Day Ninety- Takashi Murakami- Superflat

It’s Day 90 and there’s a rainstorm outside.  My dogs were freaking out from the thunder and lightning and I was painting with glitter!  Please join me in celebrating Takashi Murakami today.

Takashi Murakami

Takashi Murakami

Takashi Murakami in front of his artwork.

Takashi Murakami in front of his artwork.

Takashi Murakami (村上 隆 Murakami Takashi, born in Tokyo on February 1 1962) is an internationally prolific contemporary Japanese artist. He works in fine arts media—such as painting and sculpture—as well as what is conventionally considered commercial media —fashion, merchandise, and animation— and is known for blurring the line between high and low arts.

He coined the term superflat, which describes both the aesthetic characteristics of the

Takashi Murakami-Kaikaimimi

Takashi Murakami-Kaikaimimi

Japanese artistic tradition and the nature of post-war Japanese culture and society. Superflat is also used as a moniker to describe Murakami’s own artistic style and that of other Japanese artists he has influenced.
Murakami is the founder and President of Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd., through which he manages the careers of several younger artists and organizes the biannual art fair GEISAI.

Takashi Murakami

Takashi Murakami

Takashi Murakami was born and raised in Tokyo, Japan. From early on, he was an enthusiastic follower of animation and manga (Japanese comics), and aspired to one day work in the animation industry. He attended T.U.A Tokyo University of the Arts, originally seeking to acquire the drafting skills necessary to become an animator, but eventually majored in Nihonga, the ‘traditional’ style of Japanese painting that incorporates traditional Japanese artistic conventions, techniques and subjects.

Though he would go on to earn a Ph.D. in Nihonga, he gradually became disillusioned with the field’s insular, highly political world and started to explore more contemporary artistic styles, media, and strategies.

Murakami was unsatisfied with the state of contemporary art in Japan, believing it to be “a deep appropriation of Western trends.”  Thus,

Takashi Murakami

Takashi Murakami

much of his early work was done in the spirit of social criticism and satire. Efforts from this period include performance art (Osaka Mixer Project, 1992), parodies of the “message” art popular in Japan in the early 90’s, (DOBOZITE DOBOZITE OSHAMANBE, 1993), and conceptual works (e.g. Randoseru Project, 1991).

Takashi Murakami

Takashi Murakami

He also began developing his own pop icon, “Mr. DOB,” which would later develop into a form of self-portraiture, the first of several endlessly morphing and recurring motifs seen throughout his work. Though he garnered attention, many of his early pieces were not initially well received in Japan.

In 1994, Murakami received a fellowship from the Asian Cultural Council and participated in the PS1 International Studio Program in New York for a year. During his

Takashi Murakami- Detail from painting

Takashi Murakami- Detail from painting

stay, he was exposed to and highly inspired by Western contemporary artists such as Anselm Kiefer and especially the simulationism of artists such as Jeff Koons. While in New York, he established a small studio, which, together with the Hiropon Factory in Japan, became the precursor to his company Kaikai Kiki. After returning to Japan, he would develop the core concepts behind his artistic practice and begin exhibiting regularly at major galleries and institutions across Europe and America.

Takashi Murakami- Mushrooms

Takashi Murakami- Mushrooms

Murakami has expressed since early on a frustration with the lack of a reliable and sustainable art market in post-war Japan. Largely for this reason, he formulated a strategy wherein he would first establish himself in the Western art world and then import himself back to Japan, building a new type of art market in the process.

In order to create something rooted in his own Japanese culture and history but still

Takashi Murakami- Flowers and Skulls

Takashi Murakami- Flowers and Skulls

fresh and valid internationally, he began searching for something that could be considered ‘uniquely Japanese.’ After concluding that elements of ‘high’ art were confounding at best, he began to focus on Japan’s ‘low’ culture, especially anime and manga, and the larger subculture of otaku. He felt that these had the potential to be the key elements for his work. His signature artistic style and motifs (cute/disturbing anime-esque characters rendered in bright colors, flat and highly glossy surfaces, life-size sculptures of anime figurines) derived from this strategic concept.

Takashi Murakami

Takashi Murakami

In 2000, Murakami published his “Superflat” theory in the catalogue for a group exhibition of the same name that he curated for the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. The theory posits that there is a legacy of flat, 2-dimensional imagery which has existed throughout Japanese art history and continues today in manga and anime.

This style differentiates itself from the western approach in its emphasis on surface and use of flat planes of color. Superflat also served as a commentary on post-war Japanese society in which, Murakami argues, differences in social class and popular taste have ‘flattened,’ producing a culture with little distinction between ‘high’ and ‘low’. The theory provided the contextual background for his work and he further elaborated on it with the subsequent exhibitions, “Coloriage” (2002, Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain, Paris) and “Little Boy: The Arts of Japan’s Exploding Subculture” (2005, Japan Society, New York).

These exhibitions helped introduce Japan’s lesser-known creative culture overseas and such curatorial projects would become an integral part

Takashi Murakami painting

Takashi Murakami painting

of Murakami’s multifaceted artistic practice.
In accordance with the Superflat concept, Murakami’s practice involves repackaging elements that are usually considered “low” or subcultural and presenting them in the “high-art” market. He then further flattens the playing field by repackaging his “high-art” works as merchandise, such as plush toys and T-shirts, making them available at more affordable prices.

In 1996, Murakami launched the Hiropon Factory, his production workshop, in order to work on an increasingly larger scale and in a more diverse array of media. His model inherits the atelier system which has long existed in Japanese painting, printmaking and sculpture, and is common to anime and manga enterprises, such as Hayao Miyazaki’s Studio Ghibli. In 2001, Hiropon Factory was incorporated as Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd.

Takashi Murakami show

Takashi Murakami show

In 2002, at the invitation of designer Marc Jacobs, Murakami began his long-lasting collaboration with the fashion brand Louis Vuitton. He began by contributing artwork which was used in the design of a series of handbags. The series re-envisioned the fashion house’s signature monogram and was a huge commercial success. Though he had previously collaborated with fashion designers such as Issey Miyake Men by Naoki Takizawa, his work with Louis Vuitton won him widespread fame and notoriety as an artist who blurs the line between ‘high art’ and commercialism. It also elevated him to celebrity status in his home country of Japan.
In 2007, Murakami provided the cover artwork for rapper Kanye West’s Graduation album and directed an animated music video for West’s song Good Morning.
In both cases above, Murakami would later ‘re-appropriate’ these projects by incorporating imagery from such projects into his paintings and sculptures, further blurring the boundaries between art and commercial branding and even questioning the existence of such a boundary.
Asked by interviewer Magdalene Perez about straddling the line between art and commercial products, Murakami responded:
“I don’t think of it as straddling. I think of it as changing the line. What I’ve been talking about for years is how in Japan, that line is less defined. Both by the culture and by the post-War economic situation. Japanese people accept that art and commerce will be blended; and in fact, they are surprised by the rigid and pretentious Western hierarchy of ‘high art.’ In the West, it certainly is dangerous to blend the two because people will throw all sorts of stones. But that’s okay—I’m ready with my hard hat.”

Partial biography is from wikipedia.

Getting the background ready...

Getting the background ready…

As you can probably imagine, I was pretty overwhelmed in figuring out what I wanted to paint for this tribute.  I decided to do something simple, but also in his spirit, BUT also make it a little my own.  I read a review on one of his art shows and they mentioned that they thought he added glitter to his art so I had fun with that!

I hope you enjoy my tribute and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 91…only 9 days away til 100!  Whew.  Best, Linda

Glitter Time- Tribute to Takashi Murakami Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Glitter Time- Tribute to Takashi Murakami
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Glitter Time- Tribute to Takashi Murakami Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Glitter Time- Tribute to Takashi Murakami
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Glitter Time- Tribute to Takashi Murakami Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Glitter Time- Tribute to Takashi Murakami
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Close-Up 2 Glitter Time- Tribute to Takashi Murakami Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Glitter Time- Tribute to Takashi Murakami
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Glitter Time- Tribute to Takashi Murakami Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Glitter Time- Tribute to Takashi Murakami
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

 

Day Eighty-Nine- Raquel Forner- Brightly Covered Canvases

It’s Day 89 and I woke up feeling a bit expressionistic today.  I decided to do some research and found a wonderful Argentine expressionist painter…join me in celebrating Raquel Forner today.

Raquel Forner

Raquel Forner

Raquel Forner

Raquel Forner

Raquel Forner (April 22, 1902 – June 10, 1988) was an Argentine painter known for her expressionist works.

Forner was born in Buenos Aires in 1902. Her father was Spanish by nationality and her mother was

Raquel Forner

Raquel Forner

an Argentine of Spanish descent. As a result of frequent family travel to Europe Forner spent part of her childhood in Spain, and later developed an artistic interest in the Spanish Civil War.
Forner completed studies at the National Academy of Fine Arts (today part of the National University Art Institute) in Buenos Aires in 1923. A year before graduation she received an appointment to teach drawing at the same academy.

In 1924 she received a third place award from the Argentine National Salon of Fine arts, and in 1928 she had her first solo exhibition in Buenos Aires. Afterward she relocated to Paris and studied with Othon Friesz.

 

Raquel Forner

Raquel Forner

In 1936 she married Argentine sculptor Alfredo Bigatti.

Forner’s work demonstrated an interest in current events, and from the beginning of

Raquel Forner

Raquel Forner

the Spanish Civil War in 1936 this took a dramatic and tragic tone. She borrowed ideas from surrealism during the 1940s, adapting its esthetic of distortion without seeking to reproduce a dream state.

In 1942 she took first place at the Argentine National Salon competition. During the 1940s through most of the 1950s she produced several series on similar tragic themes in a primarily expressionist mode. Forner often portrayed strong female figures, but not as specific explorations into gender norms.

 

Raquel Forner

Raquel Forner

Beginning in 1957, coinciding with the space race, Forner’s attention turned to

Raquel Forner

Raquel Forner

imagined scenes of interplanetary travel. With her Space Series, which exhibited in Europe and earned recognition, she became one of the earliest fine artists to portray scenes of outer space. This period is characterized by a more vibrant use of color and a personal cosmic mythology of her own creation. Forner’s artistic portrayals of space travel continued until the 1970s. The United States National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. has several examples of her late period work in its collection.
Her work was exhibited widely throughout Argentina, and she was given two Konex

Raquel Forner

Raquel Forner

Awards (the highest in the Argentine cultural realm) in 1982. Forner died in Buenos Aires in 1988. That year, the Buenos Aires Museum of Modern Art organized a retrospective in her honor.

Biography is from wikipedia.

Read more about her at answers.com.

I had such fun working with bold colors and also being able to just paint without

Fun times!

Fun times!

thinking today.  I pulled my upper back last night so I didn’t want anything to involved and would cause me to be hunched over for too long today…so this was a nice relaxing painting experience. 🙂

I hope you enjoy my tribute and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 90!  Best, Linda

 

The Eyes See All- Tribute to Raquel Forner Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

The Eyes See All- Tribute to Raquel Forner
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View The Eyes See All- Tribute to Raquel Forner Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
The Eyes See All- Tribute to Raquel Forner
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 The Eyes See All- Tribute to Raquel Forner Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
The Eyes See All- Tribute to Raquel Forner
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Close-Up 2 The Eyes See All- Tribute to Raquel Forner Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
The Eyes See All- Tribute to Raquel Forner
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 The Eyes See All- Tribute to Raquel Forner Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
The Eyes See All- Tribute to Raquel Forner
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

 

Day Eighty-Eight- William Hawkins- Bold and Original

It’s Day 88 and I think I may have found my new favorite artist.  William Hawkins!  I hadn’t had him on my original list, but was researching Art Brut artists and happened to stumble across his work.  I’m inspired to buy his books and if I had the money his original artwork!  Love it.  Join me in celebrating him today.

WIlliam Hawkins

WIlliam Hawkins

As proudly inscribed on most of his paintings, William Hawkins was born in Kentucky on July 27,

William Hawkins

William Hawkins

1895, though he spent much of his adult life in and around Columbus, Ohio, where he first moved in 1916 to avoid a shotgun wedding.

One of the most highly regarded African-American self-taught artists of the twentieth century, Hawkins worked tirelessly at numerous jobs—often simultaneously—ranging from breaking horses and running numbers to industrial steel casting and truck driving. He served in the Army in World War One, working burial details in France. Hawkins began painting in the 1930s, though he only dedicated himself exclusively to art around 1979, when he was discovered by neighboring artist Lee Garrett, leading to national attention and what collectors generally describe as his mature period.

 

King Kong- William Hawkins

King Kong- William Hawkins

Tending to paint with a single brush and semigloss enamels on large plywood and Masonite surfaces, he often worked from his own black-and-white photographs of buildings and animals, boldly articulating his unique, expressionistic interpretations of architectural form, religious subjects, and nature studies in bright color and broad, patterned brushstrokes.

By the time of his death in 1990, Hawkins had amassed a body of work comprising

Two Dinosaurs Wrestling- William Hawkins

Two Dinosaurs Wrestling- William Hawkins

approximately 500 paintings and pencil drawings (not counting his lost early pieces), gradually turning toward human figuration in his final years. His highly personal visions of architecture and pop cultural themes are generally rendered in a restrained palette, sometimes including collaged found objects or images to designate depth and dimension in lieu of conventional perspective or detail.

Elk with Human Eyes- William Hawkins

Elk with Human Eyes- William Hawkins

William Hawkins is one of America’s most widely exhibited and collectable self-taught painters, and his work can be found at the American Folk Art Museum, New York; the High Museum of Art, Atlanta; the National Gallery, Washington, D.C.; and in Ohio at the Columbus Museum of Art and the Akron Art Museum.

Biography is from Fleisher-Ollman gallery website.

William Hawkins was born in Kentucky on July 27, 1895, though he spent much of his

William Hawkins

William Hawkins

adult life in and around Columbus, Ohio, where he moved in 1916 to avoid a shotgun wedding. One of the most highly regarded African American self taught artists of the twentieth century, Hawkins worked tirelessly at numerous jobs—often simultaneously—ranging from breaking horses and running numbers to industrial steel casting and truck driving. Hawkins said that he began painting in the 1930s, though he only dedicated himself exclusively to art around 1979, when he was discovered by artist Lee Garrett, leading to national attention and what collectors generally describe as his mature period.

Last Supper- William Hawkins

Last Supper- William Hawkins

Tending to paint with a single brush and semigloss enamels on large plywood and Masonite surfaces, he often worked from magazine images or his own black-and-white photographs of buildings and animals, boldly articulating his unique, expressionistic interpretations of architectural forms, religious subjects, and nature studies in bright color and broad, patterned brushstrokes.

By the time of his death in 1990, Hawkins had amassed a body of work comprising approximately 500 paintings and pencil drawings (not

Jumbo Elephant- William Hawkins

Jumbo Elephant- William Hawkins

counting his lost early pieces). His highly personal visions of architecture and pop cultural themes are generally rendered in a restrained palette, sometimes including collaged found objects or images to designate depth and dimension in lieu of conventional perspective or detail.

This biography is from a great site Foundation for Self Taught Artists.

I hope you can see why I love this artist so much.  I just took a look at his work and fell in love with concept of it.  What a neat man.

Guess I'll do a moose!

Guess I’ll do a moose!

The problem with this artist is that I had too many ideas…so I decided to just start painting and not think about it too much.  Even as I type this, I’m thinking of other things I want to add to my painting.  Sheesh…just stop and do a bigger piece later Linda. (That’s what I’m saying to myself.)

I hope you enjoy my tribute to Mr. Hawkins and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 89!  11 more tip’ a hundred.

Best, Linda

Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Close-Up 3 Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 4 Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 4
Smilin Moose- Tribute to William Hawkins
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day Eighty-Seven- Kenneth Noland- Reshaping Canvases

It’s Day 87!  Painting my daily paintings has inspired me to do tons of new paintings for my new home.  I’ll put up a blog with some pictures of those soon.  Because of that I’ve been wanting to do simpler daily paintings.  Of course every time I choose a minimalist painter or abstract expressionist artist…it never ends up being as simple as I think!  On that note, join me in honoring Kenneth Noland today.

Kenneth Noland

Kenneth Noland

KENNETH NOLAND, BRIDGE, 1964

KENNETH NOLAND, BRIDGE, 1964

Kenneth Noland (April 10, 1924 – January 5, 2010) was an American abstract painter. He was one of the best-known American Color Field painters, although in the 1950s he was thought of as an abstract expressionist and in the early 1960s he was thought of as a minimalist painter.

Noland helped establish the Washington Color School movement. In 1977, he was honored by a major retrospective at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York

'Beginning', magna on canvas painting by Kenneth Noland, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, 1958

‘Beginning’, magna on canvas painting by Kenneth Noland, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, 1958

that then traveled to the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C. and Ohio’s Toledo Museum of Art in 1978. In 2006, Noland’s Stripe Paintings were exhibited at the Tate in London.

A son of Harry Caswell Noland (1896–1975), a pathologist, and his wife, Bessie (1897–1980), Kenneth Clifton Noland was born in Asheville, North Carolina. He had four siblings: David, Bill, Neil and Harry Jr.

 

Kenneth Noland, Lovely Rosa, 1983

Kenneth Noland, Lovely Rosa, 1983

Noland enlisted in the U.S. Air Force in 1942 after completing high school. A veteran of World War II, Noland took advantage of the G.I. Bill to study art at the experimental Black Mountain College in his home state of North Carolina. At Black Mountain, where two of his brothers also studied art, Noland studied with Ilya Bolotowsky, a professor who introduced him to neoplasticism and the work of Piet Mondrian. There, Noland also studied Bauhaus theory and color under Josef Albers[4] and became interested in Paul Klee, specifically Klee’s sensitivity to color.

In 1948 and 1949 Noland worked with Ossip Zadkine in Paris, and had his first

Kenneth Noland

Kenneth Noland

exhibition of his paintings there. In the early 1950s he met Morris Louis in Washington, D.C. while teaching night classes at the Washington Workshop Center for the Arts. He became friends with Louis, and after being introduced by Clement Greenberg to Helen Frankenthaler and seeing her new paintings at her studio in New York City in 1953, he and Louis adopted her “soak-stain” technique of allowing thinned paint to soak into unprimed canvases.

 

 Kenneth Noland , b. 1924 Chevron 4 acrylic on canvas

Kenneth Noland , b. 1924 Chevron 4 acrylic on canvas

Most of Noland’s paintings fall into one of four groups: circles (or targets), chevrons, stripes and shaped canvases. His preoccupation with the relationship of the image to the containing edge of the picture led him to a series of studies of concentric rings or bullseyes, commonly referred to as targets, which, like the one reproduced here called Beginning from 1958, used unlikely color combinations.

This also led Noland away from Morris Louis in 1958. In 1964, he was included in the

Kenneth Noland

Kenneth Noland

exhibition Post-Painterly Abstraction curated by Clement Greenberg, which traveled the country and helped to firmly establish Color Field painting as an important new movement in the contemporary art of the 1960s.

Kenneth Noland

Kenneth Noland

Noland pioneered the shaped canvas, initially with a series of symmetrical and asymmetrical diamonds or chevrons. In these paintings, the edges of the canvas become as structurally important as the center. During the 1970s and 1980s his shaped canvases were highly irregular and asymmetrical. These resulted in increasingly complex structures of highly sophisticated and controlled color and surface integrity.
Instead of painting the canvas with a brush, Noland’s style was to stain the canvas with color. This idea sought to remove the artist through brushstrokes. This made the piece about the art, not the artist. He emphasized spatial relationships in his work by leaving unstained, bare canvas as a contrast against the colors used throughout his paintings. Noland used simplified abstraction so the design would not detract from the use of color.

Noland died of kidney cancer at his home in Port Clyde, Maine on January 5, 2010 at the age of 85.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my tribute to Kenneth Noland today.  Paintings like these are more difficult than I always think they are going to be.  It definitely reminds me that I cannot draw a straight line…or even paint in between straight lines!  Well, I will see you tomorrow on Day 88…then it’s 12 more paintings until I hit a hundred!

Best, Linda

Rainbow Chevron- Tribute to Kenneth Noland Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Rainbow Chevron- Tribute to Kenneth Noland
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Rainbow Chevron- Tribute to Kenneth Noland Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Rainbow Chevron- Tribute to Kenneth Noland
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Rainbow Chevron- Tribute to Kenneth Noland Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Rainbow Chevron- Tribute to Kenneth Noland
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Rainbow Chevron- Tribute to Kenneth Noland Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Rainbow Chevron- Tribute to Kenneth Noland
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Rainbow Chevron- Tribute to Kenneth Noland Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Rainbow Chevron- Tribute to Kenneth Noland
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day Eighty-Six- Anne Truitt- Color Vibrations

It’s Day 86 and I originally wasn’t going to do this artist (because I thought she was just a sculptor) until I saw her works on paper which I loved!  Simple and yet so appealing to me.  Join me in celebrating Anne Truitt today.

Anne Truitt

Anne Truitt

Anne Truitt

Anne Truitt

Anne Truitt (March 16, 1921 – December 23, 2004),[1] born Anne Dean, was a major American artist of the mid-20th century.
She married James Truitt in 1948 (they divorced in 1969), and she became a full-time artist in the

Anne Truitt

Anne Truitt

1950s. A protégée of art critic Clement Greenberg in her youth, she worked within an extremely limited set of variables throughout her five-decade career. She made what is considered her most important work in the early 1960s anticipating in many respects the work of minimalists like Donald Judd and Ellsworth Kelly. She was unlike minimalists in some significant ways.

Truitt grew up in Easton, on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, and spent her teenage years in Asheville, North Carolina. She graduated from Bryn Mawr College with a degree in psychology in 1943. She declined an offer to pursue a Ph.D. in Yale University’s psychology department and worked briefly as a nurse in a psychiatric ward at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. She left the field of psychology in the mid-1940s, first writing fiction and then enrolling in courses offered by the Institute of Contemporary Art in Washington, D.C.

Anne Truitt

Anne Truitt

After leaving the field of clinical psychology in the mid-1940s, Truitt began making figurative sculptures, but turned toward reduced geometric forms after seeing works by Barnett Newman and Ad Reinhardt in 1961. Truitt’s first wood sculpture, titled First (1961), consists of three white vertical slates rooted in a block ground, each coming to a point and braced to each other at the rear, resembling a fragment of a picket fence. During a period spent in Japan with her husband, who at the time was the Japan bureau chief for Newsweek, she created aluminum sculptures from 1964 to 1967.

Before her first retrospective in New York she decided she did not like the works and

Anne Truitt

Anne Truitt

destroyed them.
The sculptures that made her significant to the development of Minimalism were aggressively plain and painted structures, often large. Fabricated from wood and painted with monochromatic layers of acrylic, they often resemble sleek, rectangular columns or pillars. She applied multiple coats, alternating brushstrokes between horizontal and vertical directions and sanding between layers. The artist sought to remove any trace of her brush, sanding down each layer of paint between applications and creating perfectly finished planes of colour.

Anne Truitt

Anne Truitt

The recessional platform under her sculpture raised them just enough off the ground that they appeared to float on a thin line of shadow. The boundary between sculpture and ground, between gravity and verticality, was made illusory. This formal ambivalence is mirrored by her insistence that color itself, for instance, contained a psychological vibration which when purified, as it is on a work of art, isolates the event it refers to as a thing rather than a feeling.

The event becomes a work of art, a visual sensation delivered by color. The Arundel series of

Anne Truitt

Anne Truitt

paintings, begun in 1973, features barely visible graphite lines and accumulations of white paint on white surfaces. In the custard-color Ice Blink (1989), a tiny sliver of red at the bottom of the painting is enough to set up perspectival depth, as is a single bar of purple at the bottom of the otherwise sky-blue Memory (1981). Begun around 2001, the Piths, canvases with deliberately frayed edges and covered in thick black strokes of paint, indicate Truitt’s interest in forms that blur the lines between two and three dimensions.

 

Anne Truitt

Anne Truitt

Truitt is also known for three books she wrote, Daybook, Turn, and Prospect, all journals. In Prospect, her third volume of reflections, Truitt set out to reconsider her “whole experience as an artist”—and also as a daughter, mother, grandmother, teacher and lifelong seeker. For many years she was associated with the University of Maryland, College Park, where she was a professor, and the artists’ colony Yaddo, where she served as interim president.
Truitt died December 23, 2004 at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C., of

Anne Truitt

Anne Truitt

complications following abdominal surgery. She was survived by three children and eight grandchildren, among them writer Charles Finch.

Biography is from wikipedia.

Whenever I do minimalist art, I find that figuring out something minimal and simple to paint is very difficult.  Choosing colors is also hard!

But I did choose the colors and did paint and I liked what I came up with.  It was a joy to paint and I hope you like it.  I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 87.

Best,

Linda

Ochre, Yellow, Black- Tribute to Anne Truitt Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Ochre, Yellow, Black- Tribute to Anne Truitt
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Ochre, Yellow, Black- Tribute to Anne Truitt Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Ochre, Yellow, Black- Tribute to Anne Truitt
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Ochre, Yellow, Black- Tribute to Anne Truitt Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Ochre, Yellow, Black- Tribute to Anne Truitt
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Ochre, Yellow, Black- Tribute to Anne Truitt Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Ochre, Yellow, Black- Tribute to Anne Truitt
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Ochre, Yellow, Black- Tribute to Anne Truitt Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Ochre, Yellow, Black- Tribute to Anne Truitt
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day Eighty-Five- Robert Mangold- More Complicated than they Seem

It’s Day 85!  My tummy has been at it all day from a dinner I ate last night. It was one of those incidents where you get a bad feeling while you’re eating.  Ugh.  I was still able to paint my painting and then it’s reading the Driver’s Handbook…I’m taking my driver’s test soon.  Yes, I’m 35 and don’t have a license.  I know how to drive, just never been interested in driving.  Now that I live a little out of the way and up a big hill, I want to not die every time I carry a load of groceries to my house. 🙂  Then it’s also doing feedback for my writing group, so join me in celebrating Robert Mangold today! It’s funny…I’m getting to the point where I panic after finishing a painting because I have a slight feeling that I had already honored that artist.  I can’t imagine how I’m going to feel once I hit a couple hundred!  Thank god for my spreadsheet and the “search” option on my glob <- mistype, but I’m keeping it. 😉

 

Robert Mangold

Robert Mangold

Mangold

Mangold

Robert Mangold (born October 12, 1937) is an American minimalist artist.

Mangold was born in North Tonawanda, New York. His mother, Blanche, was a department store buyer, and his father, Aloysius Mangold, worked at an organ factory. He first trained at the Cleveland Institute of Art from 1956 to 1959, and then at Yale University, New Haven, (BFA, 1961; MFA, 1963). In 1961 he married Sylvia Plimack, and they moved to New York.

“Robert Mangold’s paintings,” wrote Michael Kimmelman in the New York Times in

Mangold

Mangold

1997, “are more complicated to describe than they seem, which is partly what’s good about them: the way they invite intense scrutiny, which, in the nature of good art, is its own reward.” His works are comprised often of simple elements which are put together through complex means. Mangold’s work challenges the typical connotations of what a painting is or could be, and his works often appear as objects rather than images. Elements refer often to architectural elements or have the feeling of an architect’s hands. He almost always works in extensive series, often carried through both paintings and works on paper.

 

Mangold

Mangold

Mangold’s early work consisted largely of monochromatic free-standing constructions displayed against the wall, such as Grey Window Wall (1964). In 1968 he began employing acrylic instead of oil paint, rolling rather than spraying it on Masonite or plywood grounds. Within the year, he moved from these more industrially oriented supports to canvas. In 1970 he began working with shaped canvases and within the year began brushing rather than spraying paint onto canvas.

By the mid-1970s, Mangold moved on to overlapping shapes whose contours are

Column Paintings- Robert Mangold

Column Paintings- Robert Mangold

formed by combinations of canvas edges and both drawn and implied lines.  A 1994 series consisted of monochrome panels, deployed in two-panel trapezoidal works whose colors, sometimes matching, sometimes contrasting, run to deep oranges, olive greens, browns and grays. In a 2006/7 series, entitled Column Structure I through Column Structure XII, the 12 canvases each have a central vertical trunk measuring 10 feet high and 2 feet wide that is subdivided by straight, horizontal lines and appended with squares or triangles that jut from the sides, usually near the top.

 

Split Ring- Robert Mangold

Split Ring- Robert Mangold

Mangold’s paintings, quiet and restrained on the surface, are much admired by artists. In a 1994 review in Art in America, Robert Kushner wrote that “underneath the composure of their execution, there is an almost romantic vividness of experience. The contrast of this veiled undercurrent and the Apollonian restraint of the presentation make these new paintings both powerful and poignant.”
Mangold made his first prints in 1972 at Crown Point Press and has made prints throughout his career, working with Pace Editions and Brooke Alexander Editions.
Mangold designed the monumental colored glass panels contained in the Buffalo

Four Color Frame Painting- Robert Mangold

Four Color Frame Painting- Robert Mangold

Federal Courthouse pavilion lobby.
Mangold lives in Washingtonville, New York with his wife Sylvia Plimack Mangold, who is also an artist. They are the parents of film director and screenwriter James Mangold, and musician Andrew Mangold.

Biography from wikipedia.

I had an interesting time creating my tribute.  I wanted to do something that captured his style, but I also wanted to do my own version of it.  I think that’s what throws me off about minimalist art.  I always want to complicate it in some way. 😉  I’m learning about this movement just like I learned how to embrace the concept of abstract expressionism.  The point is to keep it simple and in the abstract sense…less deliberate!  I love this psychological experience I’m putting myself through.  I’m creating images I would never ever just create on my own.  So that’s a good thing!  I hope you enjoy my tribute and see you tomorrow on Day 86!  Best, Linda

 

Split Circle- Tribute to Robert Mangold Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Split Circle- Tribute to Robert Mangold
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Split Circle- Tribute to Robert Mangold Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Split Circle- Tribute to Robert Mangold
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Split Circle- Tribute to Robert Mangold Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Split Circle- Tribute to Robert Mangold
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Split Circle- Tribute to Robert Mangold Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Split Circle- Tribute to Robert Mangold
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Split Circle- Tribute to Robert Mangold Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Split Circle- Tribute to Robert Mangold
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day Eighty-Four- Sekhar Roy- Krishna and His Surroundings

It’s Day 84!

Yesterday, I was going through my artist list and realized I didn’t have enough Asian and Indian artists so I did some research in

Sekhar Roy

Sekhar Roy

the evening and found tons of artists that I couldn’t wait to pay tribute to.  Today I am honoring Indian artist Sekhar Roy!  Funny story…there are more than one Sekhar Roy’s that are artists and I had to be really careful not to get them mixed up!

Sekhar Roy Title: Ganesha With Flute

Sekhar Roy Title: Ganesha With Flute

Life is a river, starts from the hilly area, it flows down on plain, collecting the stones, soils and some dirt, making all to fertilizing others but burden for itself.

Sometimes it gets fresh water from rain or by any

Sekhar Roy

Sekhar Roy

other small stream, which makes the river strong and powerful.

His life is also the same; it started on 17th August 1973. It was not so smooth for him

Ganesha V- Sekhar Roy

Ganesha V- Sekhar Roy

in his childhood days due to some political and socio economic reasons. In his school days he had that urge for energy which could make him more empowered, more spontaneous.

After few days when some useless particles being already collected in his life and the

Sekhar Roy

Sekhar Roy

‘Gati'(speed) was obstructed, he got someone who was just like a fresh stream to his blockade wave and enhanced its speed. He was his Guru (teacher) late. Prof. Gopal Sanyal. With all his guidance and blessings he did eight solo exhibitions, participated in various group shows and camps.

Sekhar Roy Title: Krishna VII

Sekhar Roy Title: Krishna VII

He’s very much influenced by the Indian mythological characters specially ‘Krishna and His surroundings’. He’s getting immense pleasure by depicting the different postures of that great character of ‘Mahabharata’, because that particular character is seemed to him a perfect combination of love, passion and thoughtful mind. Thus his journey is going on ….

Biography is from his page at fineartamerica.com.

~

Blue!

Blue!

I wanted to do something simple, but pretty for this tribute!

I really enjoyed painting this piece.  I watered down my acrylics and it made me want to do more with water color!

I hope you enjoy my tribute to Sekhar Roy and I’ll see you tomorrow on day 85!

Best, Linda

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Krishna Moon- Tribute to Sekhar Roy Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Krishna Moon- Tribute to Sekhar Roy
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Krishna Moon- Tribute to Sekhar Roy Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Krishna Moon- Tribute to Sekhar Roy
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Krishna Moon- Tribute to Sekhar Roy Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Krishna Moon- Tribute to Sekhar Roy
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Krishna Moon- Tribute to Sekhar Roy Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Krishna Moon- Tribute to Sekhar Roy
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Krishna Moon- Tribute to Sekhar Roy Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Krishna Moon- Tribute to Sekhar Roy
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day Eighty-Three- Lee Krasner- Ever Changing Images

Day 83!  Getting closer and closer to 100…don’t know what that means, but it’ll be quite an accomplishment.  It already is!  Today is so nice out so it was hard to stay downstairs in my art studio to paint.  But I did and it was super fun.  Please join me in honoring Lee Krasner today.

Lee Krasner

Lee Krasner

White Squares 1948- Lee Krasner

White Squares 1948- Lee Krasner

Lee Krasner (October 27, 1908 – June 19, 1984) was an influential American abstract expressionist painter in the second half of the 20th century. On October 25, 1945, she married artist Jackson Pollock, who was also influential in the abstract expressionism movement.

Krasner was born as Lena Krassner (outside the family she was known as Lenore

Easter Lilies- Lee Krasner

Easter Lilies- Lee Krasner

Krasner) in Brooklyn, New York to Russian Jewish immigrant parents from Bessarabia.
She studied at The Cooper Union and the National Academy of Design and worked on the WPA Federal Art Project from 1935 to 1943. Starting in 1937, she took classes with Hans Hofmann, who taught the principles of cubism, and his influence helped to direct Krasner’s work toward neo-cubist abstraction. When commenting on her work, Hofmann stated, “This is so good you would not know it was painted by a woman.”
In 1940, she started showing her works with the American Abstract Artists, a group of American painters.

Night Creatures 1965- Lee Krasner

Night Creatures 1965- Lee Krasner

Krasner would often cut apart her own drawings and paintings to create collages and, at times, revised or discarded an entire series. As a result, her surviving body of work is relatively small. Her catalogue raisonné, published in 1995 by Abrams, lists only 599 known pieces. She was rigorously self-critical, and her critical eye is believed to have been important to Pollock’s work.
Krasner struggled with the public’s reception of her identity, both as a woman and as

Lee Krasner

Lee Krasner

the wife of Pollock. Therefore she often signed her works with the genderless initials “L.K.” instead of her more recognizable full name.
Krasner and Pollock gave each other reassurance and support during a period when neither’s work was well-appreciated. Like Picasso during the brief period of his interaction with Braque, the daily give-and-take of Pollock and Krasner stimulated both artists. Pollock and Krasner fought a battle for legitimacy, impulsiveness and individual expression. They opposed an old-fashioned, conformist, and repressed culture unreceptive to these values, which was put off by the intricacy of Modernism in general.

Lee Krasner

Lee Krasner

Lee Krasner died in 1984, age 75, from natural causes. She had been suffering from arthritis.
Six months after her death, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City held a retrospective exhibition of her work. A review of the exhibition in the New York Times noted that it “clearly defines Krasner’s place in the New York School” and that she “is a major, independent artist of the pioneer Abstract Expressionist generation, whose stirring work ranks high among that produced here in the last half-century.”

As of 2008, Krasner is one of only four women artists to have had a retrospective show

Lee Krasner

Lee Krasner

at the Museum of Modern Art. The other three women artists are Louise Bourgeois (MoMA retrospective in 1982), Helen Frankenthaler (MoMA retrospective in 1989) and Elizabeth Murray (MoMA retrospective in 2004).
Her papers were donated to the Archives of American Art in 1985; they were digitized and posted on the web for researchers in 2009.
After her death, her East Hampton property became the Pollock-Krasner House and Studio, and is open to the public for tours. A separate organization, the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, was established in 1985. The Foundation functions as the official Estate for both Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock, and also, under the terms of her will, serves “to assist individual working artists of merit with financial need.” The U.S. copyright representative for the Pollock-Krasner Foundation is the Artists Rights Society.

Krasner was portrayed in an Academy Award-winning performance by Marcia Gay Harden in the 2000 film Pollock, a drama about the life of her husband Jackson Pollock, directed by Ed Harris. In John Updike’s novel Seek My Face (2002), a significant portion of the main character’s life is based on Krasner’s.

Biography is from wikipedia.

Prepping the canvas with some color...

Prepping the canvas with some color…

I went to painting immediately after researching Krasner’s paintings.  I knew exactly how I wanted

Luminescent turquoise?  Why not??

Luminescent turquoise? Why not??

to go about it.  I think I captured her style, but also just got lost in it as I painted.  It was a nice experience creating today.  I hope you enjoy my tribute and I will see you tomorrow on Day 84!  Best, Linda

Close-Up 3 Life Maze- Tribute to Lee Krasner Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Life Maze- Tribute to Lee Krasner
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Life Maze- Tribute to Lee Krasner Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Life Maze- Tribute to Lee Krasner
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Life Maze- Tribute to Lee Krasner Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Life Maze- Tribute to Lee Krasner
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Life Maze- Tribute to Lee Krasner Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Life Maze- Tribute to Lee Krasner
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Life Maze- Tribute to Lee Krasner Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Life Maze- Tribute to Lee Krasner
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

 

Day Eighty-Two- Karl Schmidt-Rottluff- Lost in Translation

It’s Day 82 and I did my painting early today.  Didn’t really plan on finishing it this early, but I just got sucked into it.  I wanted to get started on my lazy Sunday.  Lazy meaning, organizing some stuff in the house, walking the pups…etc.  Join me in celebrating Karl Schmidt-Rottluff today!

Karl Schmidt-Rotluff

Karl Schmidt-Rottluff

Schmidt-Rottluff, Karl. German. 1884-1976. Portrait of Emy. 1919. Oil on canvas

Schmidt-Rottluff, Karl. German. 1884-1976. Portrait of Emy. 1919. Oil on canvas

He was born Karl Schmidt in Rottluff, Saxony, today a district of Chemnitz, and attended the Humanistisches Gynasium in Chemnitz. He began to study architecture in Dresden, but gave up after a term, when he became a founder member of a group of artists known as Die Brücke (“The Bridge”), along with his fellow architecture students Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Fritz Bleyl and Erich Heckel. The group was founded in Dresden on 7 June 1905, and its first exhibition opened in Leipzig in November of the same year.

In 1906 he added “Rottluff” to his surname. He spent the summer of that year on

Self Portrait- Karl Schmidt-Rotluff

Self Portrait- Karl Schmidt-Rottluff

island of Alsen, in the company of Emil Nolde. From 1907 to 1912 he spent the summers on the coast at Dangast, near Bremen. In December 1911, like the rest of members of Die Brücke he moved from Dresden to Berlin.

The group was dissolved in 1913. He served in the army on the eastern front in 1915–18, before returning to Berlin, where he spent the rest of his life, except for a period during the Second World War, when he returned to Rottluff following the destruction of his studio in an air raid.

Dangast Landscape- Karl Schmidt-Rotluff

Dangast Landscape- Karl Schmidt-Rottluff

The honours bestowed on Schmidt-Rottluff after World War I, as Expressionism officially recognized in Germany, were taken away from him after the rise to power of the Nazis.

He was expelled from the Prussian Academy of Arts in 1933, two years after his

Dr Rosa Schapire 1919 Karl Schmidt-Rottluff

Dr Rosa Schapire 1919 Karl Schmidt-Rottluff

admission.  In 1937, 608 of Schmidt-Rottluff’s paintings were seized from museums by the Nazis and several of them shown in exhibitions of “degenerate art” (“Entartete Kunst”). By 1941 he had been expelled from the painters guild and forbidden to paint.

Schmidt-Rotluff

Schmidt-Rottluff

After the war, in 1947, Schmidt-Rottluff was appointed professor at the University of Arts in Berlin-Charlottenburg, through which he again exercised an important influence on a new generation of artists. An endowment made by him in 1964 provided the basis for the Brücke Museum in West Berlin, which opened in 1967 as a repository of works by members of the group.

He was a prolific printmaker, with 300 woodcuts, 105 lithographs, 70 etchings, and 78

Schmidt-Rotluff

Schmidt-Rottluff

commercial prints described in Rosa Schapire’s Catalogue raisonné.

He died in Berlin in 1976.

Biography is from wikipedia.

photo 1I decided to do a portrait of me and my husband.  I’ve been wanting to use this reference photo of us at a friends wedding years back for something, but I didn’t know for which artist until today!

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Yay!

Yay!

I hope you enjoy my tribute to Schmidt-Rottluff today.  I had fun painting it.  It’s an interesting experiment to use colors that aren’t really there except inside your emotions.  It was also interesting using a black and white reference photo so that I could only choose colors from my feelings as opposed to what my eyes were seeing…if that makes any sense!  Enjoy and I’ll see you tomorrow on day 83! xoxo, Linda

Olden Times- Tribute to Karl Schmidt-Rotluff Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Olden Times- Tribute to Karl Schmidt-Rotluff
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Olden Times- Tribute to Karl Schmidt-Rotluff Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Olden Times- Tribute to Karl Schmidt-Rotluff
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Olden Times- Tribute to Karl Schmidt-Rotluff Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Olden Times- Tribute to Karl Schmidt-Rotluff
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Olden Times- Tribute to Karl Schmidt-Rotluff Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Olden Times- Tribute to Karl Schmidt-Rotluff
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Olden Times- Tribute to Karl Schmidt-Rotluff Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Olden Times- Tribute to Karl Schmidt-Rotluff
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 4 Olden Times- Tribute to Karl Schmidt-Rotluff Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 4
Olden Times- Tribute to Karl Schmidt-Rotluff
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

The essence of art can never change. I’m convinced you can’t talk about art. At best, you will have a translation, a poetic paraphrase, & as for that I’ll leave that to the poets.
Karl Schmidt-Rottluff
Read more at http://izquotes.com/author/karl-schmidt-rottluff

 

 

 

 

Day Eighty-One- Buff Monster- Pretty in Pink

It’s Day 81 and I was stumped on who I wanted to pay tribute to today.  I wanted to do something fun so my friend Karli told me I should do Buff Monster!  I went and looked him up and freaked out.  Join me in celebrating Buff Monster today!

buff_monster_portrait

Buff Monster

Buff Monster

Buff Monster became known as a street artist in Los Angeles whose work has

Buff Monster

Buff Monster

been visited by juxtapoz, among others. On 19 September 2012 he took part in a street art panel discussion for Doyle New York. He is featured in the Banksy movie Exit Through the Gift Shop. He is influenced by Japanese culture and his work usually combines the color pink with some form of ice cream.

His painting Happy Pink Explosion is in the collection of Bristol Museum and

Buff Monster

Buff Monster

Art Gallery.

Buff Monster

Buff Monster

Buff Monster currently lives in Brooklyn.

This biography is from wikipedia.

The one below is from his website!

Buff Monster made a name for himself by putting up thousands of hand-silkscreened posters across Los Angeles, and other far-away places. His work is characterized by happy characters living in brightly-colored bubbly landscapes.

Buff Monster

Buff Monster

Along with meticulously executed paintings, he has created a wide range of merchandise ranging from prints and stickers, to vinyl toys and plush. In 2012 he created an ambitious homage to Garbage Pail Kids called The Melty Misfits; a collection of vintage-style trading cards, complete with wax wrapper.

The color pink, a symbol of confidence, individuality and happiness, is present in

Buff Monster

Buff Monster

everything he creates. And he often cites heavy metal music, ice cream and Japanese Culture as major influences. His work has been shown in galleries worldwide, often accompanied by large installations.

Buff Monster

Buff Monster

In 2010, the Bristol City Museum acquired a painting of his for their permanent collection. His art has been published in a variety of magazines, websites, newspapers and books, including Juxtapoz, Paper, Nylon, Cool Hunting, Angeleno, The Los Angeles Times, LA Weekly, The New York Times, and many more. He was also featured in Banksy’s movie: Exit Through the Gift Shop. In 2012, after 15 years living and working in Hollywood, he moved to New York City.

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I really wanted to be careful and not completely copy one of his pieces…which was tempting.  So I decided to do a sketch of my own

I decided to paint a ghosty dude. :)

I decided to paint a ghosty dude. 🙂

and then paint it in his style.  I had to borrow a bunch of pinks from Karli’s paint stash.  The neon pink really started hurting my eyes when I was painting, but it’s just so darn cool.  I also dug out a wood panel to paint on so it’s not on the usual 10 x 10 canvas, but on a 8 x 10.

I hope you enjoy my tribute to Buff Monster.  What a cool dude!  I also hope I captured his spirit…I think I would’ve done a bit better if I had more time.  I felt a little rushed and was also doing some house chores (also fun!).

I will see you tomorrow on day 82…I can’t wait to break a hundred!  I should have some sort of celebration on day 100. 🙂  Best, Linda

Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Side-View Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Side-View
Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 1 Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 1
Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 2 Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 2
Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 3 Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 3
Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 4 Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 4
Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel