Day 329- Doze Green- Infinite Perspectives

It’s Day 329 and I had a fun time with today’s piece.  Please join me in honoring Doze Green today.  I love his style.

Doze Green

Doze Green

Doze Green

Doze Green

Doze Green translates complex metaphysical concepts through his paintings, such as the possible manipulation of energy and matter to create a timeless space. He explores meditations on matter and anti-matter, layers of consciousness, and different possibilities based on cosmology.

Through stream-of-consciousness painting, Doze Green creates fractured imagery to convey infinite possibilities. His intention is to reveal works with an ever-changing narrative. Multi-dimensional planes and illusion of time are presented through fragmented, incomplete figures.

He believes by depicting beings that are not fully materialized, these beings are not of this realm. He presents

DOZE-GREEN-Luminosity-preview-14

DOZE-GREEN-Luminosity-preview-14

possibilities of immortality through paintings where narratives are interminable. His collection of paintings is an extension of this metaphysical concept.

Cubist influences include ascending and descending planes and repetitive, overlapping, and concentric lines in an otherwise undefined landscape. For Doze Green, this energy and motion of created forms exist in a visual meeting place of ideas.

Doze Green

Doze Green

Influenced by Edo period paintings, Doze Green mixes black gesso with Sumi ink and applies “creatively chaotic, and intuitive brushstrokes,” in a calligraphy-inspired and graffiti aesthetic. Doze Green translates these primitive markings as “biological entities, a swarm of arrows coming in from infinite perspective.”

Doze Green is also known for his live painting performances. Doze Green’s work is in many public and private collections throughout the United States, Japan, Europe, and Australia. His works have been published in

Detail of painting- Doze Green

Detail of painting- Doze Green

BlackBook, Anthem, Juxtapoz, Tokion, and­­ Vibe and reviewed on CNN.

Biography above is from www.dozegreen.com.

Below blurb is from http://www.artsy.com.

In the 1970s, Doze Green was a Hip-Hop pioneer. A member of the legendary Rock Steady Crew—the group that pioneered breakdancing (also known as B-Boying)—the subway-tagging graffiti artist often participated in breakdance performances at SoHo and Lower East Side galleries.

Doze Green

Doze Green

Moving from walls to canvas, Green’s recent paintings, influenced by the art of the Edo Period in Japan and created with gesso and sumi ink, incorporate his signature style of figurative abstraction and use of letterforms while at the same time posing metaphysical questions about the nature of narrative, the physics of time, and the possibility of immortality. He calls them “biological entities, a swarm of arrows coming in from infinite perspective.”

~

I hope you enjoy my tribute today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 330!  35 to go…I almost can’t believe it.  I’m

Doze Green

Doze Green

happy, proud and sad all at the same time.

Best,

Linda

Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green Linda Cleary 2014 Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green
Linda Cleary 2014
Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green Linda Cleary 2014 Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green
Linda Cleary 2014
Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green Linda Cleary 2014 Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green
Linda Cleary 2014
Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green Linda Cleary 2014 Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green
Linda Cleary 2014
Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green Linda Cleary 2014 Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green
Linda Cleary 2014
Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Day 323- Barry McGee- Outside the Art World

It’s Day 323 and I worked on today’s piece a bit last night and this morning.  I spent most of my afternoon running errands and getting soaked in the rain.  Now I have to do stuff at home before heading out to improv class tonight.  I worked really hard on today’s piece and I am very happy with the result!  Join me in honoring Barry McGee today. 🙂

Barry McGee

Barry McGee

Barry McGee

Barry McGee

Barry McGee (born 1966 in San Francisco) is a painter and graffiti artist. He is also known by monikers such as Ray FongLydia FongBernon VernonP.KinRay VirgilTwist and further variations of Twist, such as TwisterTwistyTwisto and others.

McGee graduated from El Camino High School in South San Francisco, California. He later graduated from the San Francisco Art Institute in 1991 with a concentration in painting and printmaking.

McGee rose out of the Mission School art movement and graffiti boom in the San Francisco Bay Area during the early nineties. His

Barry McGee Installation SF MoMa.

Barry McGee Installation SF MoMa.

work draws heavily from a pessimistic view of the urban experience, which he describes as, “urban ills, overstimulations, frustrations, addictions & trying to maintain a level head under the constant bombardment of advertising”.

McGee’s paintings are very iconic, with central figures dominating abstracted backgrounds of drips, patterns and color fields. He has also painted portraits of street characters on their own empty bottles of liquor, painted flattened spray cans picked up at train yards and painted wrecked vehicles for art shows.

Barry McGee- Bottle

Barry McGee- Bottle

McGee has had numerous shows in many kinds of galleries and was also an artist in residence at inner-city McClymonds High School in Oakland, California in the early 1990s.

He was married to the artist Margaret Kilgallen, who died of cancer in 2001. The couple has a daughter named Asha.

The market value of his work rose considerably after 2001 as a result of his being included in the Venice Biennale and other major exhibitions. As a result, much of his San Francisco street art has been scavenged or stolen.

McGee was highly influential on the urban art scene that followed in his wake. He popularized use of paint drips in urban-influenced graphic design, as well as the gallery display technique of clustering paintings. These clustered compositions of pictures are based on similar installations he saw in Catholic churches whilst working in Brazil.

He also was an early participant in the practice of painting directly on gallery walls, imitating the intrusive

Barry McGee- Untitled

Barry McGee- Untitled

nature of graffiti. His use of chisel tip markers has heavily influenced sticker art and graffiti in general, which can be clearly seen in works produced by artists like sure, faust, and mecro.

McGee learned his later lowbrow style from Margaret Kilgallen, but was taught graffiti in 1989 by SR-1, mentor to both Barry McGee and artist “Dan Plasma”, and the founder of the THR graffiti crew, of which Barry was the second member.

Barry McGee

Barry McGee

McGee was involved in a controversy regarding the Adidas Y1 HUF, a shoe for which he provided the artwork. This gave rise to a protest campaign by some Asian-Americans who claimed that the picture on the shoe’s tongue depicts a racist stereotype. McGee responded to the controversy in a March 2006 press release. He stated that the drawing was a portrait of himself as an eight-year-old child. Barry McGee is half Chinese.

In 2004, as part of an exhibit, McGee spray-painted “Smash the State” on the walls of San Francisco Supervisor Matt Gonzalez’ City Hall office (City Hall is a registered national landmark).” Gonzalez told the press that he knew his office would be repainted for the next occupant.

Quotes-

  • “The more I learned about the art world, the more my interest in what was going on outside of it increased, I didn’t have any desire to bring graffiti inside the school’s walls or anything.”
  • “Compelling art to me is a name carved into a tree. Sometimes a rock soaring through a plate of glass can
    Barry McGee

    Barry McGee

    be the most beautiful, compelling work of art I have ever seen.”

  • “I’m not a sweet person. I’m OCD, ADD, but DFW and say thank you obsessively.”

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  The most challenging part was painting the geometric pattern as precise as I could.  I got some new fancy brushes and boy, do they make a difference!

I will see you tomorrow on Day 324!

Best,

Linda

My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 265- Gary John- Always a Street Artist

It’s Day 265…only 100 left to go!  Wow…Join me in honoring Gary John today.  I found this artist and fell in love with his story and artwork!  I hope you will too.  Below is an article about him from the Santa Monica Mirror that I liked .

From Santa Monica Mirror- Artist Gary John (center) has gone from living on the streets of Venice to becoming an emerging artist in the past eight months thanks to gallery owners Bruce (left) and Scot Lurie.

From Santa Monica Mirror- Artist Gary John (center) has gone from living on the streets of Venice to becoming an emerging artist in the past eight months thanks to gallery owners Bruce (left) and Scot Lurie.

Four Chairs- Gary John

Four Chairs- Gary John

Painting A New Life After Living On The Streets

POSTED NOV. 28, 2013, 8:59 AM JYNARRA BRINSON / MIRROR CONTRIBUTOR

Eight months ago, homeless street artist Gary John was up to his usual one day – painting for

Big Boy Act- Gary John

Big Boy Act- Gary John

nearly 10 hours non-stop on the Venice boardwalk – when something told him to put his brush down, pack his things, and check out Culver City’s art gallery loop.

“I never stop painting,” John says. “I don’t break my routine and more than that, I hem and haw for everything.”

But on that day, John listened to what he describes as nothing more than “divine intervention.”

During this journey to Culver City, he walked into the Bruce Lurie Gallery near the corner of La Cienega and Washington boulevards.

Gary John

Gary John

Perhaps it was the dried-up paint on John that tipped gallery owner Bruce Lurie off, or maybe the same “something” that spoke to John hours earlier, whatever it was compelled Lurie to address him, knowingly, when he said, “Hi artist.”

The salutation did not strike John as particularly significant. He walked about the gallery before heading toward the exit when he heard a voice behind him.

“What kind of art do you do?” John recalls being asked.

He told Lurie about his art – his abstract pop culture images on cardboard, newspaper,

Gary John

Gary John

canvas, and just about any low-cost material he could get his hands on.

For years John met several people, celebrities included, who filled his ears and heart with colorful hopes. They promised to help him find representation and to get his work on t-shirts, skateboards, and other commercial exposure – which never happened.

Hoax Man- Gary John

Hoax Man- Gary John

When Lurie expressed curiosity and asked him to bring his work in, John assumed the usual would transpire: He’d bring his things in, lay them out, be told his work wasn’t actually what they were looking for and sent on his way, with good wishes, of course.

However, this time was different. The decision was unanimous. All three Lurie brothers – Bruce, Evan, and Scot, all gallery owners themselves, happened to be in town that day – decided John was precisely who they were looking for.

“They said come back tomorrow and we’ll do some paperwork,” John says. “I think he took

Modern Art- Gary John

Modern Art- Gary John

everything I had. It was like a dream. They were telling me my stuff is fantastic, we’re going to promote you, not only that, represent you and take you all over the country and it was too much.”

Overwhelmed nearly to hysteria, John asked them to stop talking, said it was too much for one day and left. He walked halfway down the block, found a front porch and sat. He recalls bawling like a baby but more like someone whose wildest dreams had just come true.

Gary John

Gary John

Nearly a decade ago, John visited Los Angeles to seek a brighter backdrop than the grey and rain from his native Seattle. At the insistence of his friend Dan Corley, he said he visited LA for what he intended to be a two-week trial.

“I owe everything to Dan Corley,” John says. “He encouraged me when I wanted to give up. If it weren’t for him I would not be where I am today. No one could ask for a better friend.”

When he arrived, he says, he knew LA would be his new home. The sole earnings from his art sales on the boardwalk sustained him to a minor degree. John struggled with homelessness, finding himself in and out of motels and living on the streets of Venice.

“I was able to pull myself in and out,” John says. “After 10 years of gutting it out on

Queen in a Balloon- Gary John

Queen in a Balloon- Gary John

Venice Beach, I had all but given up. Things really improved when Bruce took me on.”

Today, John lives in an apartment in Culver City.

His art is reminiscent of Haring and Basquiat, and it’s with comparable abandon that vivid hues take shape (or not) on his canvas.

John says he’ll never forget the first time he saw his paintings on the wall.

“It was beautiful,” he says from under a dark green baseball cap and sunglasses, his hands tucked deep into his pockets. “Here were my paintings on this beautiful wall and Bruce came up to me and said, you’re where you belong – he said that to me.”

John himself won’t be at Art Basel Miami Beach 2013 next month, but his art will. The highly selective annual international show attracted 50,000 international visitors last year. Artists, collectors, gallerists, curators, art enthusiasts, and the like descend on Miami Beach for four days to celebrate work from masters of Modern and contemporary art as well as pieces by emerging stars.

Paris Shoe- Gary John

Paris Shoe- Gary John

Art Basel is not John’s first show appearance, but it is the most high profile. His acceptance to the show is something not many established artists can’t boast. Past show appearances include the Affordable Art Fair in New York, Houston Art Fair, as well as shows in the Hamptons and Palm Springs.

Bruce Lurie says he always sells out John’s artwork each show.

“His art is something that reminds us of the purity of our childhood,” Lurie says. “The iconic images, drawn spontaneously yet perfectly have a deeper psychological meaning, and connect today with yesteryears. You might initially think the images are innocent, but they can be provocative and erotic – the fine art collector is attracted to those.”

In the past few weeks John’s work appeared in an auction hosted by The Skirball Museum; Children’s Hospital Los Angeles recently purchased a few of his works; and a curator from the Gothenburg Museum of Art in Sweden expressed interest in showing his work.

John wants his story to serve as encouragement for artists who remain steadfast as well as for those who struggle with persevering through the odds.

“If you hang in there long enough, you keep pushing, your dreams can come true. I never believed it because I went through so many hardships,” John says.

Even though his art is receiving attention he never thought possible, John still paints and sells 8×10 inch pieces along the Venice boardwalk.

“People say you have success now, why are you still on Venice beach,” John says. “I always tell them – because I was a street artist, I am a street artist and I’ll always be a street artist.”

Visit Gary John’s website at streetartgaryjohn.com. Alternatively, you can find him in person most days along the Venice boardwalk across from Figtree’s Café.

Above is article from the Santa Monica Mirror website.

Isn’t his story lovely?  I love it.  I really enjoyed painting this piece today and I hope you like it!  Only a hundred paintings to go for this project!  I can’t believe it.  Well, I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 266.

Best,
Linda

Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View
Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Day 253- Hense (Alex Brewer)- Colorful Murals

It’s Day 253!  I had a really fun time painting today’s piece.  I love today’s artist and please take note to how large his pieces are!  It’s my dream to do murals and he does entire buildings as well.  Please join me in honoring Hense (Alex Brewer) today.

Hense

Hense

Hense

Hense

Internationally recognized contemporary public artist and award-winning painter Alex Brewer, known as HENSE, has been creating colorful works of art combining techniques of street art and abstract painting for nearly two decades.

Brewer’s artworks incorporate line, shape, and gesture to creative abstract compositions that are invigorated by the quick pace and commentary of street culture. His works in the realm of public arts, grants, commissions, and cross-media connections have landed him local, national, and international public art projects and commissions. Brewer has received numerous notable commissions from the cities of Atlanta and Arizona, and from local big names like Alton Brown and Fay Gold.

His largest commissioned work was for The ISIL Institute in Lima, Peru amassing

Colorful Church- Hense

Colorful Church- Hense

an impressive size of 137 feet tall and 170 feet wide. One of Brewer’s highest honors was a commission by The High Museum of Art in Atlanta to produce a site-specific installation as part of the museum’s summer exhibition Drawing Inside the Perimeter.

Hense

Hense

With nearly two decades of experience, Brewer has been creating artwork since a young age. Growing up in an artistic household allowed him to draw inspiration from various elements of his childhood. Starting in the early ‘90s, Brewer discovered his love for creating art in the public space through graffiti. He quickly became consumed with the graffiti culture and gained notoriety for his work under the name HENSE. A mix of formal education, immersion in street art culture, and experience in professional studios have lead Brewer to establish his whimsical abstract-inspired style.

 Brewer has always been inspired by creative expression in the public realm and

Hense Mural

Hense Mural

feels it plays an important role in the community. His artwork combines a street culture point-of-view with abstract compositions often consisting of vibrant colors, playful lines and a wide variety of shapes. His work focuses on the relationships of shapes, forms and colors and how those elements interact with one another.

Hense Painting

Hense Painting

Many of his tools remain consistent with those used by graffiti artists, such as rollers, spray paints and house paints. Brewer pushes himself to explore new concepts during the course of creating artwork. The freedom to re-paint and add layers during the progress of a project leaves room for experimentation and discovery. Brewer continues to explore new avenues of his artwork and looks forward to wherever his next projects will take him.

Biography is from Hense’s website.  It’s very cool and you should visit it!
~
I hope you enjoy my tribute to Hense!  Love his work and it was a joy to paint.  Now to do it HUGE on a wall… 🙂  See you tomorrow on Day 254!
Best,
Linda
Colors Make Me Happy- Tribute to Hense Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Colors Make Me Happy- Tribute to Hense
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Colors Make Me Happy- Tribute to Hense Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Colors Make Me Happy- Tribute to Hense
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Colors Make Me Happy- Tribute to Hense Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Colors Make Me Happy- Tribute to Hense
Linda Cleary 2014
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Close-Up 2 Colors Make Me Happy- Tribute to Hense Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Colors Make Me Happy- Tribute to Hense
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Colors Make Me Happy- Tribute to Hense Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Colors Make Me Happy- Tribute to Hense
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 231- John “Crash” Matos- Street Life

It’s Day 231 and I’m sure once you start scrolling you can understand why I am so excited about today’s artist.  I had a blast painting this today.  Join me in honoring John Matos a.k.a CRASH today.

John CRASH Matos

John CRASH Matos

John CRASH Matos

John CRASH Matos

Crash (b. John Matos, Bronx, New York, Oct. 11, 1961) is a graffiti artist. As early as 13, John Matos was spray painting New York City trains, the full image art as opposed to simpler tagging soon transferred to silk screened canvas. He was first noticed through his murals on subway cars and dilapidated buildings, he is now regarded as a pioneer of the Graffiti art movement.

His work is said to convey a “visual link between street life and established society”. In

John CRASH Matos

John CRASH Matos

1980, Crash curated the now iconic exhibition:”Graffiti Art Success for America” at Fashion MODA, launching the graffiti movement that has remained very active through today. By the 1980s Matos had exhibits across the United States and abroad. Galerie Yaki Kornblit was the first instrumental gallery in Amsterdam that help launch his career in Europe.

Mural- John CRASH Matos

Mural- John CRASH Matos

In 1981 Crash, along with 10 other artists were chosen by The Public Art Fund to design animated imagery for The Spectacolor Billboard in Times Square. He was given his first gallery showing by Sidney Janis at the Sidney Janis Gallery in 1983. Chase Manhattan, N.A., as well as CITIBANK, N.A., and other collections came calling. In 1984, Crash along with Keith Haring painted mural installations for the 5/5 Figuration Libre France/USA at the Musee d’art Moderne de la Villa de Paris.

In 1988 he sprayed Notes in the Wind measuring 178 x 178 centimetres to be exhibited and eventually to be owned by the Peter Stuyvesant Foundation in Zevenaar, Netherlands. In 1995, Crash was commissioned by British American Tobacco to create a commission for Lucky Strike brand cigarette, joining fellow artist Keith Haring, to create a special work for this company and their collection.

In 1996, Crash painted an Eric Clapton Signature Stratocaster and gave it to the artist as a gift. Clapton went on to use the specially designed

John CRASH Matos

John CRASH Matos

Stratocaster guitar by Crash

Stratocaster guitar by Crash

guitar through his 2001 tour and later appeared with another. In total Crash has created 5 guitars for Clapton, though only three of them have made public appearances. One of Clapton’s “Crashocasters” (nicknamed by Eric’s former guitar tech, Lee Dickson) auctioned for $321,100 (USD) by the name of “Crash-3” and was used extensively during the first Crossroads Guitar Festival in 2004.

Soon after Fender Musical Instruments commissioned the creation of 50 such graffiti designed guitars from Crash and named the line “Crashocasters.” Crash went on to also design a line of custom painted Telecasters with matching Fender amps. Other artists such as John Mayer have used the custom painted Crashocaster guitars.

John CRASH Matos

John CRASH Matos

In July 2006, the pieces titled “Aeroplane 1” (1983) and “A-U-T-O-matic”,(1985), along with other paintings from their permanent collection were displayed in the Brooklyn Museum of Art in a featured exhibit titled “Graffiti.” In 2009, Crash held his first exhibition of painted guitars and guitar related artwork in NYC.

In 2010, Crash held a 30 year retrospective at Fairfield University’s Walsh Gallery. Crash was asked by Sanrio to create a series of paintings to be shown at Art Basel, Miami Beach, FL, featuring Hello Kitty and other characters from Sanrio’s catalogue. Also, in 2010, Crash was commissioned to create a special limited edition luggage for TUMI, Inc. A painting was created and used for the design, which was released world wide in 2011. Same day releases were coordinated in Tokyo, Hong Kong, New York, Germany, Paris and London. Crash is one of the New York artist featured at MOCA, The David Geffen Building, Los Angeles’ “Art in the Streets”, April–August 2011. In 2011, Crash held his first print survey exhibition in Southport, Ct., at Southport Galleries.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I pulled out some of my old X-Men comics from high school and really wanted Archie to be in there as well. 🙂  I will see you tomorrow on Day 232!  Best, Linda

WHAK- Tribute to CRASH Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

WHAK- Tribute to CRASH
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View WHAK- Tribute to CRASH Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
WHAK- Tribute to CRASH
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 WHAK- Tribute to CRASH Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
WHAK- Tribute to CRASH
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 WHAK- Tribute to CRASH Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
WHAK- Tribute to CRASH
Linda Cleary 2014
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Close-Up 3 WHAK- Tribute to CRASH Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
WHAK- Tribute to CRASH
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day Eighty-One- Buff Monster- Pretty in Pink

It’s Day 81 and I was stumped on who I wanted to pay tribute to today.  I wanted to do something fun so my friend Karli told me I should do Buff Monster!  I went and looked him up and freaked out.  Join me in celebrating Buff Monster today!

buff_monster_portrait

Buff Monster

Buff Monster

Buff Monster became known as a street artist in Los Angeles whose work has

Buff Monster

Buff Monster

been visited by juxtapoz, among others. On 19 September 2012 he took part in a street art panel discussion for Doyle New York. He is featured in the Banksy movie Exit Through the Gift Shop. He is influenced by Japanese culture and his work usually combines the color pink with some form of ice cream.

His painting Happy Pink Explosion is in the collection of Bristol Museum and

Buff Monster

Buff Monster

Art Gallery.

Buff Monster

Buff Monster

Buff Monster currently lives in Brooklyn.

This biography is from wikipedia.

The one below is from his website!

Buff Monster made a name for himself by putting up thousands of hand-silkscreened posters across Los Angeles, and other far-away places. His work is characterized by happy characters living in brightly-colored bubbly landscapes.

Buff Monster

Buff Monster

Along with meticulously executed paintings, he has created a wide range of merchandise ranging from prints and stickers, to vinyl toys and plush. In 2012 he created an ambitious homage to Garbage Pail Kids called The Melty Misfits; a collection of vintage-style trading cards, complete with wax wrapper.

The color pink, a symbol of confidence, individuality and happiness, is present in

Buff Monster

Buff Monster

everything he creates. And he often cites heavy metal music, ice cream and Japanese Culture as major influences. His work has been shown in galleries worldwide, often accompanied by large installations.

Buff Monster

Buff Monster

In 2010, the Bristol City Museum acquired a painting of his for their permanent collection. His art has been published in a variety of magazines, websites, newspapers and books, including Juxtapoz, Paper, Nylon, Cool Hunting, Angeleno, The Los Angeles Times, LA Weekly, The New York Times, and many more. He was also featured in Banksy’s movie: Exit Through the Gift Shop. In 2012, after 15 years living and working in Hollywood, he moved to New York City.

~

I really wanted to be careful and not completely copy one of his pieces…which was tempting.  So I decided to do a sketch of my own

I decided to paint a ghosty dude. :)

I decided to paint a ghosty dude. 🙂

and then paint it in his style.  I had to borrow a bunch of pinks from Karli’s paint stash.  The neon pink really started hurting my eyes when I was painting, but it’s just so darn cool.  I also dug out a wood panel to paint on so it’s not on the usual 10 x 10 canvas, but on a 8 x 10.

I hope you enjoy my tribute to Buff Monster.  What a cool dude!  I also hope I captured his spirit…I think I would’ve done a bit better if I had more time.  I felt a little rushed and was also doing some house chores (also fun!).

I will see you tomorrow on day 82…I can’t wait to break a hundred!  I should have some sort of celebration on day 100. 🙂  Best, Linda

Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Side-View Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Side-View
Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 1 Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 1
Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 2 Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 2
Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 3 Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 3
Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 4 Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 4
Ghost Dude- Tribute to Buff Monster
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel