Day 346- Kelly Moore- Absurdity is My Friend

It’s Day 346 and I have an improv show tonight and things to get done today…so I’ve finished my painting and I

Kelly Moore

Kelly Moore

am excited to honor today’s artist.  Please join me in honoring Kelly Moore today!  I’ve compiled information about him from various sites.

Kelly Moore

Kelly Moore

Kelly Moore is a Self Taught Artist who has no formal training or education in art. His Original, Expressive work has been referred to as Outsider Art, Art Brut, Raw Art and Visionary Art. His intuitive style and technique reflects a raw, primitive quality that is frequently juxtaposed with a startling innocence.

From the website- www.artistaday.com

Toxic Alternatives-Kelly Moore

Toxic Alternatives-Kelly Moore

i paint at the flea market

on the tesuque reservation in new mexico.

and i am a completely self taught full time artist.

Massacre- Kelly Moore

Massacre- Kelly Moore

folks have described my work

as art brut, folk and even outsider art

personally

i think i am my own

genre of art

i am a flea market artist

From his website. www.kellymoore.net.

Review of Absurdity is My Friend available on amazon.com.

Aliens- Kelly Moore

Aliens- Kelly Moore

This is a well produced book outlining the work of self-taught artist Kelly Moore from New Mexico, where he shows his work at the local Tesuque Pueblo Market. Large color reproductions fill the volume and are accompanied by Moore’s poems and photographs of his desert environment and surrounding landscape.

His colourful paintings are composed of a whole variety of strange figures and beasts often in a carnival

Desert Light- Kelly Moore

Desert Light- Kelly Moore

procession across the surface or set within a distant landscape.

Other compositions are more involved with lettering, swirling, colors, thick impasto and dark surrounding atmosphere, while others show different series of strange figures, including ghosts, or ornamental beasts lined up in rows before one’s eyes. An attractive book which is an impressive documentation of Moores work. –Raw Vision Magazine

ABSURDLY MOVING ART

I met absurdity out West and now he’s a friend of mine. I stole that,

Brave- Kelly Moore

Brave- Kelly Moore

actually, from the title of a book published by an artist we discovered at a flea market outside Santa Fe. What’s absurd is that Kelly Moore isn’t as well known as Thornton Dial or Howard Finster. He’s so outside art that he actually makes art outside – almost year round, in his Tesuque Flea Market “stall.” He bungie-cords this three-sided gallery closed during the week, more to keep out the snow or desert summer heat than thieves.

If it was just the wack-factor, I probably wouldn’t be writing a blog about this guy. We have plenty of crazy right here in Beaufort, South Carolina. But Kelly Moore’s work stopped me cold and it was 97 degrees out at the time with forest fires burning on two sides. He was adding the finishing touches to an unframed canvass in the one triangle of shade inside his flea market stall, listening to Sixto Rodriguez on a battery-powered CD player.

“You ever hear this guy?” said the painter. “He blows my mind.” I had, actually, just a few days earlier when I

Billy the Kid- Kelly Moore

Billy the Kid- Kelly Moore

watched “Searching for Sugarman.” Rodriguez gives away the money he earns — now that he’s been rediscovered. Kelly Moore gave me a copy of his book of paintings and poems.

He writes with even less punctuation and spell check that Word autocorrects for – stream of consciousness from a mind determined to swim against the stream. Describing his painting is more difficult. There’s something so personal, and gripping about the unrestrained figures, dreams and animals he paints that it’s impossible to art-speak it away. He tries, mostly in self-deprecating quips about failure and rejection.

"Dead Cowboy Totem" by New Mexico flea market artist Kelly Moore

“Dead Cowboy Totem” by New Mexico flea market artist Kelly Moore

He wanted me to be sure to mention his body odor and his three-photo-only policy for not sucking away his soul. He scuffed the dust off a metal sewer cover that a friend sent him from New Orleans after the hurricane – in case I needed a portal to get the hell away from him in a hurry. It was not-so-subtle satire from a man rebuffed for not being native enough, primitive enough, awe-struck-by-art-schools enough for the outsider art word to champion.

So I will, for what it’s worth. I’m not an art scholar but I’ve been lucky enough to look at art around the world. With Kelly’s work, I didn’t even have to leave this country to be transported. It lifted me out of the representational, the familiar, the pretty and took me on darker dreams to wilder places. Great art is like that. It’s a connection that transcends language or culture, whether you live in a camper or a castle or paint in a studio or a shed in the desert.

Above is from Teresa Bruce Books Blog, Right Brain Safari.

I hope you enjoy my tribute piece today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 347!  I’m definitely buying his book!  And you should too!

Best,

Linda

Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Find Your Soul- Tribute to Kelly Moore
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 336- Henry Darger Jr.- In the Realms of the Unreal

It’s Day 336 and I’ve been excited to do this artist for a long time.  I knew it was going to be challenging and I think I had too many ideas that my brain got a bit jumbled.  Well, I finally did it and I think I’m pretty happy with it.  Please join me in honoring Henry Darger Jr. today!

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

Hands of Fire- Henry Darger Jr.

Hands of Fire- Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Joseph Darger, Jr. (April 12, 1892 – April 13, 1973) was a reclusive American writer and artist who worked as a hospital custodian in Chicago, Illinois. He has become famous for his posthumously discovered 15,145-page, single-spaced fantasy manuscript called The Story of the Vivian Girls, in What is Known as the Realms of the Unreal, of the Glandeco-Angelinian War Storm, Caused by the Child Slave Rebellion, along with several hundred drawings and watercolor paintings illustrating the story.

The visual subject matter of his work ranges from idyllic scenes in Edwardian interiors and tranquil flowered landscapes populated by children and fantastic creatures, to scenes of horrific terror and

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

carnage depicting young children being tortured and massacred. Much of his artwork is mixed media with collage elements. Darger’s artwork has become one of the most celebrated examples of outsider art.

Darger was born in Chicago, Illinois, to Rosa Fullman and Henry Darger, Sr. on April 12, 1892. Cook County records show that he was born at his home, located at 350 W. 24th Street. When he was four years old, his mother died of puerperal fever after having given birth to a daughter, who was given up for adoption; Henry Darger never knew his sister. One of Darger’s biographers, the art historian and psychologist John M. MacGregor, discovered that Rosa had two children before Henry, but did not discover their whereabouts.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

By Darger’s own report, his father, Henry Sr., was kind and reassuring to him, and they lived together until 1900. In that year, the crippled and impoverished Darger Sr. had to be taken to live at St. Augustine’s Catholic Mission home and his son was placed in a Catholic boys’ home. Darger Sr. died in 1905, and his son was institutionalized in the Illinois Asylum for Feeble-Minded Children in Lincoln, Illinois, with the diagnosis, according to Stephen Prokopoff, that “Little Henry’s heart is not in the right place”. According to John MacGregor, the diagnosis was actually “self-abuse” (at the time, this term was a euphemism for masturbation, rather than self-injury).

Darger himself felt that much of his problem was being able to see through adult lies and becoming a ‘smart-aleck’ as a result, which often led to his being disciplined by teachers and ganged up on by classmates. He also went through a lengthy phase of feeling compelled to make strange noises (perhaps as a result of Tourette Syndrome) which irritated others. The Lincoln asylum’s practices included forced labor and severe punishments, which Darger seems to have worked into In the Realms of the Unreal. He later said that, to be

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

fair, there were also good times there, he enjoyed some of the work, and he had friends as well as enemies. While he was there, he received word that his father had died. A series of attempted escapes ended successfully in 1908, the 16-year-old returned to Chicago and, with the help of his godmother, found menial employment in a Catholic hospital and in this fashion continued to support himself until his retirement in 1963.

Except for a brief stint in the U.S. Army during World War I, his life took on a pattern that seems to have varied little: he attended Mass daily, frequently returning for as many as five services; he collected and saved a bewildering array of trash from the streets. His dress was shabby, although he attempted to keep his clothes clean and mended. He was largely solitary; his one close friend, William Schloeder, was of like mind on the subject of protecting abused and neglected children, and the pair proposed founding a “Children’s Protective Society”, which would put such children up for adoption to loving families. Schloeder left Chicago sometime in the mid-1930s, but he and Darger stayed in touch through letters until Schloeder’s death in 1959. Darger biographer Jim Elledge suggests that Darger and Schloeder may have had a romantic relationship while Schloeder lived in Chicago.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

In 1930, Darger settled into a second-floor room on Chicago’s North Side, at 851 W. Webster Avenue, in the Lincoln Park section of the city, near the DePaul Universitycampus. It was in this room, for 43 years, that Darger imagined and wrote his massive tomes (in addition to a 10-year daily weather journal and assorted diaries) until his death in April 1973 in St. Augustine’s Catholic Mission home (the same institution in which his father had died). In the last entry in his diary, he wrote: “January 1, 1971. I had a very poor nothing like Christmas. Never had a good Christmas all my life, nor a good new year, and now… I am very bitter but fortunately not revengeful, though I feel should be how I am…”

Darger is buried in All Saints Cemetery in Des Plaines, Illinois, in a plot called “The Old People of the Little Sisters of the Poor Plot”. Darger’s headstone is inscribed “Artist” and “Protector of Children”.

In the Realms of the Unreal is a 15,145-page work bound in fifteen immense, densely typed volumes (with three of them consisting of several hundred illustrations, scroll-like watercolor paintings on paper derived from magazines and coloring books) created over six decades. The majority of the book, The Story of the Vivian Girls,

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

in What is Known as the Realms of the Unreal, of the Glandeco-Angelinian War Storm Caused by the Child Slave Rebellion, follows the adventures of the daughters of Robert Vivian, seven princesses of the Christian nation of Abbieannia who assist a daring rebellion against the evil regime of child slavery imposed by John Manley and the Glandelinians.

Children take up arms in their own defense and are often slain in battle or viciously tortured by the Glandelinian overlords. The elaborate mythology includes the setting of a large planet, around which Earth orbits as a moon (where most people are Christian and mostly Catholic), and a species called the “Blengigomeneans” (or Blengins for short), gigantic winged beings with curved horns who occasionally take human or part-human form, even disguising themselves as children. They are usually benevolent, but some Blengins are extremely suspicious of all humans, due to Glandelinian atrocities. Darger illustrated his stories using a technique of traced images cut from magazines and catalogues, arranged in large panoramic landscapes and painted in watercolours, some as large as 30 feet wide and painted on both sides. He wrote himself into the narrative as the children’s protector.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

Once released from the asylum, Darger repeatedly attempted to adopt a child, but his efforts failed. Images of children often served as his inspiration, particularly a portrait from the Chicago Daily News from May 9, 1911: a five-year-old murder victim, named Elsie Paroubek. The girl had left home on April 8 of that year telling her mother she was going to visit her aunt around the corner from her home. She was last seen listening to an organ grinder with her cousins. Her body was found a month later in a sanitary district channel near the screen guards of the powerhouse at Lockport, Illinois. An autopsy found she had probably been suffocated—not strangled, as is often stated in articles about Darger. Paroubek’s disappearance and murder, her funeral, and the subsequent investigation, were the subjects of a huge amount of coverage in the Daily News and other papers at the time.

This newspaper photo was part of a growing personal archive of clippings Darger had been gathering. There is no indication that the murder or the news photo and article had any particular significance for Darger, until one day he could not find it. Writing in his journal at the time, he began to process this forfeiture of yet another

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

child, lamenting that “the huge disaster and calamity” of his loss “will never be atoned for”, but “shall be avenged to the uttermost limit”. According to his autobiography, Darger believed the photo was among several items that were stolen when his locker at work was broken into. He never found his copy of the photograph again. Because he couldn’t remember the exact date of its publication, he couldn’t locate it in the newspaper archive. He carried out an elaborate series of novenas and other prayers for the picture to be returned.

The fictive war that was sparked by Darger’s loss of the newspaper photograph of the murdered girl, whose killer was never found, became Darger’s magnum opus. He had been working on some version of the novel before this time (he makes reference to an early draft which was also lost or stolen), but now it became an all-consuming creation.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

In The Realms of the Unreal, Elsie is imagined as Annie Aronburg, the leader of the first child slave rebellion. “The assassination of the child labor rebel Annie Aronburg… was the most shocking child murder ever caused by the Glandelinian Government” and was the cause of the war. Through their sufferings, valiant deeds and exemplary holiness, the Vivian Girls are hoped to be able to help bring about a triumph of Christianity. Darger provided two endings to the story, one in which the Vivian Girls and Christianity are triumphant and another in which they are defeated and the godless Glandelinians reign.

Darger’s human figures were rendered largely by tracing, collage, or photo enlargement from popular magazines and children’s books (much of the “trash” he collected was old magazines and newspapers, which he clipped for source material). Some of his favorite figures were the Coppertone Girl and Little Annie Rooney. He is praised for his natural gift for composition and the brilliant use of color in his watercolors. The images of daring escapes, mighty battles, and painful torture are reminiscent not only of epic films such as Birth of a Nation (which Darger might easily have seen) but of events in Catholic history; the text makes it clear that the child victims are heroic martyrs like the early saints.

One idiosyncratic feature of Darger’s artwork is its apparent transgenderism. Many of his subjects which appear

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

to be girls are shown to have penises when unclothed or partially clothed. Darger biographer Jim Elledge speculates that this represents a reflection of Darger’s own childhood issues with gender identity and homosexuality.  Darger’s second novel, Crazy House, deals with these subjects more explicitly.

In a paraphrase of the Declaration of Independence, Darger wrote of children’s right “to play, to be happy, and to dream, the right to normal sleep of the night’s season, the right to an education, that we may have an equality of opportunity for developing all that are in us of mind and heart”.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

A second work of fiction, provisionally titled Crazy House: Further Adventures in Chicago, contains over 10,000 handwritten pages. Written after The Realms, it takes that epic’s major characters—the seven Vivian sisters and their companion/secret brother, Penrod—and places them in Chicago, with the action unfolding during the same years as that of the earlier book. Begun in 1939, it is a tale of a house that is possessed by demons and haunted by ghosts, or has an evil consciousness of its own. Children disappear into the house and are later found brutally murdered. The Vivians and a male friend are sent to investigate and discover that the murders are the work of evil ghosts. The girls go about exorcising the place, but have to resort to arranging for a full-scale Holy Mass to be held in each room before the house is clean. They do this repeatedly, but it never works. The narrative ends mid-scene, with Darger having just been rescued from the Crazy House.

In 1968, Darger became interested in tracing some of his frustrations back to his childhood and began writing The History of My Life. Spanning eight volumes, the book only spends 206 pages detailing Darger’s early life before veering off into 4,672 pages of fiction about a huge twister called “Sweetie Pie”, probably based on memories of a tornado he had witnessed in 1908.

Despite Darger’s unusual lifestyle and strange behavior, he has not generally been considered mentally ill. This

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

topic is addressed in the biographical film In the Realms of the Unreal, in which Darger, while certainly described as eccentric, is also mentioned to be “in complete control of his life”. MacGregor, in the appendix to his book on Darger, speculates that the most fitting diagnosis is autism, of an Asperger syndrome type.

Darger’s landlords, Nathan and Kiyoko Lerner, came across his work shortly before his death, a day after his birthday, on April 13, 1973. Nathan Lerner, an accomplished photographer whose long career the New York Times wrote “was inextricably bound up in the history of visual culture in Chicago”, immediately recognized the artistic merit of Darger’s work. By this time Darger was in the Catholic mission St. Augustine’s, operated by the Little Sisters of the Poor, where his father had died.

The Lerners took charge of the Darger estate, publicizing his work and contributing to projects such as the 2004 documentary In the Realms of the Unreal. In cooperation with Kiyoko Lerner, Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art dedicated the Henry Darger Room Collection in 2008 as part of its permanent collection. Darger has become internationally recognized thanks to the efforts of people who knew to save his works. After Nathan Lerner’s death in 1997, Kiyoko Lerner became the sole figure in charge of both her husband’s and Darger’s estates. The U.S. copyright representative for the Estate of Henry Darger and the Estate of Nathan Lerner is the Artists Rights Society.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

Darger is today one of the most famous figures in the history of outsider art. At the Outsider Art Fair, held every January in New York City, and at auction, his work is among the highest-priced of any self-taught artist. The American Folk Art Museum, New York City, opened a Henry Darger Study Center in 2001. His work now commands upwards of $80,000.

Since his death in 1973 and the discovery of his massive opus, and especially since the 1990s, there have been many references in popular culture to Darger’s work by other visual artists including, but not limited to, artists of comics and graphic novels; numerous popular songs; a 1999 book-length poem, Girls on the Run, by John Ashbery; a multi-player online game, SiSSYFiGHT 2000, and a 2004 multimedia piece by choreographer Pat Graney incorporating Darger images. Jesse Kellerman’s 2008 novel The Genius took part of its inspiration from Darger’s story. These artists have variously drawn from and responded to Darger’s artistic style, his themes (especially the Vivian Girls, the young heroines of Darger’s massive illustrated novel), and the events in his life.

Jessica Yu’s 2004 documentary In the Realms of the Unreal details Darger’s life and artworks.

Comic book artist Scott McCloud refers to Darger’s work in his book Making Comics, while describing the danger artists encounter in the creation of a character’s back-story. McCloud says that complicated narratives can easily spin out of control when too much unseen information is built up around the characters.

Darger and his work have been an inspiration for several music artists. The Vivian Girls were an all-girl indie/punk trio from Brooklyn; “Henry Darger” is a song by Natalie Merchant on her album Motherland,

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

“Vivian Girls” is song by the band Wussy on their album Left for Dead. “The Vivian Girls Are Visited in the Night by Saint Dargarius and His Squadron of Benevolent Butterflies” is a song by Sufjan Stevens on his album The Avalanche: Outtakes and Extras from the Illinois Album, “The Story of the Vivian Girls” is a song by Comet Gain on their 2005 album City Fallen Leaves, and “Segue: In the Realms of the Unreal” is song by the band …And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead on their album So Divided, “The Vivian Girls” is a 1979 song by Snakefinger (Philip Lithman Roth) also recorded by the Monks of Doom on their album The Cosmodemonic Telegraph Company, “Vivian girls” is a song by the band Fucked Up on their album Hidden World, and “Lost girls” (about Darger’s work) is a song by Tilly and the Wall on their album Bottoms of Barrels. On their 1994 album Triple Mania II, San Diego’s industrial noise performance outfit Crash Worship reworked several Darger images and screen printed them on a copper foil foldout discfolio; as well as the insert and disc.

Darger is the subject of a radio play, Darger and the Detective, by Mike Walker performed by members of the Chicago-based Steppenwolf Theatre Company for BBC Radio 3.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I love his story so I decided to include all the the page.  I hope you enjoy my piece for today and I will see you tomorrow on Day 336.

Best,

Linda

Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr. Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Side-View Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr. Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Side-View
Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr. Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr. Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr. Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

 

Day 274- Sophie Orlicki- Les Visages et les Danseurs de Rêve

It’s Day 274 and it’s been another hectic week!  I had such a wonderful time doing today’s tribute.  Today’s artist does some beautiful paintings and her technique is so beautiful that I couldn’t quite figure out how to paint in her style.  I still gave it a shot and liked my end result.  Not exactly like hers, but I think I captured her style and what a lovely style it is!  Join me in honoring Sophie Orlicki today!

Sophie Orlicki

Sophie Orlicki

Sophie Orlicki

Sophie Orlicki

Sophie Orlicki

Born in 1970 in Paris

She spent her childhood in Paris and then lived in the United States

Studied philosophy at the university, teaching in elementary school

Lives in Gironde since 1992

Sophie Orlicki drawing and painting since childhood. She began to draw at 7 years

Danseuse- Sophie Orlicki

Danseuse- Sophie Orlicki

on long rolls of computer paper, with a pencil, then when she was 16, she discovered oil painting.

Without feeling the need to attend classes, she worked alone and since then she painted heads, landscapes, trees and dancers

It’s a job and an expression on a daily basis, empowering inexhaustible creativity that brings her joy.

Some exhibitions and participations:

– “Taromania” with Puls’art association, the Cellier des Chartrons in Bordeaux (France) in May 2006

Sophie Orlicki

Sophie Orlicki

-exposure collective “United Souls” at the Museum of Creation Franche in Begles (France) in July-August 2006

– “I Margini dello Sguardo” in Reggio Emilia in Italy in October-November 2007

Personal -exposure Museum of Creation Franche in Begles in April-May 2008

– “Two” with the association Spark, in Artigues-pres-Bordeaux in February 2008

collective -exposure at Espace Lucretia, Paris in September 2008

-exposure the “Harvest of the Arts” in Beychac and Caillau (Gironde), the association with Spark in September 2009

collective -exposure “Lessons in Darkness” Illzach (Alsace) in February-March 2010

-Participation “Naive, seers, lone wolves and world savers XXI”, Dean Jensen

Danseuse- Sophie Orlicki

Danseuse- Sophie Orlicki

Gallery, Milwaukee (USA) in February-April 2010

– “5th Annual Outsider Art in the Hampton’s” gallery Belage, Westhampton Beach (USA) in July-September 2010

– “Global Movement” exhibition organized by the Olof Gallery (Leiden) and Outsider Art Gallery Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands), September-November 2010

-participation in “by Dance” festival, with the association Spark, to

St Germain du Puch (France), September 2010

-Works present at the Outsider Art Fair in New York (USA) in January 2011

-exposure “The wise step” in the Jean-Louis Stutter (France) in September 201

Sophie Orlicki

Sophie Orlicki

-Participation an exhibition of artists’ books: “Echoes of Silence” library Riedischem (France), September-October 2011

– “Of all the colors,” exhibition at the Citadel of Blaye (France) in October 2011

– “Imaginary Cities” Halle Chartrons, Bordeaux (France) with combination Delaba & Dissi, in January 2012

Participation & bi-annual sales at Drouot auction in Paris (France)

Work found in:

-the collection of the Museum of Creation Franche in Begles (Gironde)

-the collection Dino Menozzi the Print Room of Reggio Emilia (Italy)

Publications:

-ai Margini dello Sguardo, Biblioteca Panizzi, 2007

-Creation Franche, No. 32, 2010

-Catalogue of the Museum of Creation Franche, 2011

 

I attempted to emulate her style using a mixture of watercolors and acrylics.  It was so difficult and of course I only have a day.  I think it looks different, but hopefully I captured her spirit.  🙂 I hope you enjoy my tribute today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 275!

Best,

Linda

Visage d'un rêve- Tribute to Sophie Orlicki Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor and Acrylic on Canvas

Visage d’un rêve- Tribute to Sophie Orlicki
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor and Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Visage d'un rêve- Tribute to Sophie Orlicki Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor and Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Visage d’un rêve- Tribute to Sophie Orlicki
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor and Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Visage d'un rêve- Tribute to Sophie Orlicki Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor and Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Visage d’un rêve- Tribute to Sophie Orlicki
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor and Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Visage d'un rêve- Tribute to Sophie Orlicki Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor and Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Visage d’un rêve- Tribute to Sophie Orlicki
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor and Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Visage d'un rêve- Tribute to Sophie Orlicki Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor and Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Visage d’un rêve- Tribute to Sophie Orlicki
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor and Acrylic on Canvas

Day 250- Pierre Silvin- Beings From Another World

It’s Day 250 and I’ve been very excited to do today’s artist.  He is a friend and colleague of Gerard Sendrey who I paid tribute to on Day 165 (click on his name to visit that page).  He connected me to some other artists and I love their work.  Pierre wrote me and sent me information and I absolutely love his style!  It was hard to emulate, but I hope I captured his spirit and that he likes my tribute!  Join me in honoring Pierre Silvin today!  I had to translate his biography from French so please excuse any weird grammar. 😉

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin

Silvin Pierre was born in 1959 in Talence.

Without learning, he always painted or drawn, more or less, depending on the time of his life. It was at the

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin

age of thirty five years he deliberately plunged into the path of dedicating itself to creating a more consistent production.

He uses pencil, gouache and colored pencil on paper playing with layering effects and transparencies. Located on a corner table in the kitchen or the living room, under the watchful eye of his family who stirs around him, Pierre Silvin gives birth to beings from another world.

These strange forms, full origins are shrouded in a lunar light and sometimes surrounded by animals, boats, bicycles. Women on the necks of giraffes and powerful busts like trunks of mangrove, entwine their arms in arabesque their offspring. In this world of quiet tenderness, time hangs as to immobilize the creative moment that provides so much gratification that creator discreet.

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin resides Léogeats in Gironde. Exhibited in France, but also in the United States, Spain and more recently in Croatia and Russia, his work is included in numerous collections including that of the New Invention of Lausanne.

His work is rooted in his everyday life. He represents persons, objects that away, assembles, superimposed.

Like life, we met new people, we embark on new adventures, and can surprise us by happy

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin

meetings, Pierre Silvin built its high color images! As if he wanted to show us a compendium of life, a sample of times when everything is mixed: faces, animals, colors, materials. His characters or animals and colorful multitude of sizes and shapes are represented with boldness and spontaneity.

Would -this to mean that we all need each other? The originality, creativity and curiosity to discover new art forms should be a necessity, a need? That create

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin

envy is always one step closer to new horizons to explore, to discover, tame, because having desire is also to be -Life, and this life, you have to chew, devour the tame.

His work has been involved since 1997 in various group and solo exhibitions in France but also in various countries including the United States, Russia, Japan …

Biography is from the artist himself and from The Musee Creation Franche website.

I hope you enjoy my piece in honor of this wonderful artist.  I feel like I could’ve done better with highlights and layering.  I tried to use the same materials, but I don’t have any gouache so I used watered down acrylics.  I feel like there’s a lack of luminosity that Pierre has in his pieces.  I also feel like his pieces are softer than mine turned out.  I had a great time painting and attempting his style!  I definitely learned a lot while painting this piece.  Thank you Pierre for being the inspiration to today’s piece!

I will see you tomorrow on Day 251!

Best,

Linda

SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Side-View SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Side-View
SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Close-Up 1 SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Close-Up 1
SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Close-Up 2 SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Close-Up 2
SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Close-Up 3 SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Close-Up 3
SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

 

Day 165- Gerard Sendrey- Visages

It’s Day 165 and I decided to do an outsider artist today.  I found today’s artist and loved his work.  I’ve been working on a couple of larger paintings on top of my daily painting so my days have been filled with paint!  Join me in celebrating Gerard Sendrey today.

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

Sendrey was a civil servant in Begles, near Bordeaux in his native France until his retirement in 1988. However, for a decade, starting in 1967, he also painted intensively and spontaneously, before turning to drawing as his main medium.

Throughout this first period of creative outpouring he worked without consideration of audiences or

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

artistic context. Then, in 1979 his work was exhibited in the Galerie du Fleuve and a year later a number of drawings were acquired for the annexe collection (Neuve Invention) of the Collection de Art Brut in Lausanne.
In 1989 he founded the Site de la Creation Franche, which emphasises the work of French self-taught artists and those marginal creators sometimes referred to as artistes singuliers. Sendrey’s early drawings consist of intricately wrought geometric marks, creating a packed, shallow picture space out of which figures or faces emerge. In recent works, such as this one, discreet, fantastical elements seemingly exude into the indeterminate spatial void of the picture ground.

Above is from the Henry Boxer Gallery.  It’s a wonderful site that features a bunch of outsider artists.

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

Before entering retirement, Gerard Sendrey worked as civil servant in Begles, a small village in the Bordeaux country of France. During much of the time that he was reporting to the village hall, dealing with quotidian municipal matters, Sendrey was leading a second life, one unknown even to his co-workers. At every opportunity he had away from his job, he was painting.

Sendrey seems always to have been at least two artists in a single body. Sometimes he

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

produces paintings that, like those of the surrealist Andre Masson or the abstract expressionist Robert Motherwell, take their form through a kind of automatic writing where he attempts to suspend thought and let the subconscious take over. On other occasions, he turns outs ink drawings that appear so maddeningly detailed that their creation would seem to require the concentration of a brain surgeon.

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

Sendrey is the embodiment of that species identified as “outsider artist.” He was around 40 before he started producing his first paintings and drawings. For the next dozen years or so, while working in isolation, he kept expanding the universe of his subjects. Often he turned out Expressionist style portraits of men and women who, like the subjects of Georges Rouault and Alberto Giacometti, seemed weighted with bottomless sorrow.

Sendrey was given his first solo show in 1979 at the Galerie du Fleve, a small cellar

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

space in Bordeaux. By marvelous chance, the exhibition was seen by Michel Thevoz, curator of the Musee de l’Art in Lausanne, Switzerland, begun by Jean Dubuffet.

 

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

Thevoz, an important critic and writer, pronounced Sendrey as a major discovery. In a published appraisal, he wrote: Rare is the artist who doesn’t give in to the temptation to conform his art to the broad public’s standards of what comprises good form, taste and aesthetic norm. Gerard Sendrey is one of these rarities. He risks new adventure without regard to whether his art might upset the tautological preferences of the viewer and cause some discomfort.

Within a year after his first show, Sendrey’s work entered the collections of virtually all the museums in Europe that have collections of art brut, among them the Musee de l’Art in Lausanne, the Musee l’Aracine in Neuilly, France, and the Centre

Gerard Sendrey

Gerard Sendrey

de Recherche et de Diffusion d’Art en Marge in Brussels, Belgium, Later his work would enter numerous institutional collections in the United States, among them those of the Museum of American Folk Art in New York City, the Milwaukee Art Museum, the Chicago Center for Self Taught Art and the Anthony Petullo Collection of Self Taught Art, Milwaukee.

Above is from the Dean Jensen Gallery.

I had so many ideas for today’s painting.  I decided to do a mixture of his styles.  I thought about sticking with black and white, but paint the canvas black and do the details in white.  I did that first, but then decided to add a few different hues of blue to the piece and I’m glad that I did.  I like how my piece turned out.  I hope I captured his style.  I had a wonderful time painting this piece.  I hope you enjoy it and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 166.  200 more paintings to go!

Best,

Linda

Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Visage et Oiseaux- Tribute to Gerard Sendrey
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas