Day 120- Bob Law- Occasionally Romantic

It’s Day 120 and yes, it took me a while to realize that my artist that I’m doing today is named Bob Law…Blah blah…for you Arrested Development fans.  But, no…seriously, this Bob Law is not Scott Baio but a British minimalist artist (the founding father of British minimalism)!  Join me in honoring Bob Law today!  Oh and it’s freaking hot outside.

Bob Law

Bob Law

 

Bob Law

Bob Law

Bob Law (January 22, 1934 – April 17, 2004) was a founding father of British Minimalism concerning painting and sculpture. A prolific artist throughout his lifetime, Law struggled with ideas surrounding the legitimacy and significance of abstract art.

Law was born in Middlesex, England in 1934, and moved to St Ives in 1957 where he painted and

Bob Law

Bob Law

made pots. He had been particularly influenced by meetings with Peter Lanyon and Ben Nicholson in the late 1950s. In 1960 Bob Law moved away from Cornwall.

Bob Law’s artistic career started in the late 1950s when he moved to St.Ives. Inspired by the landscape, these seemingly simple outlines around the perimeter of the paper lead to a minimalist exploration of lines, shapes and forms. He was influenced in this direction by his discovery of the abstract paintings of Barnett Newman and Mark Rothko that he saw in 1959 at the Tate Gallery. Law then went on to make a series of black paintings out of different combinations of dark colours that were exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art Oxford in 1974.

Black Drawing 1272- Bob Law

Black Drawing 1272- Bob Law

He took up sculpture in the 1970s, which extended and expanded his oeuvre.

Double Cross 2000 Bob Law 1934-2004 Purchased 2004 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/P78908

Double Cross 2000 Bob Law 1934-2004 Purchased 2004 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/P78908

He returned to live in the west of Cornwall in 1997 and died in April 2004.

2009 saw the publication of Bob Law: A Retrospective by Ridinghouse, a comprehensive monograph that introduces the artist, his history and his work. This publication brings together the largest group of paintings, drawings and sculpture by Bob Law to date. In addition to 300 images, 6 texts present different moments and themes in Law’s work. Anna Lovatt explores the role of drawing throughout; Jo Melvin introduces pivotal exhibitions during the 1960s and 70s; Anthony Bond provides an overview of the work and its relationship to art history and

Cross & Broken Double Cross- Bob Law

Cross & Broken Double Cross- Bob Law

David Batchelor revisits his 1999 essay which describes visual and conceptual themes throughout Law’s work. Richard Cork’s 1974 interview with Bob Law as well as Giuseppe Panza’s recollection of the artists are both reproduced in this volume.

Biography is from wikipedia.

Drawing 24.4.60 1960 Bob Law 1934-2004 Purchased 1973 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T01774

Drawing 24.4.60 1960 Bob Law 1934-2004 Purchased 1973 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T01774

Read a great article by Richard Saltoun and Karsten Schubert on Bob Law here at artcornwall.org.  Here’s an excerpt.

Bob Law takes up a special place in the memories of people who knew him. To write about him is not an easy task; he was in turn affectionate and brutal, sincere and treacherous, matter-of-fact and occasionally romantic. He instilled a particular brand of loyalty and affection in his friends, a feeling that remains. He was arguably the foremost British minimalist artist of the 1970s, yet somehow he has become almost forgotten – written out of the narratives of postwar art, whether British or international. What makes this puzzling is the fact that – the quality of the work aside – once Law had received critical attention in the early 1960s, he seems to have had all the opportunities to sustain his art and career. By the standards of his time, he had a stellar cast of supporters.

He was exhibited at Konrad Fischer and the Lisson Gallery, collected by Alan Power and Giuseppe Panza and, in 1977, was the subject of a

Drawing 25.4.60 1960 Bob Law 1934-2004 Purchased 1973 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T01775

Drawing 25.4.60 1960 Bob Law 1934-2004 Purchased 1973 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T01775

major Whitechapel retrospective curated by Nicholas Serota and Sandy Nairne. It was a tiny yet influential group, but the art world was a tiny place. Financially it did not amount to much more than subsistence but this was an art world before money. With all this he should have achieved stability but he did not.

Bob Law

Bob Law

I hope you enjoy today’s art piece.  I’m not calling it a painting since I did it all in pencil!  It was an interesting piece to work on.  Very meditative and nice to work with a different medium.  I feel like I’m constantly gaining new respect for the artists in this genre and time.  Well, I’m off to sweat and do some things before my improv show tonight.  Enjoy and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 121!  Best, Linda

30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law Linda Cleary 2014 Graphite on Canvas

30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law
Linda Cleary 2014
Graphite on Canvas

Side-View 30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law Linda Cleary 2014 Graphite on Canvas

Side-View
30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law
Linda Cleary 2014
Graphite on Canvas

Close-Up 1 30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law Linda Cleary 2014 Graphite on Canvas

Close-Up 1
30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law
Linda Cleary 2014
Graphite on Canvas

Close-Up 2 30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law Linda Cleary 2014 Graphite on Canvas

Close-Up 2
30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law
Linda Cleary 2014
Graphite on Canvas

Close-Up 3 30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law Linda Cleary 2014 Graphite on Canvas

Close-Up 3
30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law
Linda Cleary 2014
Graphite on Canvas

Close-Up 4 30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law Linda Cleary 2014 Graphite on Canvas

Close-Up 4
30-4-14- Tribute to Bob Law
Linda Cleary 2014
Graphite on Canvas

Day 119- Friedel Dzubas- Fields of Color

It’s Day 119 and I have a ton of house stuff happening right now.  They are still trying to install the vent hood and I’m waiting for the screen guy to show up.  I’d like to spend more time on my painting and blog, but gotta get life done. 🙂  Join me in celebrating Friedel Dzubas today.

Friedel Dzubas

Friedel Dzubas

Friedel Dzubas (born April 20, 1915 in BerlinGermany, died 1994 in New York) was a German-born American abstract painter.

Friedel Dzubas

Friedel Dzubas

Friedel Dzubas studied art in his native land before fleeing Nazi Germany in 1939 and settling in

Friedel Dzubas

Friedel Dzubas

New York City. In Manhattan during the early 1950s, he shared a studio with fellow abstract painter Helen Frankenthaler. He began exhibiting his Abstract expressionist paintings at this time. His work was included in the Ninth Street Show in New York City in 1951, and in group exhibitions at the Leo Castelli gallery, the Stable Gallery, and the Tibor de Nagy Gallery among others. After the Ninth Street Show annual invitational exhibitions were held at the Stable Gallery throughout the 1950s. The poster of the second New York Painting and Sculpture Annual at The Stable Gallery in 1953, included an introduction by Clement Greenberg:

In the 1960s he became associated with Color field painting and Lyrical Abstraction. He was included in Post-painterly abstraction a 1964 exhibition curated by Clement Greenberg. Dzubas was a friend of Clement Greenberg, who in turn introduced him to Jackson Pollock and other artists.

Friedel Dzubas

Friedel Dzubas

His large work (up to 24 feet (7.3 m) wide) became more fluid. During the last three decades of his career, Dzubas had more than sixty solo exhibitions around the world. He was represented by the André Emmerich gallery and Knoedler Contemporary Arts in New York for more than thirty years. In 1976 he settled in Massachusetts, but also painted and lived in New York City, where his paintings were regularly exhibited.

He used Magna paint an oil based acrylic paint. Magna was originally developed by

Friedel Dzubas

Friedel Dzubas

the paintmakers Leonard Bocour and Sam Golden for and also used by Morris Louis. Dzubas would apply thick layers of color over washes, scrubbing the paint into the unprimed canvas. Dzubas used staining, brushing and other ways of applying color. His paintings were generally large in size and scale, but he made many very small paintings as well.

