Day 252- Bram Bogart- “Building” Paintings

It’s Day 252 and I had a ton of fun with today’s piece.  I was really intrigued by today’s artist.  I hope you are too!  Join me in honoring Bram Bogart today. 🙂  I am attaching his obituary from The Guardian because I thought it included a good biography and expressed his work well.

Bram Bogart

Bram Bogart

Bram Bogart “Day Break”, 1997, 93″ x 74″

Bram Bogart “Day Break”, 1997, 93″ x 74″

The Dutch-born Belgian artist Bram Bogart, who has died aged 90, had ambitions to be an artist from a young age. But his father wanted the boy to follow him in becoming a blacksmith, or at least go into a trade where he would work with his hands. As a compromise, his parents sent him at 12 to a technical school to learn to be a painter and decorator, and in the evening he did a correspondence course in drawing.

After a spell of house painting, Bogart joined a Rotterdam advertising agency in 1937 as a

Bram Bogart

Bram Bogart

commercial artist, painting among other subjects portraits of the child star Shirley Temple, before quitting to launch his career in fine art in 1939. Despite the subterfuge needed to avoid forced labour for the German army during the second world war, he managed to produce a sequence of sombre and undeniably Dutch landscapes, solid, low-keyed and with low horizons.

Soon after liberation in 1945, he made a dull portrait of himself with a brush in one hand and the regulation-issue oval palette for wannabe artists in the other. He filled the leftover space behind him with a wall, and it is the wall that holds the attention, with its real wall-like feeling, rough-textured, solid; this and the hands, the hands of a Van Gogh potato eater, of a workman, just what his father had wanted for him.

Bram Bogart- Installation View

Bram Bogart- Installation View

This sense in his work of the tangible, a coming together of his first job painting houses and his implacably wall-like landscapes, lasted throughout Bogart’s lifetime, through to the overwhelming presence of his celebrated late paintings, glowing blocks constructed, quite literally, out of great globs of pigment mixed with cement. Abstract, yes; expressionist, yes; but not abstract expressionist. He was not interested in gestural painting, brushed or poured from cans, not in his mature work anyway. His concern was building paintings.

Bogart was born in Delft, where he spent the last year of the war in hiding. His

JAUNE-BLEU- Bram Bogart

JAUNE-BLEU- Bram Bogart

father bestowed his own name, Abraham van den Boogaart, on his son. It was a 1950s Parisian gallery owner who suggested the switch to Bram Bogart. Liberation for Bogart had meant Paris, and he was one of a number of hungry artists at the end of the war who saw arrival in France as a date with destiny. There, he began life anew by absorbing the discoveries of cubism in organising pictorial space to dispel the leftover space of his early work.

Bram BogartBram Bogart: Ommegang de Bruxelles (the historical pageant held in Brussels every summer, 1998, mixed media on board). Photograph: Bernard Jacobson Gallery

Between 1946 and 1950 he shuttled between Paris and Le Cannet on the Côte d’Azur, and then settled in Paris for almost a decade, painting often in monochrome like Jean Dubuffet, some of the canvases worked edge to edge with figures suggestive of the then recently discovered drawings of the Lascaux cavemen.

In 1957 he showed for the first time in the UK, as part of an Arts Council touring exhibition, and held his own among a group that

Bram Bogart

Bram Bogart

included Dubuffet, the Canadian abstract expressionist Jean-Paul Riopelle, the French tachiste Pierre Soulages, and Karel Appel, Bogart’s compatriot and a member of the Cobra group (Copenhagen, Brussels, Amsterdam). In 1958 Bogart had his first solo show in London, at the Gimpel Fils gallery, of canvases that were, the Times critic remarked, both sensuous and with the quality of rock faces.

Bogart got on with Appel and his Cobra associates but fell out with the Dutch cultural establishment over what he perceived as its obsession with Cobra at the expense of any other style. It may not have been coincidence that in 1960 he moved to Belgium, first to Brussels, then for the rest of his life to Ohain, in the province of Walloon Brabant. He took Belgian citizenship in 1969.

During these years, he laid on pigment and cement mixture so thickly that he had

Bram Bogart

Bram Bogart

to arrange for metal stretchers to bear the weight of his work. Bogart’s art entered collections all over Europe and he had shows at galleries including the Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam, the Guggenheim in New York and the Louvre and Pompidou Centre in Paris.

Rozerouge, 2007- Bram Bogart

Rozerouge, 2007- Bram Bogart

No public gallery in Britain picked up on him but there were several exhibitions in London over the years, culminating in two shows at Bernard Jacobson in Mayfair, in 2007 and 2009, showing late paintings of great beauty. The early drawing lessons paid off too. At the end of his life he was said to be still able, like Giotto, to draw a perfect circle, freehand.

Bogart is survived by his wife, Leni, whom he married in 1958, and their children, Cornelia, Inge and Bram.

• Bram Bogart (Abraham van den Boogaart), artist, born 12 July 1921; died 2 May 2012

~

I hope you enjoy my piece in honor of Bram Bogart today!  I really enjoyed playing with other materials.  I used spackle and paint with this one.  It was so much fun slathering all that paste on the canvas and mixing the paint etc.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 253.

Best,

Linda

Green & Red- Tribute to Bram Bogart Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Green & Red- Tribute to Bram Bogart
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View Green & Red- Tribute to Bram Bogart Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View
Green & Red- Tribute to Bram Bogart
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Green & Red- Tribute to Bram Bogart Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Green & Red- Tribute to Bram Bogart
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-up 2 Green & Red- Tribute to Bram Bogart Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-up 2
Green & Red- Tribute to Bram Bogart
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Green & Red- Tribute to Bram Bogart Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Green & Red- Tribute to Bram Bogart
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Day 251- Anthony Miler- “Words in Backwards Out Come Thoughts Sometimes”

It’s Day 251 and I really enjoyed today’s piece.  I found today’s artist on artsy.net a while back and really liked his work.  He is also close to my age which I found appealing as well.  I like the idea of promoting new artists.  Join me in honoring Anthony Miler today!  I pasted an article from Natalie Kates Projects below.  I will also put the link under the interview as well.

Anthony Miler- from Natalie Kates Project website

Anthony Miler- from Natalie Kates Project website

untitled (hill sitting) graphite, ink, marker, spraypaint, acrylic on paper- Anthony Miler

untitled (hill sitting) graphite, ink, marker, spraypaint, acrylic on paper- Anthony Miler

Anthony Miler

American, born 1982

Anthony Miler Artist Statement: “words in backwards out come thoughts sometimes”

Natalie:  Anthony where are you from?

Anthony: I was born in Toledo, Ohio, a small industrial city, and I lived there until I was probably five years old when my mother and I moved to a little town called Adrian, in south Michigan.

Natalie: And when did you come to NY?

Anthony: I came to New York 8 years ago for graduate school. I realized when I studied abroad in London how open with possibility a big city, so I needed to get to New York as soon as possible.

Natalie: Did you go to an art school, and did you go to school to become an artist?

Anthony: Ok, I did go to art school. Undergraduate was a liberal art school focusing on many

Anthony Miler

Anthony Miler

disciplines, not specifically art, but they did have a good art program, For graduate school I went to City College of new York, one of the CUNY schools. It was an MFA in painting.

Natalie: Was there any point in your life that you realized “I wanna be an artist”, and if yes, when was that, can you tell me a little bit about that?

Lemon- Anthony Miler

Lemon- Anthony Miler

Anthony: I’m not sure if there was a decision that was made, When I was a kid I was always drawing because that was available for free –I grew up as an only child and my mom had to work a lot so I just drew. My grandmother would bring stacks of paper home from the factory  she worked in, they were lined on one side and blank on the other. This was the time I was learning to write in school but I never wanted to do that, I just flipped the lined paper over and drew on the blank back. Because I was good at rendering kids in school would say “Oh, you should be an artist” and I did not know what that meant, I didn’t know that was a possibility, I didn’t know that existed. I had no idea what they were talking about.

Natalie: What was the first museum you’ve ever went to?

Anthony: The Toledo Museum of Art. They have a pretty decent collection.

Natalie: What is your earliest recollection of a piece of art? I mean, for me, growing up in Texas, I think my earliest recollection probably was the Mona Lisa. Can you remember a significant piece as a young child?

Anthony: I guess not, it’s confusing because I’ve got memory all wrapped up with current ideas about art. What I was attracted to when I was

Untitled (Bather)- Anthony Miler

Untitled (Bather)- Anthony Miler

young was comics and I would say that’s an art form that was early on for me. But, a piece of art, I don’t have any memory. I’m actually satisfied not having any early memory of art.

Natalie: In your studio, it looks like you have mockups of puppets made out of cardboard, you work on paper, you work on canvas, and you use a lot of different media. Could you define your style? Would you call it abstract, new abstract, post abstract, would you have a definition for the style of art that you do?

Yello Giatto Woman- Anthony Miler

Yello Giatto Woman- Anthony Miler

Anthony: I shy away from trying to define too much of what I’m doing with language. It’s not born in language, and besides that’s someone else’s value to add. I do relate to historical groups, a main one being COBRA. That group of artists speak to me a lot. I also think about Art Brut, and if i have to entertain the idea of a term, maybe I like an idea of Neo-Brut. I feel like we’re reaching a moment of being ripe for this type of work again. It’s the opposite of all of these industrial production values, surface shine, and dehumanizing algorithms. I can’t help but

Window Licker- Anthony Miler

Window Licker- Anthony Miler

notice that the museum of Art Fort Lauderdale currently has a COBRA exhibition running. It’s exciting to see the seeds of this raw kind of work coming around again, especially in the states.

Natalie: Anthony, can you take us through the process of conception to fully realizing the art piece?

Anthony: Well, the process is very organic, there is often not a study, although sometimes there is, and there is not really a recipe that makes me decide whether or not to use a study or to make studies beforehand. Mainly there isn’t a set system, but the imagery that’s generated still exists in the same family, and it’s a drawing heavy process. I use a wide range of media. From traditional media that’s used in non-traditional ways, or non-traditional media that’s forced into traditional applications,

Untitled Pony- Anthony Miler

Untitled Pony- Anthony Miler

and any mix of these. And so sometimes there will be nice oil paint on top of which I’ve used, industrial markers, sort of defiling the paint, and then often on a canvas painting there will be paper collaged in and then painted over again. It’s organic so its freeing, and more about discovery. I do consider it all to be painting.

Natalie: Most of your works to me look like portraits. Is there a reason for that?

Anthony: When there is a face and an expression it’s a quick and strong way to get a visceral dialogue. And it’s not tied to artifice or something that’s academic or disconnectedly conceptual. It’s very psychological and emotive, it looks back at you.

Natalie: And how quickly do you draw your pieces, like the nine black and whites that are hanging in your studio now? How quickly do you draw each one of them, is it something that happens quickly or is it something that you think about?

Anthony: It’s hard to say because they came out of many similar drawings in order to build into these nine, but now, these take one sheet of paper, one piece of charcoal, that’s pretty much the equasion. It sort of melts pretty quickly, so one piece is used per drawing, and probably in between five or ten minutes. But then what happens besides the physical act of drawing is some may be deemed finished after hanging out for a while, some will

Untitled (Smileyes 8)- Anthony Miler

Untitled (Smileyes 8)- Anthony Miler

end up as fodder on the floor possibly to be reworked later. Sometimes it takes many months to decide something is complete when it was actually done in a few minutes. Because it takes a lot of time to clear your head of your own prejudices and expectations to realize something’s already operating quite effectively. Speed is important in another way, in drawing these the faces of these nine the smile goes directly into the eyes, so there’s an economy of means, an economy of line.

Natalie: I interview a lot of young artists, a lot of established artists, and I find it interesting, we spoke a little bit about it, about the whole gallery scene and being represented by gallery or not being represented by gallery. I find it more and more that young artists are not seeking gallery representation. Do you think the gallery still plays an important role in the artists career?

Anthony: I do, I think that every artist has a group of galleries they would like to show at and that they think are appropriate for their work, and the people that show there are what they consider their peers and they want to be associated with that group and want to be presented in that context. I feel like I am 100% a painter and I feel like I am adding to the long conversation of painting. And there are some galleries that show a certain type of painting that are a similar family to mine, and I think that, yes, being associated with those galleries would be great, and would be immensely helpful in presenting and contextualizing my work. But at the same time, I do think young artists are trying to show around a lot because that’s where they’re building their audience. If they get locked in somewhere early, other places aren’t as likely to show them, because then it’s about sharing money or something  like that. That’s my impression anyway.

Untitled (Orange Cones)- Anthony Miler

Untitled (Orange Cones)- Anthony Miler

Natalie: You live and work in your studio, it is live-work space, so is it hard to be disciplined to be an artist, cause I know if I worked and lived in my space I’d probably wanna watch TV and drink coffee all day long. My question is, do you spend a lot of time creating or is it something that you have to force yourself to do?

Anthony: It is not something I have to force myself to do, I have to force myself to do the other things, to remember to pay my bills, to get out in the fresh air, to go to openings, to look up things that people tell me I should look up… I lived in situations where my studio was separate and I would still always be at the studio, there was an inconvenience in travelling there. And I knew that for me, this would allow me to be as obsessive as I want to be.

Natalie: Spoken like the true artist! Do you prefer working on paper, on canvas, on cardboard, do you have a preference?

Anthony: I don’t have a strict preference, I work on paper most often because I can buy hundreds of sheets at a time and it’s always ready to go. I’d like to work on canvas more but its costly in many ways. When ever I scale up I prefer canvas. And these days I’m more often inclined to paint larger.

Natalie: I like to ask some silly questions too. One of them is: what is currently on your iPod playlist?

Anthony: Oh, it’s not a silly question, it’s John Maus. I am obsessively listening to John Maus, and I have been for probably almost a year. Usually it’s more of a variety.

Natalie: And what do you think about the city bikes?

Anthony: I don’t have an opinion about them actually. I don’t care, you know, it’s like how I approach news, I just can’t care.

Natalie: If you could collaborate with a living artist, who would it be?

Anthony: I feel like it would be most interesting to collaborate with someone who wasn’t working in the same media as I am, so we could each have something distinct that we’re bringing that would force the project to have its own life. Maybe some type of designer or an architect. I’m not entirely sure what my work looks like to an outside observer, but for me there is a concise and deep cutting politics behind it, and one thing that has been a fantasy of mine in the past is making work specifically for a place. Look at José Clemente Orozco. Look at the UN, or courtrooms where laws are made. I don’t exactly trust that these places are more functional than theatrical, but at least they are theatrically functional. -(smiling)-

Natalie: Beautiful! You are so interesting, and your work is incredible. I love it, I’m a huge fan. If somebody were reading this interview and

Untitled (BB)- Anthony Miler

Untitled (BB)- Anthony Miler

wanted to set up a studio visit or possibly purchase something, what would be the best way to get a hold of you?

Anthony:  www.anthonymiler.blogspot.com

Natalie Kates:  What are some of your upcoming projects?

Anthony Miler: Currently I’m in an interesting group show at Ziehersmith Gallery in New York titled ‘Hope Despite The Times’. It’s a sharply curated yet eclectic show, bringing together well respected painter Katherine Bradford, with myself an emerging painter. And a wider polemic of a pair: Bulgarian artist Mina Minov from one side of the globe doing performative sculpture, all the way to a man in California who was making semi-pornographic drawings while in prison in the ’90’s. So yeah, a wide pool, but a focused vision.

I also just participated in Art Basel Miami Beach where my work was exhibited by Waterhouse & Dodd at PULSE Miami. The work was really well received there and it looks like a few new projects may come out of it. Also in process is an interview with Istanbul art magazine Sanat Dünyamız, which I’m quite excited about it as it looks like it’s going to be a pretty sizable introduction. Finally I’ll be heading to Philadelphia in early January for a show I’m included in at Space 1026 titled “Deep Fun,” curated by Austin English.  So, moderately busy for the moment I guess, also working on a project for March that I can’t speak the details of yet but definitely can be on the radar for anyone looking to see a show in Greenpoint, Brooklyn

Natalie: Then my last question would be, what are some words you would use to describe your works?

Anthony: I guess, in a denotative way, just stating what’s there, it’s aggressive and visceral painting, and used aggressive mark-making, and it’s drawing heavy. It’s very organic and human. It’s loose and engages the entire body.

In a more connotative sense, something that’s more subjective, the work is very emotive and psychological, and that’s something I enjoy about it and drives me to continue to pursue it. These things have grown over the years in this visual language and will probably simply continue its organic life.

Natalie: Beautiful, thank you!

Interview is from Natalie Kates Projects. Photos of art from Anthony Miler’s website.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today and I will see you tomorrow on Day 252.  I hope I captured his style!

Best,

Linda

Horns- Tribute to Anthony Miler Linda Cleary 2014 Graphite & Acrylic on Canvas

Horns- Tribute to Anthony Miler
Linda Cleary 2014
Graphite & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Horns- Tribute to Anthony Miler Linda Cleary 2014 Graphite & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Horns- Tribute to Anthony Miler
Linda Cleary 2014
Graphite & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Horns- Tribute to Anthony Miler Linda Cleary 2014 Graphite & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Horns- Tribute to Anthony Miler
Linda Cleary 2014
Graphite & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Horns- Tribute to Anthony Miler Linda Cleary 2014 Graphite & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Horns- Tribute to Anthony Miler
Linda Cleary 2014
Graphite & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Horns- Tribute to Anthony Miler Linda Cleary 2014 Graphite & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Horns- Tribute to Anthony Miler
Linda Cleary 2014
Graphite & Acrylic on Canvas

 

 

Day 250- Pierre Silvin- Beings From Another World

It’s Day 250 and I’ve been very excited to do today’s artist.  He is a friend and colleague of Gerard Sendrey who I paid tribute to on Day 165 (click on his name to visit that page).  He connected me to some other artists and I love their work.  Pierre wrote me and sent me information and I absolutely love his style!  It was hard to emulate, but I hope I captured his spirit and that he likes my tribute!  Join me in honoring Pierre Silvin today!  I had to translate his biography from French so please excuse any weird grammar. 😉

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin

Silvin Pierre was born in 1959 in Talence.

Without learning, he always painted or drawn, more or less, depending on the time of his life. It was at the

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin

age of thirty five years he deliberately plunged into the path of dedicating itself to creating a more consistent production.

He uses pencil, gouache and colored pencil on paper playing with layering effects and transparencies. Located on a corner table in the kitchen or the living room, under the watchful eye of his family who stirs around him, Pierre Silvin gives birth to beings from another world.

These strange forms, full origins are shrouded in a lunar light and sometimes surrounded by animals, boats, bicycles. Women on the necks of giraffes and powerful busts like trunks of mangrove, entwine their arms in arabesque their offspring. In this world of quiet tenderness, time hangs as to immobilize the creative moment that provides so much gratification that creator discreet.

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin resides Léogeats in Gironde. Exhibited in France, but also in the United States, Spain and more recently in Croatia and Russia, his work is included in numerous collections including that of the New Invention of Lausanne.

His work is rooted in his everyday life. He represents persons, objects that away, assembles, superimposed.

Like life, we met new people, we embark on new adventures, and can surprise us by happy

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin

meetings, Pierre Silvin built its high color images! As if he wanted to show us a compendium of life, a sample of times when everything is mixed: faces, animals, colors, materials. His characters or animals and colorful multitude of sizes and shapes are represented with boldness and spontaneity.

Would -this to mean that we all need each other? The originality, creativity and curiosity to discover new art forms should be a necessity, a need? That create

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin

envy is always one step closer to new horizons to explore, to discover, tame, because having desire is also to be -Life, and this life, you have to chew, devour the tame.

His work has been involved since 1997 in various group and solo exhibitions in France but also in various countries including the United States, Russia, Japan …

Biography is from the artist himself and from The Musee Creation Franche website.

I hope you enjoy my piece in honor of this wonderful artist.  I feel like I could’ve done better with highlights and layering.  I tried to use the same materials, but I don’t have any gouache so I used watered down acrylics.  I feel like there’s a lack of luminosity that Pierre has in his pieces.  I also feel like his pieces are softer than mine turned out.  I had a great time painting and attempting his style!  I definitely learned a lot while painting this piece.  Thank you Pierre for being the inspiration to today’s piece!

I will see you tomorrow on Day 251!

Best,

Linda

SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Side-View SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Side-View
SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Close-Up 1 SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Close-Up 1
SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Close-Up 2 SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Close-Up 2
SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Close-Up 3 SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Close-Up 3
SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

 

Day 248- Donald Baechler- Childhood

It’s Day 248 and I’ve had a weird emotional day.  That’s fine though!  It’s good to feel feelings. 🙂  I also keep feeling that either my allergies are going crazy or I’m coming down with a cold or something.  I probably just need to relax my brain.  I did have a really fun time working on my piece today.  I was really inspired by today’s artist.  Join me in honoring Donald Baechler today.

Donald Baechler

Donald Baechler

Donald Baechler

Donald Baechler

Donald Baechler (born 1956 in Hartford, Connecticut) is an American artist. He attended the Maryland Institute College of Art from 1974–77, and Cooper Union from 1977-78. Dissatisfied with New York City, he proceeded to the Staatliche Hochschule fuer Bildende Künste Städelschule in Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

“At Cooper Union I met some German exchange students. This was 1977, and I found the whole scene at the school to be white and boring, to be honest. It wasn’t what I wanted out of art school or what I wanted out of being in New York. The most

6 Flowers- Donald Baechler

6 Flowers- Donald Baechler

interesting minds, the most interesting talents and energy came from those German kids. And they said, ‘Why don’t you come to Germany?’ The easiest school to get into was the one attached to the Frankfurt Museum. The entrance requirements were less strict, so I went with it and spent a year in Frankfurt. They were very generous.”

Flowers and Boys- Donald Baechler

Flowers and Boys- Donald Baechler

Baechler returned to New York City in 1980, where he was soon a part of a burgeoning Lower Manhattan arts scene, showing in the East Village and exhibition spaces such as Artists Space and the Drawing Center. Baechler and Tony Shafrazi struck up an acquaintance over a shared interest in artist Joseph Kosuth. Shafrazi was developing an interest in graffiti-oriented works, and founded a downtown gallery that represented Baechler, Keith Haring, Kenny Scharf and eventually Jean-Michel Basquiat. In a 2000 interview, Baechler said:

Tony obviously had some grander vision about what was going on and decided that it wasn’t the end of conceptualism, but the beginning of something else. I never felt entirely comfortable showing my work there because it had nothing to do with what Keith and Kenny Scharf were doing. I wasn’t part of this downtown club scene, and I had nothing to do with so-called graffiti art … I always used to tell people, ‘I’m an abstract artist before anything else,’ For me, it’s always been more about line, form, balance and the edge of the canvas—all these silly formalist concerns—than it has been about subject matter or narrative or politics.

Baechler’s early work was noted for childlike imagery and thematics—associations which have

Donald Baechler

Donald Baechler

recurred throughout his career. “Like Art Brut,” wrote Steven Vincent in Art in America, “Donald Baechler’s seemingly ingenuous depictions of everyday objects and simple figures succeed in large part by tapping into our nostalgia for childhood, that period of life before the rivening onset of self-consciousness and guilt. It’s a myth, of course: children are hardly angelic, and alienation is the state of humanity—while Beachler’s art works hard to achieve its trademark appearance of prelapsarian sincerity and artlessness.”

Donald Baechler

Donald Baechler

Baechler’s source material draws broadly on classical art history, the New York School, contemporary art, folk art, outsider art, pop culture and childhood.  Grace Glueck of the New York Times noted “echoes of Rauschenberg, Warhol, Lichtenstein,” while Edward Leffingwell of Art in America characterized Baechler’s approach as “some strange and uncompromising posture out of Otterness and Rodin.”

Holland Cotter of the New York Times described a 1993 exhibition at Sperone Westwater Gallery: “Mr. Baechler jams together pages from children’s copy books, maps of Africa and Europe, sketches of toys (beach balls, building blocks) and the reiterated form—emphatic and phallic—of an upheld thumb. In one drawing several thumbs fill the inside of an outlined head, perhaps giving a clue to the darker undercurrents in Mr. Baechler’s work as a whole. Art, like play, he seems to suggest, is just a method for keeping chaos at bay, and these days even the best-behaved child knows he’s under somebody’s thumb.” Playing cars, fortune cookies, a ceramic onion, flowers, ice-cream cones, even a visual play on Mr. Bill of Saturday Night Live, little escapes Baechler’s image bank, which is a literal collection.

“I hold onto absolutely everything,” said the artist. “I would guess out of every thousand images I save, I probably use one or two. I’ve never

Large Abstract Composition with Standing Woman- Donald Baechler

Large Abstract Composition with Standing Woman- Donald Baechler

actually counted. I save images in many different forms; I save them in endless file cabinets. I have slide binders with thousands and thousands of slides that I work from. But most of the things I photograph never find their way into a painting; and most of the things I save and catalog and photocopy never really find their way into a work. It’s necessary to accumulate all of these things to get to the point of what’s important.”

Widely regarded as a painter, Baechler’s three-dimensional work has been correlated to the sculptural works of Roy Lichtenstein, Alex Katz and Carroll Dunham. Baechler has long experimented with a variety of forms and materials, always maintaining what has been dubbed his “gee-whiz approach.” Alex Hawgood, in a 2008 New York Times profile, summarized: “Baechler … is known for his sunny, multimedia work that explores the language of cultural symbols.”

Donald Baechler

Donald Baechler

But Baechler’s “animated, engaging and … beautifully made” images are not without sentiment. “Baechler,” wrote Edward Leffingwell of Art in America, “scatters his surfaces with the detritus of childhood, portraying the adult today through the images of a past not quite left behind.” And neither is Baechler outside the purview of art history. New York Times critic Holland Cotter remarked of Baechler: “At this very moment, some industrious doctoral student somewhere is documenting how thoroughly images of childhood have pervaded art of the late 1980’s and early 90’s. The images aren’t chiefly those of adolescence, as was the case with Pop Art in the 60’s, but of infancy.”

The restaurant Caravaggio on the Upper East Side of Manhattan exhibits two paintings and a sculpture by Baechler.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  Most of my time was spent on the background images.  I had a good time building my own story (in a sense)…I will see you tomorrow on Day 249!

Best,

Linda

Childhood- Tribute to Donald Baechler Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Childhood- Tribute to Donald Baechler
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View Childhood- Tribute to Donald Baechler Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View
Childhood- Tribute to Donald Baechler
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Childhood- Tribute to Donald Baechler Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Childhood- Tribute to Donald Baechler
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Childhood- Tribute to Donald Baechler Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Childhood- Tribute to Donald Baechler
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Childhood- Tribute to Donald Baechler Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Childhood- Tribute to Donald Baechler
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Day 224- Thornton Dial- The Hard Truth

It’s Day 224 and today’s piece is an example of an artwork that I would’ve never done if I wasn’t inspired by today’s artist! I had so much fun doing today’s tribute. Join me in honoring Thornton Dial today.

Thornton Dial

Thornton Dial

Beginning of Life in Yellow Jungle- Thornton Dial

Beginning of Life in Yellow Jungle- Thornton Dial

Thornton Dial was born in 1928 in Emelle, Alabama. Dial is a self-taught artist who came to prominence in the United States in the late 1980s.

Thornton Dial was born to Mattie Bell in 1928 in Emelle, Alabama. He lived with his mother until he was around three when Dial and his half-brother Arthur moved in with their second cousin, Buddy Jake Dial, who was a farmer. When Thornton moved in with Buddy Jake, he farmed and learned about the

Close Up- Beginning of Life in Yellow Jungle- Thornton Dial

Close Up- Beginning of Life in Yellow Jungle- Thornton Dial

sculptures that Buddy Jake made from items lying around the yard, an experience that greatly influenced him. Dial grew up in poverty and without the presence of his father. This poverty led him and his siblings to create toys from the discarded objects around them.

Thornton Dial Close up of mixed media piece

Thornton Dial
Close up of mixed media piece

In 1940, Dial moved to Bessemer, Alabama. When he arrived in Bessemer, he noticed the art along the way in people’s yard and was amazed at the level of craft exhibited. He married Clara Mae Murrow in 1951. They have five children, one of which died of cerebral palsy. He was cousins with the late artist Ronald Lockett.

His principal place of employment was the Pullman Company in Bessemer, Alabama, until the company closed its doors in 1981. After the Pullman factory shut down, Dial began to dedicate himself to his art for his own pleasure. In 1987, he was introduced to Bill Arnett, a local art collector of great influence who brought Dial’s work to public attention.

In a 1997 profile about Dial, the New York

Thornton Dial

Thornton Dial

Times mentions a show entitled “Bearing Witness: African-American Vernacular Art of the South.” In the article, Dial is described as an artist who “can barely read and write” but who friends describe as “smart as a fox” and good at math, with an ability to accurately estimate the size of a canvas by eye”.

Dial has lived, worked, and created art in Alabama for his entire life. He continues to create works of art and shows them throughout the United States.

Thornton Dial met another self-taught artist Lonnie Holley, who introduced Dial to Atlanta collector and art historian William Arnett. Arnett, who focuses on African-American vernacular art and artists, brought Dial’s

Drummond Mines The Strip Mining Business- Thornton Dial

Drummond Mines The Strip Mining Business- Thornton Dial

work to national prominence. The art historian has also brought Lonnie Holley, the Gee’s Bend Quilters and others to the attention of the United States. Arnett also helped to create the Tinwood publishing company in 1996, along with his sons Paul and Matt.

Dial’s work addresses urgent issues in the realm of history and politics in the United States, such as war, racism, bigotry and homelessness. He constructs large-scale assemblages using cast-away objects, anything from rope to bones to buckets. Some of his compositions are delicate drawings whilst others are dramatic and dark paintings which tend to be large-scale with strong use of colour and fluid forms. Combining paint and found materials Dial weaves together an interpretation of history and politics in the United States. David C. Driskell, an artist and art historian of African American art, points to one of Dial’s symbolic creatures, the tiger. The Tiger represents the struggle to survive through difficult events and eventually the tiger symbolizes the African American struggle to obtain equal rights in the United States.

In 2011, Dial’s work was profiled in a four-page story in Time Magazine, where art and architecture

DON'T MATTER HOW RAGGLY THE FLAG, IT STILL GOT TO TIE US TOGETHER Thornton Dial

DON’T MATTER HOW RAGGLY THE FLAG, IT STILL GOT TO TIE US TOGETHER
Thornton Dial

critic Richard Lacayo argued that Dial’s work belongs to the category of art and should not be pigeon-holed into narrowly defined categories:

“Dial’s work has sometimes been described as “outsider art”, a term that attempts to cover the product of everyone from naive painters like Grandma Moses to institutionalized lost souls like Martín Ramírez and full-bore obsessives like Henry Darger, the Chicago janitor who spent a lifetime secretly producing a private fantasia of little girls in peril. But if there’s one lesson to take away from “Hard Truths: The Art of Thornton Dial,” a triumphant new retrospective at the Indianapolis Museum of Art, it’s that Dial, 82, doesn’t belong within even the broad confines of that category….What he does can be discussed as art, just art, no surplus notions of outsiderness required….And not just that, but some of the most assured, delightful and powerful art around.”

Thornton Dial with Arnett in front of one of Dial's assemblages.

Thornton Dial with Arnett in front of one of Dial’s assemblages.

Michael Kimmelman, from the New York Times, called Dial “preternaturally gifted,” and said he looks “dumfoundingly adept to some of us because his energy and fluent line, abstracted in maelstroms of color, easily call to mind Pollock and de Kooning,” while New York Times reporter Carol Kino described Dial’s “work’s look, ambition, and obvious intellectual reach hew[ing] closely to that of many other modern and contemporary masters, from Jackson Pollock and Robert Rauschenberg to Jean-Michel Basquiat.”

In 1993, Dial’s work was the subject of a large exhibition that was presented simultaneously at the New Museum of Contemporary Art and the American Folk Art Museum in New York. In 2000, the artist’s work was included in the Whitney Biennial, and in 2005-06, the Museum of Fine Art; Houston presented a major exhibition entitled “Thornton Dial in the 21st Century”. Dial’s works can be found in many notable public and private collections, including those of, among other institutions, the High Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; the American Folk Art Museum, New York; the Philadelphia Museum of Art; The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C.; the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington D.C.; and the Indianapolis Museum of Art.

Biography is from wikipedia.

Getting everything onto the canvas!  It was a challenge!

Getting everything onto the canvas! It was a challenge!

I hope you enjoy my piece in honor of Mr. Dial today.  It was a joy to work with all these strange materials and a challenge on how to assemble it and actually get it onto the canvas.  I used a doll, a small plastic baby figure, sticks, sand, rocks, hot glue, feathers and leaves. After getting it onto the canvas I primed it with white spray and then painted it.  Whew!

I will see you tomorrow on Day 225! 

Best, Linda

We Are All Children of the Earth- Tribute to Thornton Dial Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

We Are All Children of the Earth- Tribute to Thornton Dial
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View We Are All Children of the Earth- Tribute to Thornton Dial Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View
We Are All Children of the Earth- Tribute to Thornton Dial
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 We Are All Children of the Earth- Tribute to Thornton Dial Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
We Are All Children of the Earth- Tribute to Thornton Dial
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 We Are All Children of the Earth- Tribute to Thornton Dial Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
We Are All Children of the Earth- Tribute to Thornton Dial
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 We Are All Children of the Earth- Tribute to Thornton Dial Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
We Are All Children of the Earth- Tribute to Thornton Dial
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

A Wonderful Gift from Gerard Sendrey!

Happy!

Happy!

One of the artists that I paid tribute to, Gerard Sendrey found my blog and the painting I created in honor of him and decided to contact me.  It completely made my day.  We’ve been corresponding ever since and today I received three of his original drawings and they are so wonderful.  I can’t wait to frame them and put them up!  Here’s the link to my blog entry about him.

Gerard Sendrey- Day 165

And below is his wonderful gift to me.  The painting on top is my tribute if you remember.  I will be

A wonderful gift!  Thank you Gerard!

A wonderful gift! Thank you Gerard!

painting a piece for him and sending it out soon.  These are the times where I think the internet is such an amazing tool.  I hope that your day has been as wonderful as mine.  My daily painting will be coming later today. 🙂  Best, Linda

 

 

Day 189- Matt Sesow- Resetting Expectations

It’s Day 189!  While researching experimental artists I happened upon a website for disabled artists and found Matt Sesow.  I absolutely fell in love with his artwork.  It has this Basquiat feel to it, but he also embodies his own style.  I relate to his paintings and paint in a similar way as well.  I feel like I could’ve done a little better with my piece, but I have so little time these days to REALLY work for hours on my paintings.  I was thinking about pushing this one back, but I got too excited to paint a tribute.  I’m pasting an article from his website that was published by http://www.washingtonpost.com here since there isn’t a wikipedia bio on him.  Join me in honoring Matt Sesow today!

Matt Sesow

Matt Sesow

Briar- Matt Sesow

Briar- Matt Sesow

GOING SOLO: In 1993, I was working at IBM and met a girl who shared a house with

Folk- Matt Sesow

Folk- Matt Sesow

some artists. One day, they brought out some supplies, and I started painting and couldn’t stop. I started strategizing ways to paint full time. I set up a Web site, www.sesow.com. I saved up a lot of money. I got rid of my car. I bought my apartment with IBM stock. The day I got laid off from a dot-com, in 2001, I stopped by CD Warehouse and said, “I want to hang my paintings here.” I’ve been living off my art ever since. All I have to come up with every month is a condo fee, health insurance and some brown rice.

STYLIN’: I started out looking at pictures and trying to paint them. They always turned

Cardinal- Matt Sesow

Cardinal- Matt Sesow

out really bizarre-looking: The eyes, the mouth, the teeth were way too big. People liked it. Eventually I started painting things that happened to me: When I was 8 years old, I was playing in a field by an airstrip and was struck by a landing airplane. The propeller severed my arm. So I’ve painted people missing limbs, people pointing at someone with a disability.

Che- Matt Sesow

Che- Matt Sesow

ART SCHOOL: People put me in this folk-art/outsider-art group because of the disability and the rawness of my paintings, and because I’m self-taught. But I think “outsider” is a term that’s almost like victim art. I want to reset the expectations in the art world, so I actively promote myself. I’m my own boss. I’m my own agent. I’m my sales team.

NETWORKED: When I set up online in 1995, I’d search out sites that showed art and e-mail them

Different- Matt Sesow

Different- Matt Sesow

saying, “I’d love a link from you.” I did that probably 800 times. If you do a search on “Sesow” on Google, I’m up to 2,500 hits. I get around 500 individuals visiting the site a day. I don’t think a gallery is going to get that.

ON THE ROAD: I’m always working. When curators ask me to be in a show, I go. I had a five-day solo show in January in New York, and I’ll have a solo show in D.C. at the end of April in Dupont Circle [at Art+Works+Wonders, 2122 P St. NW, Suite 303].

Matt Sesow

Matt Sesow

My paintings are pretty inexpensive, so anybody can afford a small one, and I’ll do a sliding scale. I like the idea of somebody paying $4,000 for a large painting and then a college kid buying a little thing for 10 or 20 bucks. Better my stuff than a poster.

As told to Nicole M. Miller (www.washingtonpost.com)

Matt Sesow

Matt Sesow

I hope you enjoy my tribute today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 190!  Best, Linda

 

Crazy Town- Tribute to Matt Sesow Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Crazy Town- Tribute to Matt Sesow
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Crazy Town- Tribute to Matt Sesow Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Crazy Town- Tribute to Matt Sesow
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Crazy Town- Tribute to Matt Sesow Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Crazy Town- Tribute to Matt Sesow
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Crazy Town- Tribute to Matt Sesow Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Crazy Town- Tribute to Matt Sesow
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Crazy Town- Tribute to Matt Sesow Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Crazy Town- Tribute to Matt Sesow
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 171- Daniel Johnston- The Beast of Times

It’s Day 171 and I had a lot of fun doing today’s artist.  I couldn’t wait to pay tribute to Daniel Johnston.  I’m a fan of his artwork and music.  In the past, every time I’d start a new job I’d listen to “First Day At Work” in the morning.  Join me in honoring him today!

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Dale Johnston (born January 22, 1961) is an American singer, songwriter, musician, and artist. Johnston was the subject of the 2005 documentary The Devil and Daniel Johnston. He currently lives in Waller, Texas.

Johnston was born in Sacramento, California, and grew up in the northern panhandle of West

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Johnston

Virginia between Ohio and Pennsylvania near Chester and New Cumberland, West Virginia. He began recording music in the late 1970s on a $59 Sanyomonaural Boombox, singing and playing piano and chord organ. Following graduation from Oak Glen High School, Johnston spent a few weeks at Abilene Christian University in West Texas, but soon dropped out. Later he attended the East Liverpool branch of Kent State University.

Johnston’s musical work gained some notoriety when he moved to Austin, Texas. Johnston began to attract the attention of the local press and gained a following augmented in numbers by his habit of handing out tapes to people he met. Live performances were well-attended and hotly anticipated.

Big Joe- Daniel Johnston

Big Joe- Daniel Johnston

His local standing led to him being featured in a 1985 episode of the MTV program The Cutting Edge featuring performers from Austin’s “New Sincerity” music scene. Subsequently he performed at the 1985 Woodshock music festival in Austin, where he was featured in a short documentary of the festival, Woodshock.

In 1988, Johnston visited New York City and recorded 1990 with producer Kramer at his Noise

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Johnston

New York studio. It was released in 1990 on Kramer’s Shimmy-Disc label. This was Johnston’s first experience in a professional recording environment after a decade of releasing home-made cassette recordings. His mental health further deteriorated during the making of 1990. In 1989 Johnston released the album It’s Spooky in collaboration with Half Japanese singer Jad Fair.

In 1990, Johnston played at a music festival in Austin, Texas. On the way back to West Virginia on a small, private two-seater plane piloted by his father Bill, Johnston had amanic psychotic episode believing he was Casper the Friendly Ghost and removed the key from the plane’s ignition and threw it out of the plane. His father, a former Air Force pilot, managed to successfully crash-land the plane, even though “there was nothing down there but trees”. Although the plane was destroyed, Johnston and his father emerged with only minor injuries. As a result of this episode, Johnston was involuntarily committed to a mental hospital.

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Johnston

Interest in Johnston increased when Kurt Cobain was frequently photographed wearing a t-shirt featuring the cover image of Johnston’s album Hi, How Are You which music journalist Everett True gave him. Kurt Cobain listed Yip/Jump Music as one of his favorite albums in his journal in 1993. In spite of Johnston being resident in a mental hospital at the time, a bidding war to sign him ensued. He refused to sign a multi-album deal with Elektra Records because Metallica was on the label’s roster and he was convinced that they were of Satan and would hurt him. He also dropped his manager after having a psychotic episode at a Butthole Surfers concert. His manager, Kramer, called Johnston’s parents after the episode and was in turn fired because he thought: “they’ll put me in a looneybin”. Ultimately he signed with Atlantic Records in February 1994 and that September released Fun, produced by Paul Leary of Butthole Surfers. It was a commercial failure. In June 1996, Atlantic dropped Daniel from the label.

Johnston contributed two songs to the soundtrack for Larry Clark’s controversial 1995 film Kids,

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Johnston

produced by Folk Implosion and Sebadoh’s frontman, Lou Barlow. Johnston later covered Schoolhouse Rock!’s “Unpack Your Adjectives” for a compilation of the popular education songs called Schoolhouse Rock! Rocks in 1996.

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Johnston

In 2004, he released The Late Great Daniel Johnston: Discovered Covered, a two-disc compilation. The first disc featured many artists, such as Tom Waits, Beck, TV on the Radio, Jad Fair, Eels, Bright Eyes, Calvin Johnson, Death Cab for Cutie, Sparklehorse, Mercury Rev and The Flaming Lips covering songs written by Johnston. The second disc featured Johnston’s original recordings of the songs.

In 2005, Texas-based theater company Infernal Bridegroom Productions received a Multi-Arts Production/MAP Fund grant to work with Johnston to create a rock operabased on his music, titled Speeding Motorcycle.

A 2005, Dutch documentary about Johnston for the TV series R.A.M. was followed in 2006 by The Devil and Daniel Johnston. Jeff Feuerzeig’s documentary, four years in the making, collated some of the vast amount of recorded material Johnston (and in some case, others) had produced over the years to portray his life and music. The film won high praise, receiving the Director’s Award at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival. The film also inspired more interest in Johnston’s work, and increased his pull as a touring artist.

In 2006, Johnston’s own Eternal Yip Eye Music label released his first greatest hits compilation, Welcome to My World. He also appeared as

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Johnston

musical guest on The Henry Rollins Show on which he performed “Mask” and “Care Less” (the latter was exclusive to the internet).

Through the next few years Johnston toured extensively across the world, and continued to attract press attention. In 2008, Dick Johnston, Daniel’s brother and manager, revealed that “a movie deal based on the artist’s life and music had been finalized with a tentative 2011 release.” He also said that a deal had been struck with the Conversecompany for a “signature series” Daniel Johnston shoe. Later, it was revealed by Dick Johnston that Converse had dropped the plan. In late 2008, Adjustable Productions released Johnston’s first concert DVD, The Angel and Daniel Johnston – Live at the Union Chapel, featuring a 2007 appearance in Islington, London.

On January 31, 2009, Daniel Johnston joined the band The Swell Season on a broadcast of Austin City Limits (previously recorded on September 28, 2008) to perform the song “Life in Vain”.

Daniel Johnston

Daniel Johnston

His latest album, Is and Always Was, was released on October 6, 2009 on his Eternal Yip Eye Music record label. In 2009, it was announced that Matt Groening had chosen Johnston to perform at the edition of the All Tomorrow’s Parties festival that he curated in May 2010 in Minehead, England. Later that year, he was invited by rock band Cage the Elephant to appear at Starry Nights Fest, an upstart music festival in Bowling Green, Kentucky. Johnston performed a brief solo set before being joined on stage by Cage, who backed performances of several songs, including “Speeding Motorcycle” and “True Love Will Find You in the End”.

In August 2012, male cosmetics company Axe used Daniel’s song “True Love Will Find You In The End” in a television advertisement marketing a men’s hair care product.

Johnston has been diagnosed with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

Biography is from wikipedia.

My painting for today was just created on the fly.  I didn’t want to overanalyze what I was going to draw so I just doodled something that was inspired by Daniel Johnston.  Now I want to go listen to some Daniel Johnston songs!  I hope you enjoy my piece for today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 172.  Best, Linda

Let's Be Best Friends- Tribute to Daniel Johnston Linda Cleary 2014 Pen & Ink/ Acrylic on Canvas

Let’s Be Best Friends- Tribute to Daniel Johnston
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen & Ink/ Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Let's Be Best Friends- Tribute to Daniel Johnston Linda Cleary 2014 Pen & Ink/ Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Let’s Be Best Friends- Tribute to Daniel Johnston
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen & Ink/ Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Let's Be Best Friends- Tribute to Daniel Johnston Linda Cleary 2014 Pen & Ink/ Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Let’s Be Best Friends- Tribute to Daniel Johnston
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen & Ink/ Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Let's Be Best Friends- Tribute to Daniel Johnston Linda Cleary 2014 Pen & Ink/ Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Let’s Be Best Friends- Tribute to Daniel Johnston
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen & Ink/ Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Let's Be Best Friends- Tribute to Daniel Johnston Linda Cleary 2014 Pen & Ink/ Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Let’s Be Best Friends- Tribute to Daniel Johnston
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen & Ink/ Acrylic on Canvas

 

 

Day 165- Gerard Sendrey- Visages

It’s Day 165 and I decided to do an outsider artist today.  I found today’s artist and loved his work.  I’ve been working on a couple of larger paintings on top of my daily painting so my days have been filled with paint!  Join me in celebrating Gerard Sendrey today.

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

Sendrey was a civil servant in Begles, near Bordeaux in his native France until his retirement in 1988. However, for a decade, starting in 1967, he also painted intensively and spontaneously, before turning to drawing as his main medium.

Throughout this first period of creative outpouring he worked without consideration of audiences or

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

artistic context. Then, in 1979 his work was exhibited in the Galerie du Fleuve and a year later a number of drawings were acquired for the annexe collection (Neuve Invention) of the Collection de Art Brut in Lausanne.
In 1989 he founded the Site de la Creation Franche, which emphasises the work of French self-taught artists and those marginal creators sometimes referred to as artistes singuliers. Sendrey’s early drawings consist of intricately wrought geometric marks, creating a packed, shallow picture space out of which figures or faces emerge. In recent works, such as this one, discreet, fantastical elements seemingly exude into the indeterminate spatial void of the picture ground.

Above is from the Henry Boxer Gallery.  It’s a wonderful site that features a bunch of outsider artists.

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

Before entering retirement, Gerard Sendrey worked as civil servant in Begles, a small village in the Bordeaux country of France. During much of the time that he was reporting to the village hall, dealing with quotidian municipal matters, Sendrey was leading a second life, one unknown even to his co-workers. At every opportunity he had away from his job, he was painting.

Sendrey seems always to have been at least two artists in a single body. Sometimes he

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

produces paintings that, like those of the surrealist Andre Masson or the abstract expressionist Robert Motherwell, take their form through a kind of automatic writing where he attempts to suspend thought and let the subconscious take over. On other occasions, he turns outs ink drawings that appear so maddeningly detailed that their creation would seem to require the concentration of a brain surgeon.

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

Sendrey is the embodiment of that species identified as “outsider artist.” He was around 40 before he started producing his first paintings and drawings. For the next dozen years or so, while working in isolation, he kept expanding the universe of his subjects. Often he turned out Expressionist style portraits of men and women who, like the subjects of Georges Rouault and Alberto Giacometti, seemed weighted with bottomless sorrow.

Sendrey was given his first solo show in 1979 at the Galerie du Fleve, a small cellar

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

space in Bordeaux. By marvelous chance, the exhibition was seen by Michel Thevoz, curator of the Musee de l’Art in Lausanne, Switzerland, begun by Jean Dubuffet.

 

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

Thevoz, an important critic and writer, pronounced Sendrey as a major discovery. In a published appraisal, he wrote: Rare is the artist who doesn’t give in to the temptation to conform his art to the broad public’s standards of what comprises good form, taste and aesthetic norm. Gerard Sendrey is one of these rarities. He risks new adventure without regard to whether his art might upset the tautological preferences of the viewer and cause some discomfort.

Within a year after his first show, Sendrey’s work entered the collections of virtually all the museums in Europe that have collections of art brut, among them the Musee de l’Art in Lausanne, the Musee l’Aracine in Neuilly, France, and the Centre

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

de Recherche et de Diffusion d’Art en Marge in Brussels, Belgium, Later his work would enter numerous institutional collections in the United States, among them those of the Museum of American Folk Art in New York City, the Milwaukee Art Museum, the Chicago Center for Self Taught Art and the Anthony Petullo Collection of Self Taught Art, Milwaukee.

Above is from the Dean Jensen Gallery.

I had so many ideas for today’s painting.  I decided to do a mixture of his styles.  I thought about sticking with black and white, but paint the canvas black and do the details in white.  I did that first, but then decided to add a few different hues of blue to the piece and I’m glad that I did.  I like how my piece turned out.  I hope I captured his style.  I had a wonderful time painting this piece.  I hope you enjoy it and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 166.  200 more paintings to go!

Best,

Linda

Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 130- Jean Dubuffet- Values of Savagery

It’s Day 130 and I’m so happy I’m getting screens installed soon.  It’s supposed to get really hot this week and it’ll be nice to be able to open the windows without flies and other bugs to get in.  I wasn’t too into wanting to paint today, but had fun!  Join me in honoring Jean Dubuffet today.

Jean Dubuffet

Jean Dubuffet

Jean Dubuffet

Jean Dubuffet

Jean Philippe Arthur Dubuffet (31 July 1901 – 12 May 1985) was a French painter and sculptor. His idealistic approach to aesthetics embraced so called “low art” and eschewed traditional standards of beauty in favor of what he believed to be a more authentic and humanistic approach to image-making.

Dubuffet was born in Le Havre to a family of wholesale wine merchants who were part

The Little Kiss- Jean Dubuffet (1943)

The Little Kiss- Jean Dubuffet (1943)

of the wealthy bourgeoisie. He moved toParis in 1918 to study painting at the Académie Julian, becoming close friends with the artists Juan GrisAndré Masson, andFernand Léger. Six months later, he left the Académie to study independently. In 1924, doubting the value of art, he stopped painting and took over his father’s business selling wine. He took up painting again in the 1930s when he made a large series of portraits in which he emphasized the vogues in art history.

 

Jean Dubuffet. Site Inhabited by Objects 1965

Jean Dubuffet. Site Inhabited by Objects 1965

But again he stopped, developing his wine business at Bercy during the German Occupation of France. Years later, in an autobiographical text, he boasted having made substantial profits by supplying wine to the Wehrmacht. In 1942, he decided to devote himself to art, painting figures of nude women in an impersonal and primitive way, in strong and unbroken colours. He chose subjects from everyday life such as people sitting in the Paris Métro or just walking in the country. His first solo show came in 1944.

In 1945 he was strongly impressed by a show in Paris of Jean Fautrier’s paintings in

Jean Dubuffet

Jean Dubuffet

which he recognized meaningful art which expressed directly and purely the depth of a person. As did Fautrier he started to use thick oil paint, but mixed with sand and gravel, by which he could model the paint as a skin of the painting. This resulted in the series ‘Hautes Pâtes’, which he exhibited in 1946 at the Galérie René Drouin. After 1946 he started a series of portraits, with as ‘model’ partly his own friends Henri Michaux, Francis Ponge, Jean Paulhan and Pierre Matisse.

Jean Dubuffet 'Mele Moments' Acrylic and collage mounted on canvas, 1976

Jean Dubuffet ‘Mele Moments’ Acrylic and collage mounted on canvas, 1976

He painted these portraits in the same thick materials, and in a manner deliberately anti-psychological and anti-personal, as Dubuffet expressed himself. A few years later he approached the surrealist group in 1948, then the College of Pataphysique in 1954. He was friendly with the French playwright, actor and theater director Antonin Artaud, he admired and supported the writer Louis-Ferdinand Céline and was strongly connected with the artistic circle around the surrealist André Masson. In 1944 started an important relation with the resistance-fighter and French writer, publisher, Jean Paulhan who was also strongly fighting against ‘intellectual terrorism’, as he called it.

Influenced by Hans Prinzhorn’s book Artistry of the Mentally Ill, Dubuffet coined the

Jean Dubuffet

Jean Dubuffet

term art brut (meaning “raw art,” often referred to as ‘outsider art’) for art produced by non-professionals working outside aesthetic norms, such as art by psychiatric patients, prisoners, and children. He amassed his own collection of such art, including artists such asAloïse Corbaz and Adolf Wölfli. The collection is now housed at the Collection de l’art brut in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Jean Dubuffet- Self-Portrait

Jean Dubuffet- Self-Portrait

Dubuffet sought to create an art as free from intellectual concerns as Art Brut, and his work often appears primitive and childlike. Nonetheless, Dubuffet appeared to be quite erudite when it came to writing about his own work. According to prominent art critic Hilton Kramer, “There is only one thing wrong with the essays Dubuffet has written on his own work: their dazzling intellectual finesse makes nonsense of his claim to a free and untutored primitivism. They show us a mandarin literary personality, full of chic phrases and up-to-date ideas, that is quite the opposite of the naive visionary.”

Many of Dubuffet’s works are painted in oil paint using an impasto thickened by materials such as sand, tar and straw, giving the work an unusually textured surface. From 1962 he produced a series of works in which he limited himself to the colours red, white, black, and blue. Towards the end of the 1960s he turned increasingly to sculpture, producing works in polystyrene which he then painted with vinyl paint.

In late 1960–1961, Dubuffet began experimenting with music and sound and made several recordings with the Danish painter Asger Jorn, a founding member of the avant-garde movement COBRA. The same period he started making sculpture, but in a very not-sculptural way. As his medium he preferred to use the ordinary materials as papier mâché and for all the light medium polystyrene, in which he could model very fast and switch easily from one work to another, as sketches on paper. At the end of the 1960s he started to create his large sculpture-habitations, such as ‘Tour aux figures’, ‘Jardin d’Hiver’ and ‘Villa Falbala’ in which people can wander, stay, and contemplate. In 1969 ensued an acquaintance between him and the French Outsider Art artist Jacques Soisson.

In 1978 Dubuffet collaborated with American composer and musician Jasun Martz to create the record album artwork for Martz’s avant-garde

JEAN DUBUFFET Silkscreen French 1973

JEAN DUBUFFET Silkscreen French 1973

symphony entitled The Pillory. The much written about drawing has been reproduced internationally in three different editions on tens-of-thousands of record albums and compact discs. A detail of the drawing is also featured on Martz’s second symphony (2005), The Pillory/The Battle, performed by The Intercontinental Philharmonic Orchestra and Royal Choir.

One of Dubuffet’s later works was Monument With Standing Beast (1984). Dubuffet died in Paris in 1985. The Fondation Jean Dubuffet collects and exhibits his work.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece my piece in tribute to Jean Dubuffet!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 131!

Best, Linda

“Personally, I believe very much in values of savagery; I mean: instinct, passion, mood, violence, madness.” 
― Jean Dubuffet

Memories of Something- Tribute to Jean Dubuffet Linda Cleary 2014 Pen, Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Memories of Something- Tribute to Jean Dubuffet
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen, Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Memories of Something- Tribute to Jean Dubuffet Linda Cleary 2014 Pen, Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Memories of Something- Tribute to Jean Dubuffet
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen, Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Memories of Something- Tribute to Jean Dubuffet Linda Cleary 2014 Pen, Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Memories of Something- Tribute to Jean Dubuffet
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen, Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Memories of Something- Tribute to Jean Dubuffet Linda Cleary 2014 Pen, Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Memories of Something- Tribute to Jean Dubuffet
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen, Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Memories of Something- Tribute to Jean Dubuffet Linda Cleary 2014 Pen, Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Memories of Something- Tribute to Jean Dubuffet
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen, Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 4 Memories of Something- Tribute to Jean Dubuffet Linda Cleary 2014 Pen, Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 4
Memories of Something- Tribute to Jean Dubuffet
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen, Ink & Acrylic on Canvas