Day 243- Gillian Ayres- Bright and Succulent

It’s Day 243 and I had so much fun painting today’s colorful piece!  I also went on a nice dog hike with my husband.  Such a beautiful day.  Join me in honoring Gillian Ayres today.

Gillian Ayres

Gillian Ayres

'Tivoli' by Gillian Ayres

‘Tivoli’ by Gillian Ayres

Gillian Ayres, CBE (born 3 February 1930) is an English painter.

Ayres was born on 3 February 1930 in Barnes, London, the youngest of three sisters. Ayres started school when she was six. Her parents, a prosperous couple, sent her to Ibstock, a progressive school in Roehampton run on Fröbel principles. In 1941 Ayres was sent to Colet Court, the junior school for St Paul’s, in Hammersmith, where on her eleventh birthday she finally learnt to read.  

She passed the entrance exam for St Paul’s Girls’ School the following year, and

Antony and Cleopatra- Gillian Ayres

Antony and Cleopatra- Gillian Ayres

developed an interest in art while there. Among her best schoolfriends was Shirley Williams, with whom she taught art to children in bomb-ravaged parts of London.  Ayres then decided to go to art school. In 1946, she applied to the Slade School of Fine Art and was accepted. However, at sixteen, she was too young to enrol. She was advised to apply to the Camberwell School of Art and studied there from 1946 to 1950.

High Summer World of Light- Gillian Ayres

High Summer World of Light- Gillian Ayres

Ayres worked part-time at the AIA Gallery in Soho from 1951 to 1959 before starting a teaching career.  Ayres held a number of teaching posts through the 1960s and 1970s, becoming friends with painters such as Howard Hodgkin, Robyn Denny and Roger Hilton. In 1959, Ayres was asked to teach at Bath Academy of Art, Corsham for six weeks.

She remained on the teaching staff until 1965. For much of her time at Corsham she shared a teaching studio with Malcolm Hughes.  She was a senior lecturer at Saint Martin’s School of Art, London, from 1965 to 1978 and became head of painting at Winchester School of Art in 1978. Ayres left teaching in 1981, and moved to an old rectory on the Llyn Peninsula in north-west Wales to become a full-time painter.  She moved again in 1987 to a 15th-century cottage at Morwenstowon the Devon-Cornwall border.

Her first solo exhibition was held at Gallery One, London in 1956. Ayres’ early works are typically made with thin vinyl paint in a limited

Gillian Ayres

Gillian Ayres

number of colours arranged in relatively simple forms, but later works in oil paint are more exuberant and very colourful, with a thick impasto being used. The titles of her paintings, such as Anthony and Cleopatra (1982) and A Midsummer Night (1990), are usually given after the painting is completed and do not directly describe the content of the painting, but rather are intended to resonate with the general mood of the work.

Ayres was shortlisted for the Turner Prize in 1989. She was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 1986, and in 1991 became a Royal Academician. She later temporarily resigned from the Academy, following the broadcast of a BBC Omnibus television documentary about the preparations for the controversial Sensation exhibition hosted by the Academy in 1997 show-casing the Young British Artists.

The documentary, according to Ayres, presented an unfair view of the older members

Shalimar 5, (2011), by Gillian Ayres (detail)

Shalimar 5, (2011), by Gillian Ayres (detail)

of the Academy.  Ayres also objected to the inclusion of Marcus Harvey’s portrait of the killer Myra Hindley in the exhibition. She is represented by the Alan Cristea Gallery, London.

She was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in the 2011 Birthday Honours.

Moonglade- Gillian Ayres

Moonglade- Gillian Ayres

Ayres married painter Henry Mundy in 1951. They divorced almost 30 years later but currently live together. They have two sons born 1958 and 1966.  Their younger son, Sam Mundy, is a painter.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 244.

Best,

Linda

Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 242- Anne Appleby- Inner Dialogue

It’s Day 242 and I’ve been working on a couple of large canvas pieces…excited about that.  I wanted to work on a nice relaxing piece for my daily painting and found today’s artist.  I love her paintings and the colors she puts together.  AND again it was more difficult than I thought.  Join me in honoring Anne Appleby today.

Anne Appleby

Anne Appleby

Pea- Anne Appleby

Pea- Anne Appleby

Anne Appleby (born 1954) is an American color field/landscape painter. Her works, always bearing titles from the natural world—“Sweet Pine”, “Summer Aspen”, “Gem”—are simple arrangements of colored canvas panels. Each panel is, at a glance, monochromatic, but closer inspection reveals deep and luminous gradations of hue.

She received her B.F.A. in 1977 from the San Francisco Art Institute. Before attending the Art Institute, Appleby spent a fifteen-year apprenticeship with an Ojibwe Indian elder in Montana. From him, she learned her patient observation of nature.

Her work is often shown with that of “reductive” painters, but it does not exactly fit into

Anne Appleby, Redbud, 2008

Anne Appleby, Redbud, 2008

the “pure” painting philosophy held by many of them. As Kenneth Baker wrote in 2004, “using no forms except monochrome panels, Appleby must struggle often with the potential problem of repetition. But [she] achieves a freshness and distinctness that persuade a viewer that she means each one. It is as if she has learned to translate energy of intent directly into radiance of color.”

Salmon Pea- Anne Appleby

Salmon Pea- Anne Appleby

Although Appleby’s paintings are composed of abstract panels each essentially a single color, she thinks of them as landscapes. She carefully observes particular plants or particular seasons and uses their colors as they grow and change in works that are particular to them. “As I work, I develop an inner dialogue about the meaning of what I’m doing,” she says. “But I can’t paint that. I can’t even speak it. It’s denser than my activity.”

Anne Appleby currently splits her time between San Francisco and her home on the

Winter 1999- Anne Appleby

Winter 1999- Anne Appleby

edge of a national forest in Jefferson City, Montana. She has participated in group exhibitions in institutions such as the Tacoma Art Museum in Washington, the American Academy in Rome, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, where in 1996 she was awarded the SFMoMA SECA Art Award. She was also the 1999 recipient of the Biennial Award from the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation in New York. Appleby shows her paintings primarily at San Francisco’s Gallery Paule Anglim. Her works are held in various museum collections, including the Cleveland Museum of Art and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I had a great time painting.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 243.

Best,

Linda

Vert Brun- Tribute to Anne Appleby Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Vert Brun- Tribute to Anne Appleby
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Vert Brun- Tribute to Anne Appleby Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Vert Brun- Tribute to Anne Appleby
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Vert Brun- Tribute to Anne Appleby Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Vert Brun- Tribute to Anne Appleby
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Vert Brun- Tribute to Anne Appleby Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Vert Brun- Tribute to Anne Appleby
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Vert Brun- Tribute to Anne Appleby Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Vert Brun- Tribute to Anne Appleby
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 241- Carl Ostendarp- AAARRRGH

It’s Day 241 and I found today’s artist whilst traveling through a google/youtube wormhole last night!  I fell in love with his pieces and I hope you do too.  Join me in honoring Carl Ostendarp today.  I am putting a small biography and snippets from articles and interviews.  I couldn’t find an extensive bio.

Carl Ostendarp

Carl Ostendarp

AAARRGH- Carl Ostendarp

AAARRGH- Carl Ostendarp

BIOGRAPHY  American, born 1961

Referencing Carl Ostendarp’s characteristic fusion of Pop, Minimalism, Color Field painting, and cartoons, art critic Jerry Saltz once mused that “If Dr. Seuss’s Cat in the Hat, Jules Olitski and Roy Lichtenstein made art it together, it might look like

Blue Pretzel- Carl Ostendarp

Blue Pretzel- Carl Ostendarp

Ostendarp’s.” His humorous paintings feature biomorphic forms (think “splats” and spills), words, and vibrant patches of color, and often extend beyond the canvas to cover part or all of the gallery walls.

Carl Ostendarp- Pillow Talk

Carl Ostendarp- Pillow Talk

Music, too, is integral to these works because, as Ostendarp explains, “Somehow music has this quality of keeping us in the present tense, and I hope that this feeling spills over to the viewers’ experience of the visual work.” Thus, songs by the Velvet Underground and the Talking Heads not only constitute some of his exhibition titles, but also resound throughout his exhibition spaces.

Bio is from artsy.net.

Carl Ostendarp’s paintings were once described by art critic Jerry Saltz as a hypothetical collaborative art production by Dr. Seuss’s Cat in the Hat, Jules Olitski, and Roy LIchtenstein, and we couldn’t agree more. These playful paintings evoke a

IFFFFPFP- Carl Ostendarp

IFFFFPFP- Carl Ostendarp

range of visual cues from cartoons to high art minimalism (quite notably referenced in Untitled (Miro Painting)), and Ostendarp’s distinctive painted typeface has an undeniable resemblance to that which appears in all of our favorite children’s books by none other than the author ofThe Lorax, Horton Hears a Who!, and Green Eggs and Ham (just to name a few from the master of eccentric rhymes and fantastical character illustration).

Ostendarp

Ostendarp

Filled with humor and laced with references to art history as well as contemporary popular culture, Ostendarp’s paintings have seduced us into their pleasantly colored world of empty, melting Seuss-ian landscapes.

As you gaze into Master Cylinder with its dark brown drip descending over a cream-

Carl Ostendarp

Carl Ostendarp

colored ground, you can’t help but imagine a seemingly playful yet dark sky over a mountain range of cartooned, snow-capped alps and wonder, “Oh, the places you’ll go.”

Review from Juxtapoz Magazine.
Highway Knees (Pink) by Carl Ostendarp

Highway Knees (Pink) by Carl Ostendarp

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I loved painting it.  It was inspiring in a weird way. 🙂 I think my only challenge was having too many ideas and picking just one or two for this painting.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 242!

Best,
Linda
UGH.- Tribute to Carl Ostendarp Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

UGH.- Tribute to Carl Ostendarp
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View UGH.- Tribute to Carl Ostendarp Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
UGH.- Tribute to Carl Ostendarp
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 UGH.- Tribute to Carl Ostendarp Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
UGH.- Tribute to Carl Ostendarp
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 UGH.- Tribute to Carl Ostendarp Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
UGH.- Tribute to Carl Ostendarp
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 UGH.- Tribute to Carl Ostendarp Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
UGH.- Tribute to Carl Ostendarp
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 240- Alexander Liberman- Screams

It’s Day 240 and I wanted to try my hand at doing something geometric.  I think these pieces are probably the most challenging!  I have to finish up some feedback for my writing group this evening so join me in honoring Alexander Liberman today.

h_libermanalexander

Omega IX 1961 Acrylic on Canvas

Omega IX
1961
Acrylic on Canvas

Alexander Semeonovitch Liberman (September 4, 1912 – November 19, 1999) was a Russian-American magazine editor,publisher, painter, photographer, and sculptor. He held senior artistic positions during his 32 years at Condé Nast Publications.

When his father took a post advising the Soviet government, the family moved to

Omicron VII 1961- Alexander Liberman

Omicron VII 1961- Alexander Liberman

Moscow. Life there became difficult, and his father secured permission from Lenin and the Politburo to take his son to London in 1921.

Young Liberman was educated in Russia, England, and France, where he took up life as

Socrate, Silkscreen of 1964 after a painting of 1962

Socrate, Silkscreen of 1964 after a painting of 1962

“White Émigré” in Paris.

He began his publishing career in Paris with the early pictorial magazine Vu, where he worked under Lucien Vogel and with photographers such as Brassaï, André Kertész, and Robert Capa.

After emigrating to New York in 1941, he began working for Condé Nast Publications, rising to the position of editorial director, which he held from 1962-1994.

Alexander Liberman

Alexander Liberman

Only in the 1950s did Liberman take up painting and, later, metal sculpture. His highly recognizable sculptures are assembled from industrial objects (segments of steel I-beams, pipes, drums, and such), often painted in uniform bright colors.

In a 1986 interview concerning his formative years as a sculptor and his aesthetic, Liberman said, “I think many works of art are screams, and I identify with screams.”

Revolving 1959- Alexander Liberman

Revolving 1959- Alexander Liberman

Prominent examples of his work are in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Storm King Art Center,Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Pyramid Hill Sculpture Park, Tate Gallery, and the Guggenheim Museum. His massive work “The Way”, a 65 feet (20 m) x 102 feet (31 m) x 100 feet (30 m) structure, is made of eighteen salvaged steel oil tanks, and became a signature piece of Laumeier Sculpture Park, and a major landmark of St. Louis, Missouri.

He was married briefly to Hildegarde Sturm (August 25, 1936), a model and competitive skier. His second wife (since 1942), Tatiana Yacovleff du Plessix Liberman (1906–1991), had been a childhood playmate and baby sitter. In 1941, they escaped

Time 1952- Alexander Liberman

Time 1952- Alexander Liberman

together from occupied France, via Lisbon, to New York. She had operated a hat salon in Paris, then designed hats for Henri Bendel in Manhattan. She continued in millinery at Saks Fifth Avenue where she was billed as “Tatania du Plessix” or “Tatania of Saks”, until the mid-1950s. In 1992, he married Melinda Pechangco, a nurse who had cared for Tatiana during an early illness. His stepdaughter,Francine du Plessix Gray, is a noted author.

Biography above is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece for today!  I still feel like I could use a better flowing paint to make the lines cleaner, but I like the design.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 241.

Best,

Linda

Descent- Tribute to Alexander Liberman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Descent- Tribute to Alexander Liberman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Descent- Tribute to Alexander Liberman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Descent- Tribute to Alexander Liberman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Descent- Tribute to Alexander Liberman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Descent- Tribute to Alexander Liberman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Descent- Tribute to Alexander Liberman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Descent- Tribute to Alexander Liberman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Descent- Tribute to Alexander Liberman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Descent- Tribute to Alexander Liberman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 239- John Zinsser- Anything But Simple

It’s Day 239 and I was having much difficulty with settling on an artist I wanted to pay tribute today…not because I don’t have a HUGE list of artists that I want to honor, but I wanted one that matched my mood.  Then I remembered finding today’s artist a while back and he almost fell off my radar.  Please join me in honoring John Zinsser today.  I love his work.  I am putting an interview with him below from a blog called Visual Thoughts.  I will re-link below the interview as well.  It was hard to find a large biography on him.  For more info visit his website.

John Zinsser

John Zinsser

JOHN ZINSSER

1961            Born, New York, N.Y.

Language and Memory, 2014, by John Zinsser

Language and Memory, 2014, by John Zinsser

Review below is from St. Louis Beacon website.

Review: Zinsser brings bold strokes to Philip Slein

In Visual Arts

7:48 am on Mon, 10.01.12

On view at Philip Slein Gallery is New York-based John Zinsser’s Zero Guilt. Zinsser presents nine canvases of painted abstractions, celebrating color in bold strokes. The paintings have a Japanese-aura, emitting lovely interplays of light and density, juxtaposing orange and brown or light yellow with deeper yellow.

The artist’s heavy brushstroke creates a muddy texture – in a good way. I have to stop

John Zinsser, The Immediate Past

John Zinsser, The Immediate Past

myself from touching the canvases, the enamel and oil continuing off the surface in thick pathways of line.

The most successful pieces incorporate a basket-weave motif, such as Slow Life, 2011 and Helen of Troy, 2012. The simple paintings are anything but.

INTERVIEW

John Zinsser talks about his File Folder Studies

(From a recent conversation with Jean Manuel Beauchamp)

This one’s pretty simple. It says, “War is not the answer.” And then the word “ethanol.” Do you know where “War is not the answer comes from?” Oh, I know, it’s from Marvin Gaye, “What’s Going On.” [Sings] “War is not the answer… there are so many of us here.” So, it’s a throwback to my childhood in the 1960s in the 1970s, as a child of pacifist people. And the anti-war movement of the 1960s, you know, with the years of these wars in Iraq and Afghanistan grinding on and on, and the hours and hours listening to NPR [National Public Radio] in the studio, you know. Sometimes it seems so simple. Some of these song lyrics. “War is not the answer.” Or, there’s another great one from a Laura Nyro song, or I think maybe she got it from a spiritual, something, again, from the 1960s, the title is: “In My Mind I Can’t Study War.”

From File Folder Studies- John Zinsser

From File Folder Studies- John Zinsser

Part of the whole impetus of doing this is that if you’re looking at work that is ostensibly non-representational then how does it kind of sit within the mindset of its particular time?

This one says something that you will see often on the side of a portfolio or an art-shipping crate. Stenciled on the side it says, “Do not stack on face.” Which has always struck me as funny because I don’t want to have things “stacked on my face,” either. And, perhaps when you’re making paintings, you’re kind of “stacking things” on people’s “face.” I don’t know. It’s kind of a funny imperative instruction.

I’ve been doing these about eight years now. It was kind of a natural development. I used to work on index cards. In my teaching, I used to use these index cards. I just had stacks of them. Here’s a stack of them over here. Then I just began to transfer this information more formally.

Some of these index cards would refer to something in my teaching. But this one, for example is—I just opened this pile at random—this is

From File Folder Studies- John Zinsser

From File Folder Studies- John Zinsser

“The Problem of Anxiety.” Terms from a Freud essay that I thought could take the form of painting titles. I had liked “inhibition.” But I couldn’t figure out what to do with it. I had like “vertigo,” of course. And “superego.” And “repression.” But I couldn’t make a title. But some of them did work as titles, like “Psychic Impotence.” “The Unwelcome Impulse.” That one is certainly apropos of painting activity. “Primal Repression.” “Weakness of the Ego.” “Infantile Zoophobia.” I don’t even know what that means. I did find that in a lot of these Freudian terms about the relationship between the conscious and the unconscious there were these beautiful kind of one-to-one relationships to the process of abstract painting.

Hysterical Phantasy- John Zinsser

Hysterical Phantasy- John Zinsser

In the neighborhood that I live in, Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn, people put books out on the stoop. It’s kind of like we all belong to this book exchange—this “stoop system” of people putting out books and other people taking them. So there are all these people “pawing through” books. This one was a German textbook about optics and visual phenomenology. I have it here. And so it also struck me as kind of funny because I didn’t understand all these words, like “adaptionstimulus.” But they nonetheless had this “diagrammatic” approach that went with the kind of drawings that I was making. So I just cut some pictures out. And then used them.

If you have a book that’s about optical theory, then you’re going to have a lot of primary

The Waking State- John Zinsser

The Waking State- John Zinsser

colors. And graphic depictions of color. And/or anatomy. All of those kind of naturally go with my own sensibility, which is to use bright, unmixed colors. I like, as I said before, cobalts, cadmiums, pigment-rich colors. There’s kind of a natural one-to-one correspondence there.

It has this forlorn lost artifact quality. Imagine how this book came to the US. And then there are series of decisions that led to it eventually being cast out on the stoop. Then the happenstance of walking by and picking it up. And then trying to respond to it on my own terms. It’s probably from the 1970s or the 1980s or something. You’re holding a pair of 3-D glasses that come with it. Which are to see these various diagrams inside.

This “found subject” matter kind of “tweaks” issues that are already in my painting, which have to do with complimentary color, perception of color, and so forth. It’s funny, when you take something that is an “art practice” and try to marry it to something that is “pathology” or “science,” it doesn’t really work. So it’s sort of a “broken” metaphor.

John Zinsser

John Zinsser

I was planning on doing this exhibition in Bonn, Germany, so the fact that a lot of these texts were in German, there’s sort of a “mistranslation” of ideas back-and-forth. For me, I’m mistranslating these ideas “back” into this German scientific culture, analytical culture.

It’s funny, after I had done those—all these pictures of eyeballs, and retinas receiving light, the first people who came to visit me were this couple from Bonn and it turned out that both of them are eye surgeons. Just by happenstance. And it shows I strongly believe in “fate” and “synchronicity” and all these kind of things. It was almost embarrassing that I was showing them these diagrams of eyeballs, when that is, in fact, what they do on a day-to-day basis. And here they had come to the US to try to learn something about painting, and instead I had these ridiculous, pseudo-scientific absurdist drawings of eyeballs and optical charts.

So, these things kind of go back-and-forth between knowing and not knowing. And

John Zinsser, Metropolitan Baptist

John Zinsser, Metropolitan Baptist

then, of course, after you do something like that, two weeks later, a month later, a year later, you will actually encounter the thing and understand what it is. So that it becomes meaningful retroactively.

Again the interview is from Visual Thoughts.

I had a lot of fun painting today’s piece.  I decided to play with it a bit and make it a little my own.  I was just going to use white on the midnight color in the background, but at the last minute I decided to add a little blue to the white.  I like the result.  I hope you enjoy it!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 240!  Wow, time is flying by way too fast.

Best,

Linda

Mourning and Melancholia- Tribute to John Zinsser Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Mourning and Melancholia- Tribute to John Zinsser
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Mourning and Melancholia- Tribute to John Zinsser Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Mourning and Melancholia- Tribute to John Zinsser
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Mourning and Melancholia- Tribute to John Zinsser Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Mourning and Melancholia- Tribute to John Zinsser
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Mourning and Melancholia- Tribute to John Zinsser Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Mourning and Melancholia- Tribute to John Zinsser
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Mourning and Melancholia- Tribute to John Zinsser Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Mourning and Melancholia- Tribute to John Zinsser
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 238- Mimmo Rotella- The Poster Ripper

It’s Day 238 and I had a bit of a hectic day so I decided to do something fun and maybe quick…a décollage!  Please join me in honoring Mimmo Rotella today!

Mimmo Rotella

Mimmo Rotella

Marilyn 1963- Mimmo Rotella

Marilyn 1963- Mimmo Rotella

Mimmo Rotella was born in Catanzaro on the 7th of October 1918, the son of a milliner. Following high school he moved to Naples where he began art studies (in 1941 he went to Rome after having obtained a post at the Ministry of Postal and Telecommunication Services). He did not stay long in the capital, however: on being called up he joined the course in the Officer-training School in Nocera. From here he was sent to the School for Non-commissioned Officers in Caserta (Campania). In 1944 he left the armed forces and then obtained his diploma at the Naples Art Academy. From 1944 until 1945 he taught draftsmanship at his city’s Institute for Surveyors.

In 1945 he moved to Rome: following his figurative beginnings and first experimentations he elaborated a manner of pictorial expression of neo-geometrical matrix. His participation in exhibitions began in 1947 at the Mostra Sindacale di Arti Figurative. He also took part in all the annual exhibitions of the Art Club up until 1951, both in Rome and Turin. As an alternative expressive method 1949 saw him invent phonetic poetry which the artist called ‘epistaltic’ (a neologism lacking sense): this was a collection of words (also invented ones), whistles, sounds, numbers and onomatopoeic reiterate. In the same year he wrote its Manifesto which in 1955 was published by Leonardo Sinisgalli in “Civiltà delle Macchine”. His first one-man exhibition, with abstract-geometrical works, was held in 1951 at the Galleria Chiurazzi in Rome (an exhibition which enjoyed little favour on the part of criticism).

Also in 1951 he had his first contact with French artists, exhibiting in Paris at the “Salon des Realistes Nouvelles”. For the period bridging

Casablanca- Mimmo Rotella

Casablanca- Mimmo Rotella

1951-1952 he obtained a scholarship on the part of the Fullbright Foundation, thanks to which he was able to sojourn in the United States at the University of Kansas City with the appointment as Artist in Residence. Here he created a large mural composition and recorded phonetic poems with the accompaniment of percussion instruments. At Harvard University in Boston he held a performance of phonetic poetry and recorded other pieces for the Library of Congress in Washington.

In 1952 he also held a second one-man exhibition at the Rockhill Nelson Gallery in Kansas City. His sojourn in the United States offered the possibility of getting to know the works of the protagonists of the new art currents: Rauschenberg, Oldenburg, Twombly, Pollock and Kline.

Following his return to Rome in 1953 he experienced a drawn-out crisis during which he interrupted his pictorial production. Convinced that everything in art had already been done he improvised what he himself has defined as “Zen illumination”: in short, the discovery of the advertising poster as artistic expression, as the message of the city. This saw the origin of the décollage – initially the collage – by way of glueing pieces of posters ripped off on the street onto canvas. Here Rotella adopted the collage as used by the cubists, ‘contaminating’ it with the dadaist and desecrating matrix of the objet trouvé. In Rome he showed the ‘torn poster’ for the first time in an exhibition entitled “Esposizione d’arte attuale” (1955).

Mimmo Rotella

Mimmo Rotella

He carried out the so-called “double décollage”: that is, the poster firstly removed from the wall and then torn up in the studio. In this period he also made use of the retros d’affiche, using the verso of the posters with the result obtained of non-figurative and monochrome works.

He began to receive acknowledgements in 1956 with the Graziano Award, followed in 1957 by the Battistoni e della Pubblica Istruzione Award. With the Cinecittà series of 1958 he chose both the figures and faces of film posters, orientating his production towards works of a more figurative type.

Already recognized by criticism at the close of the 1950’s as being an exponent of the “Young Roman Painting, Rotella was labelled as the ‘poster ripper’ or the ‘painter of glued paper’. At night, armed with a penknife, he not only ripped off posters but also pieces of the metal sheeting and zinc of the mounting frames of the billboard zones of the Rome City Council. In 1958 he was visited in Rome by the French critic Pierre Restany, a meeting which was to lead to a long friendship. In the same year he was included in the Roman exhibition entitled “Nuove tendenze dell’arte italiana”, organized by Lionello Venturi and held in the seat of the Rome-New York Art Foundation. In 1959 one of his works was reproduced in the review “Azimuth”, founded in Milan by Enrico Castellani and Piero Manzoni.

The curiosity on the part of the public for the artist’s extravagances, for a person who decidedly led a bohémien life, was crystallized in 1960 by way of a short film directed by Enzo Nasso dedicated to the Pittori arrabbiati [Angry Painters]. Here Rotella directed the ‘soundtrack’.

In 1960 he ‘joined’ the Nouveau Réalisme group (although he did not sign its manifesto). The theoretician of this movement was Pierre

Lo Spettacolo- Mimmo Rotella

Lo Spettacolo- Mimmo Rotella

Restany and included – amongst others – names like Klein, Tinguely, César, Spoerri, Arman and Christo. The group also included the French artists Hains, Villeglé and Dufrêne who in fact also worked on the collage, albeit in an autonomous way. By working in the most total isolation Rotella had anticipated the path of his French colleagues who were only exhibited for the first time in 1957 at the Galerie Colette Allendy in Paris.

Together with his décollages Rotella also created assemblages of objects bought from junk dealers: bottle caps and stoppers, pieces of rope, twine etc.  American Pop Art and Abstract Expressionism, together with the Informal and the spatial and matteric research works carried out in Italy at the time by Fontana and Burri, played an important role in directing Rotella’s pictorial orientation. In 1960 he met De Kooning and Rothko in Rome.  In 1961 he took part in the historical Parisian exhibition entitled “A 40° au-dessus de Dada”, supervised by Pierre Restany. In 1962 he talked about his own artistic operations at the School of Visual Arts in New York. In 1964 he was invited to take part in the Venice Biennial.

Mimmo Rotella

Mimmo Rotella

While the press increasingly more talked about the phenomenon of Affichisme Rotella moved to Paris where he began to elaborate a procedure of serial production by way of the projection of images in the negative on emulsified canvas. This operation was to be given the definition of Reportage by the artist or, and more specifically, Mec-Art in 1965 together with the art critic Otto Hanh and the painter Alain Jaquet. The same year saw his Parisian exhibition at the Galerie J.

Using typographical products, between 1967 and 1973 he created his Art-typo works, printing proofs freely chosen and reproduced on canvas. With this procedure he amused himself in insetting and superimposing advertising images: «I inverted my old approach: first I tried to disintegrate, now I try to reintegrate that matter, that reality».

At the beginning of the 1970’s he carried out a number of works by directly acting on the advertising pages of magazines with the use of solvents, reducing these either to the state of the imprint (frottage) or quite simply cancelling them (effaçage). Two years later, in 1972, he published an audacious autobiography titled “Autorotella”.

The “Plastiforme” were created in 1975: ripped posters placed on a polyurethane support with the intention of giving them tridimensionality.
In the same year he recorded his first Italian LP of phonetic poems, presented by Alfredo Todisco. In 1976 he took part in the International Recital of Sound Poetry – Poetry Action at the Atelier Annick Le Moine. Another experimentation carried out in those years was that of rolling up posters and closing them in plexiglass cubes.

On having left Paris in order to set up home and studio in Milan (1980), during the 1980’s he elaborated his “Blanks” or coperture d’affiches :

Minuit- Mimmo Rotella

Minuit- Mimmo Rotella

zeroed advertising posters covered with white sheets of paper – as happens for posters that are replaced or have finished their billboard lease – following a conceptual operation. 1984 saw him once again using brushes and acrylic colours in order to create the second cycle of works dedicated to the cinema: Cinecittà 2.

In 1986 he visited Cuba, exhibiting his works at the Havana University. During his stay he also took part in a performance: the laceration of posters in the Square of the city. During the same year he held a series of talks at the Domus Academy in Milan.

He then created his sovrapitture (overpaintings), inspired by the up-to-date theme of graffiti, pictorially intervening on the advertising posters that were torn and then glued on canvas (and from 1987 also ripped posters glued on a support of sheet metal). He drew anonymous writings, like the ones it is possible to read on city walls: signs, love notes and political slogans/epithets in a double message.

Mimmo Rotella

Mimmo Rotella

In 1990 he took part in the “Art et Pub” exhibition held at the Centre Pompidou in Paris and in the “High and Low” exhibition held in New York at the Museum of Modern Art.  In 1991 he married the young Russian economist, Inna Agarounova, who in 1993 gave birth to Asya.
In 1992 he was conferred the title of Officiel des arts et des Lettres by the French Minister of Culture, Jack Lang.

In 1994 he was invited to take part in “Italian Metamorphosis” held at the Guggenheim Museum in

Mimmo Rotella

Mimmo Rotella

New York. In 1996 he took part in “Face … l’Histoire” at the Centre Pompidou and in the exhibition entitled “Halls of Mirrors” held at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles (an exhibition that was to tour the world, Rome included). 1996 also saw the Internet inauguration of a one-man exhibition which was diffused online – the first event of its kind in Italy.

In 1997 Rotella dedicated the cycle of works entitled “Felliniana” to the films by Federico Fellini.  In 1999 the Mayor of his natal city, Sergio Abramo, signed a City Council order authorizing Rotella to freely remove posters in Catanzaro and its environs.

Biography above is from Ro Gallery’s website.

I decided to use Marilyn Monroe movie posters for my piece today since after researching the artist I noticed he used her a lot.  I really enjoyed creating today’s piece.  There was something very relaxing about ripping the paper and adhering it in patterns on the canvas.  I hope you enjoy my piece today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 239!

Best,
Linda

Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View
Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

photo 2 photo 3 photo 4 photo 5

Day 237- Paul Cézanne- “The Father of Us All”

It’s Day 237 and it’s funny because I thought I had already done a tribute to today’s artist!  I think that’s a side-effect to this project at this point.  I can’t even remember all the artists I’ve done.  I am however feeling a little pressure to do the famous/greats of our times and the intimidation factor is heightening!  Join me in honoring Paul Cézanne today!

Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne

Apples 1878- Paul Cezanne

Apples 1878- Paul Cezanne

Paul Cézanne (US /sˈzæn/ or UK /sɨˈzæn/French: [pɔl sezan]; 1839–1906) was a French artist and Post-Impressionist painter whose work laid the foundations of the transition from the 19th-century conception of artistic endeavour to a new and radically different world of art in the 20th century. Cézanne’s often repetitive, exploratory brushstrokes are highly characteristic and clearly recognizable. He used planes of colour and small brushstrokes that build up to form complex fields. The paintings convey Cézanne’s intense study of his subjects.

Cézanne can be said to form the bridge between late 19th-century Impressionism and

Still life with a Ginger Jar and Eggplants- Paul Cezanne

Still life with a Ginger Jar and Eggplants- Paul Cezanne

the early 20th century’s new line of artistic enquiry, Cubism. Both Matisse and Picasso are said to have remarked that Cézanne “is the father of us all.”

The Cézannes lived in the town of Cesana now in West Piedmont, and the surname may be of Italian origin. Paul Cézanne was born on 19 January 1839 in Aix-en-Provence, inProvence in the South of France. On 22 February, Paul was baptized in the Église de la Madeleine, with his grandmother and uncle Louis as godparents.  His father, Louis-Auguste Cézanne (28 July 1798 – 23 October 1886), was the co-founder of a banking firm that prospered throughout the artist’s life, affording him financial security that was unavailable to most of his contemporaries and eventually resulting in a large inheritance.

His mother, Anne Elisabeth Honorine Aubert (24 September 1814 – 25 October 1897), was “vivacious and romantic, but quick to take offence”. It was from her that Cézanne got his conception and vision of life. He also had two younger sisters, Marie and Rose, with whom he went to a primary school every day.

Still Life With Skull - Paul Cezanne

Still Life With Skull – Paul Cezanne

At the age of ten Paul entered the Saint Joseph school in Aix.  In 1852 Cézanne entered the Collège Bourbon (now Collège Mignet), where he met and became friends with Émile Zola, who was in a less advanced class, as well as Baptistin Baille—three friends who would come to be known as “les trois inséparables” (the three inseparables). He stayed there for six years, though in the last two years he was a day scholar. In 1857 he began attending the Free Municipal School of Drawing in Aix, where he studied drawing under Joseph Gibert, a Spanish monk. From 1858 to 1861, complying with his father’s wishes, Cézanne attended the law school of the University of Aix, while also receiving drawing lessons.

Going against the objections of his banker father, he committed himself to pursuing his artistic development and left Aix for Paris in 1861. He was strongly encouraged to make this decision by Zola, who was already living in the capital at the time. Eventually, his father reconciled with Cézanne and supported his choice of career. Cézanne later received an inheritance of 400,000 francs (£218,363.62) from his father, which rid him of all financial worries.

In Paris, Cézanne met the Impressionist Camille Pissarro. Initially the friendship formed in the mid-1860s between Pissarro and Cézanne was that of master and disciple, in which Pissarro exerted a formative influence on the younger artist. Over the course of the following decade their landscape painting excursions together, in Louveciennes and Pontoise, led to a collaborative working relationship between equals.

Cézanne’s early work is often concerned with the figure in the landscape and includes many paintings of groups of large, heavy figures in the

Still life with Apples- Paul Cezanne

Still life with Apples- Paul Cezanne

landscape, imaginatively painted. Later in his career, he became more interested in working from direct observation and gradually developed a light, airy painting style. Nevertheless, in Cézanne’s mature work there is the development of a solidified, almost architectural style of painting. Throughout his life he struggled to develop an authentic observation of the seen world by the most accurate method of representing it in paint that he could find. To this end, he structurally ordered whatever he perceived into simple forms and colour planes. His statement “I want to make of impressionism something solid and lasting like the art in the museums”, and his contention that he was recreating Poussin “after nature” underscored his desire to unite observation of nature with the permanence of classical composition.

Cézanne was interested in the simplification of naturally occurring forms to their geometric essentials: he wanted to “treat nature by the cylinder, the sphere, the cone” (a tree trunk may be conceived of as a cylinder, an apple or orange a sphere, for example). Additionally, Cézanne’s desire to capture the truth of perception led him to explore binocular vision graphically, rendering slightly different, yet simultaneous visual perceptions of the same phenomena to provide the viewer with an aesthetic experience of depth different from those of earlier ideals of perspective, in particular single-point perspective. Cézanne’s innovations have prompted critics to suggest such varied explanations as sick retinas, pure vision, and the influence of the steam railway.

Self-Portrait- Paul Cezanne

Self-Portrait- Paul Cezanne

Cézanne’s paintings were shown in the first exhibition of the Salon des Refusés in 1863, which displayed works not accepted by the jury of the official Paris Salon. The Salon rejected Cézanne’s submissions every year from 1864 to 1869. He continued to submit works to the Salon until 1882. In that year, through the intervention of fellow artist Antoine Guillemet, he exhibited Portrait of Louis-Auguste Cézanne, Father of the Artist, reading ‘l’Evénement’, 1866 (National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.), his first and last successful submission to the Salon.

Before 1895 Cézanne exhibited twice with the Impressionists (at the first Impressionist exhibition in 1874 and the third Impressionist exhibition in 1877). In later years a few individual paintings were shown at various venues, until 1895, when the Parisian dealer, Ambroise Vollard, gave the artist his first solo exhibition. Despite the increasing public recognition and financial success, Cézanne chose to work in increasing artistic isolation, usually painting in the south of France, in his beloved Provence, far from Paris.

He concentrated on a few subjects and was equally proficient in each of these genres: still lifes,

Mont Sainte Victoire- Paul Cezanne

Mont Sainte Victoire- Paul Cezanne

portraits, landscapes and studies of bathers. For the last, Cézanne was compelled to design from his imagination, due to a lack of available nude models. Like the landscapes, his portraits were drawn from that which was familiar, so that not only his wife and son but local peasants, children and his art dealer served as subjects. His still lifes are at once decorative in design, painted with thick, flat surfaces, yet with a weight reminiscent of Gustave Courbet. The ‘props’ for his works are still to be found, as he left them, in his studio (atelier), in the suburbs of modern Aix.

Although religious images appeared less frequently in Cézanne’s later work, he remained a devout Roman Catholic and said, “When I judge

Portrait of Madame Cezanne- Paul Cezanne

Portrait of Madame Cezanne- Paul Cezanne

art, I take my painting and put it next to a God-made object like a tree or flower. If it clashes, it is not art.”

Cézanne’s paintings were not well received among the petty bourgeoisie of Aix. In 1903 Henri Rochefort visited the auction of paintings that had been in Zola’s possession and published on 9 March 1903 in L’Intransigeant a highly critical article entitled “Love for the Ugly”. Rochefort describes how spectators had supposedly experienced laughing fits, when seeing the paintings of “an ultra-impressionist named Cézanne”. Erroneously believing that Cézanne’s paintings in fact represented “the art dear to Zola” (Rochefort’s Dreyfusard arch-enemy), he drew connections between “Dreyfusard snobs,” so-called after the French officer who was accused but innocent of having sold defense plans to Germany, and Zola’s supposedly cherished artist, Cézanne. The public in Aix was outraged, and for many days, copies of L’Intransigeant appeared on Cézanne’s door-mat with messages asking him to leave the town “he was dishonouring”.

Still Life Pitcher and Fruit 1894- Paul Cezanne

Still Life Pitcher and Fruit 1894- Paul Cezanne

One day, Cézanne was caught in a storm while working in the field. Only after working for two hours under a downpour did he decide to go home; but on the way he collapsed. He was taken home by a passing driver. His old housekeeper rubbed his arms and legs to restore the circulation; as a result, he regained consciousness. On the following day, he intended to continue working, but later on he fainted; the model with whom he was working called for help; he was put to bed, and he never left it. He died a few days later, on 22 October 1906. He died of pneumonia and was buried at the Saint-Pierre Cemetery in his hometown of Aix-en-Provence.

Partial biography is from wikipedia.  It’s a very long one so if you’re interested in all his eras/styles please visit it!

~

Reference for my piece.  Apples from my neighbors tree that fall into my backyard. :)

Reference for my piece. Apples from my neighbors tree that fall into my backyard. 🙂

I of course had to do a still life with apples!  I hope you enjoy my piece.  I am really working hard to get the impressionistic painting style down and I think I’m getting more comfortable with it.  The only issue I have with this piece is the shadows of the apples on the plate…I’m going to have to play around with shading and experiment more with that.  I feel like it may be a little too hard edged.  OR I’m just over-analyzing things.   I still feel like I could’ve been a little softer with the shading.  Anyways, hope you enjoy and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 238!

Best,

Linda

Still Life with Apples- Tribute to Paul Cezanne Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Still Life with Apples- Tribute to Paul Cezanne
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Still Life with Apples- Tribute to Paul Cezanne Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Still Life with Apples- Tribute to Paul Cezanne
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Still Life with Apples- Tribute to Paul Cezanne Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Still Life with Apples- Tribute to Paul Cezanne
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Still Life with Apples- Tribute to Paul Cezanne Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Still Life with Apples- Tribute to Paul Cezanne
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Still Life with Apples- Tribute to Paul Cezanne Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Still Life with Apples- Tribute to Paul Cezanne
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 236- Claude Monet- Never Finished

It’s Day 236 and I had a nice relaxing day.  Spent quite a bit of time on my tribute today since the artist is one of the most renown artist’s in history!  Join me in honoring Claude Monet today.

Claude Monet- Self Portrait

Claude Monet- Self Portrait

Poppy Field near Giverny 1885- Claude Monet

Poppy Field near Giverny 1885- Claude Monet

Oscar-Claude Monet (French: [klod mɔnɛ]; 14 November 1840 – 5 December 1926) was a founder of French Impressionist painting, and the most consistent and prolific practitioner of the movement’s philosophy of expressing one’s perceptions before nature, especially as applied to plein-air landscape painting. The term “Impressionism” is derived from the title of his painting Impression, soleil levant (Impression, Sunrise), which was exhibited in 1874 in the first of the independent exhibitions mounted by Monet and his associates as an alternative to the Salon de Paris.

Monet’s ambition of documenting the French countryside led him to adopt a method of painting the same scene many times in order to capture the changing of light and the passing of the seasons. From 1883 Monet lived in Giverny, where he purchased a house and property, and began a vast landscaping project which included lily ponds that would become the subjects of his best-known works. In 1899 he began painting the water lilies, first in vertical views with a Japanese bridge as a central feature, and later in the series of large-scale paintings that was to occupy him continuously for the next 20 years of his life.

From the late 1860s, Monet and other like-minded artists met with rejection from the conservative Académie des Beaux-Artswhich held its

Waterlilies Giverny- Claude Monet

Waterlilies Giverny- Claude Monet

annual exhibition at the Salon de Paris. During the latter part of 1873, Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Camille Pissarro, and Alfred Sisley organized the Société anonyme des artistes peintres, sculpteurs et graveurs (Cooperative and Anonymous Association of Painters, Sculptors, and Engravers) to exhibit their artworks independently. At their first exhibition, held in April 1874, Monet exhibited the work that was to give the group its lasting name.

Impression, Sunrise was painted in 1872, depicting a Le Havre port landscape. From the painting’s title the art critic Louis Leroy, in his review, “L’Exposition des Impressionnistes,” which appeared in Le Charivari, coined the term “Impressionism”. It was intended as disparagement but the Impressionists appropriated the term for themselves.

Field of Corn- Claude Monet

Field of Corn- Claude Monet

Claude Monet was born on 14 November 1840 on the 5th floor of 45 rue Laffitte, in the 9th arrondissement of Paris. He was the second son of Claude Adolphe Monet and Louise Justine Aubrée Monet, both of them second-generation Parisians. On 20 May 1841, he was baptized in the local parish church, Notre-Dame-de-Lorette, as Oscar-Claude, but his parents called him simply Oscar. (He signed his juvenilia “O. Monet”.) Despite being baptized Catholic, Monet later became an atheist.

In 1845, his family moved to Le Havre in Normandy. His father wanted him to go into the family grocery business, but Monet wanted to become an artist. His mother was a singer.

On 1 April 1851, Monet entered Le Havre secondary school of the arts. Locals knew him well for his charcoal caricatures, which he would sell for ten to twenty francs. Monet also undertook his first drawing lessons from Jacques-François Ochard, a former student of Jacques-Louis David. On the beaches of Normandy around 1856 he met fellow artistEugène Boudin, who became his mentor and taught him to use oil paints. Boudin taught Monet “en plein air” (outdoor) techniques for painting. Both received the influence ofJohan Barthold Jongkind.

On 28 January 1857, his mother died. At the age of sixteen, he left school and went to live with his widowed, childless aunt, Marie-Jeanne

Claude Monet - A Pathway in Monet's Garden A Pathway in Monet's Garden

Claude Monet – A Pathway in Monet’s Garden A Pathway in Monet’s Garden

Lecadre.

When Monet traveled to Paris to visit the Louvre, he witnessed painters copying from the old masters. Having brought his paints and other tools with him, he would instead go and sit by a window and paint what he saw. Monet was in Paris for several years and met other young painters, including Édouard Manet and others who would become friends and fellow Impressionists.

In June 1861, Monet joined the First Regiment of African Light Cavalry in Algeria for a seven-year commitment, but, two years later, after he had contracted typhoid fever, his aunt intervened to get him out of the army if he agreed to complete an art course at an art school. It is possible that the Dutch painter Johan Barthold Jongkind, whom Monet knew, may have prompted his aunt on this matter. Disillusioned with the traditional art taught at art schools, in 1862 Monet became a student of Charles Gleyre in Paris, where he met Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Frédéric Bazille and Alfred Sisley. Together they shared new approaches to art, painting the effects of light en plein air with broken color and rapid brushstrokes, in what later came to be known as Impressionism.

The Poppy Field near Argenteuil- Claude Monet

The Poppy Field near Argenteuil- Claude Monet

In January 1865 Monet was working on a version of Le déjeuner sur l’herbe, aiming to present it for hanging at the Salon, which had rejected Manet’s Le déjeuner sur l’herbe two years earlier.  Monet’s painting was very large and could not be completed in time. (It was later cut up, with parts now in different galleries.) Monet submitted instead a painting of Camille or The Woman in the Green Dress (La femme à la robe verte), one of many works using his future wife, Camille Doncieux as his model. This painting and a small landscape both were both hung.

The following year Monet used Camille for his model in Women in the Garden, and On the Bank of the Seine, Bennecourt in 1868. Camille became pregnant and gave birth to their first child, Jean, in 1867. Monet and Camille married on 28 June 1870, just before the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian War, and, after their excursion to London and

Claude Monet

Claude Monet

Zaandam, they moved to Argenteuil, in December 1871. During this time Monet painted various works of modern life. He and Camille lived in poverty for most of this period. Following the successful exhibition of some maritime paintings, and the winning of a silver medal at Le Havre, Monet’s paintings were seized by creditors, from whom they were bought back by a shipping merchant, Gaudibert, who was also a patron of Boudin.

The first Impressionist exhibition was held in 1874 at 35 boulevard des Capucines, Paris, from 15 April to 15 May. The primary purpose of the participants was not so much to promote a new style, but to free themselves from the constraints of the Salon de Paris. The exhibition, open to anyone prepared to pay 60 francs, gave artists the opportunity to show their work without the interference of a jury.

Renoir chaired the hanging committee and did most of the work himself, as others members failed to present themselves.

Venice Twilight- Claude Monet

Venice Twilight- Claude Monet

In addition to Impression: Sunrise (pictured above) Monet presented four oil paintings and seven pastels. Among the paintings he displayed was The Luncheon (1868), which features Camille Doncieux and Jean Monet, and which had been rejected by the Paris Salon of 1870. Also in this exhibition was a painting titled Boulevard des Capucines, a painting of the boulevard done from the photographer Nadar’s apartment at no. 35. Monet painted the subject twice and it is uncertain which of the two pictures, that now in the Pushkin Museum in Moscow, or that in the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City was the painting that appeared in the groundbreaking 1874 exhibition, though more recently the Moscow picture has been favored.  Altogether, 165 works were exhibited in the exhibition, including 4 oils, 2 pastels and 3 watercolors by Morisot; 6 oils and 1 pastel by Renoir; 10 works by Degas; 5 by Pissarro; 3 by Cézanne; and 3 by Guillaumin. Several works were on loan, including Cézanne’s Modern Olympia, Morisot’s Hide and Seek (owned by Manet) and 2 landscapes by Sisley that had been purchased by Durand-Ruel.

The total attendance is estimated at 3500 and some works did sell, though some exhibitors had placed their prices too high. Pissarro was asking 1000 francs for The Orchard and Monet the same for Impression: Sunrise, neither of which sold. Renoir failed to obtain the 500 francs he was asking for La Loge, but later sold it for 450 francs to Père Martin, dealer and supporter of the group.

After several difficult months following the death of Camille, Monet began to create some of his best paintings of the 19th century. During the

Camille Monet on a Bench- Claude Monet

Camille Monet on a Bench- Claude Monet

early 1880s, Monet painted several groups of landscapes and seascapes in what he considered to be campaigns to document the French countryside. These began to evolve into series of pictures in which he documented the same scene many times in order to capture the changing of light and the passing of the seasons.

At the beginning of May 1883, Monet and his large family rented a house and 2 acres (8,100 m2) from a local landowner. The house was situated near the main road between the towns of Vernon and Gasny at Giverny. There was a barn that doubled as a painting studio, orchards and a small garden. The house was close enough to the local schools for the children to attend and the surrounding landscape offered many suitable motifs for Monet’s work. The family worked and built up the gardens and Monet’s fortunes began to change for the better as his dealer Paul Durand-Ruel had increasing success in selling his paintings. By November 1890, Monet was prosperous enough to buy the house, the surrounding buildings and the land for his gardens. During the 1890s, Monet built a greenhouse and a second studio, a spacious building well lit with skylights.

Monet wrote daily instructions to his gardener, precise designs and layouts for plantings, and invoices for his floral purchases and his collection of botany books. As Monet’s wealth grew, his garden evolved. He remained its architect, even after he hired seven gardeners.

Monet purchased additional land with a water meadow. In 1893 he began a vast landscaping project which included lily ponds that would

The Studio Boat- Claude Monet

The Studio Boat- Claude Monet

become the subjects of his best-known works. White water lilies local to France were planted along with imported cultivars from South America and Egypt, resulting in a range of colours including yellow, blue and white lilies that turned pink with age. In 1899 he began painting the water lilies, first in vertical views with a Japanese bridge as a central feature, and later on the series of large-scale paintings that was to occupy him continuously for the next 20 years of his life. This scenery, with its alternating light and mirror-like reflections, became an integral part of his work. By the mid-1910s Monet had achieved:

a completely new, fluid, and somewhat audacious style of painting in which the water-lily pond became the point of departure for an almost abstract art

—Gary Tinterow

Monet’s second wife, Alice, died in 1911 and his oldest son Jean, who had married Alice’s daughter Blanche, Monet’s particular favourite, died in 1914. After Alice died, Blanche looked after and cared for Monet. It was during this time that Monet began to develop the first signs of cataracts.

The Artists House at Argenteuil- Claude Monet

The Artists House at Argenteuil- Claude Monet

During World War I, in which his younger son Michel served and his friend and admirer Clemenceau led the French nation, Monet painted a series of weeping willow trees as homage to the French fallen soldiers. In 1923, he underwent two operations to remove his cataracts. The paintings done while the cataracts affected his vision have a general reddish tone, which is characteristic of the vision of cataract victims. It may also be that after surgery he was able to see certain ultraviolet wavelengths of light that are normally excluded by the lens of the eye; this may have had an effect on the colors he perceived. After his operations he even repainted some of these paintings, with bluer water lilies than before.

Monet died of lung cancer on 5 December 1926 at the age of 86 and is buried in the Giverny church cemetery. Monet had insisted that the occasion be simple; thus only about fifty people attended the ceremony.

His home, garden, and waterlily pond were bequeathed by his son Michel, his only heir, to the French Academy of Fine Arts (part of the Institut de France) in 1966. Through the Fondation Claude Monet, the house and gardens were opened for visits in 1980, following restoration. In addition to souvenirs of Monet and other objects of his life, the house contains his collection of Japanese woodcut prints. The house and garden, along with theMuseum of Impressionism Giverny, are major attractions in Giverny, which hosts tourists from all over the world.

Partial biography is from wikipedia.

“I’m never finished with my paintings; the further I get, the more I seek the impossible and the more powerless I feel. ”
– Claude Monet

I hope I did Claude Monet justice today.  Impressionism is one of the styles of painting that I for some reason find very difficult.  That’s why I had been avoiding him and Van Gogh.  After today, I’m feeling a little better about it.  I hope you enjoy my piece and I will see you tomorrow on Day 237!

Best, Linda

Field of Poppies- Tribute to Claude Monet Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Field of Poppies- Tribute to Claude Monet
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Field of Poppies- Tribute to Claude Monet Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Field of Poppies- Tribute to Claude Monet
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Field of Poppies- Tribute to Claude Monet Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Field of Poppies- Tribute to Claude Monet
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Field of Poppies- Tribute to Claude Monet Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Field of Poppies- Tribute to Claude Monet
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Field of Poppies- Tribute to Claude Monet Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Field of Poppies- Tribute to Claude Monet
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 235- Giorgio Cavallon- Absorbing Space

It’s Day 235 and tonight I had an improv show so my brain has been there all day.  But I did have a good time painting my piece in honor of Giorgio Cavallon today.  His wikipedia page was pretty skimpy, but I found his obituary in the New York Times which was really nice.

Giorgio Cavallon

Giorgio Cavallon

Untitled- Giorgio Cavallon

Untitled- Giorgio Cavallon

Giorgio Cavallon, a pioneer Abstract Expressionist who brought to American painting a Mediterranean feeling for color and light, died last night at New York Hospital. He was 85 years old and lived in Manhattan.

While not widely known to the general art public, Mr. Cavallon’s airy, luminous, cautiously daring

Cape Cod Dunes- Giorgio Cavallon

Cape Cod Dunes- Giorgio Cavallon

work has long had a llllowing among poets and painters. ”There are those who escape fame, but not respect,” wrote the Abstract Expressionist scholar Francis V. O’Connor in a poem to Mr. Cavallon that was published in the Art Bulletin last year.

William Agee, a historian of American art, said: ”He never made the official list of the big-name artists of that generation of Abstract Expressionists. I had conditioned myself to think of him as a lesser artist. But he kept showing us to be wrong in that.”

In Mr. Cavallon’s paintings, rectangles of color, their edges soft and irregular, are woven into screens or veils that seem diaphanous yet impenetrable, light, yet capable of absorbing all the space behind and in front of the surface.

Untitled 1947- Giorgio Cavallon

Untitled 1947- Giorgio Cavallon

The paintings are carefully but intuitively balanced. Learning from Cezanne and Mondrian and then studying with Hans Hofmann, Mr. Cavallon put down one color here and another there, then tested and expanded their relationship and opened it up into others, finally tying everything together with a precision few of his peers could match.

Writing about the experience of a Cavallon exhibition, Frank O’Hara, the poet and critic, wrote in 1958: ”It resembles a town in southern Italy the walls of which have absorbed the sunlight for centuries and even on a cloudy or raining day give off the intense light of what they have absorbed.” The ”final luminosity,” Mr. O’Hara wrote, is ”achieved by white.”

Mr. Cavallon was born on March 3, 1904, in the village of Sorio in the province of

Untitled 1964- Giorgio Cavallon

Untitled 1964- Giorgio Cavallon

Venice. His parents were Augusto Cavallon, a cabinetmaker who worked in both Italy and the United States, and Agnese Scarsi.

When Augusto served in the Italian Army during World War I, he sent his two daughters to a convent and his son to the farm of his brother-in-law, Dominico Cavallon. A Farm Child’s Life

Untitled- Giorgio Cavallon

Untitled- Giorgio Cavallon

”When Giorgio was a small child,” said the painter Vita Petersen, a longtime friend, ”he had to get up at 4 and bring the cows to the field and he was so tired that he took the oxen by the horns and went to sleep, swinging between the horns.”

During the war Mr. Cavallon drew in the earth. Sometimes he scratched drawings on bombshells.

He came to the United States in 1920 with his father and two sisters and settled in Springfield, Mass. In 1926, he moved to New York, where he remained – except for 1930 to 1933, when he returned to Italy.

He began as a figurative painter and studied at the National Academy of Design. He began exploring abstraction in the 1930’s but like other Abstract Expressionists, did not take the full plunge until the late 1940’s.

In 1936 he was a founding member of the American Abstract Artists group, a contentious and polemical organization that championed the cause of abstract art. The group’s link between political radicalism and abstraction helps explain Mr. Cavallon’s unshakable faith in

Giorgio Cavallon

Giorgio Cavallon

abstraction and the consistently upbeat, almost utopian feeling of his paintings. He Did It His Way

Mr. Cavallon was remarkably self-reliant. He preferred to do everything by himself, by hand. He built his own freezer, stove and sofa, made his duck press, motorized his pasta machine and was known to spend days disassembling and assembling cars.

He made his own paints. ”He ground his own pigments, mixed it with oil and put it in the tubes,” Mrs. Petersen said.

He had a reputation as an excellent cook. Mushrooms were a passion, and he used to hunt for them with the composer John Cage. His recipes for spaghetti with clam-and-anchovy sauce, for spit-roasted leg of lamb and for risotto with mussels found their way into Craig Claiborne’s cooking column in The New York Times in 1969.

Mr. Cavallon exhibited with several New York galleries, including Egan, A. M. Sachs, Gruenebaum and Jason McCoy. He was given a retrospective by the Neuberger Museum in Purchase, N.Y., in 1977. Works in Many Collections

Giorgio Cavallon

Giorgio Cavallon

Last year, his work was shown at the Peggy Guggenheim Foundation in Venice. His work is in the collection of numerous major museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art. In March there is to be a Cavallon retrospective at the William Benton Museum of the University of Connecticut at Storrs.

In 1983 he was given the Marjorie Peabody Waite Award, granted to an ”older artist for continuing achievement” by the American Institute of Arts and Letters.

His marriage to Fabiola Caron, a singer, ended in divorce. He later married Linda Lindeberg, a painter, who died in 1973.

He is survived by his sisters, Domenica Italia Shulman of Storrs, Conn., and Marie Ida Kitzmeyer of West Brookfield, Mass., and St. Petersburg, Fla.

~

I hope you enjoy my tribute today!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 236!

Best, Linda

Untitled 235- Tribute to Giorgio Cavallon Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Untitled 235- Tribute to Giorgio Cavallon
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Untitled 235- Tribute to Giorgio Cavallon Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Untitled 235- Tribute to Giorgio Cavallon
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Untitled 235- Tribute to Giorgio Cavallon Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Untitled 235- Tribute to Giorgio Cavallon
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Untitled 235- Tribute to Giorgio Cavallon Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Untitled 235- Tribute to Giorgio Cavallon
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Untitled 235- Tribute to Giorgio Cavallon Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Untitled 235- Tribute to Giorgio Cavallon
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 234- Bobby Mathieson- Strongly Visceral

It’s Day 234 and I’m kind of rushing around to get stuff done before heading to improv rehearsal…we have a show tomorrow night so I’m excited. 🙂  I had so much fun and learned a bunch painting today’s piece today.  I really fell in love with this artist’s style.  It trained me to let go and just paint with feeling, which is what I’m trying to apply to almost everything in my life…stop being so analytical! 😉  Join me in honoring Bobby Mathieson today.

Bobby Mathieson

Bobby Mathieson

Bobby Mathieson – Do droids have feelings?

Bobby Mathieson – Do droids have feelings?

Bobby Mathieson attended Vancouver Film School and Emily Carr Institute of Fine Art and Design, and lives and works in Toronto, Ontario. Recently, Mathieson’s work has been featured in solo and group exhibitions in Toronto, New York City, Southampton and Miami.

Below is an interview from Toro Magazine by: Barry Chong

Toronto Painter Bobby Mathieson

By: Barry Chong
After generating a lot of buzz at the Toronto International Art Fair in October, Bobby Mathieson is ready explode, both on the canvas and in the world of fine art. His work is a collision of Pop art subject matter and the gestural exhilaration of Abstract Expressionism. Punctuated by his heavy paint application, Mathieson’s work inhabits the reservoirs of childhood imagination, a world both playful and terrifying.

Beginning January 16, Mathieson’s first solo exhibit Heroes — a collection of atypical celebrity portraits — will be on display at Toronto’s Neubacher Shor Contemporary gallery.

TORO spoke with Mathieson about the pros and cons of art as an institution, how he developed his frenetic style, and his fascination with

Davey, 2012 Oil on Wood 16 x 20

Davey, 2012
Oil on Wood
16 x 20

elves.

What’s your opinion of art school?

I don’t care much for its scholastic side — the dogma of art school can get into people’s minds and ruin the mystery or excitement. And many art schools are decreasing the organic and increasing the digital. As a painter and drawer, that is shocking to me.

A few months ago, we spoke with artist Adrian Williams. He told us, “If you can’t draw, you can’t think in certain ways.” Do you agree?

Bobby Mathieson

Bobby Mathieson

Definitely. I still have a classical animation degree. I studied anatomy and some mathematical skill was involved, and it was all hand drawn. You need that technical background to explore. You can’t abstract from nothing. Picasso’s work goes back to a primal, child-like place, but his early work was photorealistic.

So art for you is about going back?

All children draw. All children are artists. But for whatever reason, they go in other directions and lose that.

How important is humour in your work?

It’s important to not take things too seriously, but having a joke in a painting is not necessary. My art isn’t overtly humourous but I’ll sneak in references through heavy wordplay in the title. If you get the gag, you get the gag. It’s very nerdy in that regard.

Why did you choose paint over other mediums?

I had a paint sponsorship in Amsterdam a few years ago, so my thick paint application style comes

 Bobby Mathieson – Eva Hesse as an Elf


Bobby Mathieson – Eva Hesse as an Elf

from actually having a lot of paint! But aesthetically, I really enjoy paintings that look like paintings. Using paint is also a quick way to get to what I want.

Your work blends Pop art vibrancy with a messy, almost violent form.

The application can be violent at times. I think “visceral” is the word. All of my paintings — even the large ones — are painted in one sitting. I don’t ever go back to them to fuss and muss. That’s how that energy is transcribed.

How do you know when to stop painting?

That’s a very tricky question. Jackson Pollock would respond, “How do you know when you’re finished making love?” Being a drummer, I know when not to “add too much.” The painting’s done when I’m comfortable and I don’t feel the need to be with it anymore. It’s like the end of a conversation, or when you finish your lunch.

With Heroes, the portraits are abstracted (perverted, even) but what anchors them are the subjects’ striking eyes. Can you talk about that?

Bobby Mathieson: Venn, 2013

Bobby Mathieson: Venn, 2013

That came about from watching a lot of Scooby Doo — the paintings with moving eyes. I started throwing the eyes in last year and people responded to them. They connect the viewer to the portrait. The eyes are very important, as are the teeth!

Yes, the monster teeth.

Or elf teeth. Some of the figures have elf ears. That’s just me having fun. They give the portraits a sinister, “what the fuck” look. I’ve been playing a lot of LEGO Lord of the Rings for Xbox. That’s what the work’s about — whatever I’m obsessing over in pop culture.

What are the limits of portraiture?

If you go too far, if you hide the origins, then it becomes abstract art and loses its impact. In some

Easy Duz It- Bobby Mathieson

Easy Duz It- Bobby Mathieson

of my paintings like Camelot , a diptych of Marilyn Monroe and John F. Kennedy, you can barely recognize the faces. That’s about as far as I can go. When Goya was a housepainter, his work didn’t progress because he was stuck in that format. It’s hard to put a narrative into portraiture.

So what’s next?

I’m going to take a break for a while. Heroes is my first solo show and basically my arrival. The next step is seeing what the response is.

~

I’m not sure if I fully captured the artist’s essence, but I think I did okay and learned a lot and would like to try a larger piece like this in the future.  I like how it came out regardless!  I hope you enjoy my piece today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 235!  Best, Linda

Nevermore- Tribute to Bobby Mathieson Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Nevermore- Tribute to Bobby Mathieson
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Nevermore- Tribute to Bobby Mathieson Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Nevermore- Tribute to Bobby Mathieson
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Nevermore- Tribute to Bobby Mathieson Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Nevermore- Tribute to Bobby Mathieson
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Nevermore- Tribute to Bobby Mathieson Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Nevermore- Tribute to Bobby Mathieson
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Nevermore- Tribute to Bobby Mathieson Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Nevermore- Tribute to Bobby Mathieson
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas