Day 363- Aubrey Beardsley- The Beautifully Grotesque

It’s Day 363 and after today I only have 2 more left!  I can hardly believe it.  I’m sad and also excited to work on my other passions…my challenge for next year will be writing every day and hopefully finishing/submitting my books and short stories out into the world. 🙂  Also organizing an art show and designing a book of this project.  It’s going to be hard work, but it’s worth it.  I love today’s artist so please join me in honoring Aubrey Beardsley today!

Aubrey Beardsley

Aubrey Beardsley

The Climax - Aubrey Beardsley

The Climax – Aubrey Beardsley

Aubrey Vincent Beardsley (21 August 1872 – 16 March 1898) was an English illustrator and author. His drawings in black ink, influenced by the style of Japanese woodcuts, emphasized the grotesque, the decadent, and the erotic. He was a leading figure in the Aesthetic movement which also included Oscar Wilde and James A. McNeill Whistler. Beardsley’s contribution to the development of the Art Nouveau and poster styles was significant, despite the brevity of his career before his early death from tuberculosis.

Beardsley was born in Brighton, England, on 21 August 1872, and christened on 24 October 1872. His father, Vincent Paul Beardsley (1839–1909), was the son of a tradesman; Vincent had no trade himself, however, and instead relied

The Dancer's Reward- Aubrey Beardsley

The Dancer’s Reward- Aubrey Beardsley

on a private income from an inheritance that he received from his maternal grandfather when he was twenty-one years of age. Vincent’s wife, Ellen Agnus Pitt (1846–1932), was the daughter of Surgeon-Major William Pitt of the Indian Army.

Lucians Strange Creatures - Aubrey Beardsley

Lucians Strange Creatures – Aubrey Beardsley

The Pitts were a well-established and respected family in Brighton, and Beardsley’s mother married a man of lesser social status than might have been expected. Soon after their wedding, Vincent was obliged to sell some of his property in order to settle a claim for his “breach of promise” from another woman who claimed that he had promised to marry her. At the time of his birth, Beardsley’s family, which included his sister Mabel who was one year older, were living in Ellen’s familial home at 12 Buckingham Road.

In 1883 his family settled in London, and in the following year he appeared in public as an “infant musical phenomenon”, playing at several concerts with his sister.  In January 1885 he began to attend Brighton, Hove and Sussex Grammar School, where he would spend the next four years. His first poems, drawings and cartoons appeared in print in “Past and Present”, the school’s magazine. In 1888 he obtained a post in an architect’s office, and afterwards

Birth from the Calf of the Leg- Aubrey Beardsley

Birth from the Calf of the Leg- Aubrey Beardsley

one in the Guardian Life and Fire Insurance Company. In 1891, under the advice of Sir Edward Burne-Jones and Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, he took up art as a profession. In 1892 he attended the classes at the Westminster School of Art, then under Professor Fred Brown.

In 1892, Beardsley travelled to Paris, where he discovered the poster art of Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, and the Parisian fashion for Japanese prints, both of which would be major influences on his own style. Beardsley’s first commission was Le Morte d’Arthur by Thomas Malory (1893), which he illustrated for the publishing house J. M. Dent and Company.

His six years of major creative output can be divided into several periods, identified by the form of his signature. In the early period his work is mostly unsigned. During 1891 and 1892 he progressed to using his initials, A.V.B. In mid-1892, the period of Le Morte d’Arthur and The Bon Mots he used a Japanese-influenced mark which became progressively more graceful, sometimes accompanied by A.B. in block capitals.

Dragon Illustration- Aubrey Beardsley

Dragon Illustration- Aubrey Beardsley

He co-founded The Yellow Book with American writer Henry Harland, and for the first four editions he served as Art Editor and produced the cover designs and many illustrations for the magazine. He was also closely aligned with Aestheticism, the British counterpart of Decadence and Symbolism. Most of his images are done in ink, and feature large dark areas contrasted with large blank ones, and areas of fine detail contrasted with areas with none at all.

Beardsley was the most controversial artist of the Art Nouveau era, renowned for his dark and perverse images and grotesque erotica, which were the main themes of his later work. His illustrations were in black and white, against a white background. Some of his drawings, inspired by Japanese shunga artwork, featured enormous genitalia. His most famous erotic illustrations concerned themes of history and mythology; these include his

Aubrey Beardsley

Aubrey Beardsley

illustrations for a privately printed edition of Aristophanes’ Lysistrata, and his drawings for Oscar Wilde’s play Salome, which eventually premiered in Paris in 1896. Other major illustration projects included an 1896 edition of The Rape of the Lock by Alexander Pope, and the collection A Book of Fifty Drawings by Aubrey Beardsley (1897).

He also produced extensive illustrations for books and magazines (e.g. for a deluxe edition of Sir Thomas Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur) and worked for magazines such as The Studio and The Savoy, of which he was a co-founder. As a cofounder of The Savoy, Beardsley was able to pursue his writing as well as illustration, and a number of his writings, including Under the Hill (a story based on the Tannhäuser legend) and “The Ballad of a Barber” appeared in the magazine.

Aubrey Beardsley - Design for chapter heading from Le Morte Darthur, 1893

Aubrey Beardsley – Design for chapter heading from Le Morte Darthur, 1893

Beardsley was a caricaturist and did some political cartoons, mirroring Wilde’s irreverent wit in art. Beardsley’s work reflected the decadence of his era and his influence was enormous, clearly visible in the work of the French Symbolists, the Poster art Movement of the 1890s and the work of many later-period Art Nouveau artists such as Pape and Clarke.

Beardsley was a public as well as private eccentric. He said, “I have one aim—the grotesque. If I am not grotesque I am nothing.” Wilde said he had “a face like a silver hatchet, and grass green hair.” Beardsley was meticulous about his attire: dove-grey suits, hats, ties; yellow gloves. He would appear at his publisher’s in a morning coat and patent leather pumps.

Although Beardsley was associated with the homosexual clique that included Oscar Wilde and other English aesthetes, the details of his sexuality remain in question. He was generally regarded as asexual. Speculation about his sexuality include rumours of an incestuous relationship with his elder sister, Mabel, who

Illustrations to Lysistrata- Aubrey Beardsley

Illustrations to Lysistrata- Aubrey Beardsley

may have become pregnant by her brother and miscarried. During his entire career, Beardsley had recurrent attacks of the disease that would end it. He suffered frequent lung hemorrhages and was often unable to work or leave his home.

Beardsley converted to Roman Catholicism in March 1897, and subsequently begged his publisher, Leonard Smithers, to “destroy all copies of Lysistrata and bad drawings… by all that is holy all obscene drawings.” Smithers ignored Beardsley’s wishes, and actually continued to sell reproductions as well as forgeries of Beardsley’s work.

Aubrey Beardsley

Aubrey Beardsley

In 1897 deteriorating health prompted his move to the French Riviera, where he died a year later on 16 March 1898 at the Cosmopolitan Hotel in Menton, France, attended by his mother and sister. He was 25 years of age and the cause of death was tuberculosis. Following a Requiem Mass in Menton Cathedral the following day, his remains were interred in the adjacent cemetery.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece for today!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 364…which will be my penultimate painting and one done in tribute to my best friend!  Then it’s Bob Ross time!

Best,

Linda

Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Side-View Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Side-View
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Day 335- David Shrigley- Nervous Introspections

It’s Day 335 and I have to admit that I had fun with today’s piece even though it’s a piece of poop. 🙂  Join me in honoring David Shrigley today.  I want all his art on t-shirts.

David Shrigley

David Shrigley

David Shrigley

David Shrigley

David Shrigley (born 17 September 1968) is a British visual artist. He lives and works in Glasgow.

Shrigley was born in Macclesfield, Cheshire, the younger of two children born to Rita (née Bowring) and Joseph Shrigley. He moved with his parents and sister to Oadby, Leicestershire when he was two years old. He took the Art and Design Foundation course at the Leicester Polytechnic in 1987, and then studied environmental art at the Glasgow School of Art from 1988 to 1991.

Although Shrigley works in various media, he is best known for his mordantly humorous cartoons released in softcover books or postcard packs.

He finds humour in flat depictions of the inconsequential, the unavailing, and the bizarre, although he is far fonder of violent or otherwise disquieting

David Shrigley

David Shrigley

subject matter. His work has two of the characteristics often encountered in outsider art: an odd viewpoint and, in some of his work, a deliberately limited technique.

David Shrigley

David Shrigley

His freehand line is often weak (which jars with his frequent use of a ruler), his forms are often very crude, and annotations in his drawings are poorly executed and frequently contain crossings-out. In authentic outsider art, the artist has no choice but to produce work in his or her own way, even if that work is unconventional in content and inept in execution. In contrast, it is likely that Shrigley has chosen his style and range of subject matter for comic effect.

As well as authoring several books, he directed the video for Blur’s “Good Song” and also for Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy’s “Agnes, Queen of Sorrow”. In 2005 designed a London Underground leaflet cover. Since 2005, he has

David Shrigley

David Shrigley

contributed a cartoon for The Guardian ’​s Weekend magazine every Saturday. Other projects have included the album Worried Noodles (Tom Lab, 2007) where musicians interpret his writings as lyrics, including collaborations by David Byrne, Hot Chip, and Franz Ferdinand.

David Shrigley

David Shrigley

Shrigley co-directed a film with director Chris Shepherd called Who I Am And What I Want, based on Shrigley’s book of the same title. Kevin Eldon voiced its main character, Pete. Shrigley also produced a series of drawings and T-shirt designs for the 2006 Triptych festival, a Scottish music festival lasting for three to four days in three cities.

He also designed twelve different covers for Deerhoof’s 2007 record, Friend

David Shrigley

David Shrigley

Opportunity. In the same year he also designed the title sequence for the film Hallam Foe, as well as the drawings and the writing in Hallam’s on-screen diaries.

Shrigley was nominated for the 2013 Turner Prize. His Thumbs Up sculpture is expected to be installed on Trafalgar Square’s Fourth Plinth during 2016. He was awarded an honorary doctorate by Leicester’s De Montfort University in a ceremony on 17th July 2014.

David Shrigley

David Shrigley

Recent notable solo exhibitions include Animate, The Turku art Museum, Finland (2011); Kelvingrove Museum, Glasgow International Festival of Visual Arts, Glasgow, Scotland (2010); New Powers, Kunsthalle Mainz, Germany (2009); David Shrigley, Museum Ludwig, Cologne, Germany (2008); BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead, UK (2008); Everything Must Have a Name, Konsthall, Malmo, Sweden (2007) and David Shrigley, Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee, Scotland (2006).

Shrigley is represented by Stephen Friedman Gallery, London and Yvon Lambert Gallery, Paris.

Jason Mraz took the name of his album We Sing. We Dance. We Steal Things. from a work by Shrigley.

Pinakothek der Moderne, München, Germany (2014)

In 2006, Shrigley’s first spoken-word album Shrigley Forced To Speak With Others was released by Azuli Records. In October 2007, Tomlab released Worried Noodles, a double-CD of artists including David Byrne,

David Shrigley

David Shrigley

Islands, Liars, Grizzly Bear, Mount Eerie, R. Stevie Moore and Final Fantasy putting Shrigley’s 2005 book of the same name to music. Moore went on to record an entire album of new songs set to Shrigley’s Worried Noodles lyrics called Shrigley Field.

His spoken-word readings are used on the Late Night Tales series of recordings, with a track from Shrigley closing each album.

Above biography is from wikipedia.

Shrigley’s acrylic paintings combine visceral figures or abstractions with text; dark and at times uncomfortable, they tackle moments of confused trauma or nervous introspection. The classically trained artist has often been associated with “outsider art,” given the roughness of his lines and his apparent disregard for precision; in this latest series, his reverence for simplicity and gut-level emotional honesty is clear. The text accompanying each image—scrawled and wobbly, as if tacked as an afterthought—reads as an inner monologue, supplying each of his mangled objects with a level of humanity. “I suspect that the deformity displayed in my work,” he has said, “is a natural curse, as I am not very good at rendering beauty.” Particularly of note is the way in which he, like a disobedient child, plants red herrings in his work, mislabeling crude red streetlights as “go” or scrawling “eat the poisonous fruit if you must.”

—Molly Osberg

David Shrigley

David Shrigley

David Shrigley finds meaning in snippets of text and overheard conversations. His crude and cartoonish ink drawings, usually exhibited salon-style, recall pages from the sketchbook of a cheeky adolescent. Tackling serious issues, such as unemployment and child welfare, as well as more absurd subjects, including sexual fantasies about a squirrel, his fragmented narratives can be both poignant and funny. In a 2011 exhibition, Shrigley included a dead stuffed kitten that stood on its hind legs carrying a hand-lettered protest sign that read, “I’M DEAD.”

Above blurb and bio is from artsy.net.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I did the poop a little more in my style…but that’s okay.  I love the cleverness and absurdity of his pieces.  I laughed at everything I found online.  LOVE it!  Very inspiring.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 336!

Best,

Linda

Can't Handle Shit- Tribute to David Shrigley Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Can’t Handle Shit- Tribute to David Shrigley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Side-View Can't Handle Shit- Tribute to David Shrigley Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Side-View
Can’t Handle Shit- Tribute to David Shrigley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Can't Handle Shit- Tribute to David Shrigley Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Can’t Handle Shit- Tribute to David Shrigley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Can't Handle Shit- Tribute to David Shrigley Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Can’t Handle Shit- Tribute to David Shrigley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Can't Handle Shit- Tribute to David Shrigley Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Can’t Handle Shit- Tribute to David Shrigley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

 

 

Day 333- Bridget Bate Tichenor- Spiritual Guides

It’s Day 333 and I really enjoyed creating today’s piece.  I was stumped at first at what I wanted to paint, but when the ideas started flowing, I had a great time.  I also wanted to keep it somewhat simple, but also really capture the artist’s essence so to speak. 🙂  Join me in honoring Bridget Bate Tichenor.

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor (born Bridget Pamela Arkwright Bate on November 22, 1917 – died on October 20, 1990), also known as Bridget Tichenor or B.B.T., was a Mexican surrealist painter of fantastic art in the school of magic realism and a fashion editor. Born in Paris and of British descent, she later embraced Mexico as her home.

The mesmerizing story of the Magic Realist painter Bridget Bate Tichenor has never been told.  It is a riveting revelation of an extraordinary female artist who impacted the 20th Century world of fashion, art, and society, with enormous contributions.  Revealed are the intimacies and secrets of an outwardly beautiful, exotic, bold, and courageous, yet painfully shy and reclusive woman, who lived in extraordinary times, yet was unknown to her peers, colleagues, and the world at large.

Bridget lived in an astonishing way, in many contrasting countries, and in many revolutionary platforms. Her personal code of excellence has yet to be recognized or acknowledged, outside small and eccentric art circles. Bridget adhered to rarefied and noble standards of human pride, integrity, respect, discipline, and compassion.

Bridget Bate Tichenor, Líderes (Leaders) Close Up

Bridget Bate Tichenor, Líderes (Leaders) Close Up

She honored these humane traits above all else in life.  Bridget’s impeccable values, in tandem with her determination and prioritization to execute her artistic vision, are the essence of her story, and substantiates her historical value.

Bridget inherited a peripatetic world from her self-absorbed, famous, and creatively gifted parents. It fueled deep insecurities, and was equally fed by fears of abandonment. Subsequently, in order to survive, she reinvented herself by necessity, and chose to mold herself into whatever she needed at any given time.

Bridget’s mother, Vera Bate Lombardi (Sarah Gertrude Baring Arkwright Fitzgeorge Bate Lombardi) was an indomitable combination of beauty and bravado with the highest connections. From 1925-1939, Vera became Co Co Chanel’s muse and Public Relations liaison to several European Royal Families.

BRIDGET BATE TICHENOR (1917-1990) Gusanos y caracoles

BRIDGET BATE TICHENOR (1917-1990) Gusanos y caracoles

Her demeanor and style influenced the ‘English Look’, the very foundation for the House of Chanel. Vera Bate Lombardi’s mother was Rosa Frederica Baring of the Baring Banking family, who had rescued the British Royal family during difficult economic times. Vera was allegedly an illegitimate descendent of George III, through her reputed father, HRH Prince Adolphus Cambridge, 1st Marquess of Cambridge Duke of Teck. She was presented socially as Fitzgeorge, as she was the unadopted daughter of her stepfather, the morganatic and bastard Colonel Fitzgeorge, son of Prince George, Duke of Cambridge and his mistress Sarah Louisa Fairbrother.

Chanel craved Vera’s immense popularity and privileged patrician heritage, however shrouded in controversial

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

royal illegitimacies. Chanel came from humble beginnings, and was decidedly uneducated. She looked to Vera as a ‘social advisor’, who would be responsible for her societal launch and business triumph. It was evident that Chanel’s personal identity had been tragically dehumanized and shamed as an orphan, and she systematically absorbed Vera’s exotic mannerisms, from gestures to stance, with Cambridge and Oxford intonations, in a scheming and arrogant self-reinvention of entitlement.

Lombardi was a flawless British Royal Fashion icon to Chanel, and Chanel shamelessly used her to establish her fashion-identity-template, which became the legendary Chanel brand. Years later, Vera, retaliated against Chanel’s ruthless jealousies and manipulations, and exposed her as a Nazi spy to her cousin Sir Winston Churchill in Spain circa 1944. This disclosure shattered Chanel’s reputation for many years.

La Caja de Cristal- Bridget Bate Tichenor

La Caja de Cristal- Bridget Bate Tichenor

Until now, Vera Bate Lombardi has been relatively obscured in Chanel’s literary and film biographies. Chanel cunningly perpetuated her adapted character identity, and concealed the truths of her business cornerstone. What had begun as flattery for Vera, terminated in disgust.

Bridget’s father, Frederick Blantford Bate, was born in Virginia but lived in England for over 20 years, working as a British representative for NBC during World War I. Bate was a Mechanical Officer in the US Army, who, in 1916, was instrumental in establishing The Field Service of American Ambulance in Paris. Bate was an intimate friend of Vera’s cousin, the Duke of Windsor. He was the first news correspondent to receive the story of the Duke’s abdication and marriage to Wallis Simpson, and contacted his associate, Alistair Cooke, in the UK to broadcast it.

The beautiful, noble, artistic, and rich are patently different, often misunderstood or condemned, yet granted societal privileges few receive. These very qualities that embodied Bridget’s unique style, influenced and were

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

copied by some of the greatest names of the 20th century such as her rivals Diana Vreeland and Frida Kahlo. She was loved and envied, but most importantly, awe-inspiring to Man Ray, Diego Rivera, Ernst Lubitsch, James Whale, Laurence Olivier, Anais Nin, Greta Garbo, and Joan Crawford.

Bridget had an amazing, yet tragic, multidimensional life, which included an arranged marriage, true love, romantic and professional rivalry, artistic achievement, mysticism, fantasy, perfectionism, and shattered dreams. All of which were played out in the most glamorous settings, with famous personalities and eccentric nobility that she orchestrated in a dramatic metaphysical theater of remarkable relationships.

She was difficult to get to know, guarded, and very secretive. She revealed certain things to socially survive, while withholding her poetically rich emotional and spiritual communications to focus through her dedicated relationship with her sacred and sovereign art. She had a genius gift of observation and execution in cryptic detail, both in her character and painting.

Bridget Bate TIchenor

Bridget Bate TIchenor

Her controversial royal illegitimate background overshadowed her profound artistry and her sense of self worth.  In her era and society, it was important to be of royal lineage. Her achievement in the art world was diminished by who she was as an illegitimate royal family member, her ravishing beauty, her refined intelligence, and her commanding personality. Her controversial background was more important and interesting to her friends, which graciously made her celebrated and received on one hand, yet made her hide how great an artist she was on the other and never acknowledged. This is why she was so shy about showing who she was as a superlative painter.

She compartmentalized her life. She was deathly afraid to remove her complex multiple masks and reveal not only her precious art, but also her deepest intimate feelings to others. She was validated only by those relationships that had a higher profile than she, so that she could retreat behind her provocatively mysterious and seductive persona to hide her acute vulnerability.

She was difficult to get to know, guarded, and very secretive.  She revealed certain things to socially survive, while withholding her poetically rich emotional and spiritual communications to focus through her dedicated

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

relationship with her sacred and sovereign art.

Bridget spiritually adopted me and I became her protégé in 1971. Among her many gifts, she benevolently trained me in painting and introduced me to ancient occult religions, which included many lost esoteric sciences of Egyptian, Tantrika, and Mesoamerican Magick and Alchemy. She fed my hunger to learn, and I became her consummate student in a world that had received a death rattle to classically trained artists.

Just before her death, I promised my dear friend and genius mentor Bridget that the world would know who she was. One of the legacies she gave to me were her life stories. I began to document Bridget’s life in 1990 shortly after her death, recording her extensive and detailed personal accounts that she imparted to me over the nineteen years of our relationship. The following biography is a small part of my promise that perpetuates the significance of her life.

-Zachary Selig-

Biography is from www.bridgetbatetichenor.com.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I really had a blast painting it.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 334.

Best,

Linda

Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 262- Frank Bowling- Freedom in the Abstract

It’s Day 262 and when I found today’s artist I got pretty excited about doing a tribute for him!  Join me in honoring Frank Bowling today. 🙂

Frank Bowling

Frank Bowling

Frank Bowling 'Julia' (1975) courtesy of Tate website.

Frank Bowling ‘Julia’ (1975) courtesy of Tate website.

Richard Sheridan Franklin Bowling, known as Frank Bowling, OBE (born 29 February 1936), is a

For rose - Frank Bowling

For rose – Frank Bowling

Guyana-born British artist who is widely considered to be one of the most distinguished artists to emerge from post-war British art schools. His paintings relate to Abstract expressionism, Color Field painting and Lyrical Abstraction.

Bowling was born in Bartica, Guyana, South America. His father was a police district paymaster and his

mother a seamstress, and in 1950, at the age of 15, he moved to England, where he lived with an uncle and completed his education.

After doing his National Service in the Royal Air Force, Bowling went on to study art, despite earlier ambitions to be a poet and a writer. He studied at the Chelsea School of Art, then in 1959 won a scholarship to London’s Royal College of Art, where fellow students included artists such as David Hockney, Derek Boshier, Allen Jones, R. B. Kitaj and Peter Phillips.

At graduation in 1962, Hockney was awarded the gold medal while Bowling was given the silver. Bowling had been tipped to win the gold

Frank Bowling, Upright, 2012, acrylic on canvas, 74 x 53 inches

Frank Bowling, Upright, 2012, acrylic on canvas, 74 x 53 inches

but due to his controversial 1960 marriage to Royal College Registrar Paddy Kitchen (they divorced in the late 1960s), he was relegated to silver.

Frank Bowling- Crossing Liberty 1 (courtesy of the artist and ROLLO Contemporary Art)

Frank Bowling- Crossing Liberty 1 (courtesy of the artist and ROLLO Contemporary Art)

His first one-person exhibition, entitled “Image in Revolt,” was held in London in 1962 at the Grabowski Galleries, and other exhibitions followed. However, Bowling was frustrated at being pigeonholed as a Caribbean artist; as he said in a Guardian interview with Laura Barnett: “It seemed that everyone was expecting me to paint some kind of protest art out of postcolonial discussion. For a while I fell for it. I painted a picture called the Martyrdom of Patrice Lumumba.”

A move to New York in the mid-1960s exposed Bowling to his American

contemporaries and soon won him a place in the 1971 Whitney Biennial. As Maya Jaggi writes: “unlike contemporaries who founded British pop art, Bowling took a singular path, from Bacon-esque figurative painting to an abstract art touched by

Frank Bowling- Tony’s Anvil 1975, acrylic on canvas

Frank Bowling- Tony’s Anvil 1975, acrylic on canvas

personal memory and history…. Encouraged by the US critic Clement Greenberg, he found a freedom in

Head (1974)- Frank Bowling

Head (1974)- Frank Bowling

abstract art, alongside Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock and Barnett Newman.” Between 1969 and 1972 Bowling was a contributing editor of Arts Magazine.

Bowling now spends part of each year between London and New York, where he maintains studios.

Bowling’s paintings have been shown in numerous exhibitions in Europe, the United Kingdom and the United States and are included in major private and corporate collections worldwide. His work can also be seen in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Museum of Modern Art in New York, as well as the Tate Gallery in London.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I had such a fun time with my “pouring” painting today!  This is definitely one I want to emulate on a much larger scale.  I hope you like my piece today and I will see you tomorrow on Day 263.

Best,

Linda

Standing Up- Tribute to Frank Bowling Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Standing Up- Tribute to Frank Bowling
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Standing Up- Tribute to Frank Bowling Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Standing Up- Tribute to Frank Bowling
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Standing Up- Tribute to Frank Bowling Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Standing Up- Tribute to Frank Bowling
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Standing Up- Tribute to Frank Bowling Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Standing Up- Tribute to Frank Bowling
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Standing Up- Tribute to Frank Bowling Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Standing Up- Tribute to Frank Bowling
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

 

Day 261- William Tillyer- Edenic Visions

It’s Day 261 and I really was in the mood for doing another watercolor piece.  I loved this artist’s style.  Join me in honoring William Tillyer today!

William Tillyer

William Tillyer

William Tillyer,  The Age of Anxiety / The Kerry Sunset

William Tillyer,
The Age of Anxiety / The Kerry Sunset

William Tillyer (born 1938 in Middlesbrough) is an English artist. His work has been shown frequently in the UK and internationally since 1970.

He studied art in his home town from 1956-9, moving south to London in the 1960s to study at the Slade School of Art. It was there he encountered William Coldstream

William Tillyer The North York Moors, Falling Sky, 1985

William Tillyer The North York Moors, Falling Sky, 1985

and Anthony Gross, among others. Following his time at the Slade, Tillyer took up a French Government Scholarship to study gravure under Stanley William Hayter, at Atelier 17 in Paris.

On his return to London, Tillyer began to make radically experimental work which raised questions about the relationship of art to the world – man to nature.

William Tillyer, 'Northern Arizona 3' 1984

William Tillyer, ‘Northern Arizona 3’ 1984

Wandering between the conceptual intrigue of works like Eight Clouds and the Minimalist assertions of works like Red Interior, Tillyer developed a range of means by which to deepen the external references of his work.

Consistently searching for new means by which to explore his thoughts, the 1970s saw Tillyer return to print-making with renewed vigour. He won international

William Tillyer Haute Alps, 1983

William Tillyer
Haute Alps, 1983

acclaim at the Second International Print Bienalle in Kraków, and found the support of Bernard Jacobson, who has been his dealer ever since.

With these prints Tillyer used a variety of techniques, from etching to five tone screenprinting, to create lattices, which through the gradation of tone themselves depicted what Pat Gilmour, the head of the Print Department at the Tate, described as ‘a cool and unpeopled world…in which to reflect the surrounding flux of nature’.

William Tillyer The Balcony 25

William Tillyer The Balcony 25

Such concerns have continued to underpin Tillyer’s practice to the present day, the artist balancing formal and technical experimentation against the demands of subject matter – demanding multiple reactions from the viewer.

His most recent series reveals the artist returning to some of the earliest themes of his career, isolating John Constable’s cloud studies, as a motif through which to explore his own thoughts about the English Landscape today.

In 2010 a major monograph on his watercolours was published by 21 Publishing covering almost 40 years of his practise. In the extensive text American art critic and poet John Yau writes “However beautiful they are, and many of them are extremely beautiful, almost painfully so, Tillyer’s watercolours never lead us away in favour of an Edenic vision”

In 2013 Mima (Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art) in Middlesbrough will be giving Tillyer his first major retrospective exhibition

William Tillyer Beach and Sea, Seaton Carew, 1956

William Tillyer Beach and Sea, Seaton Carew, 1956

since 1996.

Biography is from wikipedia.

The more I experiment with watercolor the more I learn…AND the more I realize how tricky watercolors can be!  Next time I’d like to do them on paper and then mount it on a canvas.  I hope you enjoy my piece today and I will see you tomorrow on Day 262!

Best,

Linda

 

Dark Horizon- Tribute to William Tillyer Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor on Canvas

Dark Horizon- Tribute to William Tillyer
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor on Canvas

Side-View Dark Horizon- Tribute to William Tillyer Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor on Canvas

Side-View
Dark Horizon- Tribute to William Tillyer
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Dark Horizon- Tribute to William Tillyer Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Dark Horizon- Tribute to William Tillyer
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Dark Horizon- Tribute to William Tillyer Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Dark Horizon- Tribute to William Tillyer
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Dark Horizon- Tribute to William Tillyer Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Dark Horizon- Tribute to William Tillyer
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor on Canvas

Day 243- Gillian Ayres- Bright and Succulent

It’s Day 243 and I had so much fun painting today’s colorful piece!  I also went on a nice dog hike with my husband.  Such a beautiful day.  Join me in honoring Gillian Ayres today.

Gillian Ayres

Gillian Ayres

'Tivoli' by Gillian Ayres

‘Tivoli’ by Gillian Ayres

Gillian Ayres, CBE (born 3 February 1930) is an English painter.

Ayres was born on 3 February 1930 in Barnes, London, the youngest of three sisters. Ayres started school when she was six. Her parents, a prosperous couple, sent her to Ibstock, a progressive school in Roehampton run on Fröbel principles. In 1941 Ayres was sent to Colet Court, the junior school for St Paul’s, in Hammersmith, where on her eleventh birthday she finally learnt to read.  

She passed the entrance exam for St Paul’s Girls’ School the following year, and

Antony and Cleopatra- Gillian Ayres

Antony and Cleopatra- Gillian Ayres

developed an interest in art while there. Among her best schoolfriends was Shirley Williams, with whom she taught art to children in bomb-ravaged parts of London.  Ayres then decided to go to art school. In 1946, she applied to the Slade School of Fine Art and was accepted. However, at sixteen, she was too young to enrol. She was advised to apply to the Camberwell School of Art and studied there from 1946 to 1950.

High Summer World of Light- Gillian Ayres

High Summer World of Light- Gillian Ayres

Ayres worked part-time at the AIA Gallery in Soho from 1951 to 1959 before starting a teaching career.  Ayres held a number of teaching posts through the 1960s and 1970s, becoming friends with painters such as Howard Hodgkin, Robyn Denny and Roger Hilton. In 1959, Ayres was asked to teach at Bath Academy of Art, Corsham for six weeks.

She remained on the teaching staff until 1965. For much of her time at Corsham she shared a teaching studio with Malcolm Hughes.  She was a senior lecturer at Saint Martin’s School of Art, London, from 1965 to 1978 and became head of painting at Winchester School of Art in 1978. Ayres left teaching in 1981, and moved to an old rectory on the Llyn Peninsula in north-west Wales to become a full-time painter.  She moved again in 1987 to a 15th-century cottage at Morwenstowon the Devon-Cornwall border.

Her first solo exhibition was held at Gallery One, London in 1956. Ayres’ early works are typically made with thin vinyl paint in a limited

Gillian Ayres

Gillian Ayres

number of colours arranged in relatively simple forms, but later works in oil paint are more exuberant and very colourful, with a thick impasto being used. The titles of her paintings, such as Anthony and Cleopatra (1982) and A Midsummer Night (1990), are usually given after the painting is completed and do not directly describe the content of the painting, but rather are intended to resonate with the general mood of the work.

Ayres was shortlisted for the Turner Prize in 1989. She was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 1986, and in 1991 became a Royal Academician. She later temporarily resigned from the Academy, following the broadcast of a BBC Omnibus television documentary about the preparations for the controversial Sensation exhibition hosted by the Academy in 1997 show-casing the Young British Artists.

The documentary, according to Ayres, presented an unfair view of the older members

Shalimar 5, (2011), by Gillian Ayres (detail)

Shalimar 5, (2011), by Gillian Ayres (detail)

of the Academy.  Ayres also objected to the inclusion of Marcus Harvey’s portrait of the killer Myra Hindley in the exhibition. She is represented by the Alan Cristea Gallery, London.

She was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in the 2011 Birthday Honours.

Moonglade- Gillian Ayres

Moonglade- Gillian Ayres

Ayres married painter Henry Mundy in 1951. They divorced almost 30 years later but currently live together. They have two sons born 1958 and 1966.  Their younger son, Sam Mundy, is a painter.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 244.

Best,

Linda

Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 170- Richard Hamilton- Commonplace Values

It’s Day 170 and I had a full day.  Been driving on my own…big deal for me, probably silly for most of you!  Had a productive and emotional time at therapy…extra long double session so had some breakthroughs which was lovely, but also very tiring.  Had to finish up feedback for my writing group and now it’s 11pm and I’m finally finishing the blog.  Oh yes, I also painted so let’s honor the wonderful Richard Hamilton today.

Richard Hamilton

Richard Hamilton

Study for a Fashion Plate 1969- Richard Hamilton

Study for a Fashion Plate 1969- Richard Hamilton

Richard William Hamilton CH (24 February 1922 – 13 September 2011) was a British painter and collage artist. His 1955 exhibition Man, Machine and Motion (Hatton Gallery, Newcastle upon Tyne) and his 1956 collage, Just what is it that makes today’s homes so different, so appealing?, produced for the This Is Tomorrow exhibition of the Independent Group in London, are considered by critics and historians to be among the earliest works of pop art.  A major retrospective of his work is at Tate Modern until May 2014.

Hamilton was born in Pimlico, London. Despite having left school with no formal qualifications, he

Hamilton's 1956 collage Just what is it that makes today's homes so different, so appealing?

Hamilton’s 1956 collage Just what is it that makes today’s homes so different, so appealing?

managed to gain employment as an apprentice working at an electrical components firm, where he discovered an ability for draughtsmanship and began to do painting at evening classes at Saint Martin’s School of Art. This led to his entry into the Royal Academy Schools.

After spending the war working as a technical draftsman, he re-enrolled at the Royal Academy Schools but was later expelled on grounds of “not profiting from the instruction”, loss of his student status forcing Hamilton to carry out National Service. After two years at the Slade School of Art, University College, London, Hamilton began exhibiting his work at the Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA), where he also produced posters and leaflets and teaching at the Central School of Art and Design.

Interior- Richard Hamilton

Interior- Richard Hamilton

Hamilton’s early work was much influenced by D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson’s 1917 text On Growth and Form. In 1952, at the first Independent Group meeting, held at the ICA, Hamilton was introduced to Eduardo Paolozzi’s seminal presentation of collages produced in the late 1940s and early 1950s that are now considered to be the first standard bearers of Pop Art. Also in 1952, he was introduced to the Green Box notes of Marcel Duchamp through Roland Penrose, whom Hamilton had met at the ICA. At the ICA, Hamilton was responsible for the design and installation of a number of exhibitions including one on James Joyce and The Wonder and the Horror of the Human Head that was curated by Penrose. It was also through Penrose that Hamilton met Victor Pasmore who gave him a teaching post based in Newcastle Upon Tyne which lasted until 1966. Among the students Hamilton tutored at Newcastle in this period were Rita Donagh, Mark Lancaster, Tim Head, Roxy Music founder Bryan Ferry and Ferry’s visual collaborator Nicholas De Ville. Hamilton’s influence can be found in the visual styling and approach of Roxy Music.

Hamilton gave a 1959 lecture, “Glorious Technicolor, Breathtaking Cinemascope and Stereophonic Sound”, a phrase taken from a Cole Porter

Richard Hamilton collage

Richard Hamilton collage

lyric in the 1957 musical Silk Stockings. In that lecture, which sported a pop soundtrack and the demonstration of an early Polaroid camera, Hamilton deconstructed the technology of cinema to explain how it helped to create Hollywood’s allure. He further developed that theme in the early 1960s with a series of paintings inspired by film stills and publicity shots.

The post at the ICA also afforded Hamilton the time to further his research on Duchamp, which resulted in the 1960 publication of a typographic version of Duchamp’s Green Box, which comprised Duchamp’s original notes for the design and construction of his famous work The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even, also known as The Large Glass. Hamilton’s 1955 exhibition of paintings at the Hanover

Richard Hamilton's Portrait of Hugh Gaitskell as a Famous Monster of Filmland.

Richard Hamilton’s Portrait of Hugh Gaitskell as a Famous Monster of Filmland.

Gallery were all in some form a homage to Duchamp. In the same year Hamilton organized the exhibition Man Machine Motion at the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle. Designed to look more like an advertising display than a conventional art exhibition the show prefigured Hamilton’s contribution to the This Is Tomorrow exhibition in London, at the Whitechapel Gallery the following year. Just what is it that makes today’s homes so different, so appealing? was created in 1956 for the catalogue of This Is Tomorrow, where it was reproduced in black and white and also used in posters for the exhibit. The collage depicts a muscle-man provocatively holding a Tootsie Pop and a woman with large, bare breasts wearing a lampshade hat, surrounded by emblems of 1950s affluence from a vacuum cleaner to a large canned ham. Just what is it that makes today’s homes so different, so appealing? is widely acknowledged as one of the first pieces of Pop Art and his written definition of what ‘pop’ is laid the ground for the whole international movement. Hamilton’s definition of Pop Art from a letter to Alison and Peter Smithson dated 16 January 1957 was – “Pop Art is: popular, transient, expendable, low-cost, mass-produced, young, witty, sexy, gimmicky, glamorous, and Big Business” – stressing its everyday, commonplace values. He thus created collages incorporating advertisements from mass-circulation newspapers and magazines.

The success of This Is Tomorrow secured Hamilton further teaching assignments in particular at the Royal College of Art from 1957 to 1961,

Interior II 1964 Richard Hamilton

Interior II 1964 Richard Hamilton

where he promoted David Hockney and Peter Blake. During this period Hamilton was also very active in the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament and produced a work parodying the then leader of the Labour Party Hugh Gaitskell for rejecting a policy of unilateral nuclear disarmament. In the early 1960s he received a grant from the Arts Council to investigate the condition of the Kurt Schwitters ‘Merzbau’ in Cumbria. The research eventually resulted in Hamilton organising the preservation of the work by relocating it to the Hatton Gallery in the Newcastle University.

In 1962 his first wife Terry was killed in a car crash and in part to recover from this he travelled for the first time to the United States in 1963 for a retrospective of the works of Marcel Duchamp at the Pasadena Art Museum, where, as well as meeting other leading pop artists, he was befriended by Duchamp. Arising from this Hamilton curated the first British retrospective of Duchamp’s work, and his familiarity with The Green Box enabled Hamilton to make copies of The Large Glass and other glass works too fragile to travel. The exhibition was shown at the Tate Gallery in 1966.

In 1968, Hamilton appeared in a Brian De Palma film titled Greetings where Hamilton portrays a pop artist showing a “Blow Up” image. The film was the first film in the United States to receive a X rating and it was also Robert De Niro’s first motion picture.

'Swingeing London III' 1972- Richard Hamilton

‘Swingeing London III’ 1972- Richard Hamilton

From the mid-1960s, Hamilton was represented by Robert Fraser and even produced a series of prints Swingeing London based on Fraser’s arrest, along with Mick Jagger, for possession of drugs. This association with the 1960s pop music scene continued as Hamilton became friends with Paul McCartney resulting in him producing the cover design and poster collage for the Beatles’ White Album.

Hamilton died on 13 September 2011, at the age of 89.  His work Le chef d’oeuvre inconnu – a painting in three parts, unfinished at his death, comprises a trio of large inkjet prints composed from Photoshop images to visualize the moment of crisis in Balzac’s novel The Unknown Masterpiece.

Partial biography from wikipedia.

Wow, Richard Hamilton has such a body of work that I could emulate.  I thought of

Before the paint and collage…no smile.

Before the paint and collage…no smile.

doing something along the lines of his “Interior” series.  It felt like that was the obvious choice, but then I saw his piece, Portrait of Hugh Gaitskell as a Famous Monster of Filmland and instantly became inspired.  I thought about who I wanted to collage and paint and then I thought of Henry Kissinger for some reason.  And THEN I thought of my friends’ John and Mark’s band Sizzling Mansions and how they have a song called, Kissinger Smile (which I love) and thought I’d do something inspired by that song!  I always laugh when they sing, “You got that Kissinger smile”.  So that’s basically the background of how I came up with my absurd (in a good way) tribute to Richard Hamilton.  I hope you enjoy it because I definitely had that Kissinger smile as I painted it.  And please don’t ask what that means because I have no idea.  See you tomorrow on Day 171.  Best, Linda

You Got That Kissinger Smile- Tribute to Richard Hamilton Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

You Got That Kissinger Smile- Tribute to Richard Hamilton
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View You Got That Kissinger Smile- Tribute to Richard Hamilton Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View
You Got That Kissinger Smile- Tribute to Richard Hamilton
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 You Got That Kissinger Smile- Tribute to Richard Hamilton Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
You Got That Kissinger Smile- Tribute to Richard Hamilton
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 You Got That Kissinger Smile- Tribute to Richard Hamilton Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
You Got That Kissinger Smile- Tribute to Richard Hamilton
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 You Got That Kissinger Smile- Tribute to Richard Hamilton Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
You Got That Kissinger Smile- Tribute to Richard Hamilton
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

 

Day 128- Patrick Heron- The Colour of Colour

It’s Day 128 and I’m having a very emotional, busy, crazy day…in my head mostly.  I need to get feedback done before my writing group tonight and somehow I was still able to get my painting done today!  Join me in celebrating Patrick Heron today!  Painting was fun today…and I’m sure you’ll see why.  Colors!

Patrick Heron

Patrick Heron

Patrick Heron

Patrick Heron

Patrick Heron (30 January 1920 – 20 March 1999) was an English painterwriter and designer, based in St. Ives,Cornwall.

Born at HeadingleyLeeds in Yorkshire in 1920, he was the son of Thomas Milner Heron 

Patrick Heron

Patrick Heron

and Eulalie ‘Jack’ Heron (née Davies), the first of four children (Michael, Joanna and Giles). His father was a clothes manufacturer, pacifistsocialist and leading member of the Leeds Arts Club. In 1925 the Heron family moved to West Cornwall where T M Heron took over the running of Crysede and four years later the family moved to Welwyn Garden City where Tom founded the firm Cresta Silks and was to become the original mind behind Utility Clothing during the war. It was here at his new school that Patrick Heron met his future wife Delia Reiss, daughter of Celia and Dick Reiss (R.L.Reiss, co-founder of Welwyn Garden City).

 

Hard Reds, Yellow and Blues- Patrick Heron

Hard Reds, Yellow and Blues- Patrick Heron

He attended St. George’s School in Harpenden and on a school visit to the National Gallery, London in 1933 saw paintings by Paul Cézanne for the first time. He immediately began to paint in a Cézanne-influenced style. Shortly after this he was asked to make designs for Cresta Silks and continued to design for Cresta until 1951. When he was 17 he attended The Slade School of Art for two days a week, returning to the West Country to draw the landscape. In World War II he registered as a conscientious objector and worked as an agricultural labourer for three years, then at the Leach Pottery at St Ives in 1944–45, where he met Ben NicholsonBarbara Hepworth and many other leading artists of the St Ives School. He had just seen Matisse‘s The Red Studio, exhibited at the Redfern Gallery, London and soon after this completed what he later considered to be his first mature work, The Piano in 1943.

The Georges Braque exhibition at the Tate Gallery in 1946 deeply impressed him and he

Yellow Painting: October 1958 May/June 1959 1958-9 Patrick Heron 1920-1999 Purchased with asistance from Tate Friends St Ives 1999 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T07500

Yellow Painting: October 1958 May/June 1959 1958-9 Patrick Heron 1920-1999 Purchased with asistance from Tate Friends St Ives 1999 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T07500

wrote an essay on Braque for The New English Weekly. Then up to 1953 he spent time in Europe visiting Paris, Provence and Italy. Heron visited Braque in his Paris studio and presented him with the New English Weekly article. His first one-man exhibition was at the Redfern Gallery in London in 1947. In 1953 he organised, wrote the catalogue and exhibited in Space in Colour, an exhibition of ten contemporary artists, at Hanover Gallery, London. Following this he exhibited twelve paintings at the Il Bienal di São Paulo, Brazil. The same year he began teaching at Central School of Arts and Crafts in London and continued there until 1956. In 1956 he saw, and praised highly the American Abstract Expressionists who showed their work for the first time in England at the Tate Gallery. He was inspired by this group of eight painters, their confidence and the large scale and flatness.

Patrick Heron

Patrick Heron

A development towards abstraction had been evident in his paintings, for example, Square Leaves (1952) and Winter Harbour (1955) The effect on Heron of the New York painters, together with his move to live at Eagles Nest, overlooking the cliffs at Zennor, that year was a pivotal point in the transformation into his now characteristic language of interlinking forms; his balancing of colour and space. Heron’s deepest influences were Braque, Matisse and Bonnard and he was connected first of all to the pure abstraction of European lineage, represented by Naum Gabo and Pierre Soulages.

“Heron used that most rare and uncanny of gifts: the ability to invent an imagery that was unmistakenly his own, and yet which connects immediately with the natural world as we perceive it, and transforms our vision of it. Like those of his acknowledged masters, Braque, Matisse and Bonnard, his paintings are at once evocations and celebrations of the visible, discoveries of what he called ‘the reality of the eye’ “.

Patrick Heron’s writing about art began when in 1945 he was invited by Philip Mairet, the editor of The New English Weekly to contribute to

Blues with Brown Area by Patrick Heron

Blues with Brown Area by Patrick Heron

the journal. His first published article was on Ben Nicholson, followed by essays on Picasso, Klee, Cézanne and Braque. Two years later he became art critic of the New Statesman until 1950. He became London correspondent to Arts Digest, New York (later renamed Arts(NY)). The Changing Forms of Art, a selection of his criticism was published in 1955. A further selection of writings, edited by Mel Gooding, was published in 1998 to coincide with his Tate Gallery retrospective exhibition.

January 1973: 14 1973 Patrick Heron 1920-1999 Presented by Rose and Chris Prater through the Institute of Contemporary Prints 1975 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/P04302

January 1973: 14 1973 Patrick Heron 1920-1999 Presented by Rose and Chris Prater through the Institute of Contemporary Prints 1975 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/P04302

In 1966, 1968 and 1970 he published a series of articles in Studio International questioning the perceived ascendancy of American artists. His final essay on the subject was in a closely worded article of some 14,000 words published over a period of three days in The Guardian in October 1974.

He defended the independence and autonomy of the English Art Schools, resisting their integration into the polytechnic system. The publication of his article ‘Murder of the art schools’ in The Guardian in 1971 precipitated an enormous correspondence over a period of six weeks. The article was reprinted in Patrick Heron on Art and Education, published by Bretton Hall Wakefield to coincide with presentation of Honorary Fellowship of Bretton Hall, University of Leeds and a one man show of gouaches.

In 1947 Heron began a series of portraits of T.S.Eliot. The final cubist version, painted in 1949, was acquired by the National Portrait Gallery

Scarlet, Emerald, and Orange: July-September 1976 1976 by Patrick Heron 1920-1999

Scarlet, Emerald, and Orange: July-September 1976 1976 by Patrick Heron 1920-1999

in 1966. His daughter Katharine was born early in 1947, followed by Susanna in 1949. The summer of 1947 was spent in St. Ives (as were consecutive summers until 1956 when the family moved permanently from London to Cornwall) followed by his first London exhibition at Redfern Gallery in October. Heron’s writings were admired by American art critic Clement Greenberg who sought him out in London in 1954. The friendship they formed eventually disintegrated when they disagreed as judges of the John Moores Prize Exhibition in 1965.

In April 1956 the family moved from London to Eagles Nest in west Cornwall, and in June he exhibited ‘Tachiste Garden Paintings’ at Redfern Gallery. The following year his first Stripe paintings were exhibited in a group exhibition at the Redfern Gallery Metavisual Tachiste Abstract (exhibition title invented by Delia Heron). Towards the end of the next decade Alan Bowness wrote: “I can think of few more disconcerting pictures shown in England in the last twenty years than Patrick Heron’s striped paintings of 1957.”

Fourteen Discs- Patrick Heron

Fourteen Discs- Patrick Heron

In 1958, he moved to Ben Nicholson’s former studio at Porthmeor, St Ives, and two years later he held his first exhibitions in New York at the Bertha Schaefer Gallery and at the newly arrived Waddington Galleries in London.”The American critical response was enthusiastic and perceptive. Dennison, in Arts (April 1960) was struck by the subtlety and richness of his colour and ….He was able to discern a crucial distinction ” Where Rothko arrives at an impersonal and yet lyrical grandeur, Heron develops a personal image..” ……For Stuart Preston of the new York Times, Heron was ‘ balancing [his specific, squarish shapes] in compositions of momentary equilibrium. Their state of suspended animation gives his pictures their extraordinary lightness despite the positive existence of his forms.’

He visited Australia in 1967 and 1973, exhibiting at the Bonython Gallery, Sydney. He delivered the Power lecture in Contemporary Art entitled The Shape of Colour. ”He wrote ‘There is no shape that is not conveyed to you by colour, and there is no colour that can present itself to you without involving shape. If there is no shape then the colour would be right across your retina’ “.

In 1978 he delivered the William Doty Lectures in Fine Arts at University of Texas in Austin entitled ‘The Colour of Colour’ coinciding with a

Patrick Heron

Patrick Heron

presentation of over 30 large canvases from the previous twelve years This was the culmination of the ‘wobbly hard-edge’ period, works filled with intense fields of unadulterated colour and spatial brushwork “with an immediacy of sensational impact … only possible in the actual relation of spectator to painting”.

On the same visit Patrick and Delia Heron were made honorary citizens of Texas by order of the Secretary of State.

“His last paintings were full-on, risky, filled with bright squiggles, painterly flurries and cartoon doodles. They should have been chaotic and absurd, but they were instead open and vital, eye-rocking and beautiful. Heron’s retrospective was ravishing, and had the vitality of a much younger artist.”

He continued painting until the day before he died. He died peacefully at his home in Zennor, Cornwall, on 20 March 1999 at the age of 79. He was survived by both his daughters, Katharine Heron, now an architect, and Susanna Heron, a sculptor.

On 24 May 2004, the Momart warehouse fire destroyed a number of Heron’s most important works.

Patrick Heron’s paintings are in public collections worldwide.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I really enjoyed painting this piece today.  I needed to get much done and had a strange emotional day because of therapy today and still need to get things done…so this piece was a nice distraction from the rest of my day. 🙂  I hope you enjoy this piece and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 129!  I have some challenging pieces coming up and hope I can do them!  Best, Linda

Different Blues, Lime, Orange, Black and White- Tribute to Patrick Heron Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Different Blues, Lime, Orange, Black and White- Tribute to Patrick Heron
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side- VIew Different Blues, Lime, Orange, Black and White- Tribute to Patrick Heron Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side- VIew
Different Blues, Lime, Orange, Black and White- Tribute to Patrick Heron
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Different Blues, Lime, Orange, Black and White- Tribute to Patrick Heron Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Different Blues, Lime, Orange, Black and White- Tribute to Patrick Heron
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Different Blues, Lime, Orange, Black and White- Tribute to Patrick Heron Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Different Blues, Lime, Orange, Black and White- Tribute to Patrick Heron
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Different Blues, Lime, Orange, Black and White- Tribute to Patrick Heron Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Different Blues, Lime, Orange, Black and White- Tribute to Patrick Heron
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 126- John McHale- The Future of the Future

It’s Day 126 and I was happy to do another collage style piece today!  I really like today’s artist.  If I’m feeling up to it, I’m going to keep painting my way through my art studio walls.  Thank god the ceiling is done.  Whew…not the fun kind of painting, but I can’t wait for the space to be bright, blue and beautiful.  Goodbye ugly creamy yellow!  Join me in celebrating John McHale today!

John McHale

John McHale

Head- John McHale

Head- John McHale

John McHale (born MaryhillGlasgow 1922, died Houston,Texas 1978) was an artist and sociologist. He was a founder member of the Institute of Contemporary Arts, and a founder of the Independent Group, which was a British movement that originated Pop Art which grew out of a fascination with American mass culture and post-WWII technologies.

According to McHale’s son, the term Pop Art was first coined by his father in 1954 in conversation

From John McHale book

From John McHale book

with Frank Cordell, although other sources credit its origin to the British critic Lawrence Alloway. Both versions agree that the term was in use in Independent Group discussions by mid-1955.

The critic Reyner Banham called John McHale the “scholar-artist, this ‘Father of Pop'”. Alloway in his Artforum article on “Pop art Since 1949” notes that “with reference to pop art that could be demonstrated […] John McHale made collages in 1955 out of the then-fresh postwar color printed American magazines.”

Machine Made America- John McHale

Machine Made America- John McHale

McHale’s works included fine arts, graphics, exhibition design, television, film and general consultancy to organisations in the US and Europe. He exhibited widely in Europe from 1950. He started as aConstructivist artist and then transitioned into his Pop art and proto Op art. With fellow members of the Independent Group, Richard Hamilton, Reyner Banham and Lawrence Alloway he organised the Growth and Form exhibition in 1951, inspired by the work of the scientist D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson.

Although it received no financial support from the government or the Festival Office it had an

Machine Made America II- John McHale

Machine Made America II- John McHale

agenda which was close to the official exhibitions of the Festival of Britain. McHale with Alloway curated a Collages and Objects exhibit at the ICA in 1954, where McHale first exhibited his formative Pop Art collages including the Transistor series, and his interactive gaming collage Why I Took To The Washers In Luxury Flats.

McHale was awarded a scholarship to study with Josef Albers at the Design Department of Yale University in August 1955, and returned to London in June 1956. John McHale participated in the 1956 exhibition This Is Tomorrow at the Whitechapel Art Gallery, where he supplied a good deal of the Pop Art visual material. (Projectors, gramophone motors, film posters and probably the juke box were supplied by Frank Cordell) Jeremy Hunt states in his article on ‘This Is Tomorrow’ that the exhibition Pop Art poster Just What Is It that Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing? is attributed to “Richard Hamilton based on a design by McHale.”According to Magda Cordell, “the material in that collage came from John McHale’s files.”

Why I Took To The Washers In Luxury Flats, 1954- John McHale

Why I Took To The Washers In Luxury Flats, 1954- John McHale

Born in Scotland, McHale was educated in the United Kingdom and the United States of America, with a PhD in Sociology. McHale published extensively in Europe and the US on the impact of technology and culture, mass communications and the future.

His numerous articles include “Gropius and the Bauhaus” in Art (1955), “Josef Albers”

John McHale, First Contact, collage on canvas, 1958. Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo

John McHale, First Contact, collage on canvas, 1958. Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo

and “Buckminster Fuller” in Architectural Review (1956), “The Expendable Ikon #1, #2” in Architectural Design (1959),”The Fine Arts and Mass Media” in Cambridge Opinion (17)(1959), “The Plastic Parthenon” in Macatre (1966) and “2000+” in Architectural Design (1967), “Telefutures: Prospective Observations” in The New Television: A Public/Private Art, MOMA (1977),”The Future of Art and Mass Culture”, Leonardo, (Vol.12, No.1, Winter,1979, pp59–64),”The Future and Function of Art”, ART News Feb 1973,pp24–28.

John McHale, Telemath, collage, ca. 1958

John McHale, Telemath, collage, ca. 1958

His books include The Future of the Future published by Braziller in 1968, The Ecological Context, also by Braziller, in 1970, World Facts and Trends published by Collier-MacMillan in 1972, and The Changing Information Environment published by Westview Press in 1972. McHale was a member of the Southern Illinois University Design Faculty. In the 1960s he was an Associate with Buckminster Fuller in the World Resources Inventory and in the World Design Science Decade Centre at Southern Illinois University Carbondale where he co-authored a number of the reports.

Biography is from wikipedia.

When I started my piece today, I didn’t have a message in mind.  Even when I got halfway through I still didn’t realize that there was a message in the piece…then I started seeing it!  Please enjoy my collage in tribute to John McHale today and I will see you tomorrow on day 127!  Only 239 paintings to go.  Yikes. 🙂  Best, Linda

What A Deal!- Tribute to John McHale Linda Cleary 2014 Collage Mixed Media on Canvas

What A Deal!- Tribute to John McHale
Linda Cleary 2014
Collage Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View What A Deal!- Tribute to John McHale Linda Cleary 2014 Collage Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View
What A Deal!- Tribute to John McHale
Linda Cleary 2014
Collage Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 What A Deal!- Tribute to John McHale Linda Cleary 2014 Collage Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
What A Deal!- Tribute to John McHale
Linda Cleary 2014
Collage Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 What A Deal!- Tribute to John McHale Linda Cleary 2014 Collage Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
What A Deal!- Tribute to John McHale
Linda Cleary 2014
Collage Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 What A Deal!- Tribute to John McHale Linda Cleary 2014 Collage Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
What A Deal!- Tribute to John McHale
Linda Cleary 2014
Collage Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 4 What A Deal!- Tribute to John McHale Linda Cleary 2014 Collage Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 4
What A Deal!- Tribute to John McHale
Linda Cleary 2014
Collage Mixed Media on Canvas

Day 120- Bob Law- Occasionally Romantic

It’s Day 120 and yes, it took me a while to realize that my artist that I’m doing today is named Bob Law…Blah blah…for you Arrested Development fans.  But, no…seriously, this Bob Law is not Scott Baio but a British minimalist artist (the founding father of British minimalism)!  Join me in honoring Bob Law today!  Oh and it’s freaking hot outside.

Bob Law

Bob Law

 

Bob Law

Bob Law

Bob Law (January 22, 1934 – April 17, 2004) was a founding father of British Minimalism concerning painting and sculpture. A prolific artist throughout his lifetime, Law struggled with ideas surrounding the legitimacy and significance of abstract art.

Law was born in Middlesex, England in 1934, and moved to St Ives in 1957 where he painted and

Bob Law

Bob Law

made pots. He had been particularly influenced by meetings with Peter Lanyon and Ben Nicholson in the late 1950s. In 1960 Bob Law moved away from Cornwall.

Bob Law’s artistic career started in the late 1950s when he moved to St.Ives. Inspired by the landscape, these seemingly simple outlines around the perimeter of the paper lead to a minimalist exploration of lines, shapes and forms. He was influenced in this direction by his discovery of the abstract paintings of Barnett Newman and Mark Rothko that he saw in 1959 at the Tate Gallery. Law then went on to make a series of black paintings out of different combinations of dark colours that were exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art Oxford in 1974.

Black Drawing 1272- Bob Law

Black Drawing 1272- Bob Law

He took up sculpture in the 1970s, which extended and expanded his oeuvre.

Double Cross 2000 Bob Law 1934-2004 Purchased 2004 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/P78908

Double Cross 2000 Bob Law 1934-2004 Purchased 2004 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/P78908

He returned to live in the west of Cornwall in 1997 and died in April 2004.

2009 saw the publication of Bob Law: A Retrospective by Ridinghouse, a comprehensive monograph that introduces the artist, his history and his work. This publication brings together the largest group of paintings, drawings and sculpture by Bob Law to date. In addition to 300 images, 6 texts present different moments and themes in Law’s work. Anna Lovatt explores the role of drawing throughout; Jo Melvin introduces pivotal exhibitions during the 1960s and 70s; Anthony Bond provides an overview of the work and its relationship to art history and

Cross & Broken Double Cross- Bob Law

Cross & Broken Double Cross- Bob Law

David Batchelor revisits his 1999 essay which describes visual and conceptual themes throughout Law’s work. Richard Cork’s 1974 interview with Bob Law as well as Giuseppe Panza’s recollection of the artists are both reproduced in this volume.

Biography is from wikipedia.

Drawing 24.4.60 1960 Bob Law 1934-2004 Purchased 1973 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T01774

Drawing 24.4.60 1960 Bob Law 1934-2004 Purchased 1973 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T01774

Read a great article by Richard Saltoun and Karsten Schubert on Bob Law here at artcornwall.org.  Here’s an excerpt.

Bob Law takes up a special place in the memories of people who knew him. To write about him is not an easy task; he was in turn affectionate and brutal, sincere and treacherous, matter-of-fact and occasionally romantic. He instilled a particular brand of loyalty and affection in his friends, a feeling that remains. He was arguably the foremost British minimalist artist of the 1970s, yet somehow he has become almost forgotten – written out of the narratives of postwar art, whether British or international. What makes this puzzling is the fact that – the quality of the work aside – once Law had received critical attention in the early 1960s, he seems to have had all the opportunities to sustain his art and career. By the standards of his time, he had a stellar cast of supporters.

He was exhibited at Konrad Fischer and the Lisson Gallery, collected by Alan Power and Giuseppe Panza and, in 1977, was the subject of a

Drawing 25.4.60 1960 Bob Law 1934-2004 Purchased 1973 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T01775

Drawing 25.4.60 1960 Bob Law 1934-2004 Purchased 1973 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T01775

major Whitechapel retrospective curated by Nicholas Serota and Sandy Nairne. It was a tiny yet influential group, but the art world was a tiny place. Financially it did not amount to much more than subsistence but this was an art world before money. With all this he should have achieved stability but he did not.

Bob Law

Bob Law

I hope you enjoy today’s art piece.  I’m not calling it a painting since I did it all in pencil!  It was an interesting piece to work on.  Very meditative and nice to work with a different medium.  I feel like I’m constantly gaining new respect for the artists in this genre and time.  Well, I’m off to sweat and do some things before my improv show tonight.  Enjoy and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 121!  Best, Linda

30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law Linda Cleary 2014 Graphite on Canvas

30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law
Linda Cleary 2014
Graphite on Canvas

Side-View 30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law Linda Cleary 2014 Graphite on Canvas

Side-View
30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law
Linda Cleary 2014
Graphite on Canvas

Close-Up 1 30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law Linda Cleary 2014 Graphite on Canvas

Close-Up 1
30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law
Linda Cleary 2014
Graphite on Canvas

Close-Up 2 30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law Linda Cleary 2014 Graphite on Canvas

Close-Up 2
30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law
Linda Cleary 2014
Graphite on Canvas

Close-Up 3 30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law Linda Cleary 2014 Graphite on Canvas

Close-Up 3
30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law
Linda Cleary 2014
Graphite on Canvas

Close-Up 4 30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law Linda Cleary 2014 Graphite on Canvas

Close-Up 4
30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law
Linda Cleary 2014
Graphite on Canvas