Day 365- Bob Ross- Happy Accidents

Well, it’s finally Day 365 and I’ve been anticipating and slightly dreading this day all year!  I wasn’t sure how I was going to feel when this project was finally complete.  I’m ecstatic, tired, shocked, humbled and proud…just to name a few emotions!  I still have to plan an art show, organize my pieces…repaint the Lisa Frank tribute since that’s the sole painting I gave away before completing the project. Now please join me in honoring Bob Ross today!

Bob Ross

Bob Ross

Night Light- Bob Ross

Night Light- Bob Ross

Robert Norman “Bob” Ross (October 29, 1942 – July 4, 1995) was an American painter, art instructor, and television host.  He was best known as the creator and host of The Joy of Painting, a television program that aired on PBS in the United States, Canada, and Europe.

Bob Ross was born on October 29, 1942 in Daytona Beach, Florida. Ross was raised in Orlando, Florida. Ross had a half brother Jim, whom he mentioned in passing on his show.

While working as a carpenter with his father, Ross lost his left index

Mountain Blossoms- Bob Ross

Mountain Blossoms- Bob Ross

finger. It did not affect the way he held his palette while painting.

Ross enlisted in the United States Air Force at age 17. The Air Force transferred him to Eielson Air Force Base in Alaska, where he first saw the snow and mountains that later became recurring themes in his artwork. He developed his quick-painting technique to create art for sale in brief daily work breaks. Having held military positions that required him to be, in his own words, “mean” and “tough,” “the guy who makes you scrub the latrine, the guy who makes you make your bed, the guy who screams at you for being late to work,” Ross decided that if he ever moved on from the military, he would never scream again.

Blue Moon- Bob Ross

Blue Moon- Bob Ross

During Ross’ stay in Alaska, he worked as a bartender part-time, when he discovered a TV show that was called The Magic World of Oil Painting, hosted by a German painter, named Bill Alexander.

After studying with Bill Alexander, Ross discovered that he was soon able to earn more from selling his work than from his Air Force position. Ross then retired from the Air Force after 20 years of service with the rank of Master Sergeant and became famous worldwide hosting The Joy of Painting, with the help of Annette & Walter Kowalski.

Before the show was launched, Bob would try to promote the painting technique but with little interest. He also had to find a way to cut back on spending, so he decided to have his hair permed, just so he could save money on haircuts. The perm hairstyle was not comfortable for Bob, but ultimately became an iconic feature of the painter.

Ross used the wet-on-wet oil painting technique, in which the painter continues adding paint on top of still-wet paint rather than waiting a lengthy amount of time to allow each layer of paint to dry. From the beginning, the

Bob Ross

Bob Ross

program kept the selection of tools and colors simple so that viewers wouldn’t have to make large investments in expensive equipment.

Ross frequently recommended odorless paint thinner (aka odorless mineral spirits) for brush cleaning. Combining the painting method with the use of one- and two-inch brushes as well as painting knives allowed Ross to paint trees, water, clouds, and mountains in a matter of seconds. Each painting would start with simple strokes that appeared to be nothing more than colored smudges. As he added more and more strokes, the blotches transformed into intricate landscapes. Ross dedicated the first episode of the second season of The Joy of Painting to William Alexander, explaining that “years ago, Bill taught me this fantastic [wet-on-wet] technique, and I feel as though he gave me a precious gift, and I’d like to share that gift with you [the viewer]”. He estimated having painted between 25,000 and 30,000 paintings in his life.

Bob Ross

Bob Ross

Ross noted that the landscapes he painted—typically mountains, lakes, snow, and log cabin scenes—were strongly influenced by his years living in Alaska, where he was stationed for the majority of his Air Force career. He repeatedly stated on the show his belief that everyone had inherent artistic talent and could become an accomplished artist given time, practice, and encouragement, and to this end was often fond of saying, “We don’t make mistakes; we just have happy accidents.”

Ross was well known for other catch phrases he used while painting as he crafted the ever-so-popular saying: “happy little trees.” In most episodes of The Joy of Painting, he noted that one of his favorite parts of painting was cleaning the brush, specifically his method of drying off a brush, which he had dipped in odorless thinner, by striking it against the thinner can and easel. He would smile and often laugh aloud as he “beat the devil out of it.” He also used a palette that had been lightly sanded down, which was necessary to avoid catching the reflections of strong studio lighting. At the end of each episode, Ross was best known for saying, “so from all of us here, I’d like to wish you happy painting, and God bless, my friend.”

When asked about his laid-back approach to painting and calm and contented demeanor, he once commented: “I got a letter from somebody here a while back, and they said, ‘Bob, everything in your world seems to be

Camp Fire- Bob Ross

Camp Fire- Bob Ross

happy.’ That’s for sure. That’s why I paint. It’s because I can create the kind of world that I want, and I can make this world as happy as I want it. Shoot, if you want bad stuff, watch the news.”

Ross had two sons, Bob and Steven, with his first wife, Lynda Brown. Steven occasionally appeared on The Joy of Painting and became a Bob Ross–certified instructor. The last episode of Season 1 was a question-and-answer forum in which Steven read a series of general “how-to” questions sent in by viewers during the season, and Bob answered them one at a time, technique by technique, until he had completed an entire painting. Ross and Lynda’s marriage ended in divorce in 1981.

Bob Ross

Bob Ross

Ross and his second wife, Jane, had one son, Morgan, who is also an accomplished painter. In 1993, Jane died from cancer, and Ross would not remarry.

Ross was diagnosed with lymphoma in the early 1990s, forcing his retirement; The Joy of Painting’s final episode aired on May 17, 1994. He died at the age of 52 on July 4, 1995. His remains are interred at Woodlawn Memorial Park in Gotha, Florida.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I decided to honor Bob Ross for the last piece and I also decided to finally do an oil piece.  I decided that aspect because I wanted to actually paint along with an episode of his TV show and wanted to have the proper materials.  Alas, I didn’t get “firm” enough oil paints and didn’t prep (as well) or wait for the paint to get a little dryer before jumping right in.  I was just a little too excited so it didn’t turn out exactly the way I wanted (not as soft looking), BUT also I do like the piece because it came out a little better than I expected and I have to give my self a little slack for working with oils for the first time in years!  Bob Ross definitely eliminated my anxiety while I painted.  He definitely knows how to put joy in painting!

I will be posting another blog with more of my thoughts about this project and what it has meant to me.  I’ll also continue using this blog for featuring my future paintings and artwork!  I do hope you’ll continue to visit and say hello!  Thank you all for your support, encouragement and kind words throughout this insane challenge.  It’s been wonderful, stressful, challenging and they’re were definitely days where painting a piece was the last thing I felt like doing, but I persevered and learned so much about motivation and sheer will!  Now off to walk the dogs, finally listen to that Serial podcast, eat a sandwich and possibly fall into some sort of hibernation state.  HAPPY NEW YEAR ALL!

Love,

Linda

Wish I Was There- Tribute to Bob Ross Linda Cleary 2014 Oil, Acrylic on Canvas

Wish I Was There- Tribute to Bob Ross
Linda Cleary 2014
Oil, Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Wish I Was There- Tribute to Bob Ross Linda Cleary 2014 Oil, Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Wish I Was There- Tribute to Bob Ross
Linda Cleary 2014
Oil, Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Wish I Was There- Tribute to Bob Ross Linda Cleary 2014 Oil, Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Wish I Was There- Tribute to Bob Ross
Linda Cleary 2014
Oil, Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Wish I Was There- Tribute to Bob Ross Linda Cleary 2014 Oil, Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Wish I Was There- Tribute to Bob Ross
Linda Cleary 2014
Oil, Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Wish I Was There- Tribute to Bob Ross Linda Cleary 2014 Oil, Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Wish I Was There- Tribute to Bob Ross
Linda Cleary 2014
Oil, Acrylic on Canvas

 

 

 

 

Day 364- Karli Donna Young- Detach This Part

It’s Day 364 and I’m so happy and excited to do a tribute in honor of my very best friend who happens to be a great artist as well.  I’m so lucky to live with her and see her art everyday AND see her create her art.  Please join me in honoring Karli Donna Young today!

Karli Donna Young

Karli Donna Young

1921- Karli Donna Young

1921- Karli Donna Young

In the beginning there was Me, Carley Young, born and raised in a small town just outside of Vancouver, Canada. Growing up I loved horror movies, Stephen King novels, cartoons and making stuff out of other stuff (a gift from my mother, a crafty person in her own right).

I was an only child early on and spent lots of time pretending I lived inside of a John Bellairs book. I started painting in high school, but it didn’t really stick.

Me Me Me- Karli Donna Young

Me Me Me- Karli Donna Young

I couldn’t focus on just one thing. I tried sewing and knitting, photography and writing poetry. Again, nothing really stuck. I wanted to do too many things all at once. That’s still kinda true.

My mom says, lovingly, that I am like a lump of coal….there is a diamond in there somewhere, I just need to apply the appropriate pressure and time. I think she’s right.

Detach This Part- Karli Donna Young

Detach This Part- Karli Donna Young

I don’t want to be ONE thing. I want to be ALL the things. A painter, a quilter, a photographer and a ukulele superstar. I want to build furniture and sew dresses, paint signs and tap dance.

It’s hard to say why I make art, or why I make art the way that I do. I think I like to make things that are aesthetically pleasing to me or things that tap into

That Dream I had that One Time- Karli Donna Young

That Dream I had that One Time- Karli Donna Young

my own sense of nostalgia. I am in love with my childhood and all the magic that it holds for me.

I think that love comes through in all the things that I do, artistic or otherwise. I guess I just like to stand back once a project is complete, point and say “I MADE THAT”. I like the sense of accomplishment.

Drippy Painting- Karli Donna Young

Drippy Painting- Karli Donna Young

Oh, and I like to put glitter on everything.

I currently live on top of a big hill in El Cerrito, CA. where I ride bikes, make art, play ukulele and pretend I live inside a John Bellairs book.

~

Yay! I had so much fun doing today’s penultimate piece.  Glitter and great colors.  How lucky was I to be able to ask the artist herself throughout my creation any questions I had while creating my piece?  She also accompanied me to the art store to buy supplies this morning!  Including some oils for tomorrow’s Bob Ross tribute!  The FINAL painting!  I will see you then…on Day 365!  Woweeeee!

Best,

Linda

Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Side-View Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Side-View
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

 

Day 358- Mark Ryden- “True Magic is All Around Us”

It’s Day 358 and I can’t believe my project is coming to an end.  It’s also Christmas eve and I think my plan is to try and relax tonight!  My arm is hurting and last night we had a holiday get together with friends.  I’m ready to give my elbow a huge rest in the new year!  BUT today I spent a large portion of my day tackling my painting.  It was extremely challenging and difficult.  One of my favorite artists and one of the most difficult in my opinion regarding his style and the materials I dealt with.  Please join me in honoring Mark Ryden today.

Mark Ryden

Mark Ryden

Mark Ryden

Mark Ryden

Mark Ryden (born January 20, 1963) is an American painter, part of the Lowbrow (or Pop Surrealist) art movement. He was dubbed “the god-father of pop surrealism” by Interview Magazine. Ryden’s aesthetic is developed from subtle amalgams of many sources: from Ingres, David and other French classicists to Little Golden Books. Ryden also draws his inspiration from anything that will evoke mystery; old toys, anatomical models, stuffed animals, skeletons and religious ephemera found in flea markets.

Ryden was born in Medford, Oregon on January 20, 1963, but raised in Southern California. Ryden is the son of Barbara and Keith Ryden. His

Mark Ryden

Mark Ryden

father made a living painting, restoring and customizing cars.  He has two sisters and two brothers, one a fellow artist named Keyth Ryden, who works under the name KRK. Ryden graduated from the Art Center College of Design inPasadena, in 1987.

From 1988 to 1998 Ryden made his living as a commercial artist. During this period Ryden created numerous album covers including, Michael Jackson’s Dangerous, Red Hot Chili Peppers’ One Hot Minute, and Aerosmith’s Love in an Elevator.

Fur Girl- Mark Ryden

Fur Girl- Mark Ryden

Also during this time, Ryden created book covers including Stephen King’s novel Desperation and The Regulators. Ryden made a living as a commercial artist until his work was taken up by Robert Williams, a former member of the Zap Comix collective, who in 1994 put it on the cover of Juxtapoz, a magazine devoted to “lowbrow art”.

Ryden’s solo debut show entitled “The Meat Show” was in Pasadena, California in 1998. Meat is a reoccurring theme in Ryden’s work. Ryden observes the disconnect in our contemporary culture between meat we use for food and the living, breathing creature it comes from. “I suppose it is this contradiction that

Mark Ryden

Mark Ryden

brings me to return to meat in my art.” According to Ryden, meat is the physical substance that makes all of us alive and through which we exist in this reality. All of us are wearing our bodies, which are like a garment of meat.

A midcareer retrospective, “Wondertoonel,” which refers to a cabinet of curiosities or Wunderkammer (“wonder-room”), was co-organized in 2004 by the Frye Museum in Seattle and the Pasadena Museum of California Art. It was the best attended exhibition since the Frye Art Museum opened in 1952, and also broke attendance records in Pasadena. Debra Byrne, curator at the Frye at the time of Ryden’s exhibition, placed Ryden’s work in the camp of the

Yoshi the Forest Spirit- Mark Ryden

Yoshi the Forest Spirit- Mark Ryden

carnivalesque—a strain of visual culture rooted in such works as Hieronymous Bosch’s Garden of Earthly Delights. According to the Russian author and literary critic Mikhail Bakhtin (1895–1975), there are three forms of carnivalesque art—the ritualized spectacle, the comic composition and various genres of billingsgate (foul language)—all three of which are interwoven in Ryden’s work.

In 2007, “The Tree Show” opened at the Michael Kohn Gallery, Los Angeles. In this show Ryden explores the modern human experience of nature.  Ryden explains “Some people look at these massive trees and feel a sort of spiritual awe looking at them, and then other people just want to cut them up and sell them, they only see a commodity”. Ryden has created limited editions of his art to raise money for the Sierra Club and Nature Conservancy.

In 2009, Ryden’s exhibition “The Snow Yak Show” was shown at the Tomio Koyama Gallery in Tokyo. In this

The Butcher Bunny- Mark Ryden

The Butcher Bunny- Mark Ryden

exhibition Ryden’s compositions were more serene and suggestive of solitude, peacefulness and introspection.

In 2010, “The Gay 90’s: Old Tyme Art Show” debuted at Paul Kasmin Gallery in New York. The central theme the show referenced the idealism and sentimentalism of the 1890s while addressing the role of kitsch and nostalgia in our current culture. Here Ryden explores the line between attraction and repulsion to kitsch. According to The New York Times, “Ryden’s pictures hint at the psychic stuff that pullulates beneath the sentimental, nostalgic and naïve surface of modern kitsch.”

Ryden’s “The Tree of Life” painting was included in the exhibition “The Artist’s Museum, Los Angeles Artists 1980-2010” at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA). The exhibition showcased artists who have helped shape the artistic dialogue in Los Angeles since the founding of MOCA over 30 years ago. Ryden hung on the same wall as Robert Williams.

Mark Ryden

Mark Ryden

On May 13, 2014, Ryden released an album entitled ‘The Gay Nineties Old Tyme Music: Daisy Bell,’ that features Tyler the Creator,Weird Al, Katy Perry, Stan Ridgway of Wall Of Voodoo, and Danny Elfman, Mark Mothersbaugh of Devo, Nick Cave, Kirk Hammettof Metallica, and Everlast, all giving a different rendition of the same song, Daisy Bell (Bicycle Built for Two). The proceeds from the signed and limited edition record, benefited Little Kids Rock, a nonprofit that supports musical education in disadvantaged elementary schools.

Ryden has two children, Rosie and Jasper. In 2009 he married artist Marion Peck in the Pacific Northwest rainforest. He currently lives in Eagle Rock, California, where he shares a studio with his wife.

Biography is from wikipedia.

“There is a very dark and painful side to life, but that is natural. People in our culture think they should never be unhappy. They think that being unhappy is unnatural. They try to make it go away. They take pills or they go to therapy to “fix” themselves. They blame themselves or others for their suffering. We need to understand that sadness is as much a part of life as joy. It would be easy just to get bitter and cold while focusing on the dark side, but there is also an amazing, wonderful side of life. If you look for it, there is true magic all around us. Maybe that sounds trite to the hardened, self-protective modern ego, but there is magiv in this miraculous life. If you open yourself up, you do make yourself vulnerable to pain but the deeper the pain you experience, the deeper joy you have.”   ― Mark Ryden

I decided to do a simple Mark Ryden tribute…painting on the wood was a little more challenging than I expected.  Again, I’m using acrylics and not oils so blending was hard and I don’t think I primed and prepped the wood as good I as I could’ve.  His paintings have such a soft look to them which for me is especially hard to emulate.  But I did something!  I think it turned out okay.  🙂  I’m sad, but also kind of excited to have this project end soon.  I think my body and brain need a rest and to get back to doing some of my other passions…like writing!

I will see you tomorrow on Day 359!  Best, Linda

Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Side-VIew Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Side-VIew
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 1 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 1
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 2 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 2
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 3 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 3
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

 

Day 356- R. Black- Simplicity

It’s Day 356.  I want to thank my friend Peter DeMarco for suggesting today’s artist a while back and letting me borrow a book of his art.  I had a good time with today’s piece once I figured out exactly what I wanted to paint.  His artwork is intimidating and I believe he does some of it digitally so painting the entire piece in his style took quite a bit of time and was challenging.  But I like the result.  Please join me in honoring R. Black today.

Rich Black

Oakland-based artist R. Black, who designed posters for the Occupy movement and has completed a series of posters for the San Diego Opera, poses in the San Diego Civic Center Concourse on Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2012.

Oakland-based artist R. Black, who designed posters for the Occupy movement and has completed a series of posters for the San Diego Opera, poses in the San Diego Civic Center Concourse on Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2012.

Occupy Nation- R. Black

Occupy Nation- R. Black

Below is from an interview for Voice of San Diego.  It was difficult to find an extensive biography anywhere.

From Occupy to Opera: The Education of R. Black

The artist R. Black designed posters for the Occupy movement in Oakland last year, and they picked up some steam as the movement grew nationally. A publisher chose his work for the cover of a book about Occupy.

In interviews after that, he told reporters he had a different project in his sights: opera posters.

“Anything I want to do in life, I figure out how to make a poster so I can get to it,” he said earlier this month.

Black, who’s lived in San Diego a couple of times in his life, once wanted to be a comic book artist, but began designing posters for his friends’ rock shows and it stuck. San Diego Opera’s media relations director, Edward

Underworld- R. Black

Underworld- R. Black

Wilensky, a former record store buyer, was familiar with Black’s work. He asked the artist to design posters for San Diego Opera’s upcoming season.

Though still based in the Bay Area, Black converted an orange cargo truck into a living and working quarters and lives an itinerant life these days. We caught up with him earlier this month in the Civic Center Plaza, the place where Occupy’s San Diego contingent gathered last year, also in front of the theater where San Diego Opera performs.

Seems like a pretty wide gulf between Occupy and opera.

I disagree. Opera’s made by artists. Artists are typically liberal-type people. Opera’s all about high art. Maybe more a gulf with the audience.

But when I view opera, I view the stage. I view the artists. I view how stage theater has been so instrumental in changing people’s minds, and working with movements, and creating revolutions.

Bjork Poster- R. Black

Bjork Poster- R. Black

Have you gone to much opera in your life?

I’ve been to two. I’ve listened to a lot of operas.

What strikes you about the art form?

Melodrama. High art. The costumers, the sets, the singers. They’re living instruments. People who are just getting into opera — I think people get too wrapped up in trying to watch a production like a stage show. A lot of times people lose track of the voice. The whole thing is structured around this one voice. Just a glorified singer on stage, really.

I think if people just went and listened to the voice — there’s a living instrument on stage — and really key in on that, I think it would blow people’s minds. People who are already opera-lovers are already there. But young people need to focus. Once you start listening and tapping into that singer’s emotion, and understanding what the scene’s about even if you can’t understand the language, then you can start really losing yourself. But I think a lot of young people are blocked — by the Italian or by long things that they have no clue what’s going on.

Did you know all of these operas before you did ‘em?

No. This is my university right now. Especially thinking: Opera, that’s going to be a tough crowd to appeal to. I

Show Poster- R. Black

Show Poster- R. Black

wanted to make sure I knew a lot about it. I like to watch the opera, study it, read about it, ask a bunch of questions and try to get it.

Can you tell me about your decision-making on some of these? Let’s start with “Murder in the Cathedral.”

Well, Thomas Becket gets his head cut off by four knights. So, uh, that’s what I drew.

Growing up with comic books and pulp novels and stuff, my mom was a big romance reader, so very melodramatic covers. But with comic books especially, usually the comic book has an element that doesn’t really happen in the comic. So like Spiderman’s fighting a villain, and on the cover you’ll have the villain choking his neck and hanging him over the edge. Like, “Oh, Spiderman’s getting his butt kicked by this guy!”

Murder in the Cathedral- R. Black

Murder in the Cathedral- R. Black

In the book, that scene never happens. But it doesn’t matter, because when you’re seeing the book on the shelf, it’s like, ‘Oh, Spiderman’s in trouble’ — which he is — and he’s in a fight and he could die. It’s a cliffhanger. They heighten the story from inside the comic book for the cover.

I wanted to depict the key emotion of the play and highlight that. On “Murder in the Cathedral,” I think I might’ve been watching a lot of [Quentin] Tarantino while I was doing the posters, and then influenced by movies I love as well, old 1970s samurai movies. In every samurai movie, you cut somebody’s head off and you have a fountain of blood.

Without having to use crosses — I didn’t want to make it religious — I wanted to find a way to make his collar work and make it look like his head was separated.

I love posters with couples on them, in love. Especially for an art form like opera. So many people are involved in a partnership. When in relationships, I like looking at posters and feeling that — “Aw, falling in love again!”

So you’re watching an opera you’ve never seen before. Then what happens? Do you walk around with a sketchbook?

The hardest part is thinking about the poster, thinking of the idea. I spend lots of hours walking, sitting around,

Show Poster- R. Black

Show Poster- R. Black

mulling, going into depression sometimes, thinking about how to convey a message. Once in my mind I’ve got the idea, I don’t need to spend much time at my computer at all. My style is not a very complicated style. It’s not the style; it’s coming up with the idea that’s the hard part.

I generally walk about three or four hours a day.

What’s still out there; what’s the holy grail?

I would like to go bigger — directing something. Set designs, production designs, movie designs. Anything more grandiose that someone wants to throw a bunch of money behind. If someone just had that faith, because I haven’t done it yet.

I was thinking space tourism is coming up relatively soon. I’d love to be one of the first to do a space tourism poster. Like the old travel posters.

R. Black

R. Black

Do you make a living in art?

I say when you want to be an artist full time, you have to know how to live simply. It comes in waves. You can be rich one moment and poor the next. But if you don’t know how to be poor, you’re screwed. I think the reason why most people stop doing art is because it’s not a high-level living and they don’t know how to live simply. They need a house, they need a car. And all are great things. But, like being a monk, you have to know how to live very simply. And you have to make sacrifices.

I really focused my life on practicing what I preach: simplicity.

Description of R. Black’s Art Book Futura from Dark Horse Comics.

Sparkling as polished chrome, slick as oiled leather, hard as a scorned woman’s stare, the poster art of R. Black is renowned for its elegant line, razor-sharp design, and dark pulp motifs, creating an instantly recognizable synergy of cool elegance and hot eroticism. R. Black’s dark world is a steamy landscape of leggy sirens, gleaming

Futura Cover- R. Black

Futura Cover- R. Black

bikes, spiked heels, and leather-clad devils. Black’s voluminous catalog of work includes striking images created for Bauhaus, Elvis Costello, Misfits, GWAR, Ministry, and countless more, plus numerous album covers, t-shirt designs, and magazine covers, plus a memorable series of images for Original Sin Hard Cider, featured in this volume. Futura: The Art of R. Black is the first published collection of Black’s striking designs. Foreword by Brian Ewing.

* R. Black’s work is well known among rock fans and amongst collectors of the booming rock poster market.

~

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I had a great time creating it.  I took his advice and kept it simple. 🙂  I will see you tomorrow on Day 357!

Best,

Linda

L' Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

L’ Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View L' Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
L’ Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 L' Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
L’ Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 L' Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
L’ Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 L' Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
L’ Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 354- Mark P. Wilson- For Your Amusement

It’s Day 354 and I am so excited to pay tribute to another close buddy of mine…one of my bestest friends!  I’ve known him for years and we used to draw together all the time when I lived in Seattle and I couldn’t believe how hard I laughed at the characters he used to come up with.  I am constantly pushing him to do more art, draw comics and eventually make cartoons because I truly believe it’s one of his greatest talents.  Please join me in honoring Mark P. Wilson today!  I asked him to write his own biography as well.  It’s kind of short and I also wanted to pack his art into it.  Hope you don’t mind!

Mark P. Wilson

Mark P. Wilson

Magical Unicorn Tea Party- Mark P. Wilson

Magical Unicorn Tea Party- Mark P. Wilson

Biography, huh?  Well, I was born in March 13, 1976 and raised in Cedar Falls, IA.  I watched a ton of cartoons growing up and always enjoyed them all, even the crappy 70s low budget corner cutting ones and the weird asian import ones with bad dubbing.  I also really love the really old ones the Ub Iwerks, Max Fleischer, and Silly Symphonies stuff.

When Pee-wee’s Playhouse came out, I totally freaked out and was an obsessive fan.  Loved reading comics

Space Gramps- Mark P. Wilson

Space Gramps- Mark P. Wilson

(from Donald Duck and Harvey comics to Archie comics to superhero stuff) and satire magazines like Mad and Cracked and was very inspired by my older brothers attempts at this style of satire, which consisted mostly of poop jokes.

My Uncle Bruce was an abstract painter and his pieces hung around our house.  They were an influence throughout my childhood.  Also, our Grandma used to wear these wigs to work and she gave her old clothes and wigs to my mom for dress-up clothes for the daycare and those got a ton of use and appear in many of our movies as well.  I think that inspire some of the outfits my characters wear.

Mark P. Wilson

Mark P. Wilson

I was also really into sugar cereal mascots and marketing and McDonald land and all that Sid and Marty Krofft stuff.  I liked making up continued stories using these characters that seemed so obviously limited and disposable in nature.   I think my work is very crude/unpolished but the ideas are fun and the emotion comes through.  I tend to use bold black lines and bright colors because I’m a big fan of stain-glass windows.  I try to make my work have that same luminescent feel.

I think that I make art now for the same reason that I started doing it, to amuse myself and others.    I moved to Seattle

Karmic Vortex- Mark P. Wilson

Karmic Vortex- Mark P. Wilson

when I was 19 and eventually met Linda Cleary there and she showed me Michael Kupperman’s work and forced me to do a bunch of drawings and that started setting some things in motion.

I need to work more consistently, recently I’ve been into the idea of animating some of these creatures and hopefully that will actually happen (I have the software).

I currently live in Seoul, Korea and teach kindergarten.  I love encouraging

Mark P. Wilson

Mark P. Wilson

the kids with art projects inspired by their individual creativity.  In Korea there tends to be an element of conformity and I try to get the kids to trust their own artistic instincts.

~

I hope you enjoy my tribute today.  I had a ton of fun painting it.  It brought back memories and inspired me to get back into doodling and creating some fun absurd characters.

I will see you tomorrow on Day 355!  Only 10 more left!

Best,
Linda

How 2 Be Cool- Tribute to Mark P. Wilson Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Pen and Ink on Canvas

How 2 Be Cool- Tribute to Mark P. Wilson
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Pen and Ink on Canvas

Side-View How 2 Be Cool- Tribute to Mark P. Wilson Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Pen and Ink on Canvas

Side-View
How 2 Be Cool- Tribute to Mark P. Wilson
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Pen and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 1 How 2 Be Cool- Tribute to Mark P. Wilson Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Pen and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 1
How 2 Be Cool- Tribute to Mark P. Wilson
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Pen and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 2 How 2 Be Cool- Tribute to Mark P. Wilson Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Pen and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 2
How 2 Be Cool- Tribute to Mark P. Wilson
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Pen and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 3 How 2 Be Cool- Tribute to Mark P. Wilson Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Pen and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 3
How 2 Be Cool- Tribute to Mark P. Wilson
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Pen and Ink on Canvas

 

 

 

Day 341- Len Jessome- Need To Create

It’s Day 341 and I really had a great time with today’s painting.  I love the style and somewhat therapeutic effect it had on me.  Please join me in honoring Len Jessome today.  I couldn’t find a photo of him online so I decided to use a self portrait.

Autoportrait- Len Jessome

Autoportrait- Len Jessome

Jesus wouldn't like it - Len Jessome

Jesus wouldn’t like it – Len Jessome

Canadian artist , Leonardo Jessome was born in 1963 in Hamilton, where he lives and works. He left his career in 2000 to devote himself full time to his artistic activity.  Its very singular work is already present in many private collections in North America and Europe.

His work is based on the human condition and man’s place in contemporary society . He painted portraits of rare intensity in a unique graphical style .

His inner demons led him naturally to the raging street art but it’s

Almost Happy- Len Jessome

Almost Happy- Len Jessome

not the bomb attack that the artist but his canvases with brushes in a raw style , powerful and free.

Biography is from Galerie Sylvie’s site.

i have a manic need to create—my work is based on the temporality and fragility of life and all the experiences life may encompass. i use whatever medium is available to express an idea. sometimes i use house paint, industrial rust paint and / or mix these with artists paints, each has a unique property and express ideas differently.
 
I Love You- Len Jessome

I Love You- Len Jessome

flowing industrial paint achieves different results than artists oil. as in life not everything mixes as perfectly as one might hope, exceptions are made to the exclusion of others. as a result my work may patina and change over time.

It is the capturing of the idea that is key. the patina records the passage of

Darkness I Wish I Was Yours- Len Jessome

Darkness I Wish I Was Yours- Len Jessome

time. the style of my work changes often, expanding my awareness and perceptions.

i like that my paintings live in many parts of the world. snippets of my thoughts and feelings scattered around this earth that will remain when i am no longer here.
Len Jessome

Len Jessome

Above is from Len Jessome’s blog.

I hope you enjoy my piece for today!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 342!
Best,
Linda
Always Lurking...-Tribute to Len Jessome Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Always Lurking…-Tribute to Len Jessome
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Always Lurking...-Tribute to Len Jessome Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Always Lurking…-Tribute to Len Jessome
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Always Lurking...-Tribute to Len Jessome Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Always Lurking…-Tribute to Len Jessome
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Always Lurking...-Tribute to Len Jessome Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Always Lurking…-Tribute to Len Jessome
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Always Lurking...-Tribute to Len Jessome Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Always Lurking…-Tribute to Len Jessome
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 340- Ed “Big Daddy” Roth- “Get a bigger brush!”

It’s Day 340 and I am pretty stoked for today’s artist!  I loved drawing in his style as a kid and had so much fun with it today.  Please join me in honoring Ed “Big Daddy” Roth today!

Ed Roth

Ed Roth

Wild Child- Ed Roth

Wild Child- Ed Roth

Ed “Big Daddy” Roth (March 4, 1932 – April 4, 2001) was an artist, cartoonist, pinstriper and custom car designer and builder who created the hot-rod icon Rat Fink and other extreme characters. Roth was a key figure in Southern California’s Kustom Kulture and hot-rod movement of the late 1950s and 1960s.

Roth was born in Beverly Hills, California. He was the son of Marie (Bauer) and Henry Roth. He grew up in Bell, California, attending Bell High School, where his classes included auto shop and art.

Roth is best known for his grotesque caricatures — typified by Rat Fink — depicting imaginative, out-sized monstrosities driving representations of the hot rods that he and his contemporaries built. Roth began airbrushing and selling “Weirdo” t-shirts at car shows and in the pages of Car Craft magazine as early as July 1958. By the August 1959 issue of Car Craft “Weirdo shirts” had become a full blown craze with Roth at the forefront of the movement. The article featured Roth along with fellow Kustom Kulture pioneers Dean Jeffries and Pete Millar. Inspired by Roth and Barris Kustoms (whose shirts were airbrushed by Dean Jeffries),Detroit native Stanley Miller, a.k.a. “Stanley Mouse”, began advertising his own shirts in the pages of Car Craft in January 1961. The lesser known Rendina Studios of Detroit and Mad Mac of Cleveland also joined in on the monster “weirdo” shirt craze, but Roth was certainly the man who widely popularized the “Monsters in hot rods” art form.

In 1959 Roth created The Outlaw. This fiberglass Kustom hot rod was featured in the January 1960 issue of Car

Race?- Ed Roth

Race?- Ed Roth

Craft. The car was covered in Car Craft and Rod and Custom, and appeared at custom car and hot rod shows. Other hot rods include The Beatnik Bandit(1961), The twin Ford engined Mysterion (1963), The Orbitron (1964), and The Road Agent (1965) among others. In 1965, Roth’s surf buggy, the Surfite was featured in the film Beach Blanket Bingo starring Frankie Avalon and Annette Funicello, and also in Village of the Giants, featuring Beau Bridges and Tommy Kirk. One of Roth’s personal drivers was a tangerine orange 1955 Chevy 2-door post which he ran a Ford 406 cu. in. engine under the hood, he drove this car to his shop every day for years .

Cruisin Time- Ed Roth

Cruisin Time- Ed Roth

In 1962 the Revell model company began selling plastic models of Roth’s cars and from 1963 to 1965 Revell also manufactured plastic models of many of Roth’s monsters, including Rat Fink, Brother Rat Fink, Drag Nut, Mother’s Worry, Mr. Gasser and other weird creatures created by Roth. Revell continues to re-issue Roth’s Monsters and Kustom Car kits.

In 1963 The Hawk Model Company issued its line of “Weird-Oh’s” plastic models and Marx Toys issued Nutty Mads, both clearly inspired by Roth’s work. Both items were quite popular in the mid-sixties and remain sought after collector’s items to this day. Hawk Models continues to re-issue its “Weird-Oh’s” periodically.

Numerous artists were associated with Roth including artist David Mann, Rat Fink Comix artist R.K. Sloane, Steve Fiorilla who illustrated some of Roth’s catalogs, and most notably, Ed Newton who worked for Roth and

Chevy Nomads- Ed Roth

Chevy Nomads- Ed Roth

designed several of his cars and t-shirt designs beginning in 1964, and Kustom Kulture icon Robert Williams who began working for Roth in late 1965.

In the mid 1960s Roth began customizing motorcycles. Mainstream motorcycle magazines refused to run his articles and ads, so he started his own publication called Choppers, which featured articles on extending forks, custom sissy bars, etc. It was a small, black and white publication that ran from 1967 to 1970, and was the first magazine ever to exclusively feature custom motorcycles, or choppers. Roth also built the first known VW powered trike. Roth built many trikes for himself and others including Candy Wagon, California Cruiser, Secret Weapon, Rubber Ducky and The Great Speckled Bird.

In 1968 Mattel introduced Hot Wheels and Roth’s Beatnik Bandit was one of the first 16 die-cast toy cars produced by the company.

Cover Art- Ed Roth

Cover Art- Ed Roth

From 1970 to 1975 Roth worked for Brucker’s Movie World and their “Cars of the Stars” display. Brucker said that Roth was a very loyal guy and a very hard worker, even though he wasn’t making much money. Brucker said that when building something, Roth had a natural knack for seeing how things fit together — he would build something in a few days which would take other guys a couple of weeks. Although Roth was a laid-back, amiable guy, Brucker also remembers that Roth was a hell of a fighter and if anyone came through the museum causing trouble, Roth would put them in line. He was fearless. Roth’s Druid Princess was one of the many cars displayed there. Also during the 1970s, Roth worked for Knott’s Berry Farm as a sign painter and artist. He worked there for 10 years until about 1980.

In December 1977 Robert and Suzanne Williams along with Skip Barrett organized the first Rat Fink Reunion to celebrate the legacy of Roth. Rat Fink Reunions are still held to this day at the site of Roth’s final residence in Manti, Utah and near Los Angeles.

In 1993 a major exhibition was held at the Julie Rico Gallery in Santa Monica shortly after the Laguna Museum show “Kustom Kulture”. It was at this time that the low brow art movement began to take on steam. Featured in

Mustanger- Ed Roth

Mustanger- Ed Roth

the exhibition titled, “Rat Fink Meets Fred Flypogger Meets Cootchy Cooty” were Roth, Willams, and Mouse and their creations. The L.A. Times placed Roth’s Rat Fink on the cover of the Culture section December 20, 1993 with a full article about the entire exhibition.

A Roth custom car that was the subject of a number of articles in automotive enthusiast magazines (most notably, the Orbitron was featured in Car Craft magazine in 1965) but was feared lost in subsequent decades was discovered in Mexico in the summer of 2008. The Orbitron was built in 1964. The car, in dilapidated, inoperative condition, had been parked for some time in front of an adult bookstore in Ciudad Juárez. The owners of the shop were also the owners of the car. It was purchased and taken back to the United States by Michael Lightbourn, an American auto restorer who did business in Mexico. The Orbitron has been restored to its original condition by Beau Boeckmann.

Ed Roth

Ed Roth

Roth was active in counterculture art and hot-rodding his entire adult life. At the time of his death in 2001, he was working on a hot-rod project involving a compact car planned as a departure from the dominant tuner performance modification style.

Roth had his shop at 4616 Slauson Avenue in Maywood, California (about 8 miles southeast of downtown Los Angeles) that he started in early 1959. He ran an ad in Car Craft magazine that year announcing the new address of his shop.

For a period in the mid 1960s, Roth associated with various Outlaw motorcycle clubs who congregated at his shop as a lot of bikers were then living in Lynwood and Maywood. Musicians, police officers, FBI agents and various people involved in Hollywood would visit as well, providing an environment for one of Ed Roth’s most creative periods, and an important period in Kustom Kulture.

Roth incorporated the iron cross into his artwork (surfers had previously been using the iron cross as a symbol of youthful, carefree rebellion). Roth didn’t own a bike at the time so he bought a brand-new Harley-Davidson Sportster and then proceeded to paint its gas tank a flat black color. Roth painted white lettering on one side of the tank that said: “Love is Hate”; and on the reverse side: “Hate is Love”.

Roth had taken black and white photos of different bikers. He made posters, with titles like “Beautiful Buzzard”, or “Gray Cat” out of these photos, and sold them at car shows. Roth would periodically give these bikers small

Grim Reaper- Ed Roth

Grim Reaper- Ed Roth

amounts of money, but soon some of the bikers started to feel that Roth was “getting rich” off of them and they wanted a larger cut. Despite Roth’s agreement, rumors began to circulate that a certain club intended to attack Roth’s shop. The gang arrived at the shop with guns drawn, but Roth’s crew defended themselves. Roth challenged the head biker to a one-on-one fist fight to settle matters in the middle of the shop. Eventually Roth gained the upper hand and “just started to beat the living crap out of the guy”.

After this incident, Roth burnt his biker posters, leaving the lifestyle behind at the same time. Things started winding down at the shop in the late 1960s, and in 1970 the shop closed.

Ed Roth was married four times. His fourth wife, Ilene, lives in Manti, Utah, where Ed Roth spent the final years of his life. Roth joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1974. Roth shaved off his goatee and was heavily involved in social work through his church. His brother Gordon also became a Mormon.

Mighty Mustang- Ed Roth

Mighty Mustang- Ed Roth

At a 1999 lecture given at Brigham Young University’s Museum of Art, Roth shared some lessons he had learned in life: “expect criticism; if you can’t do it get help; you don’t need fancy tools or a fancy garage; and if you fulfill your duty Heavenly Father will bless you in what you do.”

Since his death, an annual “Big Daddy Roth” Open House has been held in Manti around the anniversary of his death. The museum that Ilene Roth created to honor her late husband includes displays of Ed’s art work and other memorabilia. Roth’s son Darryl has been working on collecting and displaying his father’s work.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my little portrait I did of myself in the Ed Roth style!  It brought back a lot of my childhood like scribbling drawings during class. 🙂  I will see you tomorrow on Day 341.

Best,

Linda

MUST PAINT!- Tribute to Ed Roth Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

MUST PAINT!- Tribute to Ed Roth
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View MUST PAINT!- Tribute to Ed Roth Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
MUST PAINT!- Tribute to Ed Roth
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 MUST PAINT!- Tribute to Ed Roth Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
MUST PAINT!- Tribute to Ed Roth
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 MUST PAINT!- Tribute to Ed Roth Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
MUST PAINT!- Tribute to Ed Roth
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 MUST PAINT!- Tribute to Ed Roth Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
MUST PAINT!- Tribute to Ed Roth
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 326- KAWS- Infusion

It’s Day 326 and I’m pooped…had a show last night and then heading out to rehearsal in a little while.  Please join me in honoring KAWS A.K.A. Brian Donnelly today.

KAWS Brian Donnelly

KAWS Brian Donnelly

kaws

kaws

Brian Donnelly (born 1974), professionally known as KAWS, is a New York-based artist and designer of limited edition toys and clothing. He currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

KAWS was born Brian Donnelly in Jersey City, New Jersey. He graduated from the School of Visual Arts in New York with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in illustration in 1996. After graduation, KAWS briefly worked for Disney as a freelance animator painting backgrounds. He also contributed to the animated series 101 DalmatiansDaria and Doug.

He began his career as a graffiti artist growing up in Jersey City, New Jersey. Later moving to New York City in the 1990s, KAWS started subverting imagery on billboards, bus shelters and kaws aldrich invite-thumb-523x358phone booth advertisements. These reworked advertisements were at first left alone, lasting for up to several months, but as KAWS’ popularity skyrocketed, the ads became increasingly sought after. In addition to New York, KAWS has done work in Paris, London, Berlin and Tokyo.

In the late 90s, KAWS began to design and produce limited edition vinyl toys, “an instant hit with the global art toy-collecting community,” especially in Japan, where this genre is well respected and widespread. More toys and later clothing were made for Original Fake, a recent collaborative store with Medicom Toy, in the Aoyama district of Tokyo where an original limited edition product is released each week.

KAWS- The Nature of Need Exhibition

KAWS- The Nature of Need Exhibition

KAWS has also participated in other commercial collaborations with Nigo for A Bathing Ape, Jun “Jonio” Takahashi for Undercover, Michael “Mic” Neumann for Kung Faux, snowboard projects with Burton, and sneakers with Nike and Vans. His most recent collaboration was with Comme des Garçons. As of August 2010, it is reported that Kaws has designed a limited edition bottle for Dos Equis, a Mexican beer brand. The bottle was released in Mexico in early September 2010.

KAWS’ acrylic paintings and sculpture have many repeating images, all meant to be universally understood, surpassing languages and cultures. One of KAWS’ early series, Package Paintings, was made in 2000. This series, entitled The Kimpsons,subverted the famous American cartoon, The Simpsons.

KAWS explains that he “found it weird how infused a cartoon could become in people’s lives; the impact it could have, compared to regular politics.” In addition,

kaws toys

kaws toys

KAWS has reworked other familiar icons such as Mickey Mouse, the Michelin Man, the Smurfs, and SpongeBob SquarePants.

Recent solo exhibitions include Original Fake at the Bape Gallery in Tokyo (2003) where his sculpture “Wonderful World” sold for $400,000. KAWS has been periodically showing both paintings and products at Colette in Paris since 1999. His work is included in the traveling exhibition Beautiful Losers, which started at the Cincinnati Contemporary Art Center and will be traveling through 2009 throughout the US and Europe, including his largest museum show to date, which will be held at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, Georgia.

kaws installation

kaws installation

KAWS’s “Companion,” a grayscale figure based on Mickey Mouse with his face obscured by both hands, was adapted into a balloon for the 2012 Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade as part of the parade’s “Blue Sky Gallery” feature.

For the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards KAWS’s company redesigned the iconic moonman statue.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today for KAWS.  I love his work and it makes me want to design toys!  I also enjoyed fusing my favorite cartoon character Spongebob and his artwork today. 🙂  I will see you tomorrow on Day 327!

Best,

Linda

Oh My- Tribute to KAWS Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Oh My- Tribute to KAWS
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Oh My- Tribute to KAWS Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Oh My- Tribute to KAWS
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Oh My- Tribute to KAWS Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Oh My- Tribute to KAWS
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Oh My- Tribute to KAWS Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Oh My- Tribute to KAWS
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Oh My- Tribute to KAWS Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Oh My- Tribute to KAWS
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 320- Elena Sisto- In The Act

It’s Day 320 and I still feel like I’m fighting off some sort of cold.  I had fun with today’s painting.  I had to play with it for a while and I still feel like I could’ve kept altering it.  The shading of today’s artist’s pieces are hard to emulate.  My instinct is to go with bolder lines…I had to fight that.  I also wanted to do an interesting perspective piece.  Join me in honoring Elena Sisto today.  Her paintings are wonderful and I couldn’t wait to do a tribute.

Elena Sisto

Elena Sisto

Hat 2013, Ear 2013- Elena Sisto

Hat 2013, Ear 2013- Elena Sisto

Elena Sisto, American, born 1952

In her paintings Elena Sisto uses the structuring ideas of abstraction to mine content that relates to her interest in how people define their own identity and present themselves.

The combination of abstract means and figurative content often results in imagery that has a simplified or slightly cartoonish cast. Sisto uses the economy of cartooning language to access emotion

Check Shirt- Elena Sisto

Check Shirt- Elena Sisto

directly and to keep the image functioning on a structural level both in terms of form and content. This way she bypasses a more anecdotal approach.

She aims to invest the paintings with the real weight of experience, but keep the figures emblematic. A character in Sisto’s world is a persona rather than a person. Her content-development process fluctuates between the pop culture/social (signified by the abstracted language of cartoon) and the personal (signified by elements of realism). There’s a touch of cubism as well. She finds an interiority through fracturing and simultaneity, seeking to avoid using a specific narrative to spell things out.

Painting with Music 2011- Elena Sisto

Painting with Music 2011- Elena Sisto

Sisto’s current work centers around the artist’s experience of being in the studio, and the passage into adulthood of young women artists. Her characters are an invented hybrid of fiction and reality. They are images of women as workers, thinkers, and creators. In creating them she has been much influenced by the students she teaches at the School of Visual Arts.

Sisto has had nineteen one-person shows, including at the Maier Museum in Lynchburg, Virginia; the Katzen Museum in Washington, D.C.; the Greenville County Museum, Greenville, south Carolina; and the Miami Dade College of Art + Design, Miami, Florida.

She exhibited work in the 43rd Biennial of Contemporary Painting at the

From- Fairy Tales: Portrait Paintings by Elena Sisto

From- Fairy Tales: Portrait Paintings by Elena Sisto

Corcoran Gallery of Art, in Washington, D.C. and numerous group shows throughout the U.S.

She’s been the recipient of two National Endowment for the Arts grants, fellowships to Yaddo, the Fine Arts Work Center in

From Fairy Tales: Portrait Paintings by Elena Sisto

From Fairy Tales: Portrait Paintings by Elena Sisto

Provincetown, the Millay Colony, the Peter S. Reed Foundation Grant, a Hand Hollow Foundation Fellowship and scholarships to the New York Studio School, the Skowhegan School, and the Yale Norfolk Program. Sisto received the National Academy Museum and School of Fine Arts 183rd Invitational Inglish Griswold Nelson Prize in painting.

Her work has been written about or reviewed in the New York Times, Arts Magazine, Art in America, Art News, Modern Painters, Art Forum, the Orange County Register, the Newark Star-Ledger, the New Art Examiner, Review Magazine, the Boston Globe, the L.A. Times, Art Journal, and the Philadelphia Inquirer, among others.

Her work has been included in numerous public and private collections.

She organized and moderated a panel for the College Art Association on drawing and has taught at the School of Visual Arts (since 1997), Columbia University, Rhode Island School of Design, the New York Studio School, The Yale Norfolk summer program, and the Chautauqua Institution. She’s been a visiting artist at about thirty-five art schools, colleges, and universities.

Sisto is newly affiliated with Lori Bookstein Fine Arts where she will be presenting her first exhibit entitled

Elena Sisto

Elena Sisto

Between Silver Light and Orange Shadow, which will be on view from April 25th through June 1st, 2013.

Article is from John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation website.

What I took from this piece is doing a whole new perspective in a painting that I normally wouldn’t have done.  I hope I captured some of Sisto’s spirit if not the style exactly.  I love the painting of the hat and ear and used those as my main inspirations.  I hope you enjoy my tribute and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 321!

Best,

Linda

The Blues- Tribute to Elena Sisto Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

The Blues- Tribute to Elena Sisto
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View The Blues- Tribute to Elena Sisto Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
The Blues- Tribute to Elena Sisto
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 The Blues- Tribute to Elena Sisto Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
The Blues- Tribute to Elena Sisto
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 The Blues- Tribute to Elena Sisto Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
The Blues- Tribute to Elena Sisto
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 The Blues- Tribute to Elena Sisto Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
The Blues- Tribute to Elena Sisto
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 318- Amy Sillman- Layer By Layer

It’s Day 318 and I’m having another difficult art day.  Just not feeling very intuitive or creative today and a little under the weather.  I am thankful that I haven’t had too many days like this throughout the past year.  Yet I persevered and did my painting.  I enjoyed the creation process, but I kept altering and jiggering the piece…overanalyzing everything going on in my brain.  I hope I captured the artist’s style…even just a little.  Her pieces are surprisingly difficult to emulate which makes them special.  Maybe on a different day I would’ve been less critical!  Join me in honoring Amy Sillman today!

Amy Sillman

Amy Sillman

Amy Sillman

Amy Sillman

Amy Sillman (born 1955) is an American painter. She lives and works in Brooklyn.

Sillman was born in Detroit, Michigan, and the winding story line of her early years led her to work in a cannery in Alaska and a feminist silkscreen factory in Chicago, and to train at New York University as a Japanese interpreter for the United Nations. She finally landed at Manhattan’s School of Visual Arts, graduating in 1979. Then she spent more than a decade content, as she has said, with “learning how to make paintings—just working, not showing.”

In a 2006 Artforum article, Jan Avgikos wrote that Sillman’s paintings “mine the edges of abstraction, meshing patches of color with bursts of chaotic line and web-like compositional scaffolding.”

Amy Sillman, Blue Diagram, 2009

Amy Sillman, Blue Diagram, 2009

Embracing a modernist reverence of inspired imagination, Sillman defines honesty as the most enduring quality of painting and speaks of painting as “physical, like an extension of my arm.” In a New York Times review of Sillman’s 2006 exhibition at Sikkema Jenkins & Co., Ken Johnson wrote, “The paintings are especially gratifying up close, where you can study the richly complicated textures and colors…” In 2007 Sillman completed four etchings at Crown Point Press, and of this experience, she has said, “Everything that is done in my painting was taken apart layer by layer in printmaking. You take one hundred layers apart and figure out which six will work.”

Bed- Amy Sillman

Bed- Amy Sillman

In a 2007 article in Artforum, Linda Norden wrote of Amy Sillman’s “fearless, tenacious pursuit of a painting that might accurately register the discomfort, incoherence, and absurdity that can characterize painterly experience—and experience in general,” and speaks of “her increasingly influential place among younger painters in both New York and Los Angeles, where she regularly shows, and her growing currency even among contingents of European painters.” Art critic Roberta Smith compared Sillman to similar women painters such as Elena Sisto, Margaret Curtis, and Sue Williams.

Sillman lives in Williamsburg, Brooklyn and maintains a studio in Bushwick.

Sillman began showing at the Brent Sikkema Gallery in New York in 2000. She is represented by Sikkema

Pirate- Amy Sillman

Pirate- Amy Sillman

Jenkins & Co., New York, and shows at Capitain-Petzel in Berlin, at Thomas Dane Gallery in London, and at Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects, Los Angeles. The first large scale survey of her work, curated by Helen Molesworth, premiered at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston in October 2013. The exhibition will also travel to the Aspen Art Museum and the Center for Curatorial Studies and Art in Contemporary Culture at Bard College. Her solo show “Third Person Singular,” the exhibition of a year-long project of portraiture and abstract painting, was on view at theHirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, DC, and travelled to the Tang Museum at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York, until 2009.

Sillman’s paintings are in the permanent collections of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York as well as private collections including the collection of CJ Follini and Renee Ryan.

Amy Sillman, P, 2007, courtesy of the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York.

Amy Sillman, P, 2007, courtesy of the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York.

In 1995, the same year she received an MFA from Bard College, Sillman was awarded a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship in painting and the Elaine de Kooning Memorial Fellowship in 1995. In 1999 she received fellowships from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation and the Joan Mitchell Foundation, and in 2000 was awarded aGuggenheim Fellowship. In 2012, as part of the fifth anniversary of the Brooklyn Museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, the museum presented Sillman with the First Award, a prize given to 15 women who were first in their fields.

Amy Sillman was a Guna S. Mundheim Fellow in the Visual Arts at the American Academy in Berlin, Germany, during the Spring of 2009. During the fall of 2010, she was a Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University. In May 2011, the Montserrat College of Art awarded Amy Sillman an honorary doctoral degree in fine arts.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 319.  I’m going to take the world’s longest nap now.  I hope I feel better tomorrow.  Bummed to be missing my improv rehearsal tonight.

Best,

Linda

Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Meet Me There- Tribute to Amy Sillman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas