Day 344- Banksy- The Banksy Effect

It’s Day 344 and I’m thrilled to do a tribute to today’s artist.  Please join me in honoring Banksy today!

Banksy- from Exit Through the Gift Shop

Banksy- from Exit Through the Gift Shop

Banksy

Banksy

Banksy is a pseudonymous English graffiti artist, political activist, film director, and painter.

His satirical street art and subversive epigrams combine dark humour with graffiti executed in a distinctive stencilling technique.

Banksy

Banksy

His works of political and social commentary have been featured on streets, walls, and bridges of cities throughout the world.

Banksy’s work grew out of the Bristol underground scene, which involved collaborations between artists and musicians.  Observers have noted that his style is similar to Blek le Rat, who began to work with stencils in 1981 in Paris. Banksy says that he was inspired by “3D”, a graffiti artist who later became a founding member of Massive Attack.

Banksy- Olympic Rings

Banksy- Olympic Rings

Above is from wikipedia.  The whole page was insanely long.

Banksy, a street artist whose identity remains unknown, is believed to have been born in Bristol, England, around 1974. He rose to prominence for his provocative stenciled pieces in the late 1990s. Banksy is the subject of a 2010 documentary, Exit Through the Gift Shop, which examines the relationship between commercial and street art.

Banksy began his career as a graffiti artist in the early 1990s, in Bristol’s graffiti gang DryBreadZ Crew. Although his early work was

Banksy

Banksy

largely freehand, Banksy used stencils on occasion. In the late ’90s, he began using stencils predominantly. His work became more widely recognized around Bristol and in London, as his signature style developed.

Banksy

Banksy

Banksy’s artwork is characterized by striking images, often combined with slogans. His work often engages political themes, satirically critiquing war, capitalism, hypocrisy and greed. Common subjects include rats, apes, policemen, members of the royal family, and children.

In addition to his two-dimensional work, Banksy is known for his installation artwork. One of the most celebrated of these pieces, which featured a live elephant painted with a Victorian wallpaper pattern, sparked controversy among animal rights activists.

Other pieces have drawn attention for their edgy themes or the boldness of their execution. Banksy’s work on

Banksy

Banksy

the West Bank barrier, between Israel and Palestine, received significant media attention in 2005. He is also known for his use of copyrighted material and subversion of classic images. An example of this is Banksy’s version of Monet’s famous series of water lilies paintings, adapted by Banksy to include drifting trash and debris.

Banksy’s worldwide fame has transformed his artwork from acts of vandalism to sought-after high art pieces. Journalist Max Foster has referred to the rising prices of graffiti as street art as “the Banksy effect.” Interest in Banksy escalated with the release of the 2010 documentary Exit Through the Gift Shop. The film, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, was nominated for an Academy Award.

Banksy

Banksy

In October 2013, Banksy took to the streets of New York City. There he pledged to create a new piece of art for each day of his residency. As he explained to the Village Voice, “The plan is to live here, react to things, see the sights—and paint on them. Some of it will be pretty elaborate, and some will just be a scrawl on a toilet wall.” During that month, he also sold some of his works on the street for $60 a piece, well below the market value for his art.

Banksy’s identity remains unknown, despite intense speculation. The two names most often suggested are Robert Banks and Robin

Banksy

Banksy

Gunningham. Pictures that surfaced of a man who was supposedly Banksy pointed toward Gunningham, an artist who was born in Bristol in 1973. Gunningham moved to London around 2000, a timeline that correlates with the progression of Banksy’s artwork.

Above is from biography.com.

I hope you enjoy my tribute piece today.  Of course I would’ve loved to do my tribute on a wall today…but alas, my canvas will have to do. 🙂  I will see you tomorrow on Day 345!  Only 20 to go.

Best,

Linda

Make Art- Tribute to Banksy Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Make Art- Tribute to Banksy
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Make Art- Tribute to Banksy Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

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Make Art- Tribute to Banksy
Linda Cleary 2014
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Close-Up 1 Make Art- Tribute to Banksy Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

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Make Art- Tribute to Banksy
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Close-Up 2 Make Art- Tribute to Banksy Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

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Make Art- Tribute to Banksy
Linda Cleary 2014
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Close-Up 3 Make Art- Tribute to Banksy Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Make Art- Tribute to Banksy
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 326- KAWS- Infusion

It’s Day 326 and I’m pooped…had a show last night and then heading out to rehearsal in a little while.  Please join me in honoring KAWS A.K.A. Brian Donnelly today.

KAWS Brian Donnelly

KAWS Brian Donnelly

kaws

kaws

Brian Donnelly (born 1974), professionally known as KAWS, is a New York-based artist and designer of limited edition toys and clothing. He currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

KAWS was born Brian Donnelly in Jersey City, New Jersey. He graduated from the School of Visual Arts in New York with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in illustration in 1996. After graduation, KAWS briefly worked for Disney as a freelance animator painting backgrounds. He also contributed to the animated series 101 DalmatiansDaria and Doug.

He began his career as a graffiti artist growing up in Jersey City, New Jersey. Later moving to New York City in the 1990s, KAWS started subverting imagery on billboards, bus shelters and kaws aldrich invite-thumb-523x358phone booth advertisements. These reworked advertisements were at first left alone, lasting for up to several months, but as KAWS’ popularity skyrocketed, the ads became increasingly sought after. In addition to New York, KAWS has done work in Paris, London, Berlin and Tokyo.

In the late 90s, KAWS began to design and produce limited edition vinyl toys, “an instant hit with the global art toy-collecting community,” especially in Japan, where this genre is well respected and widespread. More toys and later clothing were made for Original Fake, a recent collaborative store with Medicom Toy, in the Aoyama district of Tokyo where an original limited edition product is released each week.

KAWS- The Nature of Need Exhibition

KAWS- The Nature of Need Exhibition

KAWS has also participated in other commercial collaborations with Nigo for A Bathing Ape, Jun “Jonio” Takahashi for Undercover, Michael “Mic” Neumann for Kung Faux, snowboard projects with Burton, and sneakers with Nike and Vans. His most recent collaboration was with Comme des Garçons. As of August 2010, it is reported that Kaws has designed a limited edition bottle for Dos Equis, a Mexican beer brand. The bottle was released in Mexico in early September 2010.

KAWS’ acrylic paintings and sculpture have many repeating images, all meant to be universally understood, surpassing languages and cultures. One of KAWS’ early series, Package Paintings, was made in 2000. This series, entitled The Kimpsons,subverted the famous American cartoon, The Simpsons.

KAWS explains that he “found it weird how infused a cartoon could become in people’s lives; the impact it could have, compared to regular politics.” In addition,

kaws toys

kaws toys

KAWS has reworked other familiar icons such as Mickey Mouse, the Michelin Man, the Smurfs, and SpongeBob SquarePants.

Recent solo exhibitions include Original Fake at the Bape Gallery in Tokyo (2003) where his sculpture “Wonderful World” sold for $400,000. KAWS has been periodically showing both paintings and products at Colette in Paris since 1999. His work is included in the traveling exhibition Beautiful Losers, which started at the Cincinnati Contemporary Art Center and will be traveling through 2009 throughout the US and Europe, including his largest museum show to date, which will be held at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, Georgia.

kaws installation

kaws installation

KAWS’s “Companion,” a grayscale figure based on Mickey Mouse with his face obscured by both hands, was adapted into a balloon for the 2012 Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade as part of the parade’s “Blue Sky Gallery” feature.

For the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards KAWS’s company redesigned the iconic moonman statue.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today for KAWS.  I love his work and it makes me want to design toys!  I also enjoyed fusing my favorite cartoon character Spongebob and his artwork today. 🙂  I will see you tomorrow on Day 327!

Best,

Linda

Oh My- Tribute to KAWS Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Oh My- Tribute to KAWS
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Oh My- Tribute to KAWS Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Oh My- Tribute to KAWS
Linda Cleary 2014
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Close-Up 1 Oh My- Tribute to KAWS Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Oh My- Tribute to KAWS
Linda Cleary 2014
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Close-Up 2 Oh My- Tribute to KAWS Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Oh My- Tribute to KAWS
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Close-Up 3 Oh My- Tribute to KAWS Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

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Oh My- Tribute to KAWS
Linda Cleary 2014
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Day 305- Invader- Invasion!

It’s Day 305!  I have a show tonight and had only a few hours of sleep last night…so I finished my piece early so that I can take a little nap and relax a bit today.  Join me in honoring Invader today!

Invader

Invader

Invader

Invader

Invader is the pseudonym of a well-known French urban artist, born in 1969, whose work is modelled on the crude pixellation of 1970s 8-bit video games. He took his name from the 1978 arcade game Space Invaders, and much of his work is composed of square ceramic tiles inspired by video game characters.

Although he prefers to remain incognito, and guards his identity carefully, his distinctive creations can be seen in many highly-visible locations in more than 60

cities in 30 countries. He documents each intervention in a city as an “Invasion”, and has published books and maps of the location of each of his street mosaics.

In addition to working with tiles, Invader is one of the leading proponents of indoor mosaics created using stacks of Rubik’s Cubes in a style he refers to as “Rubikcubism”. He is also known for his QR code mosaic works.

As a graduate of the École des Beaux-Arts, or Tiling School on Mars, Invader initially derived inspiration for his creations from video games from the late 1970s to early 1980s that he played when he was growing up, particularly characters from Space Invaders, from which he derived his work name. Games of the era were constructed with 8-bit graphics, and so lend themselves well to the mosaic treatment, with each tile representing one pixel. Invader likes tiles for their robustness and permanence. Invader’s first mosaic was installed in the mid 1990s in his home city. It was a sleeper for several years before the full “invasion” programme was conceived in 1996.

In this project, the idea is to bring the virtual world into reality. One can see many things in it, but it refers to the early days of digital and the video game.

The first wave of “invasion” began with his home city in 1998, and then spread to 31 other cities in France. Since then, Invader’s works have appeared in 60 cities in 30 countries around the world.  He has invaded New York five times, and Hong Kong on three separate

Invader

Invader

occasions. He has tagged historic buildings and other locations. One of the more prominent places where the mosaics have been installed is on the Hollywood Sign.  The first was placed on the letter D on 31 December 1999 to mark the Y2K bug. During subsequent trips to Los Angeles, Invader placed mosaics on the eight other letters of the sign.

In June 2011, Invader marked the installation of his 1000th work in Paris with an exhibition at La Générale entitled “1000”. Since 2000, the artist has installed in excess of 70 pieces of work dotted around Hong Kong; the artist has declared the third wave undertaken in city, with 50 works, “probably my most accomplished city invasion wave”. By June 2011, 77 cities have been invaded, 2,692 Space Invaders placed comprising some 1.5 million ceramic tiles; 19 invasion maps have been published. Invader estimates that more than 15% of his early pieces, ones that were small and placed rather low, have been removed. To combat their removal or damage by building owners, thieves or fans, Invader places many out of easy reach.

In 2012, Invader made a short film Art4Space documenting his attempt to launch one of his aliens into space on a modified weather balloon. Invader is also known for his QR code works. Created using regular black and white tiles, the patterns can be decoded using apps

installed on smart phones. One decoded message reads “This is an invasion”.

Invader

Invader

Invader works incognito, often masked and largely at night. To guard his anonymity, he pixellates his own image or wears a mask as a disguise for interviews. He claims that only a few people know his real name and his face, and that even his parents think he works as a tiler in the construction industry.

By June 2011, Invader had travelled around the world six times and spent 22 nights in prison cells. Invader accepts arrest as an occupational hazard. He was arrested in 2010 for placing a mosaic on the Hollywood sign, charged with vandalism and made to pay a fine. In July 2011, the Los Angeles Police Department detained two French nationals on suspicion of vandalism near MOCA’s Little Tokyo gallery with tile and grout in hand. The police asserted that one of them was Invader, but released the pair without charge. He was also arrested by plain-clothed police in October 2013 in New York, just as he had completed installing a mural in Orchard Street in East Village in the early hours. He was again fined; the owner of the building took down the work featuring Princess Peach and had it preserved. Invader said that whilst creating installations he had been accosted by police in Hong Kong, but was left alone once they realised he was not committing any crime.

Invader sees himself as a hacker of public space spreading a virus of mosaic; the streets are his canvas, his invasions gifts to the city and its people. He believes that museums and galleries are not accessible to everyone, so deliberately makes his works public by installing

them at street level for ordinary people to enjoy on a daily basis.

The sites for the mosaics are not random. These are scouted and carefully researched, often with local support, and are also chosen for the

Invader

Invader

visibility (strategic), local interest (aesthetic) and symbolism (conceptual) they provide. Although high visibility is one objective, Invader may choose locations that are less prominent. He has said that “A spot is like a revelation… it jumps out at you.

Although many of his works feature the signature aliens, no two pieces are alike. The subject matter may also be themed and adapted to their context. Invader’s repertoire of subjects now includes Star Wars characters (London), as well as the Pink Panther and Mega

Invader

Invader

Man(Paris).  Sites near major bank buildings are marked with dollar sign mosaics. His works in Hong Kong have a more oriental theme: with some martial arts characters; gold and red colours have been employed more often to reflect the traditional Chinese colours for fire and earth. Typically, mosaics are placed ten to fifteen feet above the ground, and on street corners in areas of high visibility. He has developed methods and techniques to attain those potentially dangerous and hard-to-reach locations. Invader unveiled a massive Spider-Man (PA 1040) very high up in the 11th arrondissement April 2013.  In his invasion of Hong Kong in 2014, he planted mosaics that featured Hong Kong Phooey, Thomas from Kung-Fu Master and Popeye.

Invader has said: “I don’t know what ‘holidays’ means because anywhere I go, I can’t resist bringing tiles and cement with me.” His mosaics are half-built in advance. The weight and fragility of the tiles are constraints that influence his planning and site choices. When Invader arrives in a city, he usually stays in a city for two or three weeks.  He obtains a map and spends at least a week installing the mosaics, which are catalogued (each given an identifier with the city code and sequential number), photographed (one close-up and one in its context) and mapped to indicate their locations within the city. He prints and distributes “invasion maps” within the city he is visiting, and they are later sold in his on-line shop. In Montpellier, the locations of mosaics were chosen so that, when placed on a map, they form an image of a giant Space Invaders alien.

Since about 2004, Invader has been working on another project that involves making artworks exclusively using Rubik’s Cubes. He may

Invader

Invader

be the originator, and is certainly one of the foremost proponents of the art form he calls “Rubikcubism”.  Invader takes an image from popular culture, uses a computer program to work out the precise disposition of the six colours for each image. He then manipulates nine pixels for each Rubik’s Cube to give the required pattern – taking perhaps ten seconds per cube, constructs a full image by stacking them, after which the cubes are glued to a backing board. A piece typically composed of approximately 300 cubes, measures about 0.9 by 1.3 metres (3 ft × 4 ft), and weighs approximately 36 kilograms (80 lb), but the exact size depends on the subject and the desired level of detail.

The works are themed along three axes: “Bad Men”, where he reinterprets villains such as Osama bin Laden, Jaws and Al Capone; “Masterpieces” where famous paintings by artists such as Delacroix, Warhol, Seurat, Lichentenstein are given a workover; and “Low Fidelity” based on iconic album art such as Country LifeThe Velvet Underground & Nico, and Nevermind.[12][26][29] He has created images of the Mona Lisa and the Dalai Lama with this technique. He received a lot of attention for the 2005 portrait of Florence Rey he made with the technique, which has since been much imitated.

Space Invader tours have been organised by third parties in Paris. Invader has had solo exhibitions at art galleries in Paris, Osaka,

Invader

Invader

Melbourne, Los Angeles, New York City, London and Rome. Space Invader has shown in many galleries, art centres and museums, from the 6th Lyon contemporary art biennale (2001), the MAMA Gallery in Rotterdam (2002), at the Paris based Magda Danysz Gallery (2003), at the Borusan Center for Culture and Arts in Istanbul, Subliminal Projects in Los Angeles (2004).

In 2010, he was one of the featured artists in the Banksy production Exit Through the Gift Shop shot by Thierry Guetta (Mr. Brainwash), Invader’s cousin. In 2011, he took part in the MoCA LA show at the Geffen Contemporary  : “Art in the streets” curated by Jeffrey Deitch.  His work, when sold in galleries, often fetches six-figure sums.

Fellow street artist Shepard Fairey wrote in Swindle:

Invader

Invader

Invader’s pop art may seem shallow, but by taking the risk of illegally re-contextualizing video game characters in an urban environment that provides more chaotic social interaction than a gamer’s bedroom, he makes a statement about the desensitizing nature of video games and consumer culture. In a postmodern paradox, a game like Grand Theft Auto takes the danger of the streets and puts it in a safe video game, while Invader takes a safe video game icon and inserts it into the danger of the streets.

Invader’s work is not universally welcomed. During his Hong Kong invasion in early 2014, Invader installed 48 works all over the city. However, the city’s Highways Department admitted to removing at least one work later

Invader

Invader

that month, taking down a roadside mosaic in Fortress Hill “to ensure safety of road users”. Local residents were disappointed, and saw the removal as an example of the government only paying lip-service to promoting the arts in the city.  The artist expressed his sadness, saying he “never faced a situation where a public authority would systematically and rapidly remove the art from the streets”.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I had such a fun time with today’s piece!  I hope you enjoy it.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 306.

Best,

Linda

ART- Tribute to Invader Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

ART- Tribute to Invader
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View ART- Tribute to Invader Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View
ART- Tribute to Invader
Linda Cleary 2014
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Close-Up 1 ART- Tribute to Invader Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
ART- Tribute to Invader
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Close-Up 2 ART- Tribute to Invader Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

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Close-Up 3 ART- Tribute to Invader Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
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Day 265- Gary John- Always a Street Artist

It’s Day 265…only 100 left to go!  Wow…Join me in honoring Gary John today.  I found this artist and fell in love with his story and artwork!  I hope you will too.  Below is an article about him from the Santa Monica Mirror that I liked .

From Santa Monica Mirror- Artist Gary John (center) has gone from living on the streets of Venice to becoming an emerging artist in the past eight months thanks to gallery owners Bruce (left) and Scot Lurie.

From Santa Monica Mirror- Artist Gary John (center) has gone from living on the streets of Venice to becoming an emerging artist in the past eight months thanks to gallery owners Bruce (left) and Scot Lurie.

Four Chairs- Gary John

Four Chairs- Gary John

Painting A New Life After Living On The Streets

POSTED NOV. 28, 2013, 8:59 AM JYNARRA BRINSON / MIRROR CONTRIBUTOR

Eight months ago, homeless street artist Gary John was up to his usual one day – painting for

Big Boy Act- Gary John

Big Boy Act- Gary John

nearly 10 hours non-stop on the Venice boardwalk – when something told him to put his brush down, pack his things, and check out Culver City’s art gallery loop.

“I never stop painting,” John says. “I don’t break my routine and more than that, I hem and haw for everything.”

But on that day, John listened to what he describes as nothing more than “divine intervention.”

During this journey to Culver City, he walked into the Bruce Lurie Gallery near the corner of La Cienega and Washington boulevards.

Gary John

Gary John

Perhaps it was the dried-up paint on John that tipped gallery owner Bruce Lurie off, or maybe the same “something” that spoke to John hours earlier, whatever it was compelled Lurie to address him, knowingly, when he said, “Hi artist.”

The salutation did not strike John as particularly significant. He walked about the gallery before heading toward the exit when he heard a voice behind him.

“What kind of art do you do?” John recalls being asked.

He told Lurie about his art – his abstract pop culture images on cardboard, newspaper,

Gary John

Gary John

canvas, and just about any low-cost material he could get his hands on.

For years John met several people, celebrities included, who filled his ears and heart with colorful hopes. They promised to help him find representation and to get his work on t-shirts, skateboards, and other commercial exposure – which never happened.

Hoax Man- Gary John

Hoax Man- Gary John

When Lurie expressed curiosity and asked him to bring his work in, John assumed the usual would transpire: He’d bring his things in, lay them out, be told his work wasn’t actually what they were looking for and sent on his way, with good wishes, of course.

However, this time was different. The decision was unanimous. All three Lurie brothers – Bruce, Evan, and Scot, all gallery owners themselves, happened to be in town that day – decided John was precisely who they were looking for.

“They said come back tomorrow and we’ll do some paperwork,” John says. “I think he took

Modern Art- Gary John

Modern Art- Gary John

everything I had. It was like a dream. They were telling me my stuff is fantastic, we’re going to promote you, not only that, represent you and take you all over the country and it was too much.”

Overwhelmed nearly to hysteria, John asked them to stop talking, said it was too much for one day and left. He walked halfway down the block, found a front porch and sat. He recalls bawling like a baby but more like someone whose wildest dreams had just come true.

Gary John

Gary John

Nearly a decade ago, John visited Los Angeles to seek a brighter backdrop than the grey and rain from his native Seattle. At the insistence of his friend Dan Corley, he said he visited LA for what he intended to be a two-week trial.

“I owe everything to Dan Corley,” John says. “He encouraged me when I wanted to give up. If it weren’t for him I would not be where I am today. No one could ask for a better friend.”

When he arrived, he says, he knew LA would be his new home. The sole earnings from his art sales on the boardwalk sustained him to a minor degree. John struggled with homelessness, finding himself in and out of motels and living on the streets of Venice.

“I was able to pull myself in and out,” John says. “After 10 years of gutting it out on

Queen in a Balloon- Gary John

Queen in a Balloon- Gary John

Venice Beach, I had all but given up. Things really improved when Bruce took me on.”

Today, John lives in an apartment in Culver City.

His art is reminiscent of Haring and Basquiat, and it’s with comparable abandon that vivid hues take shape (or not) on his canvas.

John says he’ll never forget the first time he saw his paintings on the wall.

“It was beautiful,” he says from under a dark green baseball cap and sunglasses, his hands tucked deep into his pockets. “Here were my paintings on this beautiful wall and Bruce came up to me and said, you’re where you belong – he said that to me.”

John himself won’t be at Art Basel Miami Beach 2013 next month, but his art will. The highly selective annual international show attracted 50,000 international visitors last year. Artists, collectors, gallerists, curators, art enthusiasts, and the like descend on Miami Beach for four days to celebrate work from masters of Modern and contemporary art as well as pieces by emerging stars.

Paris Shoe- Gary John

Paris Shoe- Gary John

Art Basel is not John’s first show appearance, but it is the most high profile. His acceptance to the show is something not many established artists can’t boast. Past show appearances include the Affordable Art Fair in New York, Houston Art Fair, as well as shows in the Hamptons and Palm Springs.

Bruce Lurie says he always sells out John’s artwork each show.

“His art is something that reminds us of the purity of our childhood,” Lurie says. “The iconic images, drawn spontaneously yet perfectly have a deeper psychological meaning, and connect today with yesteryears. You might initially think the images are innocent, but they can be provocative and erotic – the fine art collector is attracted to those.”

In the past few weeks John’s work appeared in an auction hosted by The Skirball Museum; Children’s Hospital Los Angeles recently purchased a few of his works; and a curator from the Gothenburg Museum of Art in Sweden expressed interest in showing his work.

John wants his story to serve as encouragement for artists who remain steadfast as well as for those who struggle with persevering through the odds.

“If you hang in there long enough, you keep pushing, your dreams can come true. I never believed it because I went through so many hardships,” John says.

Even though his art is receiving attention he never thought possible, John still paints and sells 8×10 inch pieces along the Venice boardwalk.

“People say you have success now, why are you still on Venice beach,” John says. “I always tell them – because I was a street artist, I am a street artist and I’ll always be a street artist.”

Visit Gary John’s website at streetartgaryjohn.com. Alternatively, you can find him in person most days along the Venice boardwalk across from Figtree’s Café.

Above is article from the Santa Monica Mirror website.

Isn’t his story lovely?  I love it.  I really enjoyed painting this piece today and I hope you like it!  Only a hundred paintings to go for this project!  I can’t believe it.  Well, I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 266.

Best,
Linda

Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View
Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John
Linda Cleary 2014
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Close-Up 1 Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

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Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John
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Close-Up 2 Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

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Close-Up 3 Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

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Day 139- Shepard Fairey- OBEY

It’s Day 139 and I was very excited (and also intimidated) to do today’s tribute piece.  I pulled my back out days ago and my muscle is still bugging me!  I hate pinching nerves/pulling muscles…it can really eat into your day in a bad way.  I still had tons of fun planning and designing my piece today so join me in honoring street artist Shepard Fairey today!  It’s also thanks to Marc Maron’s podcast that I chose to do Fairey today since I listened to his interview yesterday. 🙂

Shepard Fairey

Shepard Fairey

OBEY- Shepard Fairey

OBEY- Shepard Fairey

Frank Shepard Fairey (born February 15, 1970) is an American contemporary street artist, graphic designer activist and illustrator who emerged from the skateboarding scene. He first became known for his “Andre the Giant Has a Posse” (…OBEY…) sticker campaign, in which he appropriated images from the comedic supermarket tabloid Weekly World News.

He became widely known during the 2008 U.S. presidential election for his Barack Obama “Hope”

Hope- Shepard Fairey

Hope- Shepard Fairey

poster. The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston calls him one of today’s best known and most influential street artists. His work is included in the collections at The Smithsonian, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C., the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

Shepard Fairey was born and raised in Charleston, South Carolina. His father, Strait Fairey, is a doctor, and his mother, Charlotte, a realtor. Fairey became involved with art in 1984, when he started to place his drawings on skateboards and T-shirts.

Shepard Fairey

Shepard Fairey

In 1988 he graduated from Idyllwild Arts Academy in California. In 1992 he earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Illustration from theRhode Island School of Design.

Fairey’s first art museum exhibition, entitled Supply & Demand (as was his earlier book), was held in Boston at the Institute of Contemporary Art during the summer of 2009. The exhibition featured more than 250 works in a wide variety of media:

Shepard Fairey

Shepard Fairey

screen prints, stencils, stickers, rubylith illustrations, collages, and works on wood, metal and canvas. As a complement to the ICA exhibition, Fairey created public art works around Boston. The artist explains his driving motivation: “The real message behind most of my work is ‘question everything’.”

Fairey sits on the advisory board of Reaching to Embrace the Arts, a nonprofit organization that provides art supplies to disadvantaged schools and students. In May 2006, Fairey became a board member of the Music Is Revolution Foundation, a nonprofit organization that supports music education for students in public schools.

 

Jean-Michel Basquiat- Shepard Fairey

Jean-Michel Basquiat- Shepard Fairey

Fairey created the “André the Giant Has a Posse” sticker campaign in 1989, while attending the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD). This later evolved into the “Obey Giant” campaign, which has grown via an international network of collaborators replicating Fairey’s original designs. As with most street artists, the Obey Giant was intended to inspire curiosity and cause the masses to question their relationship with their surroundings.

The Obey Giant website says: “The sticker has no meaning but exists only to cause people to react, to

Shepard Fairey

Shepard Fairey

contemplate and search for meaning in the sticker”. The website later goes on to contradict this statement however by saying that those who are familiar with the sticker simply find humor and enjoyment from its presence and that those who try to look deeper into its meaning only burden themselves and often, end up condemning the art as an act of vandalism from an evil, underground cult.

Originally intended to garner fame amongst his classmates and college peers, Fairey states “At first I was only thinking about the response from my clique of art school and skateboard friends. The fact that a larger segment of the public would not only notice, but investigate, the unexplained appearance of the stickers was something I had not contemplated. When I started to see reactions and consider the sociological forces at work surrounding the use of public space and the insertion of a very eye-catching but ambiguous image, I began to think there was the potential to create a phenomenon.”

Vivi La Revolucion- Shepard Fairey

Vivi La Revolucion- Shepard Fairey

In a manifesto he wrote in 1990, and since posted on his website, he links his work with Heidegger’s concept ofphenomenology. His “Obey” Campaign draws from the John Carpenter movie They Live which starred pro wrestler Roddy Piper, taking a number of its slogans, including the “Obey” slogan, as well as the “This is Your God” slogan. Fairey has also spun off the OBEY clothing line from the original sticker campaign. He also uses the slogan “The Medium is the Message” borrowed from Marshall McLuhan. Shepard Fairey has also stated in an interview that part of his work is inspired by other street artists.

After graduation, he founded a small printing business in Providence, Rhode Island, called

Shepard Fairey

Shepard Fairey

Alternate Graphics, specializing in t-shirt and sticker silkscreens, which afforded Fairey the ability to continue pursuing his own artwork. While residing in Providence in 1994, Fairey met American filmmaker Helen Stickler, who had also attended RISD and graduated with a film degree. The following spring, Stickler completed a short documentary film about Shepard and his work, titled “Andre the Giant has a Posse”. The film premiered in the 1995 New York Underground Film Festival, and went on to play at the 1997 Sundance Film Festival. It has been seen in more than 70 festivals and museums internationally.

Shepard Fairey

Shepard Fairey

Fairey was a founding partner, along with Dave Kinsey and Phillip DeWolff, of the design studio BLK/MRKT Inc. from 1997 to 2003, which specialised in guerrilla marketing, and “the development of high-impact marketing campaigns”. Clients included Pepsi, Hasbro and Netscape (for whom Fairey designed the red dinosaur version of mozilla.org’s logo and mascot).

Fairey created a series of posters supporting Barack Obama’s 2008 candidacy for

Shepard Fairey

Shepard Fairey

President of the United States, including the iconic “HOPE” portrait. The New Yorker art critic Peter Schjeldahl called the poster “the most efficacious American political illustration since ‘Uncle Sam Wants You'”. Fairey also created an exclusive design for Rock the Vote. Because the Hope poster had been “perpetuated illegally” and independently by the street artist, the Obama campaign declined to have any direct affiliation with it. Although the campaign officially disavowed any involvement in the creation or popularization of the poster, Fairey has commented in interviews that he was in communication with campaign officials during the period immediately following the poster’s release. Fairey has stated that the original version featured the word “PROGRESS” instead of the word “HOPE”, and that within weeks of its release, the campaign requested that he issue (and legally disseminate) a new version, keeping the powerful image of Obama’s face but captioning it with the word “HOPE”. The campaign openly embraced the revised poster along with two additional Fairey posters that featured the words “CHANGE” and “VOTE”.

They Live- Shepard Fairey

They Live- Shepard Fairey

Fairey distributed 300,000 stickers and 500,000 posters during the campaign, funding his grassroots electioneering through poster and fine art sales. “I just put all that money back into making more stuff, so I didn’t keep any of the Obama money”, explained Fairey in December 2009.

In February 2008, Fairey received a letter of thanks from Obama for his contribution to the campaign. The letter stated:

I would like to thank you for using your talent in support of my campaign. The political messages involved in your work have encouraged Americans to believe they can change the status-quo. Your images have a profound effect on people, whether seen in a gallery or on a stop sign. I am privileged to be a part of your artwork and proud to have your support. I wish you continued success and creativity.– Barack Obama, February 22, 2008

Fairey resides in Los Angeles with his wife Amanda and daughters Vivienne and Madeline. In addition to his successful graphic design

Noam Chomsky- Shepard Fairey

Noam Chomsky- Shepard Fairey

career, Fairey also DJs at many clubs under the name DJ Diabetic and Emcee Insulin, as he has diabetes.

Very partial biography from wikipedia.  It was long so I just included parts!

I know that when I first saw the OBEY Andre the Giant stickers everywhere I was very curious to what it meant and who was behind it.  If you’d like to hear the whole story from Shepard Fairey’s mouth listen to this great podcast (it’s great in general…I love Marc Maron and WTF. Best podcast ever in my opinion.). WTF- Shepard Fairey Episode 497

I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do for today’s piece.  Something political?  Ironic? Profound? Meaningful?  After researching and staring at his art all morning, a random idea came to me.  I even looked up the font for OBEY when researching this.  I designed it in photoshop…which took quite a while and then decided to put it on a wood panel and paint the rest.  At first I thought it’d be cool to make it look like a sticker that was pasted on a lamppost or fence, but then I opted for more color!  Red and gold!  What could be better than also paying tribute to the great Patrick Stewart/Jean Luc Picard?  I hope you enjoy it and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 140!  Best, Linda

ENGAGE- Tribute to Shepard Fairey Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media/Acrylic on Wood Panel

ENGAGE- Tribute to Shepard Fairey
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media/Acrylic on Wood Panel

Side-View ENGAGE- Tribute to Shepard Fairey Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media/Acrylic on Wood Panel

Side-View
ENGAGE- Tribute to Shepard Fairey
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media/Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 1 ENGAGE- Tribute to Shepard Fairey Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media/Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 1
ENGAGE- Tribute to Shepard Fairey
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media/Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 2 ENGAGE- Tribute to Shepard Fairey Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media/Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 2
ENGAGE- Tribute to Shepard Fairey
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media/Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 3 ENGAGE- Tribute to Shepard Fairey Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media/Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 3
ENGAGE- Tribute to Shepard Fairey
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media/Acrylic on Wood Panel

 

 

Day Eighty-One- Buff Monster- Pretty in Pink

It’s Day 81 and I was stumped on who I wanted to pay tribute to today.  I wanted to do something fun so my friend Karli told me I should do Buff Monster!  I went and looked him up and freaked out.  Join me in celebrating Buff Monster today!

buff_monster_portrait

Buff Monster

Buff Monster

Buff Monster became known as a street artist in Los Angeles whose work has

Buff Monster

Buff Monster

been visited by juxtapoz, among others. On 19 September 2012 he took part in a street art panel discussion for Doyle New York. He is featured in the Banksy movie Exit Through the Gift Shop. He is influenced by Japanese culture and his work usually combines the color pink with some form of ice cream.

His painting Happy Pink Explosion is in the collection of Bristol Museum and

Buff Monster

Buff Monster

Art Gallery.

Buff Monster

Buff Monster

Buff Monster currently lives in Brooklyn.

This biography is from wikipedia.

The one below is from his website!

Buff Monster made a name for himself by putting up thousands of hand-silkscreened posters across Los Angeles, and other far-away places. His work is characterized by happy characters living in brightly-colored bubbly landscapes.

Buff Monster

Buff Monster

Along with meticulously executed paintings, he has created a wide range of merchandise ranging from prints and stickers, to vinyl toys and plush. In 2012 he created an ambitious homage to Garbage Pail Kids called The Melty Misfits; a collection of vintage-style trading cards, complete with wax wrapper.

The color pink, a symbol of confidence, individuality and happiness, is present in

Buff Monster

Buff Monster

everything he creates. And he often cites heavy metal music, ice cream and Japanese Culture as major influences. His work has been shown in galleries worldwide, often accompanied by large installations.

Buff Monster

Buff Monster

In 2010, the Bristol City Museum acquired a painting of his for their permanent collection. His art has been published in a variety of magazines, websites, newspapers and books, including Juxtapoz, Paper, Nylon, Cool Hunting, Angeleno, The Los Angeles Times, LA Weekly, The New York Times, and many more. He was also featured in Banksy’s movie: Exit Through the Gift Shop. In 2012, after 15 years living and working in Hollywood, he moved to New York City.

~

I really wanted to be careful and not completely copy one of his pieces…which was tempting.  So I decided to do a sketch of my own

I decided to paint a ghosty dude. :)

I decided to paint a ghosty dude. 🙂

and then paint it in his style.  I had to borrow a bunch of pinks from Karli’s paint stash.  The neon pink really started hurting my eyes when I was painting, but it’s just so darn cool.  I also dug out a wood panel to paint on so it’s not on the usual 10 x 10 canvas, but on a 8 x 10.

I hope you enjoy my tribute to Buff Monster.  What a cool dude!  I also hope I captured his spirit…I think I would’ve done a bit better if I had more time.  I felt a little rushed and was also doing some house chores (also fun!).

I will see you tomorrow on day 82…I can’t wait to break a hundred!  I should have some sort of celebration on day 100. 🙂  Best, Linda

Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Side-View Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Side-View
Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 1 Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 1
Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 2 Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 2
Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 3 Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 3
Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 4 Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 4
Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel