financial success in the 1980s, partially due to his affiliation and friendships with a number of prolific younger artists, who were dominating the “bull market” of 1980s New York art: Jean-Michel Basquiat, Julian Schnabel, David Salle and other so-called Neo-Expressionists, as well as members of the Transavantgarde movement in Europe, including Francesco Clemente and Enzo Cucchi.

By this period, Warhol was being criticized for becoming merely a “business artist”. In 1979, reviewers disliked his exhibits of portraits of

Dog- Andy Warhol

Dog- Andy Warhol

1970s personalities and celebrities, calling them superficial, facile and commercial, with no depth or indication of the significance of the subjects. They also criticized his 1980 exhibit of 10 portraits at the Jewish Museum in New York, entitled Jewish Geniuses, which Warhol—who was uninterested in Judaism and Jews—had described in his diary as “They’re going to sell.” In hindsight, however, some critics have come to view Warhol’s superficiality and commerciality as “the most brilliant mirror of our times,” contending that “Warhol had captured something irresistible about the zeitgeist of American culture in the 1970s.”

Warhol also had an appreciation for intense Hollywood glamour. He once said: “I love Los Angeles. I love Hollywood. They’re so beautiful. Everything’s plastic, but I love plastic. I want to be plastic.”

Warhol died in New York City at 6:32 am on February 22, 1987. According to news reports, he had been making good recovery from a routine gallbladder surgery at New York Hospital before dying in his sleep from a sudden post-operative cardiac arrhythmia. Prior to his diagnosis and operation, Warhol delayed having his recurring gallbladder problems checked, as he was afraid to enter hospitals and see doctors. His family sued the hospital for inadequate care, saying that the arrhythmia was caused by improper care and water intoxication. The malpractice case was quickly settled out of court; Warhol’s family received an undisclosed sum of money.

Elvis I & II- Andy Warhol

Elvis I & II- Andy Warhol

Warhol’s body was taken back to Pittsburgh by his brothers for burial. The wake was at Thomas P. Kunsak Funeral Home and was an open-coffin ceremony. The coffin was a solid bronze casket with gold plated rails and white upholstery. Warhol was dressed in a black cashmere suit, a paisley tie, a platinum wig, and sunglasses. He was posed holding a small prayer book and a red rose. The funeral liturgy was held at the Holy Ghost Byzantine Catholic Church on Pittsburgh’s North Side. The eulogy was given by Monsignor Peter Tay. Yoko Ono and John Richardson were speakers. The coffin was covered with white roses and asparagus ferns. After the liturgy, the coffin was driven to St. John the Baptist Byzantine Catholic Cemetery in Bethel Park, a south suburb of Pittsburgh.

At the grave, the priest said a brief prayer and sprinkled holy water on the casket. Before the coffin was lowered, Paige Powell dropped a copy of Interview magazine, an Interview T-shirt, and a bottle of the Estee Lauder perfume “Beautiful” into the grave. Warhol was buried next to his mother and father. A memorial service was held in Manhattan for Warhol on April 1, 1987, at St. Patrick’s Cathedral, New York.

Partial biography is from wikipedia.

I enjoyed doing today’s piece.  I decided to do this mixed-media style since I lent out my silkscreening machine.  I hope you enjoy it.  I’m pretty sure I captured Warhol’s style. 🙂  I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 290!

Best, Linda

Self-Portrait- Tribute to Andy Warhol Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Self-Portrait- Tribute to Andy Warhol
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View Self-Portrait- Tribute to Andy Warhol Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Andy Warhol
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Andy Warhol Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Andy Warhol
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Andy Warhol Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Andy Warhol
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Andy Warhol Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Andy Warhol
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Day 287- Henri Matisse- “Creativity Takes Courage”

It’s Day 287 and I cannot believe that I haven’t done today’s artist yet.  I could’ve sworn I had done him and I had to search my blog a few times just to make sure!  Join me in honoring Henri Matisse today.

Henri Matisse 1933

Henri Matisse 1933

Woman with a Hat- Henri Matisse

Woman with a Hat- Henri Matisse

Henri-Émile-Benoît Matisse (French: [ɑ̃ʁi matis]; 31 December 1869 – 3 November 1954) was a French artist, known for his use of colour and his fluid and original draughtsmanship. He was a draughtsman, printmaker, and sculptor, but is known primarily as a painter. Matisse is commonly regarded, along with Pablo Picasso and Marcel Duchamp, as one of the three artists who helped to define the revolutionary developments in the plastic arts in the opening decades of the twentieth century, responsible for significant developments in painting and sculpture.

Although he was initially labelled a Fauve (wild beast), by the 1920s he was increasingly hailed as an upholder of the classical tradition in French painting. His mastery of the expressive language of colour and drawing, displayed in a body of work spanning over a half-century, won him recognition as a leading figure in modern art.

Matisse was born in Le Cateau-Cambrésis, in the Nord department in northern France, the oldest son of a prosperous grain merchant. He grew up in Bohain-en-Vermandois, Picardie, France. In 1887 he went to Paris to study law, working as a court administrator in Le Cateau-Cambrésis after gaining his qualification. He first started to paint in 1889, after his mother brought him art

Henri Matisse- Portrait of Lydia

Henri Matisse- Portrait of Lydia

supplies during a period of convalescence following an attack of appendicitis. He discovered “a kind of paradise” as he later described it, and decided to become an artist, deeply disappointing his father. In 1891 he returned to Paris to study art at the Académie Julian and became a student of William-Adolphe Bouguereau and Gustave Moreau. Initially he painted still lifes and landscapes in a traditional style, at which he achieved reasonable proficiency. Matisse was influenced by the works of earlier masters such as Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin, Nicolas Poussin, and Antoine Watteau, as well as by modern artists, such as Édouard Manet, and by Japanese art. Chardin was one of the painters Matisse most admired; as an art student he made copies of four of Chardin’s paintings in the Louvre.

Algerian Woman- Matisse

Algerian Woman- Matisse

In 1896 and 1897, Matisse visited the Australian painter John Peter Russell on the island Belle Île off the coast of Brittany. Russell introduced him to Impressionism and to the work of van Gogh, who had been a friend of Russell but was completely unknown at the time. Matisse’s style changed completely. He would later say “Russell was my teacher, and Russell explained colour theory to me.” In 1896 Matisse exhibited five paintings in the salon of the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts, two of which were purchased by the state.

With the model Caroline Joblau, he had a daughter, Marguerite, born in 1894. In 1898 he married Amélie Noellie Parayre; the two raised Marguerite together and had two sons, Jean (born 1899) and Pierre (born 1900). Marguerite and Amélie often served as models for Matisse.

In 1898, on the advice of Camille Pissarro, he went to London to study the paintings of J. M. W. Turner and then went on a trip to Corsica. Upon his return to Paris in February 1899, he worked beside Albert Marquet and met André Derain, Jean Puy, and Jules Flandrin. Matisse

Harmony in Red- Henri Matisse

Harmony in Red- Henri Matisse

immersed himself in the work of others and went into debt from buying work from painters he admired. The work he hung and displayed in his home included a plaster bust by Rodin, a painting by Gauguin, a drawing by van Gogh, and Cézanne’s Three Bathers. In Cézanne’s sense of pictorial structure and colour, Matisse found his main inspiration.

Many of Matisse’s paintings from 1898 to 1901 make use of a Divisionist technique he adopted after reading Paul Signac’s essay, “D’Eugène Delacroix au Néo-impressionisme”. His paintings of 1902–03, a period of material hardship for the artist, are comparatively somber and reveal a preoccupation with form. Having made his first attempt at sculpture, a copy after Antoine-Louis Barye, in 1899, he devoted much of his energy to working in clay, completing The Slave in 1903.

Gipsy Woman- Henri Matisse

Gipsy Woman- Henri Matisse

Fauvism as a style began around 1900 and continued beyond 1910. The movement as such lasted only a few years, 1904–1908, and had three exhibitions. The leaders of the movement were Matisse and André Derain. Matisse’s first solo exhibition was at Ambroise Vollard’s gallery in 1904, without much success. His fondness for bright and expressive colour became more pronounced after he spent the summer of 1904 painting in St. Tropez with the neo-Impressionists Signac and Henri-Edmond Cross.[15] In that year he painted the most important of his works in the neo-Impressionist style, Luxe, Calme et Volupté.[15] In 1905 he travelled southwards again to work with André Derain at Collioure. His paintings of this period are characterised by flat shapes and controlled lines, using pointillism in a less rigorous way than before.

Matisse and a group of artists now known as “Fauves” exhibited together in a room at the Salon d’Automne in 1905. The paintings expressed emotion with wild, often dissonant colours, without regard for the subject’s natural colours. Matisse showed Open Window and Woman with the Hat at the Salon. Critic Louis Vauxcelles described the work with the phrase “Donatello parmi les fauves!” (Donatello among the wild beasts), referring to a Renaissance-type sculpture that shared the room with them.

His comment was printed on 17 October 1905 in Gil Blas, a daily newspaper, and passed into popular usage. The exhibition garnered

Portrait of Madame Matisse (Green Stripe), 1905- Henri Matisse

Portrait of Madame Matisse (Green Stripe), 1905- Henri Matisse

harsh criticism—”A pot of paint has been flung in the face of the public”, said the critic Camille Mauclair—but also some favourable attention. When the painting that was singled out for special condemnation, Matisse’s Woman with a Hat, was bought by Gertrude and Leo Stein, the embattled artist’s morale improved considerably.

Matisse was recognised as a leader of the Fauves, along with André Derain; the two were friendly rivals, each with his own followers. Other members were Georges Braque, Raoul Dufy, and Maurice de Vlaminck. The Symbolist painter Gustave Moreau (1826–1898) was the movement’s inspirational teacher. As a professor at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, he pushed his students to think outside of the lines of formality and to follow their visions.

Joy of Life- Henri Matisse

Joy of Life- Henri Matisse

In 1907 Guillaume Apollinaire, commenting about Matisse in an article published in La Falange, wrote, “We are not here in the presence of an extravagant or an extremist undertaking: Matisse’s art is eminently reasonable.” But Matisse’s work of the time also encountered vehement criticism, and it was difficult for him to provide for his family. His painting Nu bleu (1907) was burned in effigy at the Armory Show in Chicago in 1913.

The decline of the Fauvist movement after 1906 did not affect the career of Matisse; many of his finest works were created between 1906 and 1917, when he was an active part of the great gathering of artistic talent in Montparnasse, even though he did not quite fit in, with his conservative appearance and strict bourgeois work habits.

He continued to absorb new influences. He travelled to Algeria in 1906 studying African art and Primitivism. After viewing a large exhibition of Islamic art in Munich in 1910, he spent two months in Spain studying Moorish art. He visited Morocco in 1912 and again in

Marguerite - Henri Matisse

Marguerite – Henri Matisse

1913 and while painting in Tangiers he made several changes to his work, including his use of black as a colour. The effect on Matisse’s art was a new boldness in the use of intense, unmodulated colour, as in L’Atelier Rouge (1911).

Self-Portrait in Striped Shirt- Henri Matisse

Self-Portrait in Striped Shirt- Henri Matisse

Matisse had a long association with the Russian art collector Sergei Shchukin. He created one of his major works La Danse specially for Shchukin as part of a two painting commission, the other painting being Music, 1910. An earlier version of La Danse (1909) is in the collection of The Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I decided to do a self-portrait (of course!) in the Fauvism style…which is one of my favorite styles.  It was very difficult and I spent most of my morning tweaking and laying more layers down.  The shadowing was challenging and you have to experience painting a piece like this to fully appreciate his work!  It’s much harder than it looks!

I hope you enjoy it and I will see you tomorrow on Day 288!  Another great master artist done.

Best,

Linda

Self-Portrait (Green Stripe)- Tribute to Henri Matisse Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Self-Portrait (Green Stripe)- Tribute to Henri Matisse
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Self-Portrait (Green Stripe)- Tribute to Henri Matisse Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Self-Portrait (Green Stripe)- Tribute to Henri Matisse
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Self-Portrait (Green Stripe)- Tribute to Henri Matisse Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Self-Portrait (Green Stripe)- Tribute to Henri Matisse
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Self-Portrait (Green Stripe)- Tribute to Henri Matisse Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Self-Portrait (Green Stripe)- Tribute to Henri Matisse
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Self-Portrait (Green Stripe)- Tribute to Henri Matisse Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Self-Portrait (Green Stripe)- Tribute to Henri Matisse
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 284- Vincent van Gogh- Painting his Dreams

It’s Day 284 and I finally am paying tribute to Van Gogh!  It was a very challenging piece to create for a number of reasons…intimidation, difficulty, different materials and the fact that I’m not that great at painting in the impressionistic style.  I did my best though.  Join me in honoring Vincent Van Gogh today!

Vincent Van Gogh- Self Portrait with Straw Hat

Vincent Van Gogh- Self Portrait with Straw Hat

The Church at Auvers- Vincent Van Gogh

The Church at Auvers- Vincent Van Gogh

Vincent Van Gogh, Painter (1853–1890)

Vincent van Gogh is considered the greatest Dutch painter after Rembrandt, although he remained poor and virtually unknown throughout his life.

Vincent van Gogh was born on March 30, 1853, in Groot-Zundert, Netherlands. Van Gogh was a post-impressionist painter whose work, notable for its beauty, emotion and color, highly influenced 20th century art. He struggled with mental illness, and remained poor and virtually unknown throughout his life. Van Gogh died in France on July 29, 1890, at age 37, from a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

Vincent van Gogh was born Vincent Willem van Gogh on March 30, 1853, in Groot-Zundert,

Skull with Burning Cigarette- Vincent Van Gogh

Skull with Burning Cigarette- Vincent Van Gogh

Netherlands. His father, Theodorus van Gogh, was an austere country minister, and his mother, Anna Cornelia Carbentus, was a moody artist whose love of nature, drawing and watercolors was transferred to her son. Van Gogh was born exactly one year after his parents’ first son, also named Vincent, was stillborn. At a young age—his name and birthdate already etched on his dead brother’s headstone—van Gogh was melancholy.

At age 15, van Gogh’s family was struggling financially, and he was forced to leave school and go to work. He got a job at his Uncle Cornelis’ art dealership, Goupil & Cie., a firm of art dealers in The Hague. By this time, van Gogh was fluent in French, German and English, as well as his native Dutch.

Starry Night- Vincent Van Gogh

Starry Night- Vincent Van Gogh

In June of 1873, van Gogh was transferred to the Groupil Gallery in London. There, he fell in love with English culture. He visited art galleries in his spare time, and also became a fan of the writings of Charles Dickens and George Eliot. He also fell in love with his landlady’s daughter, Eugenie Loyer. When she rejected his marriage proposal, van Gogh suffered a breakdown. He threw away all his books except for the Bible, and devoted his life to God. He became angry with people at work, telling customers not to buy the “worthless art,” and was eventually fired.

Van Gogh then taught in a Methodist boys’ school, and also preached to the congregation. Although raised in a religious family, it wasn’t until this time that he seriously began to consider devoting his life to the church. Hoping to become a minister, he prepared to take the entrance exam to the School of Theology in Amsterdam. After a year of studying diligently, he refused to take the Latin exams, calling Latin a “dead language” of poor people, and was subsequently denied entrance.

The same thing happened at the Church of Belgium: In the winter of 1878, van Gogh volunteered to move to an impoverished coal mine in

Still Life Vase with Twelve Sunflowers- Vincent Van Gogh

Still Life Vase with Twelve Sunflowers- Vincent Van Gogh

the south of Belgium, a place where preachers were usually sent as punishment. He preached and ministered to the sick, and also drew pictures of the miners and their families, who called him “Christ of the Coal Mines.” The evangelical committees were not as pleased. They disagreed with van Gogh’s lifestyle, which had begun to take on a tone of martyrdom. They refused to renew van Gogh’s contract, and he was forced to find another occupation.

In the fall of 1880, van Gogh decided to move to Brussels and become an artist. Though he had no formal art training, his younger brother Theo, who worked as an art dealer, offered to support van Gogh financially. He began taking lessons on his own, studying books like Travaux des champs by Jean-François Millet and Cours de dessin by Charles Bargue.

Vincent Van Gogh

Vincent Van Gogh

Van Gogh had a catastrophic love life. He was attracted to women in trouble, thinking he could help them. His cousin, Kate, was recently widowed, and when van Gogh fell in love with her, she was repulsed and fled to her home in Amsterdam. He then moved to The Hague and fell in love with Clasina Maria Hoornik, an alcoholic prostitute. She became his companion, mistress and model.

When Hoornik went back to prostitution, van Gogh became utterly depressed. In 1882, his family threatened to cut off his money unless he left Hoornik and The Hague. Van Gogh left in mid-September of that year to travel to Drenthe, a somewhat desolate district in the Netherlands. For the next six weeks, he lived a nomadic life, moving throughout the region while drawing and painting the landscape and its people.

Van Gogh’s art helped him stay emotionally balanced. In 1885, he began work on what is considered to be his first masterpiece, “Potato Eaters.” His brother, Theo, by this time living in Paris, believed the painting would not be well-received in the French capital, where impressionism had become the trend. Nevertheless, van Gogh decided to move to Paris, and showed up at Theo’s house uninvited. In March 1886, Theo welcomed his brother into his small apartment.

In Paris, van Gogh first saw impressionist art, and he was inspired by the color and light. He began studying with Henri de Toulouse-

Van Gogh's Chair- Vincent Van Gogh

Van Gogh’s Chair- Vincent Van Gogh

Lautrec, Pissarro and others. To save money, he and his friends posed for each other instead of hiring models. Van Gogh was passionate, and he argued with other painters about their works, alienating those who became tired of his bickering.

Van Gogh became influenced by Japanese art and began studying eastern philosophy to enhance his art and life. He dreamed of traveling there, but was told by Toulouse-Lautrec that the light in the village of Arles was just like the light in Japan. In February 1888, van Gogh boarded a train to the south of France. He moved into the “little yellow house” and spent his money on paint rather than food. He lived on coffee, bread and absinthe, and found himself feeling sick and strange. Before long, it became apparent that in addition to suffering from physical illness, his psychological health was declining; around this time, he is known to have sipped on turpentine and eaten paint.

A Wheatfield with Cypresses, Vincent Van Gogh, 1889

A Wheatfield with Cypresses, Vincent Van Gogh, 1889

Theo was worried, and offered Paul Gauguin money to go watch over van Gogh in Arles. Within a month, van Gogh and Gauguin were arguing constantly, and one night, Gauguin walked out. Van Gogh followed him, and when Gauguin turned around, he saw van Gogh holding a razor in his hand. Hours later, van Gogh went to the local brothel and paid for a prostitute named Rachel. With blood pouring from his hand, he offered her his ear, asking her to “keep this object carefully.” The police found him in his room the next morning, and admitted him to the Hôtel-Dieu hospital. Theo arrived on Christmas Day to see van Gogh, who was weak from blood loss and having violent seizures.

The doctors assured Theo that his brother would live and would be taken good care of, and on January 7, 1889, van Gogh was released from the hospital. He was alone and depressed. For hope, he turned to painting and nature, but could not find peace and was hospitalized again. He would paint at the yellow house during the day and return to the hospital at night.

After the people of Arles signed a petition saying that van Gogh was dangerous, he decided to move to the Saint-Paul-de-Mausole asylum

Vincent Van Gogh

Vincent Van Gogh

in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence. On May 8, 1889, he began painting in the hospital gardens. In November 1889, he was invited to exhibit his paintings in Brussels. He sent six paintings, including “Irises” and “Starry Night.”

Death and Legacy

On January 31, 1890, Theo and his wife, Johanna, gave birth to a boy and named him after van Gogh. Around this time, Theo sold van Gogh’s “The Red Vineyards” painting for 400 francs.

Also around this time, Dr. Paul Gachet, who lived in Auvers, about 20 miles north of Paris, agreed to take van Gogh as his patient. Van Gogh moved to Auvers and rented a room. In May 1890, Theo and his family visited van Gogh, and Theo spoke to his brother about needing to be stricter with his finances. Van Gogh became distraught about his future, thinking that Theo meant he was no longer interested in selling his art.

On July 27, 1890, van Gogh went out to paint in the morning as usual, but he carried a loaded pistol. He shot himself in the chest, but the bullet did not kill him. He was found bleeding in his room. Van Gogh was taken to a nearby hospital and his doctors sent for Theo, who arrived to find his brother sitting up in bed and smoking a pipe. They spent the next couple of days talking together, and then van Gogh asked Theo to take him home. On July 29, 1890, Vincent van Gogh died in the arms of his brother. He was 37 years old.

Painter on the Road to Tarascon, August 1888, Vincent van Gogh on the road to Montmajour, oil on canvas, 48 × 44 cm., formerly Museum Magdeburg, believed to have been destroyed by fire in World War II

Painter on the Road to Tarascon, August 1888, Vincent van Gogh on the road to Montmajour, oil on canvas, 48 × 44 cm., formerly Museum Magdeburg, believed to have been destroyed by fire in World War II

Theo, who was suffering from syphilis and weakened by his brother’s death, died six months later in a Dutch asylum. He was buried in Utrecht, but in 1914 Theo’s wife, Johanna, who was a dedicated supporter of van Gogh’s works, had Theo’s body reburied in the Auvers cemetery next to Vincent.

Johanna then collected as many of van Gogh’s paintings as she could, but discovered that many of them had been destroyed or lost, van Gogh’s own mother having thrown away crates full of his art. On March 17, 1901, 71 of van Gogh’s paintings were displayed at a show in Paris, and his fame subsequently grew enormously. His mother lived long enough to see her son hailed as an artist and a genius.

Today, Vincent van Gogh is considered the greatest Dutch painter after Rembrandt. He completed more than 2,100 works, consisting of 860 oil paintings and more than 1,300 watercolors, drawings and sketches. Several of his paintings rank among the most expensive in the world; “Irises” sold for a record $53.9 million, and his “Portrait of Dr. Gachet” sold for $82.5 million.

After more than 100 years since van Gogh’s death, more of his artwork was released. A

Bedroom in Arles, 1888, Van Gogh Museum

Bedroom in Arles, 1888, Van Gogh Museum

painting of a landscape entitled “Sunset at Montmajour” was discovered and unveiled by the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam in September 2013. Before coming under the possession of the Van Gogh Museum, a Norwegian industrialist owned the painting and stored it away in his attic, having thought that it wasn’t authentic. The painting is believed to have been created by van Gogh in 1888—around the same time that his artwork “Sunflowers” was made—just two years before his death.

Biography is from www.biography.com.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 285!

Best,

Linda

Self-Portrait with Straw Hat- Tribute to Vincent Van Gogh Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Self-Portrait with Straw Hat- Tribute to Vincent Van Gogh
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Self-Portrait with Straw Hat- Tribute to Vincent Van Gogh Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Self-Portrait with Straw Hat- Tribute to Vincent Van Gogh
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Self-Portrait with Straw Hat- Tribute to Vincent Van Gogh Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Self-Portrait with Straw Hat- Tribute to Vincent Van Gogh
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Self-Portrait with Straw Hat- Tribute to Vincent Van Gogh Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Self-Portrait with Straw Hat- Tribute to Vincent Van Gogh
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Self-Portrait with Straw Hat- Tribute to Vincent Van Gogh Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Self-Portrait with Straw Hat- Tribute to Vincent Van Gogh
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 279- Italo Valenti- Narrative Dimensions

It’s Day 279 and I’m running around getting things done before going out and having dinner with my in-laws that are in town.  I haven’t done a collage piece in a while so I did one today.  Join me in honoring Italo Valenti today.  I had to translate his biography from Italian.

Italo Valenti

Italo Valenti

Italo Valenti Archétypes, 1971 38 1/2 in. x 39 1/4in. Painted paper on pavatex - See more at: http://www.bechtler.org/collection#sthash.CVAeIPcI.dpuf

Italo Valenti
Archétypes, 1971
38 1/2 in. x 39 1/4in. Painted paper on pavatex
– See more at: http://www.bechtler.org/collection#sthash.CVAeIPcI.dpuf

Italo Valenti (Milan, April 29, 1912 – Ascona, September 6, 1995) was an Italian painter.

“And it’s probably indulge in this aimless, in these pauses of silence, which one has

Italo Valenti

Italo Valenti

the feeling of being closer to themselves, that is, more spontaneous. In living in this world of the unusual, where things often live concealed or lost outside and inside of us, is perhaps the natural phenomenon of forgetting, working almost automatically.”
(Italo Valenti)

He was born in Milan April 29, 1912, the son of wealthy merchants. His was a happy childhood, even in the absence of parents, passed in the house Milan welcomed by the fairy tales of his grandmother who will be a constant source of inspiration for his art. At seven he moved to Vicenza; in the Venetian city attended the School of Arts and Crafts and began working at a goldsmith.

Italo Valenti

Italo Valenti

It was the theosophist Free Augenti to him to discover that all the arts are in connection with each other. He held his first solo exhibition in Valdagno in 1932 he enrolled at the Academy of Venice and then at the Academy of Brera where he studied with Aldo Carpi and Eve Tea. At this date also the first trip to Paris and Belgium to the discovery of Cézanne, and painting impressionist and post-impressionist.

In 1937 he entered the Corrente movement with Sassu, Luciano Anceschi, Guttuso, Fontana, Birolli, Cassinari, Raffaele De Grada, Treccani, Benjamin Joppa, Salvatore Quasimodo, Migneco, Morlotti, Vittorio Sereni and others, which referred to civil

Valenti Italo Collage

Valenti Italo Collage

and social expressionist art to overcome the provincialism and the rhetoric of Italian art. The participation of Valenti activity of the group was intense: the distinctive feature of his figurative painting was to be found in the sleepy and dreamy lyricism that made mention of “primitivism fantastic,” already stretched to the stylization of the figure that will land as a result of abstract forms.

"Eurydike"- Italo Valenti

“Eurydike”- Italo Valenti

In 1938 he began his teaching career at the School of nude di Brera, where he taught until 1952, when he moved permanently to Switzerland, Locarno. Here he came in contact with the group of artists that were present at that time in Ascona (Jean Arp, Ben Nicholson, Remo Rossi and Julius Bissier) and this led to a gradual rethinking of his painting: the narrative dimension, more properly figurative, was progressively less as he said more research on the effects of color and space that led him to a phase of “lyrical abstraction informal.”

The themes of the dream “primitivism fantastic” were still present: the magicians, the series of cerfs ruffles, the moons, the theaters, the stations of vessels; but the style was completely different:

Italo Valenti

Italo Valenti

the composition was shattered into triangles, trapezoids, rhombuses, primordial symbols and enigmatic with their own “thoughtful lightness.”

It is among the painters that the entrepreneur Giuseppe Verzocchi contacted for its collection of works on the theme of the work: between 1949 and 1950, Valenti realized locomotives (1949-1950), under which, together with the self, is now preserved Collection Verzocchi, at the Pinacoteca Civica of Forlì.

His painting is more pure, clean, composed of a few elements that float in an abstract vacuum. So are created abstract collages of the last artistic production, in which the boyish, the fantastic, dreamlike find their final equilibrium with the symbolic, the enigmatic abstraction, in a vital synthesis and final. In 1985 he was hit by stroke which deprives him of speech and the use of his right arm. For this reasons, the collages that follow belong to what he calls the “era of the left hand.” He died September 6, 1995 in Ascona.

Biography is from Italian wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 279.

Best,

Linda

Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View
Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Day 276- Romero Britto- Sharing His Art and Love

It’s Day 276 and it’s another scorcher out there!  I’m surprised I didn’t pass out while I was painting this colorful yet challenging piece today!  Join me in honoring Romero Britto today.

Romero Britto

Romero Britto

Queen Elizabeth II- Robero Britto

Queen Elizabeth II- Robero Britto

Internationally renowned pop artist Romero Britto uses vibrant colors and bold patterns as a visual language of hope and happiness, reflecting his optimistic faith in the world around him. Born in Recife, Brazil in 1963, Britto lived an extremely modest lifestyle while growing up amongst eight brothers and sisters.  However, his innate creativity allowed Britto to fill his life with images of a bigger and more beautiful world beyond his own.  Self-taught at an early age, he painted what he saw and what he imagined on surfaces such as newspapers, cardboard or any scraps that he could find.  With an inordinate passion to excel, he prospered academically.  

Still, Britto’s artistic nature eventually led him to seek experiences outside the classroom.  In 1983, Britto

Romero Britto

Romero Britto

traveled to Paris where he was introduced to the works of Matisse and Picasso.  After exhibiting in a few galleries and private shows, Britto was encouraged to travel to the United States where Pop Art was flourishing. Britto moved to Miami and set up a studio open to the public.  

With an unshakable resolve and belief in his art, Britto spent the next few years exhibiting and attracting the attention of many.  In 1988, he was selected alongside Andy Warhol and Keith Haring for Absolut Vodka’s “Absolut Art” campaign.  He combined influences from cubism with pop to create an iconic style that The New York Times described ‘exudes warmth, optimism and love.’  His work has been exhibited in galleries and museums in over 100 countries, including the Salon de la Soci’t?

Romero Britto

Romero Britto

Nationale des Beaux Arts exhibition at the Carrousel du Louvre in 2008 and 2010.  As well, in December 2013, Maria Elena and Carlos Slim Domit invited Britto to be the first living artist to exhibit at Museo Soumaya.

He has created public art installations for the 02 Dome (Berlin), John F. Kennedy Airport (New York), Cirque Du Soleil at Super Bowl XLI, and has been credited with the largest monumental sculpture in Hyde Park (London) history.  He served as an official artist for the 2010 World Cup and was recently appointed Ambassador to the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil.  Britto’s pop sensibility has since leant itself to many collaborations with such brands as Audi, Bentley, Coca-Cola, Disney, Evian, Hublot, Mattel, and Technomarine to name a few. Romero Britto’s art appeals to all!

Romero Britto is an artistic activist for charitable organizations worldwide and most of all

Only You Can Hear- Romero Britto

Only You Can Hear- Romero Britto

an artist who believes “art is too important not to share.”  He serves as a benefactor, donating time, art and resources to over 250 charitable organizations and on several boards such as Best Buddies International, and St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital.  

Romero Britto

Romero Britto

Britto was named an inaugural founding benefactor of the Harvard International Negotiation Program by Daniel Shapiro, a program that seeks peaceful resolution to modern conflict.  Not a silent advocate, Britto has been selected several times to be a speaker for the arts at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. A firm believer in the role of an artist as an agent of positive change, Romero Britto is committed to developing and supporting the powerful role art plays in world issues.

Biography is from artist’s website.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  It was so fun, but hard because I wanted to be as detailed with color as the artist is!  I anticipated the challenge so I decided to do something a bit simple.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 277!

Best,

Linda

Flowers- Tribute to Romero Britto Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Flowers- Tribute to Romero Britto
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Flowers- Tribute to Romero Britto Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Flowers- Tribute to Romero Britto
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Flowers- Tribute to Romero Britto Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Flowers- Tribute to Romero Britto
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Flowers- Tribute to Romero Britto Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Flowers- Tribute to Romero Britto
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Flowers- Tribute to Romero Britto Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Flowers- Tribute to Romero Britto
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 273- Corneille- Heaven on Earth

It’s Day 273 and I’m rushing around a bit today before I head out to some appointments.  Had tons of fun with today’s piece…so colorful and one of my favorite art movements.  I wanted to play with color today since I did charcoal yesterday.  Join me in honoring Corneille today. 🙂  His wikipedia bio was short so I decided to paste his obituary from the NYtimes.com on 9/6/2010.

Corneille

Corneille

Corneille 1973

Corneille 1973

The Dutch artist Corneille, who created lyrical, expressionist paintings bursting with color and who was one of the founders of the postwar European art movement known as Cobra, died on Sunday in Paris. He was 88 and lived in Paris.

His death was announced by the Cobra Museum of Modern Art in the Netherlands.

Corneille was best known for radicalizing the conservative Dutch art world in the early

Corneille

Corneille

1950s, making modern art not only acceptable, but embraceable as well. He placed familiar subjects — birds, cats, women and landscapes — in mythological and often childlike contexts, imbuing them with spontaneity and bright, sensual reds.

“I am a painter of joy,” Corneille remarked at a 2007 exhibition of his work at the Cobra Museum, said Katja Weitering, the artistic director of the museum, in Amstelveen, near Amsterdam.

“He was really an artist for all people,” she said. “He was open to the audience; he appeared in documentaries, on television, and frequently visited exhibitions. It’s safe to say we consider him one of the most important modern artists of the postwar.” In the Netherlands, she added, his fame and influence derived from the appeal of Cobra.

Corneille

Corneille

Born Guillaume Cornelis van Beverloo to Dutch parents on July 3, 1922, in Liège, Belgium, Corneille was influenced by Miró, Picasso and Paul Klee but claimed the most profound connection to van Gogh because of their shared passion for color, form and nature. He is to be buried in a plot near the grave of van Gogh in Auvers-sur-Oise, France, Ms. Weitering said.

Corneille founded Cobra in 1948 with five other artists, including his close friends Karel Appel and Constant Nieuwenhuys. The name was an acronym made up of the artists’ home cities — Copenhagen, Brussels and Amsterdam. The artists drew inspiration from surrealism, but believed that style promoted too much discussion and not enough action, Ms. Weitering said.

Instead, Corneille and his friends formed a united front in postwar Europe, urging

Corneille

Corneille

a break from tradition and toward freedom and vitality. In an intense three years, Cobra produced two major international exhibitions and published 10 issues of a magazine for which Corneille wrote poetry. Cobra disbanded in 1951, saying it had achieved its goals, and the artists returned to their individual careers.

Corneille

Corneille

Corneille began his artistic life in 1940, studying at the Academy of Fine Arts in Amsterdam. Though he made his home base in Paris in the early 1950s, he traveled extensively in Africa, Cuba, Brazil, and Mexico. In Africa he became fascinated by the colors, smells and cultures, Ms. Weitering said, collecting brightly painted objects like the masks he later used as themes. He also spent time in Italy, Israel and San Francisco, expanding his repertory to include etching, ceramics and printmaking.

Beyond the Netherlands, Corneille’s work is in the collections of several American museums, including the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.

He is survived by his wife, Natacha, and their son, Dimitri.

Corneille

Corneille

Ms. Weitering said she recalled a television interview Corneille did several years ago in the Netherlands, in which he talked about his natural optimism.

She said: “I remember Corneille saying, ‘There are people who believe in heaven after they die. I believe in heaven on earth.’ ”

~

I hope you enjoy my piece today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 274!

Best,

Linda

Brand New Day- Tribute to Corneille  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Brand New Day- Tribute to Corneille
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Brand New Day- Tribute to Corneille  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Brand New Day- Tribute to Corneille
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Brand New Day- Tribute to Corneille  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Brand New Day- Tribute to Corneille
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Brand New Day- Tribute to Corneille  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Brand New Day- Tribute to Corneille
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Brand New Day- Tribute to Corneille  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Brand New Day- Tribute to Corneille
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 266- Thomas Downing- Spots

It’s Day 266 and I’m having a pretty busy week.  I almost forgot to post this blog today!  My mind has definitely felt a bit scattered and I’ve been practicing various British dialects for a show I’m doing on Saturday. 🙂  Join me in honoring Thomas Downing today.  I loved doing today’s painting.

Thomas Downing

Thomas Downing

Red - Thomas Downing.  Completion Date: 1966

Red – Thomas Downing. Completion Date: 1966

Thomas Downing (1928–1985) was an American painter, associated with the Washington Color Field Movement.

Thomas Downing was born in Suffolk, Virginia. He studied at Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, Virginia, where he received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1948. He then studied at the Pratt Institute, a well-known art school in Brooklyn, New York, until 1950. That year he received a grant from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, enabling him to travel to Europe, where he studied briefly at the Académie Julian in Paris.

In 1951 he returned to the United States, and after serving in the U.S. Army, settled

Thomas Downing

Thomas Downing

in Washington, D.C., where he began to teach, in 1953. The following summer, he enrolled in a summer institute at Catholic University, studying under Kenneth Noland. He became a friend of Noland, who became a significant influence on Downing’s art and who was one of the founders of the Washington Color Field Movement.

Thomas Downing

Thomas Downing

In the late 1950s, Downing shared a studio with Howard Mehring, another artist of the Washington Color School and Color Field painting. In 1964 Clement Greenberg included Noland, Mehring, Downing and others in his traveling museum exhibition called Post-painterly Abstraction.

From 1965 to 1968, Downing taught at the Corcoran College of Art and Design in Washington, D.C. There he taught several people who in their turn became artists influenced by Downing’s ideas, including Sam Gilliam.

His paintings to a large extent consisted of circles arranged in precise patterns on the canvas, with colors

Untitled 1962- Thomas Downing

Untitled 1962- Thomas Downing

often chosen according to ideas of symmetry. Downing’s Spot Paintings are his best known works.

In the last ten years of his life, Downing lived in Provincetown, Massachusetts. He died in October 1985 in Provincetown, Massachusetts at the age of 57. In its obituary theWashington Times characterized his death as mysterious. The newspaper was referring to the then recent demise of Washington Color Field artist Gene Davis (1920–1985) and to the earlier death of Howard Mehring (1931–1978), as well.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I had a good and relaxing time painting it.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 266.

Best,

Linda

Descent- Tribute to Thomas Downing Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Descent- Tribute to Thomas Downing
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Descent- Tribute to Thomas Downing Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Descent- Tribute to Thomas Downing
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Descent- Tribute to Thomas Downing Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Descent- Tribute to Thomas Downing
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Descent- Tribute to Thomas Downing Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Descent- Tribute to Thomas Downing
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Descent- Tribute to Thomas Downing Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Descent- Tribute to Thomas Downing
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 249- David Park- Figuratively Painting

It’s Day 249 and I really wanted to paint some figurative stuff today.  I found this painter a while back and loved his pieces.  He’s also a Bay Area painter so that was a neat thing too!  Join me in honoring David Park today.

David Park

David Park

David Park: Head of Lydia, 1953

David Park: Head of Lydia, 1953

David Park (March 17, 1911 – September 20, 1960) was a painter and a pioneer of the Bay Area Figurative School of painting during the 1950s.

David Park was part of the post-World War II alumni of the San Francisco Art Institute

David Park: Louise

David Park: Louise

which was called the California School of Fine Arts (CSFA) at the time. He revived an interest in figurative art, at first experimenting with still-abstracted forms that relied on color for their impact, dynamics and warmth.

Park, along with Richard Diebenkorn and Elmer Bischoff, broke away from the philosophy of painting promoted by Clyfford Still, who taught at the Institute, forming what would later be called the Bay Area Figurative Movement. Their influence may be seen in the work of later Bay Area Figurative School artists such as Paul John Wonner, Nathan Oliveira, Manuel Neri, Henry Villierme and Joan Brown.

David Park

David Park

Although these painters started out painting in what was called an objective style, deploying abstract shapes in large space, they soon migrated to using the physical world and representative subjects to experiment with shape, color, texture and temperature in their painting. Park realized that concentrating on principle and abstraction drew attention to the painter rather than the painting. He felt that it was important to focus on the present, to develop responses to nature. “I believe that we are living at a time that overemphasizes the need of newness, of furthering concepts”.

Park worked with figurative painting from about 1950 until about 1959 when he became ill with cancer. Usually working from memory, he initially painted what he

David Park

David Park

saw: kids playing in the street, musicians, his friends, people in their houses. Toward the end of the decade he painted classical studio nudes and bathers in a monumental style.

After he become too ill to work with oils, he continued working with watercolors which he produced until his early death in 1960, at the age of 49, of cancer. Tragically, he was painting his best works in the final years of his life and career.

The Friday Evening Nudes - David Park

The Friday Evening Nudes – David Park

He had a retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City, 1988–1989.

Park’s Standing Male Nude in the Shower, painted between 1955 and 1957, sold for $1,160,000 at Sotheby’s New York on May 15, 2007.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  It was very educational painting this piece.  I wanted to make sure you could tell that she was standing in water and I wanted it to have the illusion of her lower half under water.  I hope I succeeded!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 250.

Best,

Linda

Saturday Morning Nude- Tribute to David Park Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Saturday Morning Nude- Tribute to David Park
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Saturday Morning Nude- Tribute to David Park Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Saturday Morning Nude- Tribute to David Park
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Saturday Morning Nude- Tribute to David Park Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Saturday Morning Nude- Tribute to David Park
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Saturday Morning Nude- Tribute to David Park Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Saturday Morning Nude- Tribute to David Park
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Saturday Morning Nude- Tribute to David Park Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Saturday Morning Nude- Tribute to David Park
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas