Day 360- Marcel Duchamp- You Cannot Define Art

It’s Day 360 and now I actually have 5 left to go.  I’ve been putting off today’s artist for a long time because he’s one of my favorites, but I was so nervous about tackling his style.  I’m glad that I waited until the tail end of my project because I feel like I’ve learned/experienced enough to mildly pull it off.  Please join me in honoring Marcel Duchamp today.

Marcel Duchamp

Marcel Duchamp

 

Marcel Duchamp, French  (July 28, 1887- October 2, 1968)

“You cannot define electricity. The same can be said of art. It is a kind of inner current in a human being, or something which needs no definition.”

Chess Players- Marcel Duchamp

Chess Players- Marcel Duchamp

Few artists can boast having changed the course of art history in the way that Marcel Duchamp did. Having assimilated the lessons of Cubism and Futurism, whose joint influence may be felt in his early paintings, he spearheaded the American Dada movement together with his friends and collaborators Picabia and Man Ray. By challenging the very notion of what is art, his first readymades sent shock waves across the art world that can still be felt today.

Duchamp’s ongoing preoccupation with the mechanisms of desire and human sexuality as well as his fondness for wordplay aligns his work with that of Surrealists, although he steadfastly refused to be affiliated with any specific artistic movement per se. In his insistence that art should be driven by ideas above all, Duchamp is generally considered to be the father of Conceptual art.
His refusal to follow a conventional artistic path, matched only by a horror of repetition which accounts for the

Parva Domus, Magna Quies - Marcel Duchamp

Parva Domus, Magna Quies – Marcel Duchamp

relatively small number of works Duchamp produced in the span of his short career, ultimately led to his withdrawal from the art world. In later years, Duchamp famously spent his time playing chess, even as he labored away in secret at his last enigmatic masterpiece, which was only unveiled after his death in 1968.

Coined by Duchamp, the term “readymade” came to designate mass-produced everyday objects taken out of their usual context and promoted to the status of artworks by the mere choice of the artist. A performative act as much as a stylistic category, the readymade had far-reaching implications for what can legitimately be considered an object of art.
Nude Descending a Staircase- Marcel Duchamp

Nude Descending a Staircase- Marcel Duchamp

Duchamp rejected purely visual or what he dubbed “retinal pleasure,” deeming it to be facile, in favor of more intellectual, concept-driven approaches to art-making and, for that matter, viewing. He remained committed, however, to the study of perspective and optics which underpins his experiments with kinetic devices, reflecting an ongoing concern with the representation of motion and machines common to Futurist and Surrealist artists at the time.

A taste for jokes, tongue-in-cheek wit and subversive humor, rife with sexual innuendoes, characterizes Duchamp’s work and makes for much of its enjoyment. He fashioned puns out of everyday expressions which he conveyed through visual

King and Queen surrounded by swift nudes - Marcel Duchamp

King and Queen surrounded by swift nudes – Marcel Duchamp

means. The linguistic dimension of his work in particular paved the way for Conceptual art.

Marcel Duchamp was raised in Normandy, in a family of artists. His father was mayor of Blainville and his mother raised their seven children and painted landscapes depicting the French countryside. Family time was spent playing chess, reading, painting, and playing music.
Fountain 1917, replica 1964 Marcel Duchamp 1887-1968 Purchased with assistance from the Friends of the Tate Gallery 1999

Fountain 1917, replica 1964 Marcel Duchamp 1887-1968 Purchased with assistance from the Friends of the Tate Gallery 1999

One of Marcel’s earliest artworks, Landscape at Blainville (1902), painted at age fifteen, reflected his family’s love of Claude Monet. Marcel was close to his two older brothers, and in 1904, after both had left home to become artists, he joined them in Paris to study painting at Académie Julian. His brother, Jacques Villon, supported him during his studies, and Marcel earned some income by working as a cartoonist. Duchamp’s early drawings evince his ongoing interest in visual and verbal puns.

After he withdrew from the art world, Duchamp remained a passive, if influential, presence in New York avant-garde circles until he was rediscovered in the 1950s by Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns. Duchamp’s insistence that art should be an expression of the mind rather than the eye or the hand spoke to Minimalists and Conceptual artists alike.
It ushered in a new era summed up by Joseph Kosuth’s claim that “all art (after Duchamp) is conceptual (in

Yvonne and Magdeleine Torn in Tatters- Marcel Duchamp

Yvonne and Magdeleine Torn in Tatters- Marcel Duchamp

nature) because art only exists conceptually.” The seminal concept of the mass-produced readymade was eagerly seized upon not only by Andy Warhol and other Pop artists who claimed Duchamp as their founding father but also, owing to its performative aspects, by FluxusArte Povera and Performance artists.

Portrait of Chess Players- Marcel Duchamp

Portrait of Chess Players- Marcel Duchamp

Duchamp’s radical critique of art institutions made him a cult figure for generations of artists who, like him, refused to go down the path of a conventional, commercial artistic career.

Though his work was admired for its wide-ranging use of artistic materials and mediums, it is the theoretical thrust of Duchamp’s eclectic but relatively limited output that accounts for his growing impact on successive waves of twentieth-century avant-garde movements and individual artists who openly acknowledged his influence.

On his attitude about art: “It is paradoxical. It is almost schizophrenic. On one side I worked from a very

Portrait of Dulcinea- Marcel Duchamp

Portrait of Dulcinea- Marcel Duchamp

intellectual form of activity, and on the other de-deifying everything by more materialistic thoughts.”

On the readymade: “The readymade is the consequence of the refusal which made me say: There are so many people who make pictures with their hands, that one should end up not using the hand.”

On chess: “I am still a victim of chess. It has all the beauty of art, and much more. It cannot be commercialized. Chess is much purer than art in its social position.”

Biography is from The Art Story website.

I hope you enjoy my tribute to the great Marcel Duchamp today.  I had a surprisingly relaxing time creating it today!  I wanted to incorporate his love for chess.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 361…I’m going to try and have a relaxing rest of the day now. 🙂

Best,

Linda

Strategy- Tribute to Marcel Duchamp Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Crackle paint on Canvas

Strategy- Tribute to Marcel Duchamp
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Crackle paint on Canvas

Side-View Strategy- Tribute to Marcel Duchamp Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Crackle paint on Canvas

Side-View
Strategy- Tribute to Marcel Duchamp
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Crackle paint on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Strategy- Tribute to Marcel Duchamp Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Crackle paint on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Strategy- Tribute to Marcel Duchamp
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Crackle paint on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Strategy- Tribute to Marcel Duchamp Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Crackle paint on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Strategy- Tribute to Marcel Duchamp
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Crackle paint on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Strategy- Tribute to Marcel Duchamp Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Crackle paint on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Strategy- Tribute to Marcel Duchamp
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Crackle paint on Canvas

Day 345- Joseph Cornell- Poetic Theater

It’s Day 345 and I finally got to do a shadow box.  I love today’s artist.  The crazy storm that hit the Bay Area has caused power outages and flooding everywhere, but I still did my piece!  I am posting now just in case the power goes out.  Please join me in honoring Joseph Cornell today.

Joseph Cornell

Joseph Cornell

Untitled (Swan Box)- Joseph Cornell

Untitled (Swan Box)- Joseph Cornell

Joseph Cornell (December 24, 1903 – December 29, 1972) was an American artist and sculptor, one of the pioneers and most celebrated exponents of assemblage. Influenced by the Surrealists, he was also an avant-garde experimental filmmaker.

Joseph Cornell was born in Nyack, New York, to Joseph Cornell, a well-to-do designer and merchant of textiles, and Helen TenBroeck Storms Cornell, who had trained as a kindergarten teacher. The Cornells had four children: Joseph, Elizabeth (b. 1905), Helen (b. 1906), and Robert (b. 1910).

Both parents came from socially prominent families of Dutch ancestry, long-established in New York State. Cornell’s father died in 1917, leaving the family in strained circumstances. Following the elder Cornell’s death, his wife and children moved to the borough of Queens in New York City. Cornell attended Phillips Academy inAndover, Massachusetts, in the class of 1921, although he did not graduate.

Except for the three and a half years he spent at Phillips, he lived for most of his life in a small, wooden-frame

Untitled- Joseph Cornell

Untitled- Joseph Cornell

house on Utopia Parkway in a working-class area of Flushing, along with his mother and his brother Robert, whom cerebral palsy had rendered physically challenged.  Aside from the aforementioned period he spent at the academy in Andover, Cornell never traveled beyond the New York City area.

Cornell was wary of strangers. This led him to isolate himself and become a self-taught artist. Although he expressed attraction to unattainable women like Lauren Bacall, his shyness made romantic relationships almost impossible. In later life his bashfulness verged toward reclusiveness, and he rarely left the state of New York. However, he preferred talking with women, and often made their husbands wait in the next room when he discussed business with them. He also had numerous friendships with ballerinas, who found him unique, but too eccentric to be a romantic partner.

Pink Palace- Joseph Cornell

Pink Palace- Joseph Cornell

His last major exhibition was a show he arranged especially for children, with the boxes displayed at child height and with the opening party serving soft drinks and cake.

He devoted his life to caring for his younger brother Robert, who was disabled and lived with cerebral palsy. This was another factor in his lack of relationships. At some point in the 1920s, or possibly earlier, he read the writings of Mary Baker Eddy, including Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures. Cornell considered Eddy’s works to be among the most important books ever published after the Bible, and he became a lifelong Christian Science adherent.

He was also rather poor for most of his life, working during the 1920s as a wholesale fabric salesman to support his family. As a result of the American Great Depression, Cornell lost his textile industry job in 1931, and worked for a short time thereafter as a door-to-door appliance salesman. During this time, through her friendship with Ethel Traphagen, Cornell’s mother secured him a part-time position designing textiles. In the 1940s, Cornell also worked in a plant nursery (which would figure in his famous dossier “GC44”) and briefly in a defense plant, and designed covers and feature layouts for Harper’s BazaarViewDance Index, and other magazines. He only really began to sell his boxes for significant sums after his 1949 solo show at the Charles Egan Gallery.

Cornell was a highly regarded artist towards the end of his career, yet remained out of the spotlight. He

Hotel Eden- Joseph Cornell

Hotel Eden- Joseph Cornell

produced fewer box assemblages in the 1950s and 1960s, as his family responsibilities increased and claimed more of his time. He hired a series of young assistants, including both students and established artists, to help him organize material, make artwork, and run errands. At this time, Cornell concentrated on making collages, and collaborated with filmmakers like Rudy Burckhardt, Stan Brakhage, and Larry Jordan to make films that were evocative of moving collages.

In 1967 the artist was reported in possession of two or three original drawings from Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s The Little Prince. The exiled Saint-Exupéry’s wife, Consuelo, was similarly an artist and sculptor.

Cornell’s brother Robert died in 1965, and his mother in 1966. Joseph Cornell died of apparent heart failure on 29 December 1972, a few days after his sixty-ninth birthday.  The executors of his estate were Richard Ader and Wayne Andrews, as represented by the art dealers Leo Castelli, Richard Feigen, and James Corcoran. Later, the Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation was established, which administers the copyrights of Cornell’s works and represents the interests of his heirs. Currently, the Foundation is administered by Trustees, Richard Ader and Joseph Erdman.

Medici Princess- Joseph Cornell

Medici Princess- Joseph Cornell

Cornell’s most characteristic art works were boxed assemblages created from found objects. These are simple shadow boxes, usually fronted with a glass pane, in which he arranged eclectic fragments of photographs or Victorian bric a brac, in a way that combines the formal austerity of Constructivism with the lively fantasy of Surrealism. Many of his boxes, such as the famous Medici Slot Machine boxes, are interactive and are meant to be handled.

Like Kurt Schwitters, Cornell could create poetry from the commonplace. Unlike Schwitters, however, he was fascinated not by refuse, garbage, and the discarded, but by fragments of once beautiful and precious objects he found on his frequent trips to the bookshops and thrift stores of New York. His boxes relied on the Surrealist use of irrational juxtaposition, and on the evocation of nostalgia, for their appeal.

Cornell never regarded himself as a Surrealist; although he admired the work and technique of Surrealists like Max Ernst and René Magritte, he disavowed the Surrealists’ “black magic,” claiming that he only wished to make white magic with his art. Cornell’s fame as the leading American “Surrealist” allowed him to befriend several members of the Surrealist movement when they settled in the US during the Second World War. Later he was claimed as a herald of pop art and installation art.

Cornell often made series of boxed assemblages that reflected his various interests: the Soap Bubble Sets, the Medici Slot Machine series, the Pink Palace series, the Hotelseries, the Observatory series, and the Space

Object Abeilles- Joseph Cornell

Object Abeilles- Joseph Cornell

Object Boxes, among others. Also captivated with birds, Cornell created an Aviary series of boxes, in which colorful images of various birds were mounted on wood, cut out, & set against harsh white backgrounds.

In addition to creating boxes and flat collages and making short art films, Cornell also kept a filing system of over 160 visual-documentary “dossiers” on themes that interested him; the dossiers served as repositories from which Cornell drew material and inspiration for boxes like his “penny arcade” portrait of Lauren Bacall. He had no formal training in art, although he was extremely well-read and was conversant with the New York art scene from the 1940s through to the 1960s.

His methodology is described in a monograph by Charles Simic as follows:

Untitled (Grand Owl Habitat)- Joseph Cornell

Untitled (Grand Owl Habitat)- Joseph Cornell

Somewhere in the city of New York there are four or five still-unknown objects that belong together. Once together they’ll make a work of art. That’s Cornell’s premise, his metaphysics, and his religion….Marcel Duchamp and John Cage use chance operation to get rid of the subjectivity of the artist. For Cornell it’s the opposite. To submit to chance is to reveal the self and its obsessions.

Cornell was heavily influenced by the American Transcendentalists, Hollywood starlets (to whom he sent boxes he had dedicated to them), the French Symbolists such as Stéphane Mallarmé and Gérard de Nerval, and great dancers of the 19th century ballet such as Marie Taglioni and Fanny Cerrito.

Christian Science belief and practice informed Cornell’s art deeply, as art historian Sandra Leonard Starr has shown.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 346.

Best,

Linda

Start New- Tribute to Joseph Cornell Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media in a Shadow Box

Start New- Tribute to Joseph Cornell
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media in a Shadow Box

Side-View Start New- Tribute to Joseph Cornell Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media in a Shadow Box

Side-View
Start New- Tribute to Joseph Cornell
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media in a Shadow Box

Close-Up 1 Start New- Tribute to Joseph Cornell Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media in a Shadow Box

Close-Up 1
Start New- Tribute to Joseph Cornell
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media in a Shadow Box

Close-Up 2 Start New- Tribute to Joseph Cornell Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media in a Shadow Box

Close-Up 2
Start New- Tribute to Joseph Cornell
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media in a Shadow Box

Close-Up 3 Start New- Tribute to Joseph Cornell Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media in a Shadow Box

Close-Up 3
Start New- Tribute to Joseph Cornell
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media in a Shadow Box

Day 333- Bridget Bate Tichenor- Spiritual Guides

It’s Day 333 and I really enjoyed creating today’s piece.  I was stumped at first at what I wanted to paint, but when the ideas started flowing, I had a great time.  I also wanted to keep it somewhat simple, but also really capture the artist’s essence so to speak. 🙂  Join me in honoring Bridget Bate Tichenor.

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor (born Bridget Pamela Arkwright Bate on November 22, 1917 – died on October 20, 1990), also known as Bridget Tichenor or B.B.T., was a Mexican surrealist painter of fantastic art in the school of magic realism and a fashion editor. Born in Paris and of British descent, she later embraced Mexico as her home.

The mesmerizing story of the Magic Realist painter Bridget Bate Tichenor has never been told.  It is a riveting revelation of an extraordinary female artist who impacted the 20th Century world of fashion, art, and society, with enormous contributions.  Revealed are the intimacies and secrets of an outwardly beautiful, exotic, bold, and courageous, yet painfully shy and reclusive woman, who lived in extraordinary times, yet was unknown to her peers, colleagues, and the world at large.

Bridget lived in an astonishing way, in many contrasting countries, and in many revolutionary platforms. Her personal code of excellence has yet to be recognized or acknowledged, outside small and eccentric art circles. Bridget adhered to rarefied and noble standards of human pride, integrity, respect, discipline, and compassion.

Bridget Bate Tichenor, Líderes (Leaders) Close Up

Bridget Bate Tichenor, Líderes (Leaders) Close Up

She honored these humane traits above all else in life.  Bridget’s impeccable values, in tandem with her determination and prioritization to execute her artistic vision, are the essence of her story, and substantiates her historical value.

Bridget inherited a peripatetic world from her self-absorbed, famous, and creatively gifted parents. It fueled deep insecurities, and was equally fed by fears of abandonment. Subsequently, in order to survive, she reinvented herself by necessity, and chose to mold herself into whatever she needed at any given time.

Bridget’s mother, Vera Bate Lombardi (Sarah Gertrude Baring Arkwright Fitzgeorge Bate Lombardi) was an indomitable combination of beauty and bravado with the highest connections. From 1925-1939, Vera became Co Co Chanel’s muse and Public Relations liaison to several European Royal Families.

BRIDGET BATE TICHENOR (1917-1990) Gusanos y caracoles

BRIDGET BATE TICHENOR (1917-1990) Gusanos y caracoles

Her demeanor and style influenced the ‘English Look’, the very foundation for the House of Chanel. Vera Bate Lombardi’s mother was Rosa Frederica Baring of the Baring Banking family, who had rescued the British Royal family during difficult economic times. Vera was allegedly an illegitimate descendent of George III, through her reputed father, HRH Prince Adolphus Cambridge, 1st Marquess of Cambridge Duke of Teck. She was presented socially as Fitzgeorge, as she was the unadopted daughter of her stepfather, the morganatic and bastard Colonel Fitzgeorge, son of Prince George, Duke of Cambridge and his mistress Sarah Louisa Fairbrother.

Chanel craved Vera’s immense popularity and privileged patrician heritage, however shrouded in controversial

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

royal illegitimacies. Chanel came from humble beginnings, and was decidedly uneducated. She looked to Vera as a ‘social advisor’, who would be responsible for her societal launch and business triumph. It was evident that Chanel’s personal identity had been tragically dehumanized and shamed as an orphan, and she systematically absorbed Vera’s exotic mannerisms, from gestures to stance, with Cambridge and Oxford intonations, in a scheming and arrogant self-reinvention of entitlement.

Lombardi was a flawless British Royal Fashion icon to Chanel, and Chanel shamelessly used her to establish her fashion-identity-template, which became the legendary Chanel brand. Years later, Vera, retaliated against Chanel’s ruthless jealousies and manipulations, and exposed her as a Nazi spy to her cousin Sir Winston Churchill in Spain circa 1944. This disclosure shattered Chanel’s reputation for many years.

La Caja de Cristal- Bridget Bate Tichenor

La Caja de Cristal- Bridget Bate Tichenor

Until now, Vera Bate Lombardi has been relatively obscured in Chanel’s literary and film biographies. Chanel cunningly perpetuated her adapted character identity, and concealed the truths of her business cornerstone. What had begun as flattery for Vera, terminated in disgust.

Bridget’s father, Frederick Blantford Bate, was born in Virginia but lived in England for over 20 years, working as a British representative for NBC during World War I. Bate was a Mechanical Officer in the US Army, who, in 1916, was instrumental in establishing The Field Service of American Ambulance in Paris. Bate was an intimate friend of Vera’s cousin, the Duke of Windsor. He was the first news correspondent to receive the story of the Duke’s abdication and marriage to Wallis Simpson, and contacted his associate, Alistair Cooke, in the UK to broadcast it.

The beautiful, noble, artistic, and rich are patently different, often misunderstood or condemned, yet granted societal privileges few receive. These very qualities that embodied Bridget’s unique style, influenced and were

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

copied by some of the greatest names of the 20th century such as her rivals Diana Vreeland and Frida Kahlo. She was loved and envied, but most importantly, awe-inspiring to Man Ray, Diego Rivera, Ernst Lubitsch, James Whale, Laurence Olivier, Anais Nin, Greta Garbo, and Joan Crawford.

Bridget had an amazing, yet tragic, multidimensional life, which included an arranged marriage, true love, romantic and professional rivalry, artistic achievement, mysticism, fantasy, perfectionism, and shattered dreams. All of which were played out in the most glamorous settings, with famous personalities and eccentric nobility that she orchestrated in a dramatic metaphysical theater of remarkable relationships.

She was difficult to get to know, guarded, and very secretive. She revealed certain things to socially survive, while withholding her poetically rich emotional and spiritual communications to focus through her dedicated relationship with her sacred and sovereign art. She had a genius gift of observation and execution in cryptic detail, both in her character and painting.

Bridget Bate TIchenor

Bridget Bate TIchenor

Her controversial royal illegitimate background overshadowed her profound artistry and her sense of self worth.  In her era and society, it was important to be of royal lineage. Her achievement in the art world was diminished by who she was as an illegitimate royal family member, her ravishing beauty, her refined intelligence, and her commanding personality. Her controversial background was more important and interesting to her friends, which graciously made her celebrated and received on one hand, yet made her hide how great an artist she was on the other and never acknowledged. This is why she was so shy about showing who she was as a superlative painter.

She compartmentalized her life. She was deathly afraid to remove her complex multiple masks and reveal not only her precious art, but also her deepest intimate feelings to others. She was validated only by those relationships that had a higher profile than she, so that she could retreat behind her provocatively mysterious and seductive persona to hide her acute vulnerability.

She was difficult to get to know, guarded, and very secretive.  She revealed certain things to socially survive, while withholding her poetically rich emotional and spiritual communications to focus through her dedicated

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

relationship with her sacred and sovereign art.

Bridget spiritually adopted me and I became her protégé in 1971. Among her many gifts, she benevolently trained me in painting and introduced me to ancient occult religions, which included many lost esoteric sciences of Egyptian, Tantrika, and Mesoamerican Magick and Alchemy. She fed my hunger to learn, and I became her consummate student in a world that had received a death rattle to classically trained artists.

Just before her death, I promised my dear friend and genius mentor Bridget that the world would know who she was. One of the legacies she gave to me were her life stories. I began to document Bridget’s life in 1990 shortly after her death, recording her extensive and detailed personal accounts that she imparted to me over the nineteen years of our relationship. The following biography is a small part of my promise that perpetuates the significance of her life.

-Zachary Selig-

Biography is from www.bridgetbatetichenor.com.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I really had a blast painting it.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 334.

Best,

Linda

Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 325- Gertrude Abercrombie- Simple and Strange

It’s Day 325 and I’m finishing up stuff today because I have another improv show tonight…I’m trying to stay rested and not overexert myself these past couple weeks.  I had a great time painting today’s piece so join me in honoring Gertrude Abercrombie today!

Gertrude Abercrombie

Gertrude Abercrombie

Self Portrait of My Sister- Gertrude Abercrombie

Self Portrait of My Sister- Gertrude Abercrombie

Gertrude Abercrombie (February 17, 1909 – July 3, 1977) was an American painter based in Chicago. Called “the queen of the bohemian artists”, Abercrombie was involved in the Chicago jazz scene and was friends with musicians such as Dizzy Gillespie,Charlie Parker, and Sarah Vaughan, whose music inspired her own creative work.

Abercrombie was born on February 17, 1909, in Austin, Texas. Her parents, Tom and Lula Janes Abercrombie, were traveling opera singers who happened to be in Austin on the day of

"Between Two Camps" by Gertrude Abercrombie (1948)

“Between Two Camps” by Gertrude Abercrombie (1948)

Gertrude’s birth. The family lived in Berlin in 1913 to further her mother’s career, but the beginning of World War I caused the family to move back to the United States. Upon their return the family lived in Aledo, Illinois before settling in Hyde Park, Chicago in 1916. She was raised in a strict Christian Scientistenvironment at home.

She earned a degree in Romance Language from the University of Illinois in 1929. After studying figure drawing briefly at the Art Institute of Chicago, she took a year-long course in commercial art at the American Academy of Art in Chicago, leading to her first job drawing gloves for Mesirow Department Store advertisements. She also worked briefly as an artist for Sears. In the mid-1930s she moved out of her family’s home and became active in the regional art scene.

Gertrude Abercrombie, Split Personality (1954)

Gertrude Abercrombie, Split Personality (1954)

In 1940 she married lawyer Robert Livingston, and in 1942 gave birth to their daughter Dinah. In 1948 the couple divorced. That same year she married music critic Frank Sandiford, with Dizzy Gillespie performing at the wedding. The couple were active in the bohemian lifestyle and jazz scene of Chicago hence their connection with Gillespie. They met musicians through Sandiford and through Abercrombie’s own skills as an improvisational pianist. The couple would divorce in 1964.

Within Abercrombie’s avant garde social circle she was the inspiration for the song

Gertrude Abercrombie

Gertrude Abercrombie

“Gertrude’s Bounce” by Richie Powell, who claimed that she walked “just like the way the rhythm sounds in the Introduction”, and she appeared as herself in James Purdy’s Gertrude of Stony Island Avenue and as a fictional character in Purdy’s Malcolm, Eustace Chisholm.

Gertrude Abercrombie

Gertrude Abercrombie

By the late 1950s her health declined due to financial trouble, alcoholism, and arthritis, and she became reclusive. After 1959 her paintings diminished in number as well as scale. She required a wheelchair and was eventually bedridden. In the final year of her life, a major retrospective of her work was held at the Hyde Park Art Center. She died in Chicago July 3, 1977. Her will established the Gertrude Abercrombie Trust which distributed her work and the work of other artists she owned to cultural institutions throughout the Midwest.

While studying at the Institute she began working at a department store drawing gloves for advertisements and in 1932 she began to focus strictly on her art. The following summer she made her first sale at an outdoor art fair in Chicago and received an honorable mention in the newspaper for the event. From 1934-1940 she served as a painter for the Works Progress Administration and in 1934 year the Chicago Society of Artists held a solo show of her work. During the 1930s and 1940s she also began creating woodcuts.

Themes

She painted many variations of her favored subjects: sparsely furnished interiors, barren landscapes, self-portraits, and still-lifes. Many

Gertrude Abercrombie

Gertrude Abercrombie

compositions feature a lone woman in a flowing gown, often depicted with attributes of sorcery: an owl, a black cat, a crystal ball, or a broomstick. These works were often self-portraits, as she stated in an interview with Studs Terkel shortly before her death: “it is always myself that I paint”. Tall and sharp-featured, she considered herself ugly; in life she sometimes wore a pointed velvet hat to accentuate her witch-like appearance, “enjoy[ing] the power this artifice gave her over others who would fear or recoil from her”. The 1940s and ’50s are described as her most prolific and productive period; a time when she no longer painted many portraits, but retained the themes mentioned above.

Abercrombie’s mature works are painted in a precise, controlled style. She took little interest in other artists’ work, although she admired Magritte.  Largely self-taught, she did not regard her lack of extensive formal training as a hindrance. She said of her work:

I am not interested in complicated things nor in the commonplace. I like and like to paint simple things that are a little strange. My work comes directly from my inner consciousness and it must come easily. It is a process of selection and reduction.

Gertrude Abercrombie

Gertrude Abercrombie

Her work evolved into incorporating her love for jazz music, inspired by parties and jam sessions she hosted in her Hyde Park home. Musicians such as Sonny Rollins, Max Roach, Jackie Cain and the Modern Jazz Quartet were considered friends. Dizzy Gillespie described her “the first bop artist. Bop in the sense that she has taken the essence of our music and transported it to another art form”.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I really enjoyed coming up with a theme and concept of today’s piece.  It was definitely something different compared to the other pieces I’ve created.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 326!

Best,

Linda

 

Spirit Friend- Tribute to Gertrude Abercrombie Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Spirit Friend- Tribute to Gertrude Abercrombie
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Spirit Friend- Tribute to Gertrude Abercrombie Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Spirit Friend- Tribute to Gertrude Abercrombie
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Spirit Friend- Tribute to Gertrude Abercrombie Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Spirit Friend- Tribute to Gertrude Abercrombie
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Spirit Friend- Tribute to Gertrude Abercrombie Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Spirit Friend- Tribute to Gertrude Abercrombie
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Spirit Friend- Tribute to Gertrude Abercrombie Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Spirit Friend- Tribute to Gertrude Abercrombie
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 225- Mimmo Paladino- Beyond Avant-Garde

It’s Day 225 and I’ve been wanting to paint a colorful piece today.  I’m also kind of pooped because of various activities…including a nice doggie hike in the heat today!  Join me in celebrating Mimmo Paladino today!

Mimmo Paladino

Mimmo Paladino

Mimmo Paladino, Italia, 1948

Mimmo Paladino

Mimmo Paladino (born 18 December 1948) is an Italian sculptor, painter and printmaker.

Mimmo Paladino was born Domenico Paladino in Paduli, Campania, southern Italy. He attended the Liceo Artistico of Benevento (Benevento Art High School) from 1964 to 1968, when minimalism and conceptualism dominated the international art scene. He played a leading part in the international revival of painting towards the end of the 1970s.

His first work, in line with the prevailing conceptual climate at

Mimmo Paladino- Calce 1995

Mimmo Paladino- Calce 1995

the time, showed an interest in photography, but in 1977 he had already moved on to the creation of two major tempera murals, one at the Toselli gallery in Milan and one at the Lucio Amelio gallery in Naples.

Mimmo Paladino, Italia, 1948

Mimmo Paladino

In 1980, he exhibited his work at the Venice Biennale, in the “Aperto 80” exhibition. Other Italian artists present included Sandro Chia, Francesco Clemente, Enzo Cucchi and Nicola de Maria: the leaders of the Transavantgarde movement. However, it was largely thanks to a picture exhibition held in a range of Central European museums, from the Kunsthalle in Basel, to the Museum Folkwang in Essen and the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, that Paladino finally consolidated his international fame. Meanwhile, two personal exhibitions were held simultaneously in New York that year, by Annina Nosei and Marian Goodman, extending his fame to the United States.

In 1981, the Kunstmuseum in Basel organised a major

Mimmo Paladino- Untitled Green Painting

Mimmo Paladino- Untitled Green Painting

personal exhibition of paintings, curated by Dieter Koepplin. This was then also put on at the Kestner-Gesellschaft inHanover, the Mannheimer Kunstverein in Mannheim and the Groninger Museum in Groningen. The Galleria d’Arte Moderna in Bologna also dedicated a personal exhibition to him that year.

In 2001, the general catalogue of his graphic work was published (Opera Grafica 1974-2001), curated by Enzo di Martino, for Art of this Century, New York – Paris. The Centro d’Arte Contemporanea Luigi Pecci, Prato, granted him the most comprehensive retrospective exhibition ever organised by an Italian museum, curated by Bruno Corà (2002).

The Perfect Room- Mimmo Paladino

The Perfect Room- Mimmo Paladino

In 2003, together with Sandro Chia, Francesco Clemente, Enzo Cucchi, and Nicola de Maria, he put on “Transavanguardia 1979-1985” at the Castello di Rivoli Museo di Arte Contemporanea, curated by Ida Gianelli. He also put on personal exhibitions at the Reggia di Caserta, and in Galleria Scognamiglio in Naples and Galleria Valentina Bonomo, Rome (2004). He presented a travelling exhibition on Pinocchio at modern art museums across eight Japanese cities, in Venice’s 17th-century Scola dei Battioro and then at the Museo Civico di Udine, the Museo di Palazzo Pio a Carpi and in Rotterdam (2004–2006).

In 2004, he created the doors for the Padre Pio church in San Giovanni Rotondo, designed by Renzo Piano. In 2005 he exhibited at the Museum der Moderne Rupertinum in Salzburg, and the Loggetta Lombardesca in Ravenna put on “Paladino in Scena”, a major exhibition of his theatre work, curated by Claudio Spadoni. In June that year, he put on an exhibition of major sculptures at the Galleria Internazionale d’Arte Moderna Ca’ Pesaro in Venice, curated by Enzo di Martino, for the Biennale.

At the end of 2005, he put on a major exhibition dedicated to Cervantes’ Don Quixote, featuring

Matemática 2 de Mimmo Paladino

Matemática 2 de Mimmo Paladino

Mimmo Paladino, Mathematica Portfolio with 6 Etchings.

Mimmo Paladino, Mathematica Portfolio with 6 Etchings.

paintings, sculptures, drawings and a film, at the Museo Capodimonte in Naples. As requested by Marco Müller, the film was presented at the 2006 Venice Film Festival, with great success. That year, he also created the doors for the San Giovanni Battista church in Lecce (designed by Franco Purini), concluded the intervention in piazza dei Conti Guidi, in Vinci, and exhibited at the Cardi and Christian Stein Gallery in Milan, and the Waddington Gallery in London.

In 2007, he produced two theatre set designs for OEdipus Rex and Cavalleria rusticana, for the Teatro Regio in Turin, and put on a personal exhibition at the Galleria Civica in Modena. In 2008 he presented a major installation at the Museo dell’Ara Pacis in Rome, set to music by Brian Eno. That year, the University of Lugano granted him an honoris causa degree in Architecture. In June 2008, “Porta di Lampedusa – Porta d’Europa”, an important monument in memory of migrants deceased at sea, was inaugurated.

In 2009, a group of his sculptures was shown “en plein air” in Orta San Giulio, Lake of Orta, in a show curated by Flavio Arensi; among the various works it was a horse floating to the shore in front of Villa Bossi, the Town Hall. On 10 April the same year he installed a big blue horse over four metres high (13 feet) at the Amphitheatre of Vittoriale degli Italiani di Gardone Riviera (BS), house-museum of the novelist Gabriele D’Annunzio.

He is interested in the relationship between visual art and sound and has worked with the sound

Mimmo Paladino

Mimmo Paladino

artist Brian Eno on the installation I Dormienti for the Roundhouse, London in 1999 and on a piece for the Ara Pacis Museum in Rome in 2008. Paladino’s works have been featured in Piran Coastal Galleries.

Paladino currently lives and works in Rome, Paduli and Mattinata.

Partial biography is from wikipedia.

I had a great time painting today’s piece.  I hope you enjoy it!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 226!

Best, Linda

Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

photo 2 photo 3 photo 4 photo 5

 

Day 223- Frida Kahlo- Painting her own Reality

It’s Day 223 and I actually prepared last night for today’s piece.  I haven’t done that for a while because of intimidation.  But I did it today!  And I think I did a good job.  Join me in honoring the amazing Frida Kahlo today!

Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo

Roots- Frida Kahlo

Roots- Frida Kahlo

Born in 1906, in Coyoacan, Frida Kahlo was a Mexican painter, who is most well known for the self portraiture work which she created during her career. The intense vibrant colors, the “pain and passion,” and the intensity, were some of the key features which marked the works which she created. In Mexico, her work has been celebrated for the emblematic, as well as the indigenous tradition; it has also been celebrated by feminists, due to the fact that she painted the female form, which was something that was not common during the period she lived.

The work which Frida Kahlo created, has been coined as being traditional of the figures

Self Portrait Dedicated to Dr. Eloesser- Frida Kahlo

Self Portrait Dedicated to Dr. Eloesser- Frida Kahlo

in Mexican culture, and has also been labeled as surrealist work. This was mainly because of the fact that her art work took a traditional image (of the female form), yet she conformed it to distort the traditional style of portraiture work. She would create features on the face which were larger than proportionate sizes, she would use distinct colors to capture emotion, and she would use descriptive, thick brush strokes, all of which stepped outside of the norm, with self portraiture work.

Self-Portrait with a Monkey- Frida Kahlo

Self-Portrait with a Monkey- Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo suffered from many illnesses in her childhood years. A traffic accident she was involved in during her teenage years, also served as a base for many of her health problems, and these ailments were described through the work she created. As the youngest of four children, she was a survivor of polio, and did not intend on becoming an artist until an older age. At the age of 18, she was involved in the car accident, and had to spend one year in a hospital bed, recovering from the injuries to her pelvis, collar bone, shoulder, and foot injuries. Over her lifetime, she underwent over 30 surgeries, and to help distract her from the pain and suffering, she turned to painting.

In the paintings and self portraiture work which Frida Kahlo created, she incorporated a deliberate naivety in the art forms, and she also drew on Mexican folk art, to create the distinct form and artistic style she was known for. At the age of 22, she married Diego Rivera, who was a famous Mexican muralist, and 20 years her senior. This was a marriage that was full of turmoil, infidelity, struggles in their career paths, and a number of additional hurdles the couple overcame while married. She claims to have suffered two major accidents in her life; the car accident which injured her physically, and the marriage which injured her emotionally.

During her career, Frida Kahlo composed more than 200 pieces of art; this included paintings, sketches, and drawings, all of which were

Self Portrait with Necklace of Thorns- Frida Kahlo

Self Portrait with Necklace of Thorns- Frida Kahlo

related to her personal life, and the physical and emotional turbulence which she experienced. Out of the 143 paintings which she created, a total of 55 of these were self portraits. And, when people in the art world asked why she painted so many self portraits, her response was that she was often alone, and was the subject which she knew best.

The Broken Column- Frida Kahlo

The Broken Column- Frida Kahlo

In 1953, Frida Kahlo had her first solo exhibit which presented her art work to many visitors. One observer noted that it was impossible to distinguish her personal life from her work, and that her art served as a biography of her life. Due to poor health at the time, Frida’s doctor told her she would not be able to attend, due to the fact that he wanted her to remain under bed rest. But, she insisted on being at the opening, and was transported in her bed by ambulance, and was carried in to the exhibit, to meet the greeting public who was present.

Both Frida Kahlo and her husband Diego were active members in the Mexican Communist party; in 1954 she attended her last rally, and soon after, on July 17 of the same year, passed away at the age of 47. The day following her death, mourners of the famous artist’s work gathered at the crematorium, to witness her cremation. Her ashes were eventually placed at the “Blue House” which she shared with her husband. One year following her death, Diego Rivera gave the home to the Mexican government, to serve as a museum where visitors and her fans could pay tribute to the work she created, and to her short lived life.

After her death, the popularity of the portraiture work she had created during her career, became extremely desirable pieces of art for

The Wounded Deer- Frida Kahlo

The Wounded Deer- Frida Kahlo

collectors. Today, over a half century after her death, the art work which she created, brings in a higher value than any other female artist has ever earned. And, many of the works which she created, have been replicated in print, to sell to collectors, and to be displayed in museums and art exhibits.

Her home, which was passed over to the Mexican government, is now known as the Museo Frida Kahlo (the museum of Frida Kahlo). Visitors can see all of her personal effects which are left behind in the home, and the urn which carries her ashes are also on display in the home. Many of the pieces that are still in the home, seem to have been left the way they were when the couple lived in the home, and visitors describe it as being with her, and feeling her presence, when visiting the museum.

Although Frida had a very short, and troubling life, she was able to capture a magnificent audience, with the art work which she created during the course of this

Reference photo...

Reference photo…

short life. Described as her biography in art form, the self portraiture work created by her, showcases a troubled woman, and the difficult life she lived. And, today, she is still known as one of the most famous female artists in history, and sells more pieces (for more money), than any other female artist throughout history.

Biography is from www.fridakahlo.org.

Starting to sketch...

Starting to sketch…

I was very nervous about today’s painting.  I think I did a good job, but I definitely would’ve done things a little differently now that I finished the piece.  I think it’s a matter of materials…again acrylics/watercolors vs. oils.  I also think my lines are a little harder than hers.  I’m still happy with it though!  I hope you enjoy it and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 224.

Best,

Linda

“I don’t paint dreams or nightmares, I paint my own reality.”

“I used to think I was the strangest person in the world but then I thought there are so many people in the world, there must be someone just like me who feels bizarre and flawed in the same ways I do. I would imagine her, and imagine that she must be out there thinking of me too. Well, I hope that if you are out there and read this and know that, yes, it’s true I’m here, and I’m just as strange as you.”

― Frida Kahlo

Self Portrait with Lexi- Tribute to Frida Kahlo Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Watercolor on Canvas

Self Portrait with Lexi- Tribute to Frida Kahlo
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Watercolor on Canvas

Side-View Self Portrait with Lexi- Tribute to Frida Kahlo Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Watercolor on Canvas

Side-View
Self Portrait with Lexi- Tribute to Frida Kahlo
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Self Portrait with Lexi- Tribute to Frida Kahlo Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Self Portrait with Lexi- Tribute to Frida Kahlo
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Self Portrait with Lexi- Tribute to Frida Kahlo Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Self Portrait with Lexi- Tribute to Frida Kahlo
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Self Portrait with Lexi- Tribute to Frida Kahlo Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Self Portrait with Lexi- Tribute to Frida Kahlo
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Watercolor on Canvas

Day 165- Gerard Sendrey- Visages

It’s Day 165 and I decided to do an outsider artist today.  I found today’s artist and loved his work.  I’ve been working on a couple of larger paintings on top of my daily painting so my days have been filled with paint!  Join me in celebrating Gerard Sendrey today.

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

Sendrey was a civil servant in Begles, near Bordeaux in his native France until his retirement in 1988. However, for a decade, starting in 1967, he also painted intensively and spontaneously, before turning to drawing as his main medium.

Throughout this first period of creative outpouring he worked without consideration of audiences or

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

artistic context. Then, in 1979 his work was exhibited in the Galerie du Fleuve and a year later a number of drawings were acquired for the annexe collection (Neuve Invention) of the Collection de Art Brut in Lausanne.
In 1989 he founded the Site de la Creation Franche, which emphasises the work of French self-taught artists and those marginal creators sometimes referred to as artistes singuliers. Sendrey’s early drawings consist of intricately wrought geometric marks, creating a packed, shallow picture space out of which figures or faces emerge. In recent works, such as this one, discreet, fantastical elements seemingly exude into the indeterminate spatial void of the picture ground.

Above is from the Henry Boxer Gallery.  It’s a wonderful site that features a bunch of outsider artists.

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

Before entering retirement, Gerard Sendrey worked as civil servant in Begles, a small village in the Bordeaux country of France. During much of the time that he was reporting to the village hall, dealing with quotidian municipal matters, Sendrey was leading a second life, one unknown even to his co-workers. At every opportunity he had away from his job, he was painting.

Sendrey seems always to have been at least two artists in a single body. Sometimes he

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

produces paintings that, like those of the surrealist Andre Masson or the abstract expressionist Robert Motherwell, take their form through a kind of automatic writing where he attempts to suspend thought and let the subconscious take over. On other occasions, he turns outs ink drawings that appear so maddeningly detailed that their creation would seem to require the concentration of a brain surgeon.

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

Sendrey is the embodiment of that species identified as “outsider artist.” He was around 40 before he started producing his first paintings and drawings. For the next dozen years or so, while working in isolation, he kept expanding the universe of his subjects. Often he turned out Expressionist style portraits of men and women who, like the subjects of Georges Rouault and Alberto Giacometti, seemed weighted with bottomless sorrow.

Sendrey was given his first solo show in 1979 at the Galerie du Fleve, a small cellar

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

space in Bordeaux. By marvelous chance, the exhibition was seen by Michel Thevoz, curator of the Musee de l’Art in Lausanne, Switzerland, begun by Jean Dubuffet.

 

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

Thevoz, an important critic and writer, pronounced Sendrey as a major discovery. In a published appraisal, he wrote: Rare is the artist who doesn’t give in to the temptation to conform his art to the broad public’s standards of what comprises good form, taste and aesthetic norm. Gerard Sendrey is one of these rarities. He risks new adventure without regard to whether his art might upset the tautological preferences of the viewer and cause some discomfort.

Within a year after his first show, Sendrey’s work entered the collections of virtually all the museums in Europe that have collections of art brut, among them the Musee de l’Art in Lausanne, the Musee l’Aracine in Neuilly, France, and the Centre

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

de Recherche et de Diffusion d’Art en Marge in Brussels, Belgium, Later his work would enter numerous institutional collections in the United States, among them those of the Museum of American Folk Art in New York City, the Milwaukee Art Museum, the Chicago Center for Self Taught Art and the Anthony Petullo Collection of Self Taught Art, Milwaukee.

Above is from the Dean Jensen Gallery.

I had so many ideas for today’s painting.  I decided to do a mixture of his styles.  I thought about sticking with black and white, but paint the canvas black and do the details in white.  I did that first, but then decided to add a few different hues of blue to the piece and I’m glad that I did.  I like how my piece turned out.  I hope I captured his style.  I had a wonderful time painting this piece.  I hope you enjoy it and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 166.  200 more paintings to go!

Best,

Linda

Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 116- Leonor Fini- Cats and Friends

It’s Day 116 and I’m having such a lazy, not feeling well day.  Not sure if it’s allergies or just plain under the weather.  I’ve also been thinking about my mom (who’s no longer with us) the past few days…so that has put me into an emotional funk.  I was still able to paint my painting of course.  Join me in celebrating Leonor Fini…and then maybe I’ll attempt to paint my ceiling downstairs once again!

Leonor Fini

Leonor Fini

 

Spirits- Leonor Fini

Spirits- Leonor Fini

Leonor Fini (August 30, 1907 – January 18, 1996) was an Argentine surrealist painter.

Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, she was raised in Trieste, Italy. She moved to Milan at the age of

The Sphinx- Leonor Fini

The Sphinx- Leonor Fini

17, and then to Paris, in either 1931 or 1932. There, she became acquainted with, among many others, Paul Éluard, Max Ernst, Georges Bataille, Henri Cartier-Bresson,Picasso, André Pieyre de Mandiargues, and Salvador Dalí. She traveled Europe by car with Mandiargues and Cartier-Bresson where she was photographed nude in a swimming pool by Cartier-Bresson. The photograph of Fini sold in 2007 for $305,000 – the highest price paid at auction for one of his works to that date.

She painted portraits of Jean Genet, Anna Magnani, Jacques Audiberti, Alida Valli, Jean Schlumberger (jewelry designer) and Suzanne Flon as well as many other celebrities and wealthy visitors to Paris. While working for Elsa Schiaparelli she designed the flacon for the perfume, “Shocking”, which became the top selling perfume for the House of Schiaparelli.

Leonor Fini

Leonor Fini

She designed costumes and decorations for theater, ballet and opera, including the first ballet performed by Roland Petit’s Ballet de Paris, “Les Demoiselles de la nuit”, featuring a young Margot Fonteyn. This was a payment of gratitude for Fini’s having been instrumental in finding the funding for the new ballet company. She also designed the costumes for two films, Renato Castellani’s Romeo and Juliet (1954) and John Huston’s A Walk with Love and Death (1968), which starred 18 year old Anjelica Huston and Moshe Dayan’s son, Assaf.

She once said,

Marriage never appealed to me, I’ve never lived with one person. Since I was

La Gardienne des sources- Leonor Fini

La Gardienne des sources- Leonor Fini

18, I’ve always preferred to live in a sort of community – A big house with my atelier and cats and friends, one with a man who was rather a lover and another who was rather a friend. And it has always worked.

Fini only married once, for a brief period,to Fedrico Veneziani. They were divorced after she met the Italian Count, Stanislao Lepri, who abandoned his diplomatic career shortly after meeting Fini and lived with her thereafter. She met the Polish writer Konstanty Jeleński, known as Kot in Rome in January 1952. She was delighted to discover that he was the illegitimate half-brother of Sforzino Sforza, who had been one of her most favorite lovers. Kot joined Fini and Lepri in their Paris apartment in October 1952 and the three remained inseparable until their deaths.

Dithyrambe- Leonor Fini

Dithyrambe- Leonor Fini

She later employed an assistant to join the household, which he described as “a little bit of prison and a lot of theatre”. One of his jobs was to look after her beloved Persian cats. Over the years she acquired 17 of them; they shared her bed and, at mealtimes, were allowed to roam the dining-table selecting tasty morsels – and woe betide the guest who complained. The ‘inner circle’ expanded to include the American artist, Richard Overstreet and the Argentinian poet Juan-Bautista Pinero.

In the 1970s, she wrote three novels, RogomelecMoumour, Contes pour enfants velu and

Sphinx- Leonor Fini

Sphinx- Leonor Fini

Oneiropompe. Her friends included Jean Cocteau, Giorgio de Chirico, and Alberto Moravia, Fabrizio Clerici and most of the other artists and writers inhabiting or visiting Paris. She illustrated many works by the great authors and poets, including Edgar Allan Poe, Charles Baudelaire and Shakespeare, as well as texts by new writers. She was very generous with her illustrations and donated many drawings to writers to help them get published. She is, perhaps, best known for her graphic illustrations for Histoire d’O.

Leonor Fini

Leonor Fini

It has been said about her that she is the only artist to paint women without apology. Many of her paintings feature strong, beautiful women (many times resembling herself) in ceremonial or provocative situations. Men are often portrayed as lithe figures who are under the protection of her females. The sphinx and cats play major parts in her paintings, as does the theme of ‘the double’. She was equally adept at etching, drawing, watercolor and oil painting. She lived with many cats; up to a total of 23 at one time. The illness of one of her cats could send her into a deep depression.

A biographical song about Leonor Fini’s life is featured on Welsh artist Katell Keineg’s 1997 second album, Jet.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I decided to paint a mythological character for my tribute today.  This was definitely an example of painting with acrylics vs. oils today.  I love the softness of her style and tried to go for the more watercolor effect, but for just having a day to work on this piece, I just couldn’t fully accomplish what I wanted.  I think it turned out okay, but not exactly.  It’s okay though!  It was a learning experience.  Maybe I should’ve stuck with a more solid background color as opposed to washing it with a few different ones.  These are the questions that bounced around after the fact.

Well, I hope you enjoy my piece nonetheless and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 117!  Best, Linda

Medusa- Tribute to Leonor Fini Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Medusa- Tribute to Leonor Fini
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Medusa- Tribute to Leonor Fini Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Medusa- Tribute to Leonor Fini
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Medusa- Tribute to Leonor Fini Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Medusa- Tribute to Leonor Fini
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Medusa- Tribute to Leonor Fini Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Medusa- Tribute to Leonor Fini
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Medusa- Tribute to Leonor Fini Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Medusa- Tribute to Leonor Fini
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 109- David Lynch- Attracted to Absurdity

It’s Day 109 and I was super excited to paint a tribute to David Lynch…one of my all time favorite directors, artists…well, everything!  I was a little trapped in the garage since guys are here installing a new bathroom fan and switches for the sconces etc.  But it worked out fine.  The dogs are still locked in there as the guys finish up so I thought I’d finish my blog.  Join me in celebrating the great man that is David Lynch.

David Lynch LOS ANGELES,CA - SEPTEMBER 11,2009: Filmmaker David Lynch with one of his new paintings, photographed at Griffin Gallery in Santa Monica,  September 11, 2009.

David Lynch
LOS ANGELES,CA – SEPTEMBER 11,2009: Filmmaker David Lynch with one of his new paintings, photographed at Griffin Gallery in Santa Monica, September 11, 2009.

Rain- David Lynch

Rain- David Lynch

David Keith Lynch (born January 20, 1946) is an American film director, television director, visual artist, musician and occasional actor. Known for his surrealist films, he has developed a unique cinematic style, which has been dubbed “Lynchian”, a style characterized by its dream imagery and meticulous sound design. The surreal, and in many cases, violent, elements contained within his films have been known to “disturb, offend or mystify” audiences.

Born to a middle-class family in Missoula, Montana, Lynch spent his childhood

David Lynch: Pete Goes To This Girlfriend's House

David Lynch: Pete Goes To This Girlfriend’s House

traveling around the United States, before going on to study painting at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in Philadelphia, where he first made the transition to producing short films. Deciding to devote himself more fully to this medium, he moved to Los Angeles, where he produced his first motion picture, the surrealist horror Eraserhead (1977). After Eraserhead became a cult classic on the midnight movie circuit, Lynch was employed to direct The Elephant Man (1980), from which he gained mainstream success. Then being employed by the De Laurentiis Entertainment Group, he proceeded to make two films: the science-fiction epic Dune (1984), which proved to be a critical and commercial failure, and then a neo-noir crime film, Blue Velvet (1986), which was critically acclaimed.

Boy Lights Fire- David Lynch

Boy Lights Fire- David Lynch

Next, Lynch created his own television series with Mark Frost, the highly popular murder mystery Twin Peaks (1990–1991); he also created a cinematic prequel, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me (1992), a road movie, Wild at Heart (1990), and a family film,The Straight Story (1999), in the same period. Turning further towards surrealist filmmaking, three of his subsequent films operated on “dream logic”, non-linear narrative structures: Lost Highway (1997), Mulholland Drive (2001) and Inland Empire(2006). Meanwhile, Lynch embraced the Internet as a medium, producing several web-based shows, such as the animation Dumbland (2002) and the surreal sitcom Rabbits (2002).

Over his career, Lynch has received three Academy Award nominations for Best

I See My Love- David Lynch

I See My Love- David Lynch

Director and a nomination for best screenplay. Lynch has won France’s César Award for Best Foreign Film twice, as well as the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival and aGolden Lion award for lifetime achievement at the Venice Film Festival. The French government awarded him the Legion of Honor, the country’s top civilian honor, as a Chevalier in 2002 and then an Officier in 2007, while that same year, The Guardian described Lynch as “the most important director of this era”. Allmovie called him “the Renaissance man of modern American filmmaking”, while the success of his films has led to him being labelled “the first popular Surrealist.”

Detail from Lynch's painting- Some of his paintings are 400-500 lbs!  To accommodate wiring, wood, etc.  Crazy huh?

Detail from Lynch’s painting- Some of his paintings are 400-500 lbs! To accommodate wiring, wood, etc. Crazy huh?

Lynch was born in Missoula, Montana on January 20, 1946.  His father, Donald Walton Lynch, was a research scientist working for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and his mother, Edwina “Sunny” Lynch (née Sundholm), was an English language tutor whose grandfather’s parents had immigrated to the United States from Finland in the 19th century.  Lynch was raised a Presbyterian.  The Lynch family often moved around according to where the USDA assigned Donald. It was because of this that when he was two months old, David Lynch moved with his parents to Sandpoint, Idaho, and only two years after that, following the birth of his brother John, the family again moved, this time to Spokane, Washington. It was here that his sister Martha was born, before they once more moved, this time to Durham, North Carolina, then to Boise, Idaho and then to Alexandria, Virginia.  

Lynch found this transitory early life relatively easy to adjust to, noting that he found it fairly easy to meet new friends whenever he started

The Deformation Man: David Lynch's Chimerical Universe of Metamorphosis

The Deformation Man: David Lynch’s Chimerical Universe of Metamorphosis

attending a new school. Commenting on much of his early life, Lynch has remarked that “I found the world completely and totally fantastic as a child. Of course, I had the usual fears, like going to school … For me, back then, school was a crime against young people. It destroyed the seeds of liberty. The teachers didn’t encourage knowledge or a positive attitude.”  Alongside this schooling, he joined the Boy Scouts, although he would later note that he only “became one so I could quit, and put it behind me.” He rose to the highest rank of Eagle Scout. It was through being an Eagle Scout that he was present with other Boy Scouts outside of the White House at the inauguration of President John F. Kennedy, which took place on Lynch’s birthday in 1961.

Here I Am - Me as a House 1990- David Lynch

Here I Am – Me as a House 1990- David Lynch

Lynch had become interested in painting and drawing from an early age, becoming intrigued by the idea of pursuing it as a career path when living in Virginia, where his friend’s father was a professional painter. At Francis C. Hammond High School in Alexandria, Virginia, he did poorly academically, having little interest in school work, but was popular with other students, and after leaving decided that he wanted to study painting at college, thereby beginning his studies at School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston in 1964, where he was a roommate of Peter Wolf. Nonetheless, he left after only a year, stating that “I was not inspired AT ALL in that place”, and instead deciding that he wanted to travel around Europe for three years with his friend Jack Fisk, who was similarly unhappy with his studies at Cooper Union. They had some hopes that in Europe they could train with the expressionist painter Oskar Kokoschka at his school. Upon reaching Salzburg, however, they found that he was not available and, disillusioned, returned to the United States after spending only 15 days of their planned three years in Europe.

Lynch first trained as a painter, and although he is now better known as a filmmaker, he has also produced much painting work. Lynch has

Twin Peaks Mountain- David Lynch

Twin Peaks Mountain- David Lynch

stated that “all my paintings are organic, violent comedies. They have to be violently done and primitive and crude, and to achieve that I try to let nature paint more than I paint.” Many of his works are very dark in colour, and Lynch has described this as being because “I wouldn’t know what to do with [colour]. Colour to me is too real. It’s limiting. It doesn’t allow too much of a dream. The more you throw black into a colour, the more dreamy it gets … Black has depth. It’s like a little egress; you can go into it, and because it keeps on continuing to be dark, the mind kicks in, and a lot of things that are going on in there become manifest. And you start seeing what you’re afraid of. You start seeing what you love, and it becomes like a dream.”

David Lynch painting The Face, No. 31 / April 1991

David Lynch painting The Face, No. 31 / April 1991

Many of his works also contain letters and words added to the painting, something which he explains: “The words in the paintings are sometimes important to make you start thinking about what else is going on in there. And a lot of times, the words excite me as shapes, and something’ll grow out of that. I used to cut these little letters out and glue them on. They just look good all lined up like teeth … sometimes they become the title of the painting.”

Lynch considers the 20th-century Irish artist Francis Bacon to be his “number one kinda hero painter”, stating that “Normally I only like a couple of years of a painter’s work, but I like everything of Bacon’s. The guy, you know, had the stuff.”

Lynch was the subject of a major art retrospective at the Fondation Cartier, Paris from

Shadow of a Twisted Hand Across My House 1988- David Lynch

Shadow of a Twisted Hand Across My House
1988- David Lynch

March 3 – May 27, 2007. The show was titled The Air is on Fire and included numerous paintings, photographs, drawings, alternative films and sound work. New site-specific art installations were created specially for the exhibition. A series of events accompanied the exhibition including live performances and concerts. Some of Lynch’s art include photographs of dissected chickens and other animals as a “Build your own Chicken” toy ad.

Between 1983 and 1992, Lynch wrote and drew a weekly comic strip called The Angriest Dog in the World for the L.A. Reader. The drawings in the panels never change, just the captions.

Very partial biography from wikipedia.  I mainly focused on including his life story and painting oriented information.  The entry otherwise is huge!

I very much enjoyed painting this piece today.  And strangely enough, I randomly had a bunch of plastic babies I could use as a 3D effect.  I combined styles from different paintings.  I personally think his pieces are amazing.  I hope that I did a good job capturing his style and spirit and his work (as did his films in the past) inspired me as usual.  Enjoy and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 110!  Best, Linda

Baby Bomb- Tribute to David Lynch Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, mixed media on Canvas

Baby Bomb- Tribute to David Lynch
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, mixed media on Canvas

Side-View Baby Bomb- Tribute to David Lynch Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, mixed media on Canvas

Side-View
Baby Bomb- Tribute to David Lynch
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, mixed media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Baby Bomb- Tribute to David Lynch Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, mixed media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Baby Bomb- Tribute to David Lynch
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, mixed media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Baby Bomb- Tribute to David Lynch Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, mixed media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Baby Bomb- Tribute to David Lynch
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, mixed media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Baby Bomb- Tribute to David Lynch Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, mixed media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Baby Bomb- Tribute to David Lynch
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, mixed media on Canvas

Close-Up 4 Baby Bomb- Tribute to David Lynch Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, mixed media on Canvas

Close-Up 4
Baby Bomb- Tribute to David Lynch
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, mixed media on Canvas