Friedel Dzubas

Friedel Dzubas

Biography is from wikipedia.

Even though I was rushed today, I still had a wonderful time painting this piece.   I hope you enjoy it as well.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 120.  Best, Linda

Untitled 119- Tribute to Friedel Dzubas Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Untitled 119- Tribute to Friedel Dzubas
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Untitled 119- Tribute to Friedel Dzubas Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Untitled 119- Tribute to Friedel Dzubas
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Untitled 119- Tribute to Friedel Dzubas Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Untitled 119- Tribute to Friedel Dzubas
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Untitled 119- Tribute to Friedel Dzubas Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Untitled 119- Tribute to Friedel Dzubas
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Untitled 119- Tribute to Friedel Dzubas Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Untitled 119- Tribute to Friedel Dzubas
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 118- Auguste Herbin- Le Fin

It’s Day 118 and I just spent hours trying to assist the vent hood installation guy (who was very wonderful)…then we didn’t have the tools to install it and I realized that I wasn’t getting paid to install it and that we were paying the design company to do it.  Needless, to say they are coming back tomorrow to finish the install.  He didn’t leave until 8pm and I didn’t finish my painting until now.  Sheesh!  I was able to finish my piece so join me in celebrating Auguste Herbin today.

Auguste Herbin

Auguste Herbin

Auguste Herbin

Auguste Herbin

Auguste Herbin (April 29, 1882 – January 30/31 1960) was a French painter.

Born in Quiévy, Nord, he studied drawing at the École des Beaux-Arts de Lille, from

Auguste Herbin

Auguste Herbin

1898 to 1901, when he settled in Paris.

The initial influence of Impressionism and Post-Impressionism visible in paintings that he sent to the Salon des Indépendants in 1906 gradually gave way to an involvement with Cubism after his move in 1909 to the Bateau-Lavoirstudios, where he met Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque and Juan Gris; he was also encouraged by his friendship withWilhelm Uhde. His work was exhibited in the same room as that of Jean Metzinger, Albert Gleizes and Fernand Léger in the Salon des Indépendants of 1910, and in 1912 he participated in the influential Section d’Or exhibition.

Auguste Herbin

Auguste Herbin

After producing his first abstract paintings in 1917, Herbin came to the attention of Léonce Rosenberg who, after World War I, made him part of the group centred on his Galerie de l’Effort Moderne and exhibited his work there on several occasions in March 1918 and 1921.

Herbin’s radical reliefs of simple geometric forms in painted wood, such as Coloured Wood Relief 

Auguste Herbin

Auguste Herbin

(1921; Paris, Musée National d’Art Moderne), challenged not only the status of the easel painting but also traditional figure–ground relationships.

The incomprehension that greeted these reliefs and related furniture designs, even from those critics most favourably disposed towards Cubism, was such that until 1926 or 1927 he followed Rosenberg’s advice to return to a representational style. Herbin himself later disowned landscapes, still lifes and genre scenes of this period, such as Bowls Players (1923; Paris, Musée National d’Art Moderne), in which the objects were depicted as schematized volumes.

Auguste Herbin

Auguste Herbin

Auguste Herbin died in Paris on 31 January 1960. One painting remained unfinished – the motif of the painting was constructed on the word Fin.

Biography is from wikipedia.

As with most painters who have painted for a long time it was difficult to choose which era I wanted to emulate.  I decided to focus on his colorful geometric period.  I really enjoyed his use of space, shapes and colors.  There is something different and playful in his pieces compared to other artists in this genre.

I hope you enjoy my piece.  After I finished I realized I should’ve used some yellow or other colors, but my husband looked at it and loved it so I decided to roll with it.  I am also exhausted and don’t want to be painting anymore today.  Especially after painting most of my ceiling of my art space yesterday!  Enjoy and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 119!  Best, Linda

Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 4 Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 4
Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 117- Howard Finster- “Paint Sacred Art”

It’s Day 117 and I’m having another lazy, not feel good day.  Dizzy from allergies and sore chest and back.  Ugh!  I just want to sleep all day, but instead, I did my painting and after this blog I’m going to try and finish Chapter 1 of my new teen romance novel.  Wee.  Join me in celebrating Howard Finster today. 🙂

Howard Finster

Howard Finster

Howard Finster

Howard Finster

Howard Finster (December 2, 1916 – October 22, 2001) was an American artist and Baptist minister from Georgia. He claimed to be inspired by God to spread the gospel through the design of his swampy land into Paradise Gardens, a folk art sculpture garden with over 46,000 pieces of art. His creations include outsider artnaïve art, and visionary art. Finster first came to widespread notice in the 1980s with his album cover designs for bands such as R.E.M. and Talking Heads.

Finster was born at Valley Head, Alabama and lived on the family farm as one of 13 children. He

Howard Finster

Howard Finster

attended school from age six into the sixth grade. He said he had his first vision at three years old, when he saw his recently deceased sister Abbie Rose walking down out of the sky wearing a white gown. She told him, “Howard, you’re gonna be a man of visions.”

He became “born again” at a Baptist revival at the age of 13 and began to preach at 16. He gave the occasional sermon at local churches and wrote articles for the town newspaper, and became a full-time pastor at Rock Bridge Baptist Church in 1940. He later served at the Mount Carmel Baptist Church in Fort Payne, Alabama, shortly before venturing into full-time art.

Howard Finster

Howard Finster

Finster started building his first garden park museum in Trion, Georgia in the late 1940s. It featured an exhibit on the inventions of mankind in which Finster planned to display one of everything that had ever been invented, models of houses and churches, a pigeon flock and a duck pond.

When he ran out of land in Trion in 1961, he moved to Pennville, Georgia, near Summerville, and

Super Powers- Howard Finster

Super Powers- Howard Finster

bought four acres (16,000 m²) of land upon which to build the Plant Farm Museum “to show all the wonderful things o’ God’s Creation, kinda like the Garden of Eden”. It features such attractions as the “Bible House,” “the Mirror House,” “the Hubcap Tower,” “the Bicycle Tower,” “the Machine Gun Nest,” and the largest structure in the garden, the five-story “Folk Art Chapel”. He also started putting up signs with Bible verses on them because “he felt that they stuck in people’s heads better that way.”

He retired from preaching in 1965 and focused all of his time on improving the Plant Farm Museum. In 1976, he had another vision to paint sacred art. According to Finster, “…one day I was workin’ on a patch job on a bicycle, and I was rubbin’ some white paint on that patch with this finger here, and I looked at the round tip o’ my finger, and there was a human face on it… then a warm feelin’ come over my body, and a voice spoke to me and said, ‘Paint sacred art.'”

Howard Finster

Howard Finster

His diverse range of subjects include pop culture icons like Elvis Presley, historical figures likeGeorge Washington, religious images like The Devils Vice and “John the Baptist”, UFOs and aliens, war and politics. His paintings are colorful and detailed; they use flat picture plane without perspective and are often covered with words, especially Bible verses. Every painting also has a number: God had asked him to do 5,000 paintings to spread the gospel and Finster wanted to keep track.

He finished the 5,000 a few days before Christmas in 1985, but continued painting and

Mona Lisa- Howard Finster

Mona Lisa- Howard Finster

numbering until the day he died. By 1989, he was already numbering in the ten thousands.

He first started receiving outside publicity in 1975. That year, Atlanta, Ga. television stationChannel 5 ran a story; he also appeared in an Esquire magazine article that first dubbed his museum Paradise Garden. He made his first exhibition appearance in 1976 and painted four paintings for the Library of Congress in 1977. He was also selected to be part of the Venice Biennale in 1984.

Baby Elvis- Howard Finster

Baby Elvis- Howard Finster

Finster gained national fame after his collaborative work with Athens, Georgia-based rock band R.E.M.. The group filmed the video for the group’s debut single “Radio Free Europe” in Finster’s Paradise Gardens in 1983. The following year, the band’s singer Michael Stipe and Finster collaborated on a painting for the cover of their second album Reckoning. After that the band made the song “Maps and Legends” (in its third album Fables of the Reconstruction) as an homage to Finster. Along with R.E.M., Finster also appeared in thedocumentary film Athens, GA: Inside Out, filmed in 1985, in which he tells the story of how he came to be an artist. Finster (and his art) also appears in the band’s video for Radio Free Europe.

The band Talking Heads commissioned a Finster painting for Little Creatures in 1985 that was

Howard Finster

Howard Finster

subsequently selected as album cover of the year by Rolling Stone magazine. Other artists to use Finster as an album cover designer include Memory Dean, Pierce Pettis, and Adam Again. In 1994, a portion of his Paradise Garden was installed as part of the permanent collection of Atlanta’s High Museum. Bill Mallonee of the Vigilantes of Love (also a Christian from Athens, Georgia) wrote a song inspired by Finster’s artwork called The Glory and the Dream in 1994.

God Bless You All- Howard Finster

God Bless You All- Howard Finster

Howard Finster was responsible for introducing millions to outsider art, but even with his fame, he remained focused on religious outreach. He said of the Talking Heads album, “I think there’s twenty-six religious verses on that first cover I done for them. They sold a million records in the first two and a half months after it come out, so that’s twenty-six million verses I got out into the world in two and a half months!”[4]

The classification of his creations overlap folk art and outsider art for the origin, naïve art and visionary art for the content.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my tribute to Howard Finster today.  I love his style and knew it looked familiar and then it made sense after researching him and realizing that he did album covers for bands I loved!  I did my painting with messages true to my own beliefs and I think I captured his style and essence.  Enjoy and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 118!  Best, Linda

So Say I- Tribute to Howard Finster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

So Say I- Tribute to Howard Finster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View So Say I- Tribute to Howard Finster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
So Say I- Tribute to Howard Finster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 So Say I- Tribute to Howard Finster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
So Say I- Tribute to Howard Finster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 So Say I- Tribute to Howard Finster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
So Say I- Tribute to Howard Finster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 So Say I- Tribute to Howard Finster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
So Say I- Tribute to Howard Finster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 4 So Say I- Tribute to Howard Finster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 4
So Say I- Tribute to Howard Finster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 116- Leonor Fini- Cats and Friends

It’s Day 116 and I’m having such a lazy, not feeling well day.  Not sure if it’s allergies or just plain under the weather.  I’ve also been thinking about my mom (who’s no longer with us) the past few days…so that has put me into an emotional funk.  I was still able to paint my painting of course.  Join me in celebrating Leonor Fini…and then maybe I’ll attempt to paint my ceiling downstairs once again!

Leonor Fini

Leonor Fini

 

Spirits- Leonor Fini

Spirits- Leonor Fini

Leonor Fini (August 30, 1907 – January 18, 1996) was an Argentine surrealist painter.

Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, she was raised in Trieste, Italy. She moved to Milan at the age of

The Sphinx- Leonor Fini

The Sphinx- Leonor Fini

17, and then to Paris, in either 1931 or 1932. There, she became acquainted with, among many others, Paul Éluard, Max Ernst, Georges Bataille, Henri Cartier-Bresson,Picasso, André Pieyre de Mandiargues, and Salvador Dalí. She traveled Europe by car with Mandiargues and Cartier-Bresson where she was photographed nude in a swimming pool by Cartier-Bresson. The photograph of Fini sold in 2007 for $305,000 – the highest price paid at auction for one of his works to that date.

She painted portraits of Jean Genet, Anna Magnani, Jacques Audiberti, Alida Valli, Jean Schlumberger (jewelry designer) and Suzanne Flon as well as many other celebrities and wealthy visitors to Paris. While working for Elsa Schiaparelli she designed the flacon for the perfume, “Shocking”, which became the top selling perfume for the House of Schiaparelli.

Leonor Fini

Leonor Fini

She designed costumes and decorations for theater, ballet and opera, including the first ballet performed by Roland Petit’s Ballet de Paris, “Les Demoiselles de la nuit”, featuring a young Margot Fonteyn. This was a payment of gratitude for Fini’s having been instrumental in finding the funding for the new ballet company. She also designed the costumes for two films, Renato Castellani’s Romeo and Juliet (1954) and John Huston’s A Walk with Love and Death (1968), which starred 18 year old Anjelica Huston and Moshe Dayan’s son, Assaf.

She once said,

Marriage never appealed to me, I’ve never lived with one person. Since I was

La Gardienne des sources- Leonor Fini

La Gardienne des sources- Leonor Fini

18, I’ve always preferred to live in a sort of community – A big house with my atelier and cats and friends, one with a man who was rather a lover and another who was rather a friend. And it has always worked.

Fini only married once, for a brief period,to Fedrico Veneziani. They were divorced after she met the Italian Count, Stanislao Lepri, who abandoned his diplomatic career shortly after meeting Fini and lived with her thereafter. She met the Polish writer Konstanty Jeleński, known as Kot in Rome in January 1952. She was delighted to discover that he was the illegitimate half-brother of Sforzino Sforza, who had been one of her most favorite lovers. Kot joined Fini and Lepri in their Paris apartment in October 1952 and the three remained inseparable until their deaths.

Dithyrambe- Leonor Fini

Dithyrambe- Leonor Fini

She later employed an assistant to join the household, which he described as “a little bit of prison and a lot of theatre”. One of his jobs was to look after her beloved Persian cats. Over the years she acquired 17 of them; they shared her bed and, at mealtimes, were allowed to roam the dining-table selecting tasty morsels – and woe betide the guest who complained. The ‘inner circle’ expanded to include the American artist, Richard Overstreet and the Argentinian poet Juan-Bautista Pinero.

In the 1970s, she wrote three novels, RogomelecMoumour, Contes pour enfants velu and

Sphinx- Leonor Fini

Sphinx- Leonor Fini

Oneiropompe. Her friends included Jean Cocteau, Giorgio de Chirico, and Alberto Moravia, Fabrizio Clerici and most of the other artists and writers inhabiting or visiting Paris. She illustrated many works by the great authors and poets, including Edgar Allan Poe, Charles Baudelaire and Shakespeare, as well as texts by new writers. She was very generous with her illustrations and donated many drawings to writers to help them get published. She is, perhaps, best known for her graphic illustrations for Histoire d’O.

Leonor Fini

Leonor Fini

It has been said about her that she is the only artist to paint women without apology. Many of her paintings feature strong, beautiful women (many times resembling herself) in ceremonial or provocative situations. Men are often portrayed as lithe figures who are under the protection of her females. The sphinx and cats play major parts in her paintings, as does the theme of ‘the double’. She was equally adept at etching, drawing, watercolor and oil painting. She lived with many cats; up to a total of 23 at one time. The illness of one of her cats could send her into a deep depression.

A biographical song about Leonor Fini’s life is featured on Welsh artist Katell Keineg’s 1997 second album, Jet.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I decided to paint a mythological character for my tribute today.  This was definitely an example of painting with acrylics vs. oils today.  I love the softness of her style and tried to go for the more watercolor effect, but for just having a day to work on this piece, I just couldn’t fully accomplish what I wanted.  I think it turned out okay, but not exactly.  It’s okay though!  It was a learning experience.  Maybe I should’ve stuck with a more solid background color as opposed to washing it with a few different ones.  These are the questions that bounced around after the fact.

Well, I hope you enjoy my piece nonetheless and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 117!  Best, Linda

Medusa- Tribute to Leonor Fini Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Medusa- Tribute to Leonor Fini
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Medusa- Tribute to Leonor Fini Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Medusa- Tribute to Leonor Fini
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Medusa- Tribute to Leonor Fini Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Medusa- Tribute to Leonor Fini
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Medusa- Tribute to Leonor Fini Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Medusa- Tribute to Leonor Fini
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Medusa- Tribute to Leonor Fini Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Medusa- Tribute to Leonor Fini
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 115- Fernand Léger- Objects as Main Characters

It’s Day 115 and I am very excited to be painting today.  My daily painting that is and not really excited about painting my ceiling of the art/laundry space, but I know in the end it’ll look much better than the dirty banana cream color it currently is.  I can’t wait to start on the walls and trim!  It’s a gloomy rainy day, but my tribute to Fernand Léger certainly isn’t!  Join me in honoring him today.

Fernand Léger

Fernand Léger

Joseph Fernand Henri Léger (French: [leʒe]; February 4, 1881 – August 17, 1955) was a French paintersculptor, and filmmaker. In his early works he created a personal form of cubism which he gradually modified into a more figurativepopulist style. His boldly simplified treatment of modern subject matter has caused him to be regarded as a forerunner of pop art.

 

LE JEUNE HOMME AU CHANDAIL- Fernand Leger

LE JEUNE HOMME AU CHANDAIL- Fernand Leger

Léger was born in ArgentanOrneLower Normandy, where his father raised cattle. Fernand Léger initially trained as an architect from 1897 to 1899, before moving in 1900 to Paris, where he supported himself as an architectural draftsman. After military service in VersaillesYvelines, in 1902–1903, he enrolled at the School of Decorative Arts after his application to the École des Beaux-Arts was rejected. He nevertheless attended the Beaux-Arts as a non-enrolled student, spending what he described as “three empty and useless years” studying with Gérôme and others, while also studying at the Académie Julian. He began to work seriously as a painter only at the age of 25. At this point his work showed the influence of impressionism, as seen in Le Jardin de ma mère (My Mother’s Garden) of 1905, one of the few paintings from this period that he did not later destroy. A new emphasis on drawing and geometry appeared in Léger’s work after he saw the Cézanne retrospective at the Salon d’Automne in 1907.

In 1909 he moved to Montparnasse and met such leaders of the avant-garde as Archipenko,Lipchitz, Chagall, Joseph Csaky and Robert Delaunay. His major painting of this period is Nudes in the Forest (1909–10), in which Léger displays a personal form of Cubism that his critics termed “Tubism” for its emphasis on cylindrical forms.

In 1910 he exhibited at the Salon d’Automne in the same room (salle VIII) with Jean Metzingerand Henri Le Fauconnier. In 1911 the hanging

Les grands plonguers noirs, Fernand Léger (1944)

Les grands plonguers noirs, Fernand Léger (1944)

committee of the Salon des Indépendantsplaced together the painters that would soon be identified as ‘Cubists’. Metzinger, Gleizes, Le Fauconnier, Delaunay and Léger were responsible for revealing Cubism to the general public for the first time as an organized group.

The following year he again exhibited at the Salon d’Automne and Indépendants with the Cubists, and joined with several artists, including Henri Le Fauconnier, Jean Metzinger, Albert Gleizes, Francis Picabia and the Duchamp brothers, Jacques Villon, Raymond Duchamp-Villonand Marcel Duchamp to form the Puteaux Group—also called the Section d’Or (The Golden Section).

Composition Aux Trois Femmes-1927- Fernand Leger

Composition Aux Trois Femmes-1927- Fernand Leger

Léger’s paintings, from then until 1914, became increasingly abstract. Their tubular, conical, and cubed forms are laconically rendered in rough patches of primary colors plus green, black and white, as seen in the series of paintings with the title Contrasting Forms. Léger made no use of the collage technique pioneered by Braque and Picasso.

Léger’s experiences in World War I had a significant effect on his work. Mobilized in August 1914 for service in the French Army, he spent two years at the front in Argonne. He produced many sketches of artillery pieces, airplanes, and fellow soldiers while in the trenches, and painted Soldier with a Pipe (1916) while on furlough. In September 1916 he almost died after a mustard gas attack by the German troops at Verdun. During a period of convalescence in Villepinte he painted The Card Players (1917), a canvas whose robot-like, monstrous figures reflect the ambivalence of his experience of war. As he explained:

…I was stunned by the sight of the breech of a 75 millimeter in the sunlight. It was the magic of

Le Grande Julie, Fernand Léger (1945)

Le Grande Julie, Fernand Léger (1945)

light on the white metal. That’s all it took for me to forget the abstract art of 1912–1913. The crudeness, variety, humor, and downright perfection of certain men around me, their precise sense of utilitarian reality and its application in the midst of the life-and-death drama we were in … made me want to paint in slang with all its color and mobility.

This work marked the beginning of his “mechanical period”, during which the figures and objects he painted were characterized by sleekly rendered tubular and machine-like forms. Starting in 1918, he also produced the first paintings in the Disk series, in which disks suggestive of traffic lights figure prominently. In December 1919 he married Jeanne-Augustine Lohy, and in 1920 he met Le Corbusier, who would remain a lifelong friend.

The “mechanical” works Léger painted in the 1920s, in their formal clarity as well as in their subject matter—the mother and child, the female nude, figures in an ordered landscape—are typical of the postwar “return to order” in the arts, and link him to the tradition of French figurative painting represented by Poussin and Corot. In his paysages animés (animated landscapes) of 1921, figures and animals exist harmoniously in landscapes made up of streamlined forms. The frontal compositions, firm contours, and smoothly blended colors of these paintings frequently recall the works of Henri Rousseau, an artist Léger greatly admired and whom he had met in 1909.

Three Women 1921- Fernand Leger

Three Women 1921- Fernand Leger

They also share traits with the work of Le Corbusier and Amédée Ozenfant who together had founded Purism, a style intended as a rational, mathematically based corrective to the impulsiveness of cubism. Combining the classical with the modern, Léger’s Nude on a Red Background (1927) depicts a monumental, expressionless woman, machinelike in form and color. His still life compositions from this period are dominated by stable, interlocking rectangular formations in vertical and horizontal orientation. The Siphon of 1924, a still life based on an advertisement in the popular press for the aperitif Campari, represents the high-water mark of the Purist aesthetic in Léger’s work. Its balanced composition and fluted shapes suggestive of classical columns are brought together with a quasi-cinematic close-up of a hand holding a bottle.

As an enthusiast of the modern, Léger was greatly attracted to cinema, and for a time he considered giving up painting for filmmaking. In 1923–24 he designed the set for the laboratory scene in Marcel L’Herbier’s L’Inhumaine (The Inhuman One). In 1924, in collaboration with Dudley Murphy, George Antheil, and Man Ray, Léger produced and directed the iconic and Futurism-influenced film, Ballet Mécanique (Mechanical Ballet). Neither abstract nor narrative, it is a series of images of a woman’s lips and teeth, close-up shots of ordinary objects, and repeated images of human activities and machines in rhythmic movement.

Fernand Leger (1881-1955) | L'Anniversaire

Fernand Leger (1881-1955) | L’Anniversaire

In collaboration with Amédée Ozenfant he established a free school where he taught from 1924, with Alexandra Exter and Marie Laurencin. He produced the first of his “mural paintings”, influenced by Le Corbusier’s theories, in 1925. Intended to be incorporated into polychrome architecture, they are among his most abstract paintings, featuring flat areas of color that appear to advance or recede.

Starting in 1927, the character of Léger’s work gradually changed as organic and irregular forms assumed greater importance. The figural style that emerged in the 1930s is fully displayed in the Two Sisters of 1935, and in several versions of Adam and Eve. With characteristic humor, he portrayed Adam in a striped bathing suit, or sporting a tattoo.

In 1931, Léger made his first visit to the United States, where he traveled to New York City and Chicago. In 1935, the Museum of Modern Art in New York City presented an exhibition of his work. In 1938, Léger was commissioned to decorate Nelson Rockefeller’s apartment.

During World War II Léger lived in the United States. He taught at Yale University, and found inspiration for a new series of paintings in the novel sight of industrial refuse in the landscape. The shock of juxtaposed natural forms and mechanical elements, the “tons of abandoned machines with flowers cropping up from within, and birds perching on top of them” exemplified what he called the “law of contrast”. His enthusiasm for such contrasts resulted in such works as The Tree in the Ladder of 1943–44, and Romantic Landscape of 1946. A major work of 1944, Three Musicians (Museum of Modern Art, New York), reprises a composition of 1930. A folk-like composition reminiscent of Rousseau, it exploits the law of contrasts in its realistic juxtaposition of the three men and their instruments.

The part of Chart (1917) - Fernand Lege

The part of Chart (1917) – Fernand Lege

Upon his return to France in 1945, he joined the Communist Party. During this period his work became less abstract, and he produced many monumental figure compositions depicting scenes of popular life featuring acrobats, builders, divers, and country outings. Art historian Charlotta Kotik has written that Léger’s “determination to depict the common man, as well as to create for him, was a result of socialist theories widespread among the avant-garde both before and after World War II. However, Léger’s social conscience was not that of a fierce Marxist, but of a passionate humanist”. His varied projects included book illustrations, murals, stained-glass windows, mosaics, polychrome ceramic sculptures, and set and costume designs.

After the death of his wife in 1950, Léger married Nadia Khodossevitch in 1952. In his final years he lectured in Bern, designed mosaics and stained-glass windows for the Central University of Venezuela in Caracas, Venezuela, and painted Country OutingThe Camper, and the series The Big Parade. In 1954 he began a project for a mosaic for the São Paulo Opera, which he would not live to finish. Fernand Léger died at his home in 1955 and is buried in Gif-sur-Yvette, Essonne.

Léger wrote in 1945 that “the object in modern painting must become the main character and overthrow the subject. If, in turn, the human

Composition with the three figures - Fernand Leger

Composition with the three figures – Fernand Leger

form becomes an object, it can considerably liberate possibilities for the modern artist.” He elaborated on this idea in his 1949 essay, “How I Conceive the Human Figure”, where he wrote that “abstract art came as a complete revelation, and then we were able to consider the human figure as a plastic value, not as a sentimental value. That is why the human figure has remained willfully inexpressive throughout the evolution of my work”. As the first painter to take as his idiom the imagery of the machine age, and to make the objects of consumer society the subjects of his paintings, Léger has been called a progenitor of Pop art.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I really enjoyed my painting today.  I also liked the result a lot!  I feel like I captured his essence and spirit of his style. 🙂  I hope you like my piece today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 116.  Best, Linda

Femme Dans La Nature- Tribute to Fernand Leger Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Femme Dans La Nature- Tribute to Fernand Leger
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Femme Dans La Nature- Tribute to Fernand Leger Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Femme Dans La Nature- Tribute to Fernand Leger
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Femme Dans La Nature- Tribute to Fernand Leger Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Femme Dans La Nature- Tribute to Fernand Leger
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Femme Dans La Nature- Tribute to Fernand Leger Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Femme Dans La Nature- Tribute to Fernand Leger
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Femme Dans La Nature- Tribute to Fernand Leger Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Femme Dans La Nature- Tribute to Fernand Leger
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 4 Femme Dans La Nature- Tribute to Fernand Leger Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 4
Femme Dans La Nature- Tribute to Fernand Leger
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 114- Clara Ledesma- Enthusiasm for Life

It’s Day 114 and I’m thinking about not only painting paintings, but starting on painting my ceiling of my art studio today.  OR take a nap.  Ha.  Join me in celebrating Clara Ledesma today.  It was difficult finding much information on her.  Her bio on wikipedia was short.

Clara Ledesma

Clara Ledesma

Clara Ledesma

Clara Ledesma

Clara Ledesma (1924–1999) was an artist from the Dominican Republic.Born in Santiago de los Caballeros, she initially studied art under Yoryi Morel in his academy in that city.

Ledesma later enrolled in the National School of Fine Arts in Santo Domingo,

Clara Ledesma

Clara Ledesma

 

graduating in 1948. Her professors included Celeste Woss y Gil and George Hausdorf, while her primary mentor was painting professor Josep Gausachs. Fellow students included Gilberto Hernández Ortega and Eligio Pichardo.

In 1949, Ledesma had her first solo exhibition and in 1951 she opened a studio/gallery, where she displayed her works as well as those of other artists. With the proceeds from a very successful solo exhibition in 1952, Ledesma traveled to Europe to further her education. She studied painting in Barcelona and Madrid, and exhibited her works in galleries in Spain. Ledesma also traveled to Lisbon and Paris to visit important museums. She was particularly influenced by the works of Marc ChagallJoan Miró and Paul Klee. During her stay in Europe, Ledesma met Bolivian artist Walter Terrazas, who returned to Santo Domingo with her in 1954.

Clara Ledesma

Clara Ledesma

In Santo Domingo, she worked closely with other important Dominican artists, including Gilberto Hernández OrtegaJosep Gausachs and Jaime Colson. In 1955, she was named vice director of the National School of Fine Arts.

In 1961, Ledesma and her husband, Terrazas, moved to New York CityNew York, where

Clara Ledesma

Clara Ledesma

she opened another gallery. She lived and worked in New York City the rest of her life.

She had numerous international solo exhibitions, including events in Madrid, Mexico City and New York City, and participated in group exhibitions in Brazil, Spain, Cuba, Haiti, Venezuela, Argentina and Puerto Rico.

Ledesma’s style ranged from Expressionism and Surrealism to Abstraction.

She is known for her use of brilliant colors, imaginative figures and the feeling of magic and mysticism created in her paintings and drawings. In 1955, journalist Horia Tanasescu described her work,

Clara Ledesma

Clara Ledesma

“At times ironic, often playful, but taking great care in the production of her paintings, this artist introduces an enthusiasm for life to the national art scene that is in striking contrast to the solemnity of the majority of her fellow artists.”

Ledesma died, age 74 or 75, in New York City.

~

I decided to focus on emulating her pen & ink drawings.  I really enjoyed them.  I started the piece with a thinner pen and then a thicker one.  I think I should’ve kept it thin.  That’s my only critical feedback that I have today.  It was nice to actually draw as opposed to controlling a paintbrush.

I hope you enjoy today’s piece and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 115.  Best, Linda

Sirena Luna Roja- Tribute to Clara Ledesma Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Pen & Ink on Canvas

Sirena Luna Roja- Tribute to Clara Ledesma
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Pen & Ink on Canvas

Side-View Sirena Luna Roja- Tribute to Clara Ledesma Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Pen & Ink on Canvas

Side-View
Sirena Luna Roja- Tribute to Clara Ledesma
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Pen & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Sirena Luna Roja- Tribute to Clara Ledesma Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Pen & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Sirena Luna Roja- Tribute to Clara Ledesma
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Pen & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Sirena Luna Roja- Tribute to Clara Ledesma Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Pen & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Sirena Luna Roja- Tribute to Clara Ledesma
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Pen & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Sirena Luna Roja- Tribute to Clara Ledesma Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Pen & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Sirena Luna Roja- Tribute to Clara Ledesma
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Pen & Ink on Canvas

Day 113- Carl Holty- Color, Shapes and Forms

It’s Day 113 and I was going to paint the ceiling of my art studio/laundry room, but I’m sore from prior painting and don’t want to get too sucked into things before heading out to improv.  Join me in honoring Carl Holty today!

Carl Holty

Carl Holty

Bread and Fruit- Carl Holty

Bread and Fruit- Carl Holty

Carl Robert Holty (1900-1973) was a German-born American abstract painter. Raised in Wisconsin, he was the first major abstract painter to gain notoriety from the state. Harold Rosenberg described Holty as “a figure of our art history,” known for his use of color, shape and form.

Carl Holty was born in 1900 in Freiburg, Germany. His parents, Americans, lived in

Carl Holty

Carl Holty

Freiburg while his father, a doctor, studied specialty medicine since 1899. His father was German, gaining citizenship in the United States in 1906. Shortly after his birth the family moved back to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where they lived in the German district with his grandparents. The Holty family then moved to the countryside near Green Bay where his father practiced medicine, before returning to Milwaukee around 1906.Holty’s grandfather introduced him to art by visiting local art galleries. Around the age of 12, Holty began taking lessons with a local German painter. As a teenager he started drawing cartoons and became interested in poster art. He attended Milwaukee University School, graduating high school within 2 1/2 years. In 1919 he went to Marquette University, then joining the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps during World War I, with the program ending within the same year. Back in college, he experimented with medicine, only to visit home to tell his father he wanted to attend art school. That summer he enrolled at the Art Institute of Chicago, eventually attending classes at the Parsons School of Design. He returned to Milwaukee in 1923 and opened a portrait painting studio.

Carl Holty

Carl Holty

In 1925 Holty married and honeymooned in Europe, living there for the next ten years of his life, first in Munich and then Switzerland. In Switzerland Mrs. Holty sought treatment for her tuberculosis, dying in 1930. He moved to Paris that year, before returning to the United States in 1935 and living in New York City. In New York he remarried and had a daughter. He taught at Brooklyn College from 1950 until 1970. Upon his retirement from Brooklyn he was awarded the title of Professor Emeritus. While at Brooklyn, he also was a visiting instructor at the Art Students League, Washington University in St. Louis, and University of Louisville. Holty would die, March 22, 1973 in New York City.

In 1926, while living in Munich, Holty originally planned to attend the Royal Academy, only to train

Carl Holty Untitled c.1965

Carl Holty Untitled c.1965

under Hans Hofmann. Hofmann’s ideas about space, color, shape would transform Holty’s work, with Holty’s work becoming more abstract as time went on.

“No one had ever talked to me about conceptual drawing, about knowing what I’m looking at from the point of view of my tactile knowledge as well as my visual knowledge. Hofmann did. And the world opened up just like that.”
– Carl Holty on Hans Hofmann’s influence

From 1930 to 1935 he lived in Paris, exhibiting his work to good reception. There he met Robert Delaunay and joined Delaunay’s group Abstration-Création. He would have his work published in the groups magazine, and his work became associated with Cubism and Neo-Plasticism. His Paris works have been compared to the paintings of Juan Gris and Pablo Picasso’s Synthetic Cubism.

Carl Holty

Carl Holty

Upon returning to the United States, he found artist representation in New York City and became involved, once again, with Hans Hofmann and Vaclav Vytlacil and Stuart Davis, the latter whom he knew in Paris. Vytlacil invited Holty to participate in discussions which led to the formation of the American Abstract Artists, which Holty would eventually come to chair, retaining his membership until 1944. During this time, he moved away from Cubism and started to experiment with Biomorphism. In the 1930s he used tape to give strong edges to forms, also reworking and overpainting sections, as seen in his work Gridiron (1943-1944). Between 1945 and 1948 he was represented by the Samuel M. Kootz Gallery. He continued to explore shapes and form, and in the 1960s contours had disappeared from his work, being replaced with subtle toned down colors.

Holty served as artist in residence at Georgia State University, University of Florida, University of California at Berkeley, University of

Carl Holty

Carl Holty

Wisconsin and the Corcoran School of Art. He also wrote a book, with Romare Bearden, titled The Painter’s Mind, published in 1969.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I decided to focus on a specific era of Holty’s paintings.  With some artists (more than less), I notice that’s it’s difficult trying to pick which style evolution I want to emulate.

I hope you enjoy my painting today.  I really enjoyed creating it.  I’m going to get some feedback done for my writing group now!  I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 114.  Best, Linda

Untitled 113- Tribute to Carl Holty Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Untitled 113- Tribute to Carl Holty
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Untitled 113- Tribute to Carl Holty Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Untitled 113- Tribute to Carl Holty
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Untitled 113- Tribute to Carl Holty Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Untitled 113- Tribute to Carl Holty
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Untitled 113- Tribute to Carl Holty Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Untitled 113- Tribute to Carl Holty
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Untitled 113- Tribute to Carl Holty Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Untitled 113- Tribute to Carl Holty
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 4 Untitled 113- Tribute to Carl Holty Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 4
Untitled 113- Tribute to Carl Holty
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

 

Day 112- Jo Baer- Radical Figuration

It’s Day 112 and I’m exhausted from painting a stairwell in my house.  I’ve got some other errands and want to enjoy the sunny (and windy!) day taking my pups for a little hike.  I also need to go to the DMV and pick up a form…how exciting!  I did my painting pretty early today.  I thought I’d try my hand at another minimal artist.  Join me in honoring the wonderful Jo Baer!

Jo Baer

Jo Baer

Cardinations # 3 (detail) 1974 - Screenprint on handmade paper

Cardinations # 3 (detail)
1974 – Screenprint on handmade paper

Josephine Gail “Jo” Baer, born Josephine Kleinberg August 7, 1929, is an American painter, whose works are associated with minimalist art. She began exhibiting her work at the Fischbach Gallery, New York, and other venues for contemporary art in the mid-1960s. In the mid-1970s, she turned away from non-objective painting. Since then, Baer has fused images, symbols, words, and phrases in a non-narrative manner, a mode of expression she once termed “radical figuration.”

Josephine Gail Kleinberg was born into an upper-middle class home. Her mother,

Jo Baer

Jo Baer

Hortense Kalisher Kleinberg, a commercial artist, was a fierce proponent of women’s rights and imbued her daughter with a sense of independence. Her father, Lester Kleinberg, was a successful commodities broker in hay and grain. Josephine studied art as a child at the Cornish College of the Arts, but because her mother wanted her to become a medical illustrator, she majored in biology at the University of Washington, Seattle, which she attended from 1946-1949.  She dropped out of school in her junior year to marry a fellow-student at the University, Gerard L. Hanauer.

The marriage was over quickly, and in 1950, Baer went to Israel to explore the realities of rural socialism on various kibbutzim for a few months. Returning to New York City, from 1950–53 she did the course work for a master’s degree in psychology at the New School for Social Research.  Baer went to school at night, while during the day she was employed by an interior design studio as a draftsman and secretary.

Jo Baer- Cardinations

Jo Baer- Cardinations

Baer moved to Los Angeles in 1953 and shortly afterwards married Richard Baer, a television writer. Their son, Joshua Baer, who became an art dealer, writer, and consultant, was born in 1955; the couple was divorced in the late 1950s. During this time Baer began to paint and draw for the first time since adolescence, becoming friends with Edward Kienholz and other local artists in the orbit of the Ferus Gallery. She met the painter John Wesley, to whom she was married from 1960-1970. She, Wesley, and Joshua moved to New York in 1960, where Baer lived until 1975. After separating from Wesley, she was in a long-term relationship with the sculptor Robert Lawrance Lobe.

Baer’s work of the late 1950s emulated paintings by members of the New York School, particularly Arshile Gorky, Robert Motherwell, Clyfford Still, and Mark Rothko. Rothko, she observed, “gave me permission to work with a format.” Jasper Johns’s paintings and sculpture also made an immediate impression, because they suggested “how a work should be the thing itself.”

In 1960 Baer rejected Abstract Expressionism for spare, hard-edge non-objective

Jo Baer, "Hiccup", 1964. Gouache on paper

Jo Baer, “Hiccup”, 1964. Gouache on paper

painting. Two early important paintings in this style were Untitled (Black Star) (1960-1961; Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo) and Untitled (White Star) (1960-1961; Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo). She then introduced an even more pared-down format: the image was excised and the central area of the canvas became completely white. In 1962 Baer began the Korean series, a group of sixteen canvases.

The Koreans were given their name by the art dealer Richard Bellamy, who said that Baer’s paintings were just as unknown as Korean art was to most Westerners. The

Bootless Boots- Jo Baer

Bootless Boots- Jo Baer

Koreans were composed of a dominant field of densely painted white enclosed by bands of sky blue and black that seem to shimmer and move: this optical illusion underscored Baer’s focus on “the notion of light.” Baer ascribed her inspiration for the Koreans to Samuel Beckett’s novel The Unnamble, which she was reading at the time. His observations about osmosis and diffusion through membranes influenced her to examine the properties of boundaries between spaces. In many works that Baer created between 1964 and 1966, the peripheries and edges of the canvas continued to be marked by two square or rectangular bands of color. The outer, thicker border was black; inside it, a thinner band was painted in another color, such as red, green, lavender, or blue. Baer summed up the artistic concerns of her own work in 1971, writing, “Non-objective painting’s language is rooted, nowadays, in edges and boundaries, contours and gradients, brightness, darkness and color reflections. Its syntax is motion and change.”

Baer was accepted as a peer in the burgeoning Minimalist movement by such artists as Sol LeWitt, Donald

One of Jo Baer's wraparound paintings

One of Jo Baer’s wraparound paintings

Judd, and Dan Flavin. In 1964 Flavin organized “Eleven Artists,” an exhibition that was an important step in defining the key figures of Minimalism. He included Baer, along with Judd, Flavin, LeWitt, Ward Jackson, Frank Stella, Irwin Fleminger,Larry Poons, Walter Darby Bannard, Robert Ryman, Leo Valledor, and himself. In 1966 Baer’s first one-person show took place at the Fischbach Gallery, then a center for avant-garde art. That year she was also represented in both “Systemic Painting,” a survey exhibition of contemporary geometric abstraction at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, and “10,” a group exhibition at the Virginia Dwan Gallery co-curated by Ad Reinhardt and Robert Smithson that further enshrined its participants as canonical for Minimalism. Besides Baer, Reinhardt, and Smithson, the other artists selected were Carl Andre, Judd, LeWitt, Flavin, Robert Morris, Michael Steiner, and Agnes Martin. Baer’s works shown in these exhibitions, which included vertical and horizontal single, diptych, and triptych paintings, established her avant-garde reputation in the New York art world.

Jo Baer

Jo Baer

In the late 1960s, Baer was experimenting with color and shifting the visual focus of her work. While working on the series The Stations of the Spectrum (1967-1969), Baer painted over their white surfaces to make them gray. She then turned them into triptychs because she saw that these paintings had more wall power when they were hung together. Next, as she said, “I wanted to know what happens around a corner – that interested me as an optical thing.” The result was the Wraparound paintings,

Speculum- Jo Baer

Speculum- Jo Baer

where-in which Baer painted thick black bands edged by blues, greens, oranges, and lavenders that went around the sides of the canvas – areas that artists customarily ignore, overlook, or cover with a frame. More than ever, the action was at the edges: “Sensation,” Baer wrote, “is the edge of things. Where there are no edges, there are no places—a uniform visual field quickly disappears.”

Further challenging the notion of where a painting begins or ends, Baer added sweeping diagonal and curved paths of color that streaked across her once-inviolate white fields and down the sides of the canvas. These canvases bore titles like H. Arcuata (1971; coll. Daimler Corporation, Zurich) and V. Lurida (1971, Levi-Strauss Collection, San Francisco). The titles were orotund flights of fancy – they identified fictitious specious of plants that she extrapolated from a book of botanical Latin she owned. (Baer was cultivating prize-winning orchids in the late 1960s, and became an expert on growing them inside an urban loft.) When translated into English, Baer’s Latinate letters and words have nothing to do with flowers; instead, they are visual descriptions masquerading as scientific diction. “H.” stands for “horizontal” and “V.” for “vertical.” “Arcuata” means curved, and “lurida” means “pale” or “shining.”

Partial biography from wikipedia.

Visit her website to look at all the different eras of her artwork! http://www.jobaer.net

I enjoyed today’s painting, but I had the same stress that I usually have when having to paint straight lines.  I need to really get some tools to get better results.  I used painters tape yet it still bled through and I spent a good amount of time fixing lines.  That’s the part of minimalist geometric type art that drive me crazy.  I enjoyed the imagery however!  I hope you enjoy today’s piece and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 113.  Best, Linda

Symblistic- Tribute to Jo Baer Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Symblistic- Tribute to Jo Baer
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Symblistic- Tribute to Jo Baer Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Symblistic- Tribute to Jo Baer
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Symblistic- Tribute to Jo Baer Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Symblistic- Tribute to Jo Baer
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Symblistic- Tribute to Jo Baer Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Symblistic- Tribute to Jo Baer
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Symblistic- Tribute to Jo Baer Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Symblistic- Tribute to Jo Baer
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 111- Frank Stella- What You See is What You See

It’s Day 111 and I’m busy with chores, errands and prepping (and possibly) painting my stairwell that heads downstairs.  It’s an icky yellow cream color right now.  I also can’t wait to paint my studio/laundry room a nice blue color soon!  Please join me in honoring Frank Stella today!

Frank Stella 1964- Photo by Ugo Mulas

Frank Stella 1964- Photo by Ugo Mulas

 

1966 Moultonville IV- Frank Stella

1966 Moultonville IV- Frank Stella

Frank Stella (born May 12, 1936) is an American painter and printmaker, noted for his work in the areas of minimalism and post-painterly abstraction. Stella continues to live and work in New York.

Stella was born in Malden, Massachusetts, to parents of Italian descent. After attending high

Frank Stella (American, born 1936) Gran Cairo.  1962 Alkyd on canvas 85 ¼ x 85 ¼” (216.5 x 216.5 cm) Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.  Purchase, with funds from the Friends of the Whitney Museum of American Art © 2008 Frank Stella/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Frank Stella (American, born 1936)
Gran Cairo. 1962
Alkyd on canvas
85 ¼ x 85 ¼” (216.5 x 216.5 cm)
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Purchase, with funds from the Friends of the Whitney Museum of American Art
© 2008 Frank Stella/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

school at Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, he attended Princeton University, where he majored in history and met Darby Bannard and Michael Fried. Early visits to New York art galleries influenced his artist development, and his work was influenced by the abstract expressionism of Jackson Pollock and Franz Kline. Stella moved to New York in 1958, after his graduation. He is one of the most well-regarded postwar American painters still working today. He is heralded for creating abstract paintings that bear no pictorial illusions or psychological or metaphysical references in twentieth-century painting.

Upon moving to New York City, he reacted against the expressive use of paint by most painters of the abstract expressionist movement, instead finding himself drawn towards the “flatter” surfaces of Barnett Newman‘s work and the “target” paintings of Jasper Johns. He began to produce works which emphasized the picture-as-object, rather than the picture as a representation of something, be it something in the physical world, or something in the artist’s emotional world. Stella married Barbara Rose, later a well-known art critic, in 1961. Around this time he said that a picture was “a flat surface with paint on it – nothing more”. This was a departure from the technique of creating a painting by first making a sketch. Many of the works are created by simply using the path of the brush stroke, very often using common house paint.

Frank Stella

Frank Stella

This new aesthetic found expression in a series of paintings, the Black Paintings (69) in which regular bands of black paint were separated by very thin pinstripes of unpainted canvas. Die Fahne Hoch! (1959) is one such painting. It takes its name (“The Raised Banner” in English) from the first line of the Horst-Wessel-Lied, the anthem of the National Socialist German Workers Party, and Stella pointed out that it is in the same proportions as banners used by that organization. It has been suggested that the title has a double meaning, referring also to Jasper Johns’ paintings of flags. In any case, its emotional coolness belies the contentiousness its title might suggest, reflecting this new direction in Stella’s work. Stella’s art was recognized for its innovations before he was twenty-five. In 1959, several of his paintings were included in “Three Young Americans” at the Allen Memorial Art Museum at Oberlin College, as well as in “Sixteen Americans” at the Museum of Modern Art in New York (60).

From 1960 Stella began to produce paintings in aluminum and copper paint which, in

Frank Stella

Frank Stella

their presentation of regular lines of color separated by pinstripes, are similar to his black paintings. However they use a wider range of colors, and are his first works using shaped canvases (canvases in a shape other than the traditional rectangle or square), often being in L, N, U or T-shapes. These later developed into more elaborate designs, in the Irregular Polygon series (67), for example.

Frank Stella

Frank Stella

Also in the 1960s, Stella began to use a wider range of colors, typically arranged in straight or curved lines. Later he began his Protractor Series (71) of paintings, in which arcs, sometimes overlapping, within square borders are arranged side-by-side to produce full and half circles painted in rings of concentric color. These paintings are named after circular cities he had visited while in the Middle East earlier in the 1960s. The Irregular Polygon canvases and Protractor series further extended the concept of the shaped canvas.

Stella began his extended engagement with printmaking in the mid-1960s, working first with master printer Kenneth Tyler at Gemini G.E.L. Stella produced a series of prints during the late 1960s starting with a print called Quathlamba I in 1968. Stella’s abstract prints in lithography, screenprinting, etching and offset lithography (a technique he introduced) had a strong impact upon printmaking as an art.

In 1967, he designed the set and costumes for Scramble, a dance piece by Merce

Visione Artistica – Frank Stella: emotion and color melt together

Visione Artistica – Frank Stella: emotion and color melt together

Cunningham. The Museum of Modern Art in New York presented a retrospective of Stella’s work in 1970, making him the youngest artist to receive one. During the following decade, Stella introduced relief into his art, which he came to call “maximalist” painting for its sculptural qualities. Ironically, the paintings that had brought him fame before 1960 had eliminated all such depth. The shaped canvases took on even less regular forms in the Eccentric Polygon series, and elements of collage were introduced, pieces of canvas being pasted onto plywood, for example. His work also became more three-dimensional to the point where he started producing large, free-standing metal pieces, which, although they are painted upon, might well be considered sculpture.

After introducing wood and other materials in the Polish Village series (73), created in high relief, he began to use aluminum as the primary support for his paintings. As the 1970s and 1980s progressed, these became more elaborate and exuberant. Indeed, his earlier Minimalism [more] became baroque, marked by curving forms, Day-Glo colors, and scrawled brushstrokes. Similarly, his prints of these decades combined various printmaking and drawing techniques. In 1973, he had a print studio installed in his New York house. In 1976, Stella was commissioned by BMW to paint a BMW 3.0 CSL for the second installment in the BMW Art Car Project. He has said of this project, “The starting point for the art cars was racing livery. In the old days there used to be a tradition of identifying a car with its country by color. Now they get a number and they get advertising. It’s a paint job, one way or another. The idea for mine was that it’s from a drawing on graph paper. The graph paper is what it is, a graph, but when it’s morphed over the car’s forms it becomes interesting, and adapting the drawing to the racing car’s forms is interesting. Theoretically it’s like painting on a shaped canvas.”

Frank Stella

Frank Stella

From the mid-1980s to the mid-1990s, Stella created a large body of work that responded in a general way to Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick. During this time, the increasingly deep relief of Stella’s paintings gave way to full three-dimensionality, with sculptural forms derived from cones, pillars, French curves, waves, and decorative architectural elements. To create these works, the artist used collages or maquettes that were then enlarged and re-created with the aids of assistants, industrial metal cutters, and digital technologies.

In the 1990s, Stella began making free-standing sculpture for public spaces and developing architectural projects. In 1993, for example, he created the entire decorative scheme for Toronto’s Princess of Wales Theatre, which includes a 10,000-square-foot mural. His 1993 proposal for a Kunsthalle and garden in Dresden did not come to fruition. In 1997, he painted and oversaw the installation of the 5,000-square-foot “Stella Project” which serves as the centerpiece of the theater and lobby of the Moores Opera House located at theRebecca and John J. Moores School of Music on the campus of the University of Houston, in Houston, TX. His aluminum bandshell, inspired by a folding hat from Brazil, was built in downtown Miami in 2001; a monumental Stella sculpture was installed outside theNational Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

Stella’s wall-hung Scarlatti K Series was triggered by the harpsichord sonatas of Domenico Scarlatti and the writings of the U.S. 20th-

Frank Stella

Frank Stella

century harpsichord virtuoso and musicologist Ralph Kirkpatrick, who made the sonatas widely known. (The title’s “K” refers to Kirkpatrick’s chronology numbers.) Scarlatti wrote more than 500 keyboard sonatas; Stella’s series today includes about 150 works.

From 1978 to 2005, Stella owned the landmarked Van Tassell and Kearney Horse Auction Mart building and used it as his studio. His nearly 30-year stewardship of the building resulted in the facade being cleaned and restored. Since then, he split his time between his West Village apartment and his Newburgh, New York studio.

Biography from wikipedia.

What you see is what you see.

I enjoyed today’s painting.  It was a bit challenging as this type of art always seems to be to me.  I decided to go with more unconventional bright colors, but I like the combination that I chose.  I’m starting to enjoy mixing a palette that I wouldn’t normally choose.  I really like the blue, pink and green combo.  I hope you like my piece today.  I do have to say that I need to get some painting tools that will allow me to paint straighter lines!  Or maybe I just need more patience! 😉  This painting is just another example of making sure I have the right tools to complete the piece to my expectations.  See you tomorrow on Day 112.  Best, Linda

Montagne Gris- Tribute to Frank Stella Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Montagne Gris- Tribute to Frank Stella
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Montagne Gris- Tribute to Frank Stella Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Montagne Gris- Tribute to Frank Stella
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Montagne Gris- Tribute to Frank Stella Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Montagne Gris- Tribute to Frank Stella
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Montagne Gris- Tribute to Frank Stella Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Montagne Gris- Tribute to Frank Stella
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Montagne Gris- Tribute to Frank Stella Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Montagne Gris- Tribute to Frank Stella
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas