Day 333- Bridget Bate Tichenor- Spiritual Guides

It’s Day 333 and I really enjoyed creating today’s piece.  I was stumped at first at what I wanted to paint, but when the ideas started flowing, I had a great time.  I also wanted to keep it somewhat simple, but also really capture the artist’s essence so to speak. 🙂  Join me in honoring Bridget Bate Tichenor.

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor (born Bridget Pamela Arkwright Bate on November 22, 1917 – died on October 20, 1990), also known as Bridget Tichenor or B.B.T., was a Mexican surrealist painter of fantastic art in the school of magic realism and a fashion editor. Born in Paris and of British descent, she later embraced Mexico as her home.

The mesmerizing story of the Magic Realist painter Bridget Bate Tichenor has never been told.  It is a riveting revelation of an extraordinary female artist who impacted the 20th Century world of fashion, art, and society, with enormous contributions.  Revealed are the intimacies and secrets of an outwardly beautiful, exotic, bold, and courageous, yet painfully shy and reclusive woman, who lived in extraordinary times, yet was unknown to her peers, colleagues, and the world at large.

Bridget lived in an astonishing way, in many contrasting countries, and in many revolutionary platforms. Her personal code of excellence has yet to be recognized or acknowledged, outside small and eccentric art circles. Bridget adhered to rarefied and noble standards of human pride, integrity, respect, discipline, and compassion.

Bridget Bate Tichenor, Líderes (Leaders) Close Up

Bridget Bate Tichenor, Líderes (Leaders) Close Up

She honored these humane traits above all else in life.  Bridget’s impeccable values, in tandem with her determination and prioritization to execute her artistic vision, are the essence of her story, and substantiates her historical value.

Bridget inherited a peripatetic world from her self-absorbed, famous, and creatively gifted parents. It fueled deep insecurities, and was equally fed by fears of abandonment. Subsequently, in order to survive, she reinvented herself by necessity, and chose to mold herself into whatever she needed at any given time.

Bridget’s mother, Vera Bate Lombardi (Sarah Gertrude Baring Arkwright Fitzgeorge Bate Lombardi) was an indomitable combination of beauty and bravado with the highest connections. From 1925-1939, Vera became Co Co Chanel’s muse and Public Relations liaison to several European Royal Families.

BRIDGET BATE TICHENOR (1917-1990) Gusanos y caracoles

BRIDGET BATE TICHENOR (1917-1990) Gusanos y caracoles

Her demeanor and style influenced the ‘English Look’, the very foundation for the House of Chanel. Vera Bate Lombardi’s mother was Rosa Frederica Baring of the Baring Banking family, who had rescued the British Royal family during difficult economic times. Vera was allegedly an illegitimate descendent of George III, through her reputed father, HRH Prince Adolphus Cambridge, 1st Marquess of Cambridge Duke of Teck. She was presented socially as Fitzgeorge, as she was the unadopted daughter of her stepfather, the morganatic and bastard Colonel Fitzgeorge, son of Prince George, Duke of Cambridge and his mistress Sarah Louisa Fairbrother.

Chanel craved Vera’s immense popularity and privileged patrician heritage, however shrouded in controversial

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

royal illegitimacies. Chanel came from humble beginnings, and was decidedly uneducated. She looked to Vera as a ‘social advisor’, who would be responsible for her societal launch and business triumph. It was evident that Chanel’s personal identity had been tragically dehumanized and shamed as an orphan, and she systematically absorbed Vera’s exotic mannerisms, from gestures to stance, with Cambridge and Oxford intonations, in a scheming and arrogant self-reinvention of entitlement.

Lombardi was a flawless British Royal Fashion icon to Chanel, and Chanel shamelessly used her to establish her fashion-identity-template, which became the legendary Chanel brand. Years later, Vera, retaliated against Chanel’s ruthless jealousies and manipulations, and exposed her as a Nazi spy to her cousin Sir Winston Churchill in Spain circa 1944. This disclosure shattered Chanel’s reputation for many years.

La Caja de Cristal- Bridget Bate Tichenor

La Caja de Cristal- Bridget Bate Tichenor

Until now, Vera Bate Lombardi has been relatively obscured in Chanel’s literary and film biographies. Chanel cunningly perpetuated her adapted character identity, and concealed the truths of her business cornerstone. What had begun as flattery for Vera, terminated in disgust.

Bridget’s father, Frederick Blantford Bate, was born in Virginia but lived in England for over 20 years, working as a British representative for NBC during World War I. Bate was a Mechanical Officer in the US Army, who, in 1916, was instrumental in establishing The Field Service of American Ambulance in Paris. Bate was an intimate friend of Vera’s cousin, the Duke of Windsor. He was the first news correspondent to receive the story of the Duke’s abdication and marriage to Wallis Simpson, and contacted his associate, Alistair Cooke, in the UK to broadcast it.

The beautiful, noble, artistic, and rich are patently different, often misunderstood or condemned, yet granted societal privileges few receive. These very qualities that embodied Bridget’s unique style, influenced and were

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

copied by some of the greatest names of the 20th century such as her rivals Diana Vreeland and Frida Kahlo. She was loved and envied, but most importantly, awe-inspiring to Man Ray, Diego Rivera, Ernst Lubitsch, James Whale, Laurence Olivier, Anais Nin, Greta Garbo, and Joan Crawford.

Bridget had an amazing, yet tragic, multidimensional life, which included an arranged marriage, true love, romantic and professional rivalry, artistic achievement, mysticism, fantasy, perfectionism, and shattered dreams. All of which were played out in the most glamorous settings, with famous personalities and eccentric nobility that she orchestrated in a dramatic metaphysical theater of remarkable relationships.

She was difficult to get to know, guarded, and very secretive. She revealed certain things to socially survive, while withholding her poetically rich emotional and spiritual communications to focus through her dedicated relationship with her sacred and sovereign art. She had a genius gift of observation and execution in cryptic detail, both in her character and painting.

Bridget Bate TIchenor

Bridget Bate TIchenor

Her controversial royal illegitimate background overshadowed her profound artistry and her sense of self worth.  In her era and society, it was important to be of royal lineage. Her achievement in the art world was diminished by who she was as an illegitimate royal family member, her ravishing beauty, her refined intelligence, and her commanding personality. Her controversial background was more important and interesting to her friends, which graciously made her celebrated and received on one hand, yet made her hide how great an artist she was on the other and never acknowledged. This is why she was so shy about showing who she was as a superlative painter.

She compartmentalized her life. She was deathly afraid to remove her complex multiple masks and reveal not only her precious art, but also her deepest intimate feelings to others. She was validated only by those relationships that had a higher profile than she, so that she could retreat behind her provocatively mysterious and seductive persona to hide her acute vulnerability.

She was difficult to get to know, guarded, and very secretive.  She revealed certain things to socially survive, while withholding her poetically rich emotional and spiritual communications to focus through her dedicated

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

relationship with her sacred and sovereign art.

Bridget spiritually adopted me and I became her protégé in 1971. Among her many gifts, she benevolently trained me in painting and introduced me to ancient occult religions, which included many lost esoteric sciences of Egyptian, Tantrika, and Mesoamerican Magick and Alchemy. She fed my hunger to learn, and I became her consummate student in a world that had received a death rattle to classically trained artists.

Just before her death, I promised my dear friend and genius mentor Bridget that the world would know who she was. One of the legacies she gave to me were her life stories. I began to document Bridget’s life in 1990 shortly after her death, recording her extensive and detailed personal accounts that she imparted to me over the nineteen years of our relationship. The following biography is a small part of my promise that perpetuates the significance of her life.

-Zachary Selig-

Biography is from www.bridgetbatetichenor.com.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I really had a blast painting it.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 334.

Best,

Linda

Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 331- Grandma Moses- Life, A Good Day’s Work

It’s Day 331…and it’s Thanksgiving!  I thought today’s artist was perfect to pay tribute to on a holiday!  Please join me in honoring Grandma Moses today.  If only we all can find fame (for the first time or again) at the age of 80 and live til the age of 101!  I give thanks to her for pursuing such creativity later in life.

Grandma Moses

Grandma Moses

Anna Mary Robertson Moses (September 7, 1860 – December 13, 1961), better known by her nickname of “Grandma Moses,”was a renowned American folk artist. Having begun painting in earnest at the age of 78, she is often cited as an example of an individual successfully beginning a career in the arts at an advanced age. Her works have been shown and sold in the United States and abroad and have been marketed on greeting cards and other merchandise. Moses’ paintings are among the collections of many museums. The Sugaring Off was sold for US$1.2 million in 2006.

The Burning of Troy- Grandma Moses

The Burning of Troy- Grandma Moses

Moses has appeared on magazine covers, television, and in a documentary of her life. She wrote an autobiography of her life, won numerous awards and was awarded two honorary doctoral degrees.

The New York Times said of her: “The simple realism, nostalgic atmosphere and luminous color with which Grandma Moses portrayed homely farm life and rural countryside won her a wide following. She was able to capture the excitement of winter’s first snow, Thanksgiving preparations and the new, young green of oncoming spring… In person, Grandma Moses charmed wherever she went. A tiny, lively woman with mischievous gray eyes and a quick wit, she could be sharp-tongued with a sycophant and stern with an errant grandchild. ”

Starting at 12 years of age and for a total of 15 years, she was a live-in housekeeper. One of the families that she

Grandma Moses - Christmas at Home

Grandma Moses – Christmas at Home

worked for, who noticed her appreciation for their prints made by Currier and Ives, supplied her with art materials to create drawings. Moses and her husband began their married life in Virginia, where they worked on farms. In 1905 they returned to Northeastern United States and settled in Eagle Bridge, New York. The couple had five children who survived infancy. Her interest in art was expressed throughout her life, including embroidery of pictures with yarn, until arthritis made this pursuit too painful.

Born in Greenwich on September 7, 1860, Anna Mary Robertson was the third of Margaret Shanahan Robertson and Russell King Robertson’s ten children. She was raised with four sisters and five

GRANDMA MOSES The Old Checkered House in Cambridge Valley

GRANDMA MOSES The Old Checkered House in Cambridge Valley

brothers. Her father ran a flax mill and was a farmer. Moses attended a one-room school for a short period of time as a child. That school is now the Bennington Museum in Vermont which has the largest collection of her works in the United States. Moses first painted as a child, using lemon and grape juice to make colors for her “lambscapes”. Other natural materials that she used to create works of art included ground ochre, grass, flour paste, slack lime and sawdust.

She left home and began to work for a wealthy neighboring family at 12 years of age, performing chores on their farm. She continued to keep house, cook and sew for wealthy families for 15 years. One of the families that she worked for, the Whitesides, noticed her interest in their Currier and Ives prints and purchased chalk and wax crayons so that she could create her own artwork.

She was 27 when she worked on the same farm as Thomas Salmon, a “hired man”. They married and established themselves nearStaunton, Virginia where they spent nearly two decades, living and working in turn

Moving Day on the Farm- Grandma Moses

Moving Day on the Farm- Grandma Moses

on four separate local farms. To supplement the family income, Moses made potato chips and churned butter from the milk of a cow that she purchased with her savings. Later, the couple bought a farm.

Moses and her husband had five of ten children born to them survive infancy. Although she loved living in the Shenandoah Valley, in 1905 Anna and Robert moved to a farm in Eagle Bridge, New York at her husband’s urging. Thomas Moses died in 1927 of a heart attack, after which her son Forrest helped her operate the farm. She retired and moved to a daughter’s home in 1936. Anna Mary was known as either “Mother Moses” or “Grandma Moses,” and although she first exhibited as “Mrs. Moses,” the press dubbed her “Grandma Moses,” and the nickname stuck.

Grandma Moses

Grandma Moses

As a young wife and mother, Moses had been creative in her home by, for example, using housepaint to decorate a fireboard in 1918. Moses made embroidered pictures of yarn for friends and family beginning in 1932.  She also created beautiful quilted objects, a form of “hobby art” as defined by Lucy R. Lippard.

Moses had developed arthritis by the age of 76, which made embroidery painful. It was suggested to her by Celestia, her sister, that painting would be easier for her, which spurred Moses’s painting career in her late 70s.

Moses painted scenes of rural life from earlier days, which she called “old-timey” New England landscapes. Moses said that she would “get an inspiration and start painting; then I’ll forget everything, everything except how things used to be and how to paint it so people will know how we used to live.” She omitted features of modern life, like tractors and telephone poles, from her works of art.

Her early style is less individual and more realistic or primitive, despite her lack of knowledge of, or perhaps rejection of, basic perspective. Initially she created simple compositions or copied existing images. As her career advanced she created complicated, panoramic compositions of rural life.

She was a prolific painter, generating over 1,500 canvasses in three decades. Initially Moses charged $3 to $5

Grandma Moses

Grandma Moses

for a painting, depending upon its size, and as her fame increased her works were sold for $8,000 to $10,000. Her winter paintings are reminiscent of some such of the known winter paintings of Pieter Bruegel the Elder, although she had never seen his work. A German fan of her work said, “There emanates from her paintings a light-hearted optimism; the world she shows us is beautiful and it is good. You feel at home in all these pictures, and you know their meaning. The unrest and the neurotic insecurity of the present day make us inclined to enjoy the simple and affirmative outlook of Grandma Moses.”

During a visit to Hoosick Falls in 1938, Louis J. Caldor, who collected art and worked as an engineer in the state of New York, discovered paintings made by Moses in the window of a drug store. He bought their supply and ten more from her Eagle Bridge house for $3 or $5 each. The next year, three Grandma Moses paintings were included in New York’s Museum of Modern Art exhibition entitled “Contemporary Unknown American Painters”. Her first solo exhibition, “What a Farm Wife Painted,” opened in the same city in October 1940 at Otto Kallir’s Galerie St. Etienne. A meet-and-greet with the artist

Grandma Moses

Grandma Moses

and an exhibition of 50 paintings at Gimbel’s Department Store was held next on November 15. Her art displays included samples of her baked goods and preserves that won Moses prizes at the county fair. Her third solo show in as many months, was held at the Whyte Gallery, Washington, D.C. In 1944 she began to be represented by the American British Art Center and the Galerie St. Etienne, which increased her sales. Her paintings were exhibited throughout Europe and the United States over the next 20 years. Otto Kallir established the Grandma Moses Properties, Inc. for her.

Grandma Moses’s paintings were used to publicize American holidays, including Thanksgiving, Christmas and Mother’s Day. During the 1950s, Grandma Moses’s exhibitions broke attendance records around the world. Art historian Judith Stein noted: “A cultural icon, the spry, productive nonagenarian was continually cited as an inspiration for housewives, widows and retirees.” Her paintings were reproduced on Hallmark greeting cards, tiles, fabrics, and ceramics. They were also used to market products, like coffee, lipstick, cigarettes, and cameras.

n 1950, the National Press Club cited her as one of the five most newsworthy women and the National Association of House Dress Manufacturers honored her as their 1951 Woman of the Year. At age 88, Mademoiselle magazine named Grandma Moses a “Young Woman of the Year.” She was awarded two honorary

So Long Till Next Year- Grandma Moses

So Long Till Next Year- Grandma Moses

doctoral degrees. The first was bestowed in 1949 from Russell Sage College and the second two years later from the Moore College of Art and Design.

President Harry S. Truman presented her with the Women’s National Press Club trophy Award for outstanding accomplishment in art in 1949. Jerome Hill directed the 1950 documentary of her life, which was nominated for an Academy Award. In 1952, she published My Life’s History, her autobiography. In it she said “I look back on my life like a good day’s work, it was done and I feel satisfied with it. I was happy and contented, I knew nothing better and made the best out of what life offered. And life is what we make it, always has been, always will be.” In 1955, she appeared as a guest on See It Now, a television program hosted by Edward R. Murrow.

Grandma Moses

Grandma Moses

She was a Society of Mayflower Descendants and Daughters of the American Revolution member. Her 100th birthday was named by New York Governor Nelson Rockefelleras “Grandma Moses Day”. LIFE magazine celebrated her birthday by featuring her on its September 19, 1960 cover. The children’s book “Grandma Moses Story Book” was published in 1961.

Grandma Moses died on December 13, 1961 at 101 years of age in Hoosick Falls, New York at the Health Center. She is buried there at the Maple Grove Cemetery. President John F. Kennedy memorialized her: “The death of Grandma Moses removed a beloved figure from American life. The directness and vividness of her paintings restored a primitive freshness to our perception of the American scene. Both her work and her life helped our nation renew its pioneer heritage and recall its roots in the countryside and on the frontier. All Americans mourn her loss.” After her death, her work was exhibited in several large traveling exhibitions in the United States and abroad.

Biography is from wikipedia.

Painting’s not important. The important thing is keeping busy.

Grandma Moses
Keep in mind that she lived to 101!  Keep busy folks! 😉

I hope you enjoy my piece for today!  I was going to add more figures, but kind of liked the solitude after painting the little girl ice skating. 🙂  I had a nice time doing today’s tribute.  I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 332!  Hope everyone is getting stuffed with food today!  And I am grateful to all these artists that inspire me and continue to inspire me!  I am thankful for art in general for always being there for me in all ways possible.  Aren’t we lucky to live in a world so full of creativity?

Best,

Linda

Next Year's Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Next Year’s Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Next Year's Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Next Year’s Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Next Year's Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Next Year’s Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Next Year's Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Next Year’s Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Next Year's Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Next Year’s Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 288- Elaine de Kooning- Returning to Things

It’s Day 288 and I was excited to work on today’s painting.  Another artist I could’ve sworn I had already paid tribute to!  Join me in honoring Elaine de Kooning today!

Elaine de Kooning

Elaine de Kooning

Elaine de Kooning, Bacchus #63, 1982

Elaine de Kooning, Bacchus #63, 1982

Elaine de Kooning (March 12, 1918 – February 1, 1989)

Elaine de Kooning was born Elaine Marie Catherine Fried in 1918 (although she would later claim her birth year was 1920), to Marie and Charles Frank Fried, a plant manager for the Bond Bread Company in Brooklyn, NY. She was the first of four children who were all raised in the Sheepshead Bay neighborhood of Brooklyn. Elaine’s younger sister, Marjorie, once recalled that their mother was not the most attentive and loving parent, but she did instill in her children a love for the arts, often taking them to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and to several Broadway shows.

Elaine was clearly their mother’s favorite of the four children. According to an old friend

Bullfight- Elaine de Kooning

Bullfight- Elaine de Kooning

of Elaine’s, Marie’s nickname for her oldest daughter was “Samson,” from the Old Testament figure who was granted great strength by God. Marie was an eccentric and highly intelligent woman who was frequently seen walking around town in disheveled clothing and heavy makeup.

Self-Portrait

Self-Portrait

In the late 1920s, a neighbor reported Marie to the police for neglecting her children, and when the police arrived at the Fried home, Marie had to be physically forced from the premises. She was committed to the Creedmoor Psychiatric

Bullfight La Corrida- Elaine de Kooning

Bullfight La Corrida- Elaine de Kooning

Center in Queens Village for a year, during which time the children’s primary caregiver was their housekeeper. Elaine de Kooning became a surrogate parent for her younger siblings.

In 1932, de Kooning began attending Erasmus Hall High School where she excelled at nearly everything, including sports and academics. Four years later, she enrolled at Hunter College in Manhattan, but dropped out after only a few weeks of classes.

After leaving Hunter, de Kooning enrolled in classes at the Leonardo da Vinci Art School, located on 3rd Avenue and 34th Street, where artists employed by the New Deal-funded WPA (Works Progress Administration) were working as teachers. It was at the da Vinci School where she met artist Robert Jonas, whom she dated briefly, and remained close to throughout her life.

Portrait of John F. Kennedy- Elaine de Kooning

Portrait of John F. Kennedy- Elaine de Kooning

While attending classes at the da Vinci School, de Kooning became politically active, representing the school at meetings of the leftist John Reed Club. At these meetings she attempted to organize students into a new auxiliary union for artists, simply called the Artists’ Union. It was also at the John Reed Club meetings where she met artist Milton Resnick, who was representing the American Artists School. Resnick and de Kooning began dating soon thereafter, at which point she dropped out of Leonardo da Vinci and enrolled in classes at American Artists, where she learned from teachers Stuart Davis and Raphael Soyer.

Through her involvement with the American Artists School, de Kooning became active with

Untitled Corrida- Elaine de Kooning

Untitled Corrida- Elaine de Kooning

the Young Communist League (YCL), and frequently attended workers camps and other meetings sponsored by the Communist Party. To support herself financially during her student years, de Kooning joined the Models’ Union to find work as an artist’s model.

In the autumn of 1938, Elaine’s art teacher introduced her to the 34-year-old Dutch emigre Willem (Bill) de Kooning, but there is little evidence to suggest any romantic connection at their initial meeting. Elaine was with Resnick at the time, who had supposedly commented once to her, “Bill is going to be the greatest painter in the country.”

Untitled 1965- Elaine de Kooning

Untitled 1965- Elaine de Kooning

Shortly after their introduction, a friend of de Kooning’s took her to Willem’s studio. Later in life, Elaine recalled, “It was the cleanest place I ever saw in my life. It had painted gray floors, white walls, one table…one easel, one fantastically good phonograph that cost $800 when he was only making $22 a week, and one painting of a man on the easel.”

Shortly after meeting, Willem offered to give Elaine drawing lessons, which she

Portrait of Jack Greenbaum- Elaine de Kooning

Portrait of Jack Greenbaum- Elaine de Kooning

accepted. In late 1938, de Kooning finally sold her first work, a watercolor, for $10.

Photographer Rudy Burkhardt, who Willem introduced to Elaine, later recalled that “Bill was incredibly in love with her, but she didn’t treat him very well at the beginning… She would lean back on the couch and say, ‘Bill. Cigarette.’ And he would leap to get it.” In 1939, the year after the two artists met, de Kooning moved into Willem’s studio on West 22nd Street.

On December 9, 1943, Elaine and Willem were married at a small, understated ceremony at City Hall. De Kooning later recalled that the wedding itself was “kind of bleak… afterwards, we went to a bar in the downtown district and we all had a drink… it was kind of amusing.”

Elaine de Kooning, Al Lazar (Man in a Hotel Room), 1954

Elaine de Kooning, Al Lazar (Man in a Hotel Room), 1954

Working and teaching outside the shadow of her more famous husband, de Kooning gained acclaim as one of America’s premier artists. In 1962, she received a commission from the White House to paint the portrait of President John F. Kennedy; an impressive honor bestowed upon an artist commonly associated with the bohemian New York School of painting. De Kooning then spent the better part of 1963 fine-tuning the portrait, collecting hundreds of photographs of Kennedy, and drawing short-hand sketches of him whenever he appeared on TV. The resulting portrait remains one of de Kooning’s most well-known and celebrated paintings, and easily stands out in the long line of presidential portraits.

She died February 1, 1989.

Partial biography is from www.theartstory.org.

I decided to use a few matador/bullfighting photos as reference for my piece today, since it seemed to be a recurring theme in some of her paintings.  I really enjoyed the gestural and fluid style of today’s piece.  I think I needed to return to that after doing artists like van Gogh and Matisse this week!  I hope you enjoy my piece and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 289!

Best,

Linda

Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side View Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side View
Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 257- Hertha Hanson- Controlled Movements

It’s Day 257 and I’ve had a busy week.  I’m always feeling busy because of good things of course!  I found this artist whilst falling into a wormhole of art research one evening.  I fell in love with her style and think it’s nice to honor newer artists that are around my age.  🙂  Join me in honoring Hertha Hanson today.

Hertha Hanson

Hertha Hanson

#133- Hertha Hanson

#133- Hertha Hanson

Hertha Hanson, born in 1980 in Lund, Sweden is a Swedish painter.

Hertha Hanson was educated at Malmö Art Academy from 2004 to 2009.  Hanson has exhibited separately on including Anna Elle gallery in Stockholm, in the crypt of the Cathedral of Lund, the Lilith Gallery Walt Rock in Malmö and Bror Hjorth’s house in Uppsala .

Hanson has also participated in group exhibitions at the Wolf Åkragatan art gallery

#131- Hertha Hanson

#131- Hertha Hanson

  in Hammenhog , at Luleå Art Gallery, Malmö Art Museum, Lund Konsthall, Bror Hjorth’s house in Uppsala and Gallery Arnstedt in Östra Karup .

Hanson is represented at the National Public Art , Malmö Art Museum, Sweden’s Public Art Association , Bror Hjorth’s House, Halland and at Anne Elle Gallery in Stockholm.

#126- Hertha Hanson

#126- Hertha Hanson

About the exhibition “Below the Time” on Anne Elle Gallery in 2012 Hakan Nilson wrote: “In her paintings are different degrees of density in the surface layers of a more or less clear gestures, where color pressed and scraped away in distinct, controlled movements.”

ANNAELLEGALLERY is pleased to present Hertha Hanson´s first solo show at the gallery and in Stockholm. The exhibition, titled Below Time, contains a series of new paintings, all oil on canvas.

In her recent work, the Malmö-based Swedish artist explores the paradoxical

#139- Hertha Hanson

#139- Hertha Hanson

qualities of spontaneity and restraint, producing paintings that are deliberated yet whimsical. All works included in the show reflects Hanson’s process of simultaneously working on multiple canvases and allowing the series to develop in tandem, both in color and forms. Using different techniques such as scraping and applying paint fluidly, Hanson makes it easy for the viewer to follow the work process as one can see how and when the color has been applied to the canvas.

#12- Hertha Hanson

#12- Hertha Hanson

In her paintings, Hanson processes what are unclear, difficult to understand and categorize, always having the resolution present. For Hertha Hanson, painting is a strong inherent power, leading to the wordless thought. Through her paintings, Hanson explores the boundaries of language – perhaps what we call emotions and intuition.

Hertha Hanson was born in 1980 in Lund, and lives and works in Malmö, Sweden.

#110- Hertha Hanson

#110- Hertha Hanson

In 2009, she received an MFA at Malmö Art Academy. Her work has previously been shown at Malmö konstmuseum, Lund Konsthall, Luleå Konsthall, Lund Cathedral, etc. In the past she has received awards such as Ellen Trotzig, Fredrik Roos, Bror Hjort.

Biography is from wikipedia and from ANNAELLEGALLERY.COM.

All painting photos from artist’s website.

#81- Hertha Hanson

#81- Hertha Hanson

I hope you enjoy my tribute piece today!  I really relate to her works.  There are a few pieces of my abstract pieces that I’ve done that is a little reminiscent of her pieces.  I’d love to do a huge piece like this.  Enjoy and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 258!

Best,

Linda

#257- Tribute to Hertha Hanson Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

#257- Tribute to Hertha Hanson
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View #257- Tribute to Hertha Hanson Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
#257- Tribute to Hertha Hanson
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 #257- Tribute to Hertha Hanson Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
#257- Tribute to Hertha Hanson
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 #257- Tribute to Hertha Hanson Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
#257- Tribute to Hertha Hanson
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 #257- Tribute to Hertha Hanson Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
#257- Tribute to Hertha Hanson
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 205- Huguette Arthur Bertrand- Dazzling

It’s Day 205 and I really love today’s artists artwork.  I’m so exhausted from singing for three hours last night at improv.  I think today I’m going to just spend on painting, finishing up a chapter for my writing group and just chillaxing for once!  Join me in celebrating Huguette Arthur Bertrand today!  I had to translate her biography from French into English so it’s going to read a little strange.  I think instead of translating “her” it says “his”…oops!  Hope you don’t mind!  It’s from the French wikipedia.

Huguette Arthur Bertrand

Huguette Arthur Bertrand

L'amant cachalot, circa. 1990 Oil on canvas

L’amant cachalot, circa. 1990
Oil on canvas

Huguette Arthur Bertrand, born in 1920 and died in Ecouen 2005 in Paris, is a French non-figurative painter of the post-war related the adventure of the lyrical abstraction .

Rare woman painter of lyrical abstraction Postwar, Huguette Arthur Bertrand actively

Pirador, 1961 Oil on canvas

Pirador, 1961
Oil on canvas

involved in the Parisian art scene, alongsidePierre Soulages and Hans Hartung , Zao Wou-Ki and Chu Teh-Chun and others.

Huguette Arthur Bertrand has shown very early among the first representatives of abstract art French postwar designated under the name of the young and the new school of Paris .

Flèches en berges ensablées, circa. 1985 Oil on canvas

Flèches en berges ensablées, circa. 1985
Oil on canvas

Born in 1920 and after a childhood spent in the region of Saint-Étienne in contact with the textile tradition, she moved to Paris in the immediate post-war period, is befriended artists orbiting the Galerie Denise René and travel (purse Prague).

Its sensitivity and the ardor however take away from the smooth and cold geometry developed by his environment and encourage him to follow his own pictorial energy.Present in living May 1949, she participated in the group “The Hands dazzled” exposed by the Maeght Gallery in 1949-1950 and gained his first solo exhibitions at the gallery Niepce in 1951, then Galerie Arnaud from 1953 to 1959. Price Fénéon in 1955, she exhibited the following year in New York (Meltzer Gallery) to Copenhagen (Birch Gallery) and in England, Belgium, Germany and Japan.

In 1956, she participated in the exhibition of abstract art Adventure presented by Michel Ragon .

1950s to the 1990s, his work evolves very constructed compositions, organizing masses of color and lines in bundles, to smoother fields overgrown and covered in dazzling shades. His pictorial universe expands a reasoned implement a freedom won and matured, perceptible in erasing the line and the color distribution. The material is lighter and shapes disappear to make way for transparent clouds borne solvents, as to reach the essence of painting in a roll-overs (all over).

The transition takes place over several years gradually, in a slow and patient research. If progress is soft, energy is released and the gesture

Sans titre, 1957 Oil on canvas

Sans titre, 1957
Oil on canvas

says forcefully. Construction and organization values ​​always take precedence over the color used in small registers, often with dominant brown, red and orange, his favorite colors

“Neither geometrism or abstract landscape. A beautiful lyrical abstraction which takes its source in the fifties and has never ceased to swell its waters (…);strong beliefs that no user can shake, “writes Michel Ragon in the catalog of a recent exhibition of the painter (Galarté gallery, Paris, 1987).

Huguette Arthur Bertrand is also the author of numerous tapestry made in Aubusson, a form of loyalty to his parentage and origins (gallery La Demeure, Paris, 1975).

Works of Huguette Arthur Bertrand are collected worldwide, in major international museums including the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the Museum of Fine Arts of Quebec,the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, as well as in private collections and foundations such as the renowned Gandur Foundation for Art in Geneva.

In March 2012, the Galerie Diane de Polignac in Paris presented a solo booth artist Huguette Arthur Bertrand at the Pavilion of Art and Design, PAD Tuileries. The Gallery Diane de Polignac has also published a monographic catalog on the artist.

~

The paintings are from her page on artsy.net.  It’s such a wonderful site filled with great art.  Check it out!

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I feel that I may have made it a little busier than I wanted it to be.  Well, I still like it. 😉  I will see you tomorrow on Day 206!  Best, Linda

Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 194- Esphyr Slobodkina- Abstract Pioneer

It’s Day 194 and I know I’ve been focusing a lot on abstract artists because of my back to back house guests and being busy.  I found this artist while researching painters and fell in love with her style.  It’s nice to find woman artist pioneers in any art movement.  Been enjoying this style.  Join me in honoring Esphyr Slobodkina today!

Esphyr Slobodkina

Esphyr Slobodkina

Esphyr Slobodkina, Crossroad #2, ca. 1942-5, Oil on fiberboard

Esphyr Slobodkina, Crossroad #2, ca. 1942-5, Oil on fiberboard

Esphyr Slobodkina (September 22, 1908 – July 21, 2002) was a popular artist, author, and illustrator, best known for her classic 1940 children’s book Caps for Sale.

Esphyr Slobodkina (ESS-phere sloh-BOD-kee-nah) was born in Chelyabinsk, Siberia, Russia in

Esphyr Slobodkina

Esphyr Slobodkina

1908. During the Russian Revolution of 1917, she emigrated with her family to Harbin, Manchuria (China), where she studied art and architecture. Slobodkina immigrated to theUnited States in 1929. She enrolled at the National Academy of Design. It was there that she met her future husband, Russian-born Ilya Bolotowsky (they got divorced in 1938). Along with Ilya, Slobodkina was a founding member of the American Abstract Artists group, which began amid controversy in 1936. Like other Russian modernists, surrounded by ancient icons and a rich craft tradition, Slobodkina developed a lifelong appreciation of clear, rich colors, and flat, stylized forms.

In 1937 Slobodkina met the children’s author Margaret Wise Brown. In an effort to find work as an illustrator, Slobodkina wrote and illustrated a story with collage called Mary And The Poodies to present to Brown. This began a new career for Slobodkina, who illustrated many children’s stories for Ms. Brown (including Sleepy ABCs and the Big and Little series) while still continuing her work as an abstract artist.

"Mural Sketch No. 1," Esphyr Slobodkina, 1937, oil on Masonite, 9.5 x 22.5 inches, Samuel P. Harn Museum, University of Florida

“Mural Sketch No. 1,” Esphyr Slobodkina, 1937, oil on Masonite, 9.5 x 22.5 inches, Samuel P. Harn Museum, University of Florida

In the late 1930s, Slobodkina began to write and illustrate her own children’s books. Among her 24 published works Caps for Sale (1940) is considered a children’s book classic; it has sold more than two million copies and has been translated into more than a dozen languages. Caps for Sale won the Lewis Carroll Shelf Award in 1958. Other children’s works include The Wonderful Feast (written in 1928, first published in 1955), The Clock (1956), The Long Island Ducklings (1961), and Pezzo the Peddler and the Circus Elephant (1967), reissued as Circus Caps for Sale (2002). In 1948, feeling the need to get out of New York City and having saved some money, Slobodkina built a house in Great Neck, New York and moved there with her mother; they remained in the house until 1977.

During this period she was invited back to the Yaddo artist’s colony and also

Esphyr Slobodkina (Rus. 1908-2002) Untitled (Pink and Blue Abstraction) 1940's gouache on paperboard

Esphyr Slobodkina (Rus. 1908-2002) Untitled (Pink and Blue Abstraction) 1940’s gouache on paperboard

accepted a residency at the MacDowell Colony in New Hampshire. In 1960, Slobodkina married William Urquhart, a business owner whom she had met in 1942 at an American Abstract Artists show. They were married for three years, but in 1963, Urquhart died after suffering from a prolonged illness. Slobodkina stated that “it took me some six years to just recover from the grief and life in general was never the same”… In 1967, Slobodkina and her mother began travelling to Florida to be close to her sister. Annual trips to the southern state soon became impractical because of her mother’s failing health and in 1979, they permanently relocated to Hallandale, Florida. After the death of Slobodkina’s brother-in-law in 1974 and her mother in 1975, her sister Tamara joined her in her Hallandale home. The two sisters continued to live together for the rest of Slobodkina’s life, moving from Hallandale to West Hartford, CT, then back to Great Neck before settling in Glen Head, Long Island.

Esphyr Slobodkina

Esphyr Slobodkina

Slobodkina died in 2002.

Through the 1930s Slobodkina developed her unique method of working in oils; a flattened, abstracted style that incorporated line, suspended or interlocking forms. But by the late 30s and 40s Slobodkina was using a variety of techniques and materials. Many of her works are collages and constructions, integrating paint, wood, plastic, and metal with everyday objects such as parts of disassembled typewriters and computers into amusing and often great art. Slobodkina’s work eventually received high acclaim.

“Her life’s work pulled imagery and objects together into magnificent compositions time and time

Esphyr Slobodkina

Esphyr Slobodkina

again,” stated Harold Porcher, an authority on Slobodkina’s art. “I equate an artist like Esphyr to the American mockingbird. A mockingbird borrows and embellishes the songs of other birds around him. Often he changes the phrasing as he incorporates each element into an orchestration of birdsong. The abstract expressionist movement shifted the center of the art world from Paris to New York City – where it remains today – and Esphyr and her contemporaries were the torchbearers, establishing abstraction as a viable form of expression in America.”

Esphyr Slobodkina Composition, 1940. Oil on gessoed Masonite

Esphyr Slobodkina Composition, 1940. Oil on gessoed Masonite

In the last years of the 20th century, Slobodkina continued her productivity, alternating serious work on abstract paintings with the more relaxing activities – to her – of creating sculpture, wall hangings, multimedia constructions, dolls and jewelry, often made out of old typewriter and computer parts.

As Anne Cohen DePietro wrote, “Traversing nearly a century of inspiration, it is Slobodkina’s enduring delight in the creative act and her single-minded pursuit of her aesthetic vision in a multiplicity of media that continues to enchant.”

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece for today.  I enjoyed creating it.  It was challenging to pick colors, but I am happy with how it turned out.  Join me tomorrow on Day 195.  Best, Linda  PS I can’t believe I’m almost at Day 200!

Composition #194- Tribute to Esphyr Slobodkina Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Composition #194- Tribute to Esphyr Slobodkina
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Composition #194- Tribute to Esphyr Slobodkina Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Composition #194- Tribute to Esphyr Slobodkina
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Composition #194- Tribute to Esphyr Slobodkina Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Composition #194- Tribute to Esphyr Slobodkina
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Composition #194- Tribute to Esphyr Slobodkina Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Composition #194- Tribute to Esphyr Slobodkina
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Composition #194- Tribute to Esphyr Slobodkina Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Composition #194- Tribute to Esphyr Slobodkina
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 186- Alma Woodsey Thomas- Creative Spirit for All

It’s Day 186 and today and tomorrow I’m making quick posts because I still have guests in town.  Join me in honoring Alma Woodsey Thomas today!

Alma Thomas at Whitney Museum

Alma Thomas at Whitney Museum

Alma_ThomasAlma Woodsey Thomas (September 22, 1891 – February 24, 1978) was an African-American Expressionist painter and art educator. She lived and worked primarily in Washington, D.C. and the Washington Post described her as a force in theWashington Color School.

Alma Thomas was born the eldest of four children to John Harris Thomas, a businessman, and Amelia

The Eclipse 1970- Alma Thomas

The Eclipse 1970- Alma Thomas

Cantey Thomas, a dress designer, in Columbus, Georgia, 1891. In 1906 the family moved to the Logan Circle neighborhood of Washington, D.C., relocating due to racial violence in Georgia and the public school system of Washington. As a child she showed artistic interest, making puppets and sculptures at home. Thomas attended Armstrong Technical High School, where she took her first art classes. After graduating from high school in 1911, she studied kindergarten education at Miner Normal School until 1913. She served as a substitute teacher in Washington until 1914 when she obtained a permanent teaching position on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Two years later in 1916, she started teaching kindergarten at the Thomas Garrett Settlement House in Wilmington, Delaware, staying there until 1923.

Milky Way- Alma Thomas

Milky Way- Alma Thomas

Thomas entered Howard University in 1921 as a home economics student, only to switch tofine art after studying under art department founder James V. Herring. She earned her BS in Fine Arts in 1924 from Howard, becoming the first graduate from the university fine art program. That year Thomas began teaching at Shaw Junior High School, where she taught until her retirement in 1960. While at Shaw Junior High, she started a community arts program that encouraged student appreciation of fine art. The program supported marionette

Transcendental 1965- Alma Thomas

Transcendental 1965- Alma Thomas

performances and the distribution of student designed holiday cards which were given to soldiers at the Tuskegee Veterans Administration Medical Center. In 1934 she earned her Masters in Art Education from Columbia University and studied painting atAmerican University under Jacob Kainen from 1950 to 1960. In 1958 she visited art centers in Western Europe on behalf of the Tyler School of Art. She retired in 1960 from teaching and dedicated herself to painting. In 1963, she walked in the March on Washington, with her friend Lillian Evans.

Alma Thomas died, living in the same house that her family moved into upon their arrival in Washington in 1906, on February 28, 1978.

Starry Night and the Astronauts 1972- Alma Thomas

Starry Night and the Astronauts 1972- Alma Thomas

Creative art is for all time and is therefore independent of time. It is of all ages, of every land, and if by this we mean the creative spirit in man which produces a picture or a statue is common to the whole civilized world, independent of age, race and nationality; the statement may stand unchallenged.
-Alma Thomas, 1970

Alma Thomas’ early work was representational in manner, and then and upon classes at Howard and training under James V. Herring and Lois Mailou Jones her work became more

Alma Woodsey Thomas

Alma Woodsey Thomas

abstract. Thomas would not be recognized as a professional artist until her retirement from teaching in 1960, when she enrolled in classes at American University. There she learned about the Color Field movement and theory from Joe Summerford and Jacob Kainen and became interested in the use of color and composition. Within twelve years after her first class at American she began creating Color Field paintings, inspired by the work of the New York School and Abstract Expressionism. She worked out of the kitchen in her house, creating works like Watusi (Hard Edge) (1963), a manipulation of the Matisse cutout The Snail, in which Thomas shifted shapes around and changed the colors that Matisse used, and named it after a Chubby Checker song.

Untitled Music Series- Alma Thomas

Untitled Music Series- Alma Thomas

Her first retrospective exhibit was in 1966 at the Gallery of Art at Howard University, curated by art historian James A. Porter. For this exhibition she created Earth Paintings, a series of nature inspired abstract works, including Wind and Crepe Myrtle Concerto (1973) which art historian Sharon Patton considers “one of the most Minimalist Color-Field paintings ever produced by an African-American artist.”These paintings have been compared to Byzantine mosaics and the pointillist paintings of Georges-Pierre Seurat. A friend of Delilah Pierce, Thomas and Pierce would drive into the countryside where Thomas would seek inspiration, pulling ideas from the effects of light and atmosphere on rural environments. Thomas was, in 1972, the first African-American woman to have a solo exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art, and within the same year an exhibition was also held at the Corcoran Gallery of Art.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I had a great time painting it.  It was very meditative!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 187.  Best, Linda

Full Spectrum- Tribute to Alma Woodsey Thomas Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Full Spectrum- Tribute to Alma Woodsey Thomas
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Full Spectrum- Tribute to Alma Woodsey Thomas Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Full Spectrum- Tribute to Alma Woodsey Thomas
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Full Spectrum- Tribute to Alma Woodsey Thomas Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Full Spectrum- Tribute to Alma Woodsey Thomas
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Full Spectrum- Tribute to Alma Woodsey Thomas Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Full Spectrum- Tribute to Alma Woodsey Thomas
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Full Spectrum- Tribute to Alma Woodsey Thomas Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Full Spectrum- Tribute to Alma Woodsey Thomas
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas