Day 288- Elaine de Kooning- Returning to Things

It’s Day 288 and I was excited to work on today’s painting.  Another artist I could’ve sworn I had already paid tribute to!  Join me in honoring Elaine de Kooning today!

Elaine de Kooning

Elaine de Kooning

Elaine de Kooning, Bacchus #63, 1982

Elaine de Kooning, Bacchus #63, 1982

Elaine de Kooning (March 12, 1918 – February 1, 1989)

Elaine de Kooning was born Elaine Marie Catherine Fried in 1918 (although she would later claim her birth year was 1920), to Marie and Charles Frank Fried, a plant manager for the Bond Bread Company in Brooklyn, NY. She was the first of four children who were all raised in the Sheepshead Bay neighborhood of Brooklyn. Elaine’s younger sister, Marjorie, once recalled that their mother was not the most attentive and loving parent, but she did instill in her children a love for the arts, often taking them to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and to several Broadway shows.

Elaine was clearly their mother’s favorite of the four children. According to an old friend

Bullfight- Elaine de Kooning

Bullfight- Elaine de Kooning

of Elaine’s, Marie’s nickname for her oldest daughter was “Samson,” from the Old Testament figure who was granted great strength by God. Marie was an eccentric and highly intelligent woman who was frequently seen walking around town in disheveled clothing and heavy makeup.

Self-Portrait

Self-Portrait

In the late 1920s, a neighbor reported Marie to the police for neglecting her children, and when the police arrived at the Fried home, Marie had to be physically forced from the premises. She was committed to the Creedmoor Psychiatric

Bullfight La Corrida- Elaine de Kooning

Bullfight La Corrida- Elaine de Kooning

Center in Queens Village for a year, during which time the children’s primary caregiver was their housekeeper. Elaine de Kooning became a surrogate parent for her younger siblings.

In 1932, de Kooning began attending Erasmus Hall High School where she excelled at nearly everything, including sports and academics. Four years later, she enrolled at Hunter College in Manhattan, but dropped out after only a few weeks of classes.

After leaving Hunter, de Kooning enrolled in classes at the Leonardo da Vinci Art School, located on 3rd Avenue and 34th Street, where artists employed by the New Deal-funded WPA (Works Progress Administration) were working as teachers. It was at the da Vinci School where she met artist Robert Jonas, whom she dated briefly, and remained close to throughout her life.

Portrait of John F. Kennedy- Elaine de Kooning

Portrait of John F. Kennedy- Elaine de Kooning

While attending classes at the da Vinci School, de Kooning became politically active, representing the school at meetings of the leftist John Reed Club. At these meetings she attempted to organize students into a new auxiliary union for artists, simply called the Artists’ Union. It was also at the John Reed Club meetings where she met artist Milton Resnick, who was representing the American Artists School. Resnick and de Kooning began dating soon thereafter, at which point she dropped out of Leonardo da Vinci and enrolled in classes at American Artists, where she learned from teachers Stuart Davis and Raphael Soyer.

Through her involvement with the American Artists School, de Kooning became active with

Untitled Corrida- Elaine de Kooning

Untitled Corrida- Elaine de Kooning

the Young Communist League (YCL), and frequently attended workers camps and other meetings sponsored by the Communist Party. To support herself financially during her student years, de Kooning joined the Models’ Union to find work as an artist’s model.

In the autumn of 1938, Elaine’s art teacher introduced her to the 34-year-old Dutch emigre Willem (Bill) de Kooning, but there is little evidence to suggest any romantic connection at their initial meeting. Elaine was with Resnick at the time, who had supposedly commented once to her, “Bill is going to be the greatest painter in the country.”

Untitled 1965- Elaine de Kooning

Untitled 1965- Elaine de Kooning

Shortly after their introduction, a friend of de Kooning’s took her to Willem’s studio. Later in life, Elaine recalled, “It was the cleanest place I ever saw in my life. It had painted gray floors, white walls, one table…one easel, one fantastically good phonograph that cost $800 when he was only making $22 a week, and one painting of a man on the easel.”

Shortly after meeting, Willem offered to give Elaine drawing lessons, which she

Portrait of Jack Greenbaum- Elaine de Kooning

Portrait of Jack Greenbaum- Elaine de Kooning

accepted. In late 1938, de Kooning finally sold her first work, a watercolor, for $10.

Photographer Rudy Burkhardt, who Willem introduced to Elaine, later recalled that “Bill was incredibly in love with her, but she didn’t treat him very well at the beginning… She would lean back on the couch and say, ‘Bill. Cigarette.’ And he would leap to get it.” In 1939, the year after the two artists met, de Kooning moved into Willem’s studio on West 22nd Street.

On December 9, 1943, Elaine and Willem were married at a small, understated ceremony at City Hall. De Kooning later recalled that the wedding itself was “kind of bleak… afterwards, we went to a bar in the downtown district and we all had a drink… it was kind of amusing.”

Elaine de Kooning, Al Lazar (Man in a Hotel Room), 1954

Elaine de Kooning, Al Lazar (Man in a Hotel Room), 1954

Working and teaching outside the shadow of her more famous husband, de Kooning gained acclaim as one of America’s premier artists. In 1962, she received a commission from the White House to paint the portrait of President John F. Kennedy; an impressive honor bestowed upon an artist commonly associated with the bohemian New York School of painting. De Kooning then spent the better part of 1963 fine-tuning the portrait, collecting hundreds of photographs of Kennedy, and drawing short-hand sketches of him whenever he appeared on TV. The resulting portrait remains one of de Kooning’s most well-known and celebrated paintings, and easily stands out in the long line of presidential portraits.

She died February 1, 1989.

Partial biography is from www.theartstory.org.

I decided to use a few matador/bullfighting photos as reference for my piece today, since it seemed to be a recurring theme in some of her paintings.  I really enjoyed the gestural and fluid style of today’s piece.  I think I needed to return to that after doing artists like van Gogh and Matisse this week!  I hope you enjoy my piece and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 289!

Best,

Linda

Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side View Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side View
Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Matador- Tribute to Elaine de Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 252- Bram Bogart- “Building” Paintings

It’s Day 252 and I had a ton of fun with today’s piece.  I was really intrigued by today’s artist.  I hope you are too!  Join me in honoring Bram Bogart today. 🙂  I am attaching his obituary from The Guardian because I thought it included a good biography and expressed his work well.

Bram Bogart

Bram Bogart

Bram Bogart “Day Break”, 1997, 93″ x 74″

Bram Bogart “Day Break”, 1997, 93″ x 74″

The Dutch-born Belgian artist Bram Bogart, who has died aged 90, had ambitions to be an artist from a young age. But his father wanted the boy to follow him in becoming a blacksmith, or at least go into a trade where he would work with his hands. As a compromise, his parents sent him at 12 to a technical school to learn to be a painter and decorator, and in the evening he did a correspondence course in drawing.

After a spell of house painting, Bogart joined a Rotterdam advertising agency in 1937 as a

Bram Bogart

Bram Bogart

commercial artist, painting among other subjects portraits of the child star Shirley Temple, before quitting to launch his career in fine art in 1939. Despite the subterfuge needed to avoid forced labour for the German army during the second world war, he managed to produce a sequence of sombre and undeniably Dutch landscapes, solid, low-keyed and with low horizons.

Soon after liberation in 1945, he made a dull portrait of himself with a brush in one hand and the regulation-issue oval palette for wannabe artists in the other. He filled the leftover space behind him with a wall, and it is the wall that holds the attention, with its real wall-like feeling, rough-textured, solid; this and the hands, the hands of a Van Gogh potato eater, of a workman, just what his father had wanted for him.

Bram Bogart- Installation View

Bram Bogart- Installation View

This sense in his work of the tangible, a coming together of his first job painting houses and his implacably wall-like landscapes, lasted throughout Bogart’s lifetime, through to the overwhelming presence of his celebrated late paintings, glowing blocks constructed, quite literally, out of great globs of pigment mixed with cement. Abstract, yes; expressionist, yes; but not abstract expressionist. He was not interested in gestural painting, brushed or poured from cans, not in his mature work anyway. His concern was building paintings.

Bogart was born in Delft, where he spent the last year of the war in hiding. His

JAUNE-BLEU- Bram Bogart

JAUNE-BLEU- Bram Bogart

father bestowed his own name, Abraham van den Boogaart, on his son. It was a 1950s Parisian gallery owner who suggested the switch to Bram Bogart. Liberation for Bogart had meant Paris, and he was one of a number of hungry artists at the end of the war who saw arrival in France as a date with destiny. There, he began life anew by absorbing the discoveries of cubism in organising pictorial space to dispel the leftover space of his early work.

Bram BogartBram Bogart: Ommegang de Bruxelles (the historical pageant held in Brussels every summer, 1998, mixed media on board). Photograph: Bernard Jacobson Gallery

Between 1946 and 1950 he shuttled between Paris and Le Cannet on the Côte d’Azur, and then settled in Paris for almost a decade, painting often in monochrome like Jean Dubuffet, some of the canvases worked edge to edge with figures suggestive of the then recently discovered drawings of the Lascaux cavemen.

In 1957 he showed for the first time in the UK, as part of an Arts Council touring exhibition, and held his own among a group that

Bram Bogart

Bram Bogart

included Dubuffet, the Canadian abstract expressionist Jean-Paul Riopelle, the French tachiste Pierre Soulages, and Karel Appel, Bogart’s compatriot and a member of the Cobra group (Copenhagen, Brussels, Amsterdam). In 1958 Bogart had his first solo show in London, at the Gimpel Fils gallery, of canvases that were, the Times critic remarked, both sensuous and with the quality of rock faces.

Bogart got on with Appel and his Cobra associates but fell out with the Dutch cultural establishment over what he perceived as its obsession with Cobra at the expense of any other style. It may not have been coincidence that in 1960 he moved to Belgium, first to Brussels, then for the rest of his life to Ohain, in the province of Walloon Brabant. He took Belgian citizenship in 1969.

During these years, he laid on pigment and cement mixture so thickly that he had

Bram Bogart

Bram Bogart

to arrange for metal stretchers to bear the weight of his work. Bogart’s art entered collections all over Europe and he had shows at galleries including the Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam, the Guggenheim in New York and the Louvre and Pompidou Centre in Paris.

Rozerouge, 2007- Bram Bogart

Rozerouge, 2007- Bram Bogart

No public gallery in Britain picked up on him but there were several exhibitions in London over the years, culminating in two shows at Bernard Jacobson in Mayfair, in 2007 and 2009, showing late paintings of great beauty. The early drawing lessons paid off too. At the end of his life he was said to be still able, like Giotto, to draw a perfect circle, freehand.

Bogart is survived by his wife, Leni, whom he married in 1958, and their children, Cornelia, Inge and Bram.

• Bram Bogart (Abraham van den Boogaart), artist, born 12 July 1921; died 2 May 2012

~

I hope you enjoy my piece in honor of Bram Bogart today!  I really enjoyed playing with other materials.  I used spackle and paint with this one.  It was so much fun slathering all that paste on the canvas and mixing the paint etc.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 253.

Best,

Linda

Green & Red- Tribute to Bram Bogart Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Green & Red- Tribute to Bram Bogart
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View Green & Red- Tribute to Bram Bogart Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View
Green & Red- Tribute to Bram Bogart
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Green & Red- Tribute to Bram Bogart Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Green & Red- Tribute to Bram Bogart
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-up 2 Green & Red- Tribute to Bram Bogart Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-up 2
Green & Red- Tribute to Bram Bogart
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Green & Red- Tribute to Bram Bogart Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Green & Red- Tribute to Bram Bogart
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Day 227- Edward Dugmore- Being Free

It’s Day 227 and it’s a busy day…need to do some feedback for my writing group and then I’m heading off to rehearsal tonight.  I had fun doing today’s paintings and wanted to go back to the abstract.  When I did research on today’s artist I found out he studied in San Francisco.  I also thought of Clyfford Still and found out he studied with him.  I found a handful of artist’s through him which is also an inspiration!  Join me in honoring Edward Dugmore today.

Edward Dugmore

Edward Dugmore

Untitled- Edward Dugmore

Untitled- Edward Dugmore

Edward Dugmore (February 20, 1915 – June 13, 1996) was an abstract expressionist painter known for close ties to both the San Francisco and New York art worlds in the post-war era following World War II. Since 1950 he had more than two dozen solo exhibitions of his paintings in galleries across the United States. His paintings have been seen in hundreds of group exhibitions over the years.

Edward Dugmore was born in Hartford, Connecticut on February 20, 1915. He underwent

Edward Dugmore  Untitled R-B, 1979

Edward Dugmore
Untitled R-B, 1979

traditional art training at the Hartford Art School before going to Kansas City in the summer of 1941 to study with Thomas Hart Benton at the Kansas City Art Institute. He entered the Marine Corps in 1943, and upon his discharge, taught painting and drawing at St. Joseph’s College in West Hartford, Connecticut.

In 1948, Dugmore took advantage of the G.I. Billand moved out west to San Francisco to further his studies in art at the California School of Fine Arts. There he studied with Clyfford Still, who was influential on his development, both as an artist and a close friend. Dugmore also became a lifelong friend of fellow student and artist Ernest Briggs.

Edward Dugmore

Edward Dugmore

During this time, he co-organized an artists collaborative gallery called the Metart Gallery. In 1951 he moved to Guadalajara, Mexico to study at the University of Guadalajara, where he received his M.F.A. He moved to New York City in 1952 and began exhibiting along with other Abstract Expressionist artists at the Stable Gallery, where he subsequently had three solo exhibitions.

His paintings have been in exhibitions in important museums, institutions and art galleries over the course of eight decades beginning in the 1940s. Some of the museums and institutions in which his paintings have been seen include: Ball State University Museum of Art, Muncie, IN; Greenville County Museum of Art, Greenville, SC; Loyola University Museum of Art, Chicago, Worcester Art Museum, Worcester, MA; The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH, Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, TX; Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art,

Edward Dugmore

Edward Dugmore

Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; the New School for Social Research, New York, NY; The Portland Museum of Art, Portland, OR, Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art, Utah State University, Logan, UT; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, CA; American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters; New York University, New York, NY, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.; Oakland Museum of California, Oakland, CA; Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY; The Kansas City Art Institute; The Hudson River Museum, Yonkers, NY; Walker Art Center,Minneapolis, MN; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY; The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, NY; Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL; Musee A. Lecuyr,Saint-Quentin, France (organized by MoMA); among others.

Edward Dugmore

Edward Dugmore

His work is in the permanent collection of several prominent museums including the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, the Corcoran Gallery in Washington D.C., the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C., the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, and the Menil Collection in Houston.

Dugmore received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1966, National Endowment for the Arts

Edward Dugmore

Edward Dugmore

grants in 1976 and 1985, and the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award in 1995. In 1992 he was elected into the National Academy of Design as an Associate member, and became a full Academician in 1994.

Edward Dugmore died June 13, 1996 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Biography is from wikipedia.

“But Nickolaides was one of the guys that Lintelmann used to talk about, was one of the great draftsmen. I mean, so I studied like what Lintelmann told me, and I found out that I could draw a lot better by reading about Nickolaides and how he felt about art. Free. Don’t try to tighten. Don’t ever tighten up at all. Just do as free as you can, and any time never try to draw. Just do it. And so after that, it’s all I’ve done is that, always, is just start in doing right away. Because you’re already. . . . It’s in you. You just follow what you’re thinking, and what your hand’s going to do, and let the Devil take the hindmost, so called. And it’s worked out. I’ve got life drawings over there, thousands of them in drawers over there, and they were all just done sitting. Sometimes I never even looked down, you know.” from an oral history interview that you can read here.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I kind of feel like my brushstrokes were a little off, but I like how it came out.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 228!

Best,

Linda

Untitled #227- Tribute to Edward Dugmore Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Untitled #227- Tribute to Edward Dugmore
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Untitled #227- Tribute to Edward Dugmore Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Untitled #227- Tribute to Edward Dugmore
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Untitled #227- Tribute to Edward Dugmore Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Untitled #227- Tribute to Edward Dugmore
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Untitled #227- Tribute to Edward Dugmore Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Untitled #227- Tribute to Edward Dugmore
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Untitled #227- Tribute to Edward Dugmore Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Untitled #227- Tribute to Edward Dugmore
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas