Day 365- Bob Ross- Happy Accidents

Well, it’s finally Day 365 and I’ve been anticipating and slightly dreading this day all year!  I wasn’t sure how I was going to feel when this project was finally complete.  I’m ecstatic, tired, shocked, humbled and proud…just to name a few emotions!  I still have to plan an art show, organize my pieces…repaint the Lisa Frank tribute since that’s the sole painting I gave away before completing the project. Now please join me in honoring Bob Ross today!

Bob Ross

Bob Ross

Night Light- Bob Ross

Night Light- Bob Ross

Robert Norman “Bob” Ross (October 29, 1942 – July 4, 1995) was an American painter, art instructor, and television host.  He was best known as the creator and host of The Joy of Painting, a television program that aired on PBS in the United States, Canada, and Europe.

Bob Ross was born on October 29, 1942 in Daytona Beach, Florida. Ross was raised in Orlando, Florida. Ross had a half brother Jim, whom he mentioned in passing on his show.

While working as a carpenter with his father, Ross lost his left index

Mountain Blossoms- Bob Ross

Mountain Blossoms- Bob Ross

finger. It did not affect the way he held his palette while painting.

Ross enlisted in the United States Air Force at age 17. The Air Force transferred him to Eielson Air Force Base in Alaska, where he first saw the snow and mountains that later became recurring themes in his artwork. He developed his quick-painting technique to create art for sale in brief daily work breaks. Having held military positions that required him to be, in his own words, “mean” and “tough,” “the guy who makes you scrub the latrine, the guy who makes you make your bed, the guy who screams at you for being late to work,” Ross decided that if he ever moved on from the military, he would never scream again.

Blue Moon- Bob Ross

Blue Moon- Bob Ross

During Ross’ stay in Alaska, he worked as a bartender part-time, when he discovered a TV show that was called The Magic World of Oil Painting, hosted by a German painter, named Bill Alexander.

After studying with Bill Alexander, Ross discovered that he was soon able to earn more from selling his work than from his Air Force position. Ross then retired from the Air Force after 20 years of service with the rank of Master Sergeant and became famous worldwide hosting The Joy of Painting, with the help of Annette & Walter Kowalski.

Before the show was launched, Bob would try to promote the painting technique but with little interest. He also had to find a way to cut back on spending, so he decided to have his hair permed, just so he could save money on haircuts. The perm hairstyle was not comfortable for Bob, but ultimately became an iconic feature of the painter.

Ross used the wet-on-wet oil painting technique, in which the painter continues adding paint on top of still-wet paint rather than waiting a lengthy amount of time to allow each layer of paint to dry. From the beginning, the

Bob Ross

Bob Ross

program kept the selection of tools and colors simple so that viewers wouldn’t have to make large investments in expensive equipment.

Ross frequently recommended odorless paint thinner (aka odorless mineral spirits) for brush cleaning. Combining the painting method with the use of one- and two-inch brushes as well as painting knives allowed Ross to paint trees, water, clouds, and mountains in a matter of seconds. Each painting would start with simple strokes that appeared to be nothing more than colored smudges. As he added more and more strokes, the blotches transformed into intricate landscapes. Ross dedicated the first episode of the second season of The Joy of Painting to William Alexander, explaining that “years ago, Bill taught me this fantastic [wet-on-wet] technique, and I feel as though he gave me a precious gift, and I’d like to share that gift with you [the viewer]”. He estimated having painted between 25,000 and 30,000 paintings in his life.

Bob Ross

Bob Ross

Ross noted that the landscapes he painted—typically mountains, lakes, snow, and log cabin scenes—were strongly influenced by his years living in Alaska, where he was stationed for the majority of his Air Force career. He repeatedly stated on the show his belief that everyone had inherent artistic talent and could become an accomplished artist given time, practice, and encouragement, and to this end was often fond of saying, “We don’t make mistakes; we just have happy accidents.”

Ross was well known for other catch phrases he used while painting as he crafted the ever-so-popular saying: “happy little trees.” In most episodes of The Joy of Painting, he noted that one of his favorite parts of painting was cleaning the brush, specifically his method of drying off a brush, which he had dipped in odorless thinner, by striking it against the thinner can and easel. He would smile and often laugh aloud as he “beat the devil out of it.” He also used a palette that had been lightly sanded down, which was necessary to avoid catching the reflections of strong studio lighting. At the end of each episode, Ross was best known for saying, “so from all of us here, I’d like to wish you happy painting, and God bless, my friend.”

When asked about his laid-back approach to painting and calm and contented demeanor, he once commented: “I got a letter from somebody here a while back, and they said, ‘Bob, everything in your world seems to be

Camp Fire- Bob Ross

Camp Fire- Bob Ross

happy.’ That’s for sure. That’s why I paint. It’s because I can create the kind of world that I want, and I can make this world as happy as I want it. Shoot, if you want bad stuff, watch the news.”

Ross had two sons, Bob and Steven, with his first wife, Lynda Brown. Steven occasionally appeared on The Joy of Painting and became a Bob Ross–certified instructor. The last episode of Season 1 was a question-and-answer forum in which Steven read a series of general “how-to” questions sent in by viewers during the season, and Bob answered them one at a time, technique by technique, until he had completed an entire painting. Ross and Lynda’s marriage ended in divorce in 1981.

Bob Ross

Bob Ross

Ross and his second wife, Jane, had one son, Morgan, who is also an accomplished painter. In 1993, Jane died from cancer, and Ross would not remarry.

Ross was diagnosed with lymphoma in the early 1990s, forcing his retirement; The Joy of Painting’s final episode aired on May 17, 1994. He died at the age of 52 on July 4, 1995. His remains are interred at Woodlawn Memorial Park in Gotha, Florida.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I decided to honor Bob Ross for the last piece and I also decided to finally do an oil piece.  I decided that aspect because I wanted to actually paint along with an episode of his TV show and wanted to have the proper materials.  Alas, I didn’t get “firm” enough oil paints and didn’t prep (as well) or wait for the paint to get a little dryer before jumping right in.  I was just a little too excited so it didn’t turn out exactly the way I wanted (not as soft looking), BUT also I do like the piece because it came out a little better than I expected and I have to give my self a little slack for working with oils for the first time in years!  Bob Ross definitely eliminated my anxiety while I painted.  He definitely knows how to put joy in painting!

I will be posting another blog with more of my thoughts about this project and what it has meant to me.  I’ll also continue using this blog for featuring my future paintings and artwork!  I do hope you’ll continue to visit and say hello!  Thank you all for your support, encouragement and kind words throughout this insane challenge.  It’s been wonderful, stressful, challenging and they’re were definitely days where painting a piece was the last thing I felt like doing, but I persevered and learned so much about motivation and sheer will!  Now off to walk the dogs, finally listen to that Serial podcast, eat a sandwich and possibly fall into some sort of hibernation state.  HAPPY NEW YEAR ALL!

Love,

Linda

Wish I Was There- Tribute to Bob Ross Linda Cleary 2014 Oil, Acrylic on Canvas

Wish I Was There- Tribute to Bob Ross
Linda Cleary 2014
Oil, Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Wish I Was There- Tribute to Bob Ross Linda Cleary 2014 Oil, Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Wish I Was There- Tribute to Bob Ross
Linda Cleary 2014
Oil, Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Wish I Was There- Tribute to Bob Ross Linda Cleary 2014 Oil, Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Wish I Was There- Tribute to Bob Ross
Linda Cleary 2014
Oil, Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Wish I Was There- Tribute to Bob Ross Linda Cleary 2014 Oil, Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Wish I Was There- Tribute to Bob Ross
Linda Cleary 2014
Oil, Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Wish I Was There- Tribute to Bob Ross Linda Cleary 2014 Oil, Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Wish I Was There- Tribute to Bob Ross
Linda Cleary 2014
Oil, Acrylic on Canvas

 

 

 

 

Day 319- Raoul Dufy- Painting With His Heart

It’s Day 319 and I thought, “Why not paint a vase of flowers?”.  I’m still a little under the weather so it was nice to paint something cheerful.  Join me in honoring Raoul Dufy today.

Raoul Dufy

Raoul Dufy

Interior with Indian Woman - Raoul Dufy

Interior with Indian Woman – Raoul Dufy

Raoul Dufy (French: [ʁa.ul dy.fi]; 3 June 1877 – 23 March 1953) was a French Fauvist painter. He developed a colorful, decorative style that became fashionable for designs of ceramics and textiles, as well as decorative schemes for public buildings. He is noted for scenes of open-air social events. He was also a draftsman, printmaker, book illustrator, Scenic designer, a designer of furniture, and a planner of public spaces.

Raoul Dufy was born into a large family at Le Havre, in Normandy. He left school at the age of fourteen to work in a coffee-importing company. In 1895, when he was 18, he started taking evening

Bouquet of Flowers 1937- Raoul Dufy

Bouquet of Flowers 1937- Raoul Dufy

classes in art at Le Havre’s École d’Art (municipal art school). The classes were taught by Charles Lhuillier, who had been, forty years earlier, a student of the remarkable French portrait-painter, Ingres. There, Dufy met Raymond Lecourt and Othon Friesz with whom he later shared a studio in Montmartre and to whom he remained a lifelong friend. During this period, Dufy painted mostly Norman landscapes in watercolors.

Raoul Dufy

Raoul Dufy

In 1900, after a year of military service, Raoul Dufy won a scholarship to the École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris, where again he crossed paths with Othon Friesz. (He was there when Georges Braque also was studying.) He concentrated on improving his drawing skills. The impressionist landscape painters, such as Claude Monet and Camille Pissarro, influenced Dufy profoundly.

His first exhibition (at the Exhibition of French Artists) took place in 1901. Introduced to Berthe Weill in 1902, Dufy showed his work in her gallery. Then he exhibited again in 1903 at the Salon des

Independants. A boost to his confidence: the painter, Maurice Denis, bought one of his paintings. Dufy continued to paint, often in the vicinity of Le Havre, and, in particular, on the beach at Sainte-Adresse, made

Raoul Dufy

Raoul Dufy

famous by Eugène Boudin and Claude Monet. In 1904, with his friend, Albert Marquet, he worked in Fecamp on the English Channel (La Manche).

Henri Matisse’s Luxe, Calme et Volupté, which Dufy saw at the Salon des Indépendants in 1905, was a revelation to the young artist, and it directed his interests towards Fauvism. Les Fauves (the wild beasts) emphasized bright color and bold contours in their work. Dufy’s painting reflected this aesthetic until about 1909, when contact with the work of Paul Cézanne led him to adopt a somewhat subtler technique. It was not until 1920, however, after he had flirted briefly with yet another style, cubism, that Dufy developed his own distinctive approach. It involved skeletal structures, arranged with foreshortened perspective, and the use of thin washes of color applied quickly, in a manner that came to be known as stenographic.

Raoul Dufy- Still Life 1941

Raoul Dufy- Still Life 1941

Dufy’s cheerful oils and watercolors depict events of the time period, including yachting scenes, sparkling views of the French Riviera, chic parties, and musical events. The optimistic, fashionably decorative, and illustrative nature of much of his work has meant that his output has been less highly valued critically than the works of artists who have addressed a wider range of social concerns.

Dufy completed one of the largest paintings ever contemplated, a huge and immensely popular ode to electricity, the fresco La Fée Electricité for the 1937 Exposition Internationale in Paris.

Dufy also acquired a reputation as an illustrator and as a commercial artist. He painted murals for public buildings; he also produced a huge number of tapestries and ceramic designs. His plates appear in books by Guillaume Apollinaire, Stéphane Mallarmé, and André Gide.

In 1909, Raoul Dufy was commissioned by Paul Poiret to design stationery for the house, and after 1912 designed textile patterns for Bianchini-Ferier used in Poiret’s and Charvet’s garments.

In the late 1940s and early 1950s Dufy exhibited at the annual Salon des Tuileries in Paris. By 1950, his hands

Raoul Dufy

Raoul Dufy

were struck with rheumatoid arthritis and his ability to paint diminished, as he has to fasten the brush to his hand. In April he went to Boston to undergo an experimental treatment with cortisone and corticotropin, based on the work of Philip S. Hench. It proved successful, and some of his next works were dedicated to the doctors and researchers in the United States. In 1952 he received the grand prize for painting in the 26th Venice Biennale. Dufy died at Forcalquier, France, on 23 March 1953, of intestinal bleeding, which is a likely result of his continuous treatment. He was buried near Matisse in the Cimiez Monastery Cemetery in Cimiez, a suburb of the city of Nice.

Biography is from wikipedia.

What I wish to show when I paint is the way I see things with my eyes and in my heart. (Raoul Dufy)

I hope you enjoy my piece for today.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 320.

Best,

Linda

Vase of Flowers- Tribute to Raoul Dufy Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolors and Acrylics on Canvas

Vase of Flowers- Tribute to Raoul Dufy
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolors and Acrylics on Canvas

Side-View Vase of Flowers- Tribute to Raoul Dufy Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolors and Acrylics on Canvas

Side-View
Vase of Flowers- Tribute to Raoul Dufy
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolors and Acrylics on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Vase of Flowers- Tribute to Raoul Dufy Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolors and Acrylics on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Vase of Flowers- Tribute to Raoul Dufy
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolors and Acrylics on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Vase of Flowers- Tribute to Raoul Dufy Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolors and Acrylics on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Vase of Flowers- Tribute to Raoul Dufy
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolors and Acrylics on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Vase of Flowers- Tribute to Raoul Dufy Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolors and Acrylics on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Vase of Flowers- Tribute to Raoul Dufy
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolors and Acrylics on Canvas

 

Day 271- Pamela Munger- Individualistic Responses

It’s Day 271 and I am a little pooped after my improv show last night.  It went so well!  Now back to painting!  Join me in honoring Pamela Munger today. 🙂  Had a wonderful time painting my tribute today.

Pamela Munger

Pamela Munger

TRACE ELEMENTS- Pamela Munger

TRACE ELEMENTS- Pamela Munger

What draws me to painting is the combination of creativity, solitude and limitless possibilities.  I’m all about experimentation with paint, surfaces and subject matter but I like to keep it simple and innocent, avoiding detail and not giving away the whole story. I lean towards  the abstract because that’s where I can truly be creative and people can develop their own interpretation based on what they see, but I also do the occasional painterly landscape or still life. I’ve noticed that’s one of the trickiest things about painting….trying to focus on what to paint since I want to paint everything!

I’ve been fortunate to work with several popular interior designers over the years and enjoy taking on the occasional commission. Recently, I’ve been featured on popular websites such as One Kings Lane, Joy and Revelry, and Fifty Artists.

My career as an artist started when I was teaching English and was looking for something to do creatively. I was given some art supplies one Xmas, painted my first painting and that was it. I was hooked. What started as a keen hobby grew to be a part time income and now I work full time as an artist.

I’m from southern California, and currently reside in rural western Colorado where my husband and I have a farm where we grow hops

Green and Yellow Fields- Pamela Munger

Green and Yellow Fields- Pamela Munger

for the Colorado microbreweries. The big open sky and land are a constant inspiration for my art.

About the artist and some paintings are from her website.

Artist Interview: Pamela Munger

Interview below is from The Gallivanting Girl Blog.  According to above info, she is now a full time artist.  Nice!

1. Were you always an art kid, or did you stumble upon it later in life?

I wasn’t an artsy kid at all, unless coloring in coloring books count. I thought one had to be gifted in art in order to do art. I don’t come from an artsy family– my father was an engineer and my mother was a homemaker and the art we had in our home was strictly traditional prints and one original painting of a barn that I believe was bought at a furniture store.
What happened was, about 10 years ago I started feeling crafty and creative and was looking for some outlet….I dabbled in writing, learned some tunes on the guitar, but nothing really took. Then, 6 years ago, my husband bought me a paint set from a hobby store for xmas and I painted my first painting and that’s all it took for me to become completely obsessed with painting.
Snow Bound- Pamela Munger

Snow Bound- Pamela Munger

2. What style of art is your favorite and why?

I love semi-abstract pieces. Because there’s a hint of what it is representing but the artist has taken liberty and creativity and produced the image with something more to say.
3. What do you use for inspiration, or how do you generate ideas?

Other artists are always an inspiration of course and the internet is so fabulous for looking at great art. I’m sort of all over the place with my paintings because I’m always thinking of different things I can do, plus I get bored easily and can’t stand to do the same thing over and over again. I get ideas from photos I take and images I see, and colors and light and texture. Many of my paintings start off as one thing and then morph into something completely different than I intended. I’m very loose when I paint and am attracted to the idea that I’m not completely sure what I will produce. It makes for a more exciting and fun process.

4. Walk us through your creative process from idea to finished project.

I’m a fast painter so most of my time is spent deciding what to paint. ( I love how painting tells you who you are as a person) It really depends on my mood. I might want to paint in oils one day and do some abstract landscapes, so I’ll look at some photos I have and choose

White Cloud- Pamela Munger

White Cloud- Pamela Munger

some colors and start mixing with a palette knife. I’ve got music playing, maybe some blues, I’ll take a canvas and cover it in an acrylic color, wait a few minutes for it to dry, then I’ll start laying on the oil paint. I decide as I go. If I don’t like what I see, I scrape it off and start over. (I love how painting takes a certain amount of bravery)

5. What is a typical day in your life?

Right now, I work full time as a case manager for children with disabilities. The weekends are the only time I have for painting. Maybe that will change some day. We have a farm where we grow hops for the craft brew industry and when that is successful enough, I’ll quit my job and have more time for painting. Yeah, right!

6. What do you think draws you to other people’s work?

That’s a tough question. If you saw the art in my house you’d think, huh…wonder why she bought that? There are just too many reasons to say why I’m drawn to a work. That’s the great thing about art….it produces an individualistic response.

West Abstract Landscape- Pamela Munger

West Abstract Landscape- Pamela Munger

7. What are your interests/hobbies?

Ah, any easy question! Other than painting. my second love is reading great literature. I was a lit major and taught English for several years. I also ski and cook and hike and obsess about my hair and chew gum alot.
8. Is this your full time job, or do you have a job out-of-studio?

I wish painting was my full time job! See above.

9. What is your favorite piece you’ve ever made and why?

Hmmm…..usually it’s my latest piece. Right now I’m working on a commission for my boss….a Hawaiian landscape. I pretty much love it and may take it for myself. Ssssh, don’t tell.

10. What advice would you give to an artist just starting out in the business world?

The business world of art? Sell online.
11. Describe your work space.
My work space is in our home office which I share with hubs. I have a small corner which I try to keep contained and often don’t. There is usually a smudge of paint on our business papers and on the computer mouse. Painting is a little messy and I’m not a clean freak. I paint on an easel and have a table and supply cabinet and my paintings are all over the house, in various stages, some completed and drying, some I plan to paint over, and some for sale on my etsy site. 

12. Did you face any setbacks on your path to being an artist?

Nothing really to make note of. You do have to overcome your fear of people not caring for your art. You can’t take it personally, everyone

Shaded was her Dream- Pamela Munger

Shaded was her Dream- Pamela Munger

has different tastes and are on their own artistic journey.

13. What milestones, goals, or achievements are you striving for right now? 
 
To increase my presence on the web and sell double what I sold in 2011. To get hubs to make enough money with the hop farm so we can build a new home with a separate studio for me 🙂 If everyone would just please start drinking more craft brew, thank you. Cheers! Thanks Julia for this opportunity!!
~
I really enjoyed doing my tribute today.  I randomly found Pamela’s paintings online and loved her style.  I hope I was able to capture her essence in my piece. 🙂  She has an etsy site if you are interested in purchasing one of her paintings!  One of her pieces was featured on Mad Men!
Blue Cascade (Featured on Mad Men Season 7)- Pamela Munger

Blue Cascade (Featured on Mad Men Season 7)- Pamela Munger

I will see you tomorrow on Day 272.
Best,
Linda
Lonely Tree- Tribute to Pamela Munger Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Lonely Tree- Tribute to Pamela Munger
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Lonely Tree- Tribute to Pamela Munger Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Lonely Tree- Tribute to Pamela Munger
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Lonely Tree- Tribute to Pamela Munger Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Lonely Tree- Tribute to Pamela Munger
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Lonely Tree- Tribute to Pamela Munger Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Lonely Tree- Tribute to Pamela Munger
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Lonely Tree- Tribute to Pamela Munger Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Lonely Tree- Tribute to Pamela Munger
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 261- William Tillyer- Edenic Visions

It’s Day 261 and I really was in the mood for doing another watercolor piece.  I loved this artist’s style.  Join me in honoring William Tillyer today!

William Tillyer

William Tillyer

William Tillyer,  The Age of Anxiety / The Kerry Sunset

William Tillyer,
The Age of Anxiety / The Kerry Sunset

William Tillyer (born 1938 in Middlesbrough) is an English artist. His work has been shown frequently in the UK and internationally since 1970.

He studied art in his home town from 1956-9, moving south to London in the 1960s to study at the Slade School of Art. It was there he encountered William Coldstream

William Tillyer The North York Moors, Falling Sky, 1985

William Tillyer The North York Moors, Falling Sky, 1985

and Anthony Gross, among others. Following his time at the Slade, Tillyer took up a French Government Scholarship to study gravure under Stanley William Hayter, at Atelier 17 in Paris.

On his return to London, Tillyer began to make radically experimental work which raised questions about the relationship of art to the world – man to nature.

William Tillyer, 'Northern Arizona 3' 1984

William Tillyer, ‘Northern Arizona 3’ 1984

Wandering between the conceptual intrigue of works like Eight Clouds and the Minimalist assertions of works like Red Interior, Tillyer developed a range of means by which to deepen the external references of his work.

Consistently searching for new means by which to explore his thoughts, the 1970s saw Tillyer return to print-making with renewed vigour. He won international

William Tillyer Haute Alps, 1983

William Tillyer
Haute Alps, 1983

acclaim at the Second International Print Bienalle in Kraków, and found the support of Bernard Jacobson, who has been his dealer ever since.

With these prints Tillyer used a variety of techniques, from etching to five tone screenprinting, to create lattices, which through the gradation of tone themselves depicted what Pat Gilmour, the head of the Print Department at the Tate, described as ‘a cool and unpeopled world…in which to reflect the surrounding flux of nature’.

William Tillyer The Balcony 25

William Tillyer The Balcony 25

Such concerns have continued to underpin Tillyer’s practice to the present day, the artist balancing formal and technical experimentation against the demands of subject matter – demanding multiple reactions from the viewer.

His most recent series reveals the artist returning to some of the earliest themes of his career, isolating John Constable’s cloud studies, as a motif through which to explore his own thoughts about the English Landscape today.

In 2010 a major monograph on his watercolours was published by 21 Publishing covering almost 40 years of his practise. In the extensive text American art critic and poet John Yau writes “However beautiful they are, and many of them are extremely beautiful, almost painfully so, Tillyer’s watercolours never lead us away in favour of an Edenic vision”

In 2013 Mima (Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art) in Middlesbrough will be giving Tillyer his first major retrospective exhibition

William Tillyer Beach and Sea, Seaton Carew, 1956

William Tillyer Beach and Sea, Seaton Carew, 1956

since 1996.

Biography is from wikipedia.

The more I experiment with watercolor the more I learn…AND the more I realize how tricky watercolors can be!  Next time I’d like to do them on paper and then mount it on a canvas.  I hope you enjoy my piece today and I will see you tomorrow on Day 262!

Best,

Linda

 

Dark Horizon- Tribute to William Tillyer Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor on Canvas

Dark Horizon- Tribute to William Tillyer
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor on Canvas

Side-View Dark Horizon- Tribute to William Tillyer Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor on Canvas

Side-View
Dark Horizon- Tribute to William Tillyer
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Dark Horizon- Tribute to William Tillyer Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Dark Horizon- Tribute to William Tillyer
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Dark Horizon- Tribute to William Tillyer Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Dark Horizon- Tribute to William Tillyer
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Dark Horizon- Tribute to William Tillyer Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Dark Horizon- Tribute to William Tillyer
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor on Canvas

Day 242- Anne Appleby- Inner Dialogue

It’s Day 242 and I’ve been working on a couple of large canvas pieces…excited about that.  I wanted to work on a nice relaxing piece for my daily painting and found today’s artist.  I love her paintings and the colors she puts together.  AND again it was more difficult than I thought.  Join me in honoring Anne Appleby today.

Anne Appleby

Anne Appleby

Pea- Anne Appleby

Pea- Anne Appleby

Anne Appleby (born 1954) is an American color field/landscape painter. Her works, always bearing titles from the natural world—“Sweet Pine”, “Summer Aspen”, “Gem”—are simple arrangements of colored canvas panels. Each panel is, at a glance, monochromatic, but closer inspection reveals deep and luminous gradations of hue.

She received her B.F.A. in 1977 from the San Francisco Art Institute. Before attending the Art Institute, Appleby spent a fifteen-year apprenticeship with an Ojibwe Indian elder in Montana. From him, she learned her patient observation of nature.

Her work is often shown with that of “reductive” painters, but it does not exactly fit into

Anne Appleby, Redbud, 2008

Anne Appleby, Redbud, 2008

the “pure” painting philosophy held by many of them. As Kenneth Baker wrote in 2004, “using no forms except monochrome panels, Appleby must struggle often with the potential problem of repetition. But [she] achieves a freshness and distinctness that persuade a viewer that she means each one. It is as if she has learned to translate energy of intent directly into radiance of color.”

Salmon Pea- Anne Appleby

Salmon Pea- Anne Appleby

Although Appleby’s paintings are composed of abstract panels each essentially a single color, she thinks of them as landscapes. She carefully observes particular plants or particular seasons and uses their colors as they grow and change in works that are particular to them. “As I work, I develop an inner dialogue about the meaning of what I’m doing,” she says. “But I can’t paint that. I can’t even speak it. It’s denser than my activity.”

Anne Appleby currently splits her time between San Francisco and her home on the

Winter 1999- Anne Appleby

Winter 1999- Anne Appleby

edge of a national forest in Jefferson City, Montana. She has participated in group exhibitions in institutions such as the Tacoma Art Museum in Washington, the American Academy in Rome, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, where in 1996 she was awarded the SFMoMA SECA Art Award. She was also the 1999 recipient of the Biennial Award from the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation in New York. Appleby shows her paintings primarily at San Francisco’s Gallery Paule Anglim. Her works are held in various museum collections, including the Cleveland Museum of Art and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I had a great time painting.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 243.

Best,

Linda

Vert Brun- Tribute to Anne Appleby Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Vert Brun- Tribute to Anne Appleby
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Vert Brun- Tribute to Anne Appleby Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Vert Brun- Tribute to Anne Appleby
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Vert Brun- Tribute to Anne Appleby Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Vert Brun- Tribute to Anne Appleby
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Vert Brun- Tribute to Anne Appleby Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Vert Brun- Tribute to Anne Appleby
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Vert Brun- Tribute to Anne Appleby Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Vert Brun- Tribute to Anne Appleby
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 236- Claude Monet- Never Finished

It’s Day 236 and I had a nice relaxing day.  Spent quite a bit of time on my tribute today since the artist is one of the most renown artist’s in history!  Join me in honoring Claude Monet today.

Claude Monet- Self Portrait

Claude Monet- Self Portrait

Poppy Field near Giverny 1885- Claude Monet

Poppy Field near Giverny 1885- Claude Monet

Oscar-Claude Monet (French: [klod mɔnɛ]; 14 November 1840 – 5 December 1926) was a founder of French Impressionist painting, and the most consistent and prolific practitioner of the movement’s philosophy of expressing one’s perceptions before nature, especially as applied to plein-air landscape painting. The term “Impressionism” is derived from the title of his painting Impression, soleil levant (Impression, Sunrise), which was exhibited in 1874 in the first of the independent exhibitions mounted by Monet and his associates as an alternative to the Salon de Paris.

Monet’s ambition of documenting the French countryside led him to adopt a method of painting the same scene many times in order to capture the changing of light and the passing of the seasons. From 1883 Monet lived in Giverny, where he purchased a house and property, and began a vast landscaping project which included lily ponds that would become the subjects of his best-known works. In 1899 he began painting the water lilies, first in vertical views with a Japanese bridge as a central feature, and later in the series of large-scale paintings that was to occupy him continuously for the next 20 years of his life.

From the late 1860s, Monet and other like-minded artists met with rejection from the conservative Académie des Beaux-Artswhich held its

Waterlilies Giverny- Claude Monet

Waterlilies Giverny- Claude Monet

annual exhibition at the Salon de Paris. During the latter part of 1873, Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Camille Pissarro, and Alfred Sisley organized the Société anonyme des artistes peintres, sculpteurs et graveurs (Cooperative and Anonymous Association of Painters, Sculptors, and Engravers) to exhibit their artworks independently. At their first exhibition, held in April 1874, Monet exhibited the work that was to give the group its lasting name.

Impression, Sunrise was painted in 1872, depicting a Le Havre port landscape. From the painting’s title the art critic Louis Leroy, in his review, “L’Exposition des Impressionnistes,” which appeared in Le Charivari, coined the term “Impressionism”. It was intended as disparagement but the Impressionists appropriated the term for themselves.

Field of Corn- Claude Monet

Field of Corn- Claude Monet

Claude Monet was born on 14 November 1840 on the 5th floor of 45 rue Laffitte, in the 9th arrondissement of Paris. He was the second son of Claude Adolphe Monet and Louise Justine Aubrée Monet, both of them second-generation Parisians. On 20 May 1841, he was baptized in the local parish church, Notre-Dame-de-Lorette, as Oscar-Claude, but his parents called him simply Oscar. (He signed his juvenilia “O. Monet”.) Despite being baptized Catholic, Monet later became an atheist.

In 1845, his family moved to Le Havre in Normandy. His father wanted him to go into the family grocery business, but Monet wanted to become an artist. His mother was a singer.

On 1 April 1851, Monet entered Le Havre secondary school of the arts. Locals knew him well for his charcoal caricatures, which he would sell for ten to twenty francs. Monet also undertook his first drawing lessons from Jacques-François Ochard, a former student of Jacques-Louis David. On the beaches of Normandy around 1856 he met fellow artistEugène Boudin, who became his mentor and taught him to use oil paints. Boudin taught Monet “en plein air” (outdoor) techniques for painting. Both received the influence ofJohan Barthold Jongkind.

On 28 January 1857, his mother died. At the age of sixteen, he left school and went to live with his widowed, childless aunt, Marie-Jeanne

Claude Monet - A Pathway in Monet's Garden A Pathway in Monet's Garden

Claude Monet – A Pathway in Monet’s Garden A Pathway in Monet’s Garden

Lecadre.

When Monet traveled to Paris to visit the Louvre, he witnessed painters copying from the old masters. Having brought his paints and other tools with him, he would instead go and sit by a window and paint what he saw. Monet was in Paris for several years and met other young painters, including Édouard Manet and others who would become friends and fellow Impressionists.

In June 1861, Monet joined the First Regiment of African Light Cavalry in Algeria for a seven-year commitment, but, two years later, after he had contracted typhoid fever, his aunt intervened to get him out of the army if he agreed to complete an art course at an art school. It is possible that the Dutch painter Johan Barthold Jongkind, whom Monet knew, may have prompted his aunt on this matter. Disillusioned with the traditional art taught at art schools, in 1862 Monet became a student of Charles Gleyre in Paris, where he met Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Frédéric Bazille and Alfred Sisley. Together they shared new approaches to art, painting the effects of light en plein air with broken color and rapid brushstrokes, in what later came to be known as Impressionism.

The Poppy Field near Argenteuil- Claude Monet

The Poppy Field near Argenteuil- Claude Monet

In January 1865 Monet was working on a version of Le déjeuner sur l’herbe, aiming to present it for hanging at the Salon, which had rejected Manet’s Le déjeuner sur l’herbe two years earlier.  Monet’s painting was very large and could not be completed in time. (It was later cut up, with parts now in different galleries.) Monet submitted instead a painting of Camille or The Woman in the Green Dress (La femme à la robe verte), one of many works using his future wife, Camille Doncieux as his model. This painting and a small landscape both were both hung.

The following year Monet used Camille for his model in Women in the Garden, and On the Bank of the Seine, Bennecourt in 1868. Camille became pregnant and gave birth to their first child, Jean, in 1867. Monet and Camille married on 28 June 1870, just before the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian War, and, after their excursion to London and

Claude Monet

Claude Monet

Zaandam, they moved to Argenteuil, in December 1871. During this time Monet painted various works of modern life. He and Camille lived in poverty for most of this period. Following the successful exhibition of some maritime paintings, and the winning of a silver medal at Le Havre, Monet’s paintings were seized by creditors, from whom they were bought back by a shipping merchant, Gaudibert, who was also a patron of Boudin.

The first Impressionist exhibition was held in 1874 at 35 boulevard des Capucines, Paris, from 15 April to 15 May. The primary purpose of the participants was not so much to promote a new style, but to free themselves from the constraints of the Salon de Paris. The exhibition, open to anyone prepared to pay 60 francs, gave artists the opportunity to show their work without the interference of a jury.

Renoir chaired the hanging committee and did most of the work himself, as others members failed to present themselves.

Venice Twilight- Claude Monet

Venice Twilight- Claude Monet

In addition to Impression: Sunrise (pictured above) Monet presented four oil paintings and seven pastels. Among the paintings he displayed was The Luncheon (1868), which features Camille Doncieux and Jean Monet, and which had been rejected by the Paris Salon of 1870. Also in this exhibition was a painting titled Boulevard des Capucines, a painting of the boulevard done from the photographer Nadar’s apartment at no. 35. Monet painted the subject twice and it is uncertain which of the two pictures, that now in the Pushkin Museum in Moscow, or that in the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City was the painting that appeared in the groundbreaking 1874 exhibition, though more recently the Moscow picture has been favored.  Altogether, 165 works were exhibited in the exhibition, including 4 oils, 2 pastels and 3 watercolors by Morisot; 6 oils and 1 pastel by Renoir; 10 works by Degas; 5 by Pissarro; 3 by Cézanne; and 3 by Guillaumin. Several works were on loan, including Cézanne’s Modern Olympia, Morisot’s Hide and Seek (owned by Manet) and 2 landscapes by Sisley that had been purchased by Durand-Ruel.

The total attendance is estimated at 3500 and some works did sell, though some exhibitors had placed their prices too high. Pissarro was asking 1000 francs for The Orchard and Monet the same for Impression: Sunrise, neither of which sold. Renoir failed to obtain the 500 francs he was asking for La Loge, but later sold it for 450 francs to Père Martin, dealer and supporter of the group.

After several difficult months following the death of Camille, Monet began to create some of his best paintings of the 19th century. During the

Camille Monet on a Bench- Claude Monet

Camille Monet on a Bench- Claude Monet

early 1880s, Monet painted several groups of landscapes and seascapes in what he considered to be campaigns to document the French countryside. These began to evolve into series of pictures in which he documented the same scene many times in order to capture the changing of light and the passing of the seasons.

At the beginning of May 1883, Monet and his large family rented a house and 2 acres (8,100 m2) from a local landowner. The house was situated near the main road between the towns of Vernon and Gasny at Giverny. There was a barn that doubled as a painting studio, orchards and a small garden. The house was close enough to the local schools for the children to attend and the surrounding landscape offered many suitable motifs for Monet’s work. The family worked and built up the gardens and Monet’s fortunes began to change for the better as his dealer Paul Durand-Ruel had increasing success in selling his paintings. By November 1890, Monet was prosperous enough to buy the house, the surrounding buildings and the land for his gardens. During the 1890s, Monet built a greenhouse and a second studio, a spacious building well lit with skylights.

Monet wrote daily instructions to his gardener, precise designs and layouts for plantings, and invoices for his floral purchases and his collection of botany books. As Monet’s wealth grew, his garden evolved. He remained its architect, even after he hired seven gardeners.

Monet purchased additional land with a water meadow. In 1893 he began a vast landscaping project which included lily ponds that would

The Studio Boat- Claude Monet

The Studio Boat- Claude Monet

become the subjects of his best-known works. White water lilies local to France were planted along with imported cultivars from South America and Egypt, resulting in a range of colours including yellow, blue and white lilies that turned pink with age. In 1899 he began painting the water lilies, first in vertical views with a Japanese bridge as a central feature, and later on the series of large-scale paintings that was to occupy him continuously for the next 20 years of his life. This scenery, with its alternating light and mirror-like reflections, became an integral part of his work. By the mid-1910s Monet had achieved:

a completely new, fluid, and somewhat audacious style of painting in which the water-lily pond became the point of departure for an almost abstract art

—Gary Tinterow

Monet’s second wife, Alice, died in 1911 and his oldest son Jean, who had married Alice’s daughter Blanche, Monet’s particular favourite, died in 1914. After Alice died, Blanche looked after and cared for Monet. It was during this time that Monet began to develop the first signs of cataracts.

The Artists House at Argenteuil- Claude Monet

The Artists House at Argenteuil- Claude Monet

During World War I, in which his younger son Michel served and his friend and admirer Clemenceau led the French nation, Monet painted a series of weeping willow trees as homage to the French fallen soldiers. In 1923, he underwent two operations to remove his cataracts. The paintings done while the cataracts affected his vision have a general reddish tone, which is characteristic of the vision of cataract victims. It may also be that after surgery he was able to see certain ultraviolet wavelengths of light that are normally excluded by the lens of the eye; this may have had an effect on the colors he perceived. After his operations he even repainted some of these paintings, with bluer water lilies than before.

Monet died of lung cancer on 5 December 1926 at the age of 86 and is buried in the Giverny church cemetery. Monet had insisted that the occasion be simple; thus only about fifty people attended the ceremony.

His home, garden, and waterlily pond were bequeathed by his son Michel, his only heir, to the French Academy of Fine Arts (part of the Institut de France) in 1966. Through the Fondation Claude Monet, the house and gardens were opened for visits in 1980, following restoration. In addition to souvenirs of Monet and other objects of his life, the house contains his collection of Japanese woodcut prints. The house and garden, along with theMuseum of Impressionism Giverny, are major attractions in Giverny, which hosts tourists from all over the world.

Partial biography is from wikipedia.

“I’m never finished with my paintings; the further I get, the more I seek the impossible and the more powerless I feel. ”
– Claude Monet

I hope I did Claude Monet justice today.  Impressionism is one of the styles of painting that I for some reason find very difficult.  That’s why I had been avoiding him and Van Gogh.  After today, I’m feeling a little better about it.  I hope you enjoy my piece and I will see you tomorrow on Day 237!

Best, Linda

Field of Poppies- Tribute to Claude Monet Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Field of Poppies- Tribute to Claude Monet
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Field of Poppies- Tribute to Claude Monet Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Field of Poppies- Tribute to Claude Monet
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Field of Poppies- Tribute to Claude Monet Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Field of Poppies- Tribute to Claude Monet
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Field of Poppies- Tribute to Claude Monet Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Field of Poppies- Tribute to Claude Monet
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Field of Poppies- Tribute to Claude Monet Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Field of Poppies- Tribute to Claude Monet
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 226- Irving Shapiro- Artist and Educator

It’s Day 226 and today I wanted to work with watercolors again.  I’m still learning techniques and am constantly learning more as I’m painting.  Join me in honoring Irving Shapiro today.  I was really drawn to his style of watercolors. 🙂  Below is his short bio and some notes about his techniques.  I’ve also included his obituary from the Chicago Tribune at the bottom.  I could not find a photo of this man so I did the best I could!

How to Make a Painting- by Irving Shapiro Thinking about getting this one!

How to Make a Painting- by Irving Shapiro
Thinking about getting this one!

Irving Shapiro (1927 – 1994)

Irving Shapiro

Irving Shapiro

” A slightly false statement, yet fresh, is much better than a tiresomely truthful one”. My mentor, Irving Shapiro, on watercolor painting.  from An Interview with Eric Weigardt – Watercolorist

Irving Shapiro went out into nature to make sketches, color samples, and black-and-white photographs for his watercolors. Then, back in his studio, he would begin his large paintings. He believed that only the fewest of pencil lines should be used to give guidelines to the composition, which he designed in his head. First, he applied the main color washes to define the large areas of the painting. He preferred risking mistakes while being bold and fresh with the paint, rather than risking getting bogged down in static details.

This painting shows a glimpse of the grasses, plants, and dead limbs that carpet the floor of a forest

Forest Floor- Irving Shapiro

Forest Floor- Irving Shapiro

in summer. The artist used the white of the paper and dark washes to show sunlight piercing the forest canopy to cast shadows of the leaves.

Irving Shapiro
Irving Shapiro was born in Chicago. He studied painting at the Art Institute and the American Academy of Art, both in Chicago. He taught art at the Academy from 1945 until he retired. Many artists working in watercolor today mention Shapiro as one of their teachers.

Watercolor

In progress...

In progress…

The characteristic of watercolor painting that sets it apart from other types of painting is its transparency. Watercolor consists of a thin mixture of paint pigment (from a tube or a solid block) suspended in water. As the brush lays down the paint, often on wet paper, the color spreads rapidly, leaving a transparent layer of color on the paper. A watercolor painting is built of controlled areas of wash.

Techniques
White areas of a watercolor painting are made by covering them with a layer of liquid rubber calledmasque instead of by using white paint. The masque is pulled off after the painting is finished and dried. That is how the tiny twigs of Forest Floor were done.

A dry brush technique paints stronger color onto dry paper. Artists use this for adding details such as the small, dark twigs in the background of this painting.

Tools
Shapiro used 300 or 400 pound paper, heavy enough to stay flat without stretching or taping down.

Irving Shapiro

Irving Shapiro

He used numbers eight and twelve round sable brushes and flat camel’s hair brushes one and two inches wide. He chose these colors for his palette: alizarin crimson golden, light vermilion, cadmium orange, light cadmium yellow, mauve, cobalt violet, thalo-blue, ultramarine, cerulean, lemon yellow, sap green, thalo green, yellow ochre, burnt sienna, burnt umber, sepia, and Payne’s gray.

Shapiro, Irving. “Irving Shapiro Says Watercolor Has Gender”American Artist. April, 1959. Pp. 60, 92.

From the Chicago Tribune below.

Irving Shapiro

Irving Shapiro

Irving Shapiro, 67, an artist, educator and author, was associated with the American Academy of Art for 50 years and served for many years as its director and president.

A resident of Highland Park, he died Tuesday in Whitehall North Convalescent Home in Deerfield.

His watercolors have been exhibited throughout the United States, Europe and, most recently, in China. His works hang in galleries, in hundreds of corporate offices and in private collections.

Mr. Shapiro in 1992 was given the Artist’s Achievement Award in Watercolor by the American Artist Magazine. He has won the High Winds Medal and the Mary Litt Medal at juried shows of the American Watercolor Society and was one of the youngest artists ever admitted to signature membership in that organization.

In addition to teaching and to his administrative responsibilities at the academy, he has lectured in

Irving Shapiro Signature

Irving Shapiro Signature

the U.S., Italy, France and Switzerland. Six of his demonstrations in watercolor painting have been videotaped and distributed widely.

His book, “How to Make a Painting: Planning, Procedures and Techniques in Watercolor,” has been translated into eight languages.

Mr. Shapiro has served on the boards of the Palette and Chisel Academy of Art, the Municipal Art League, the Midwest Watercolor Society and the American Watercolor Society, New York.

“He was a very dignified gentleman,” his wife, Syril, said. “He was an educator all his life and a man with the soul of an artist.”

Survivors, besides his wife, include three daughters, Paula Winter, Diane Golin and Gail; a son, Dan; a brother; and nine grandchildren.

Services for Mr. Shapiro will be 11 a.m. Friday in Shalom Memorial Park, U.S. Highway 12, Palatine.

~

I hope you enjoy my piece for today!  I’m happy with it, but I still have a ton to learn when it comes to watercolors.  I really want to try my hand at a huge piece.  Maybe something photographic or more abstract.  It’s definitely a medium I love working with, but it still has it’s mysteries.  It’s going to be fun experimenting for sure!  I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 227!

Best, Linda

The Wild- Tribute to Irving Shapiro Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor on Canvas

The Wild- Tribute to Irving Shapiro
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor on Canvas

Side-View The Wild- Tribute to Irving Shapiro Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor on Canvas

Side-View
The Wild- Tribute to Irving Shapiro
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 1 The Wild- Tribute to Irving Shapiro Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 1
The Wild- Tribute to Irving Shapiro
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 2 The Wild- Tribute to Irving Shapiro Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 2
The Wild- Tribute to Irving Shapiro
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 3 The Wild- Tribute to Irving Shapiro Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 3
The Wild- Tribute to Irving Shapiro
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor on Canvas

Day 214- Jon Schueler- Seeing Eternity

It’s Day 214 and my body is so sore…I’m not even sure what I did to make it sore. 🙂  I feel like a ran a marathon or something.  Maybe it was gardening or hiking with my dogs or something.  Sheesh.  I had a good time painting today.  It took longer than I thought it would for some reason.  I guess I wanted to get it right.  Join me in honoring Jon Schueler today.

Jon Schueler 1973

Jon Schueler 1973

Storm at Sea Remembered- Jon Schueler

Storm at Sea Remembered- Jon Schueler

Jon Schueler was an abstract expressionist painter born in Milwaukee, WI on September 12, 1916 and died August 5, 1992.  He was 76.

Schueler originally wanted to become a writer and, after acquiring his MA at the

Summer Day Sleat- Jon Schueler

Summer Day Sleat- Jon Schueler

University of Wisconsin–Madison in 1940, he worked for a short time as a journalist. The Second World War interrupted his writing. From 1941 to 1944 he served as an Army Air Corps navigator and flew numerous missions in a B-17 Flying Fortress bomber out of Molesworth, England, over France and Germany.

After the war, he moved to San Francisco and taught English while he began attending the California School of Fine Arts where he studied with Edward Corbett, David Park, Hassel Smith, and Richard Diebenkorn. He chose Abstract Expressionism as his preferred style and moved to New York in 1951, where he became part of the New York School of artists. His first solo exhibition was in 1954, at the Stable Gallery.

The Search: Black Shadow Blues- Jon Schueler

The Search: Black Shadow Blues- Jon Schueler

Jon Schueler is represented by Ingleby Gallery worldwide.

First experiences of Scotland

In September 1957, he set up a studio just north of Mallaig, Scotland. He later described the effect this had on his painting:

“There now have been three massive experiences I have had with the Scottish sky. The first, in March 1958, when I had given up and, aching in my head and eyes and soul, I cycled from Mallaig Vaig to the white sands of Arisaig, where I watched the snow clouds moving toward me, implacable, from the sea. One passed over and through me, snow beating against my face. Then I turned to the south and saw the winter sun glowing in the snow cloud; strange image of light burning and dying through the shadows of a changing form. Though the sun was a winter sun, it translated itself in my mind to the most powerful and vibrant colors, reds, yellows, Indian yellows, or sometimes alizarin through blue.”

After his first stay, from 1958 to 1959, he wanted to return to Mallaig, but various circumstances

Forgotten Blues II- Jon Schueler

Forgotten Blues II- Jon Schueler

permitted only a few brief visits until 1970, when he settled there for almost five years. Meanwhile, he had painted in New York, and Chester, Connecticut, exhibiting in both solo and group shows, and teaching as a visiting artist at both Yale University and the Maryland Institute of Fine and Applied Arts, (now the Maryland Institute College of Art).

On a visit to Mallaig in 1967, he had another experience of the Scottish sky that became a major theme in his future repertoire:

“The second experience was in 1967 when I was at sea with Jim Manson, the day of the gale. A mist hung like a curtain, to the sea, haunted by a subtle glow from the direction of Rhum. I pointed out the image to Jim, who said, “Yes, we call that a sun dog; it’s the sign of the gale.” This warning of the storm that was to drive us from the sea was the most delicate sign, impossible to draw, impossible to define, impossible to understand except in the most exquisitely sensitive terms.”

Jon Schueler

Jon Schueler

The summer of 1967 was also the first time he had begun to use watercolor as a medium, abandoning the use of heavy impasto that had characterized his earlier oil paintings.

Before 1970, his times in Scotland had been in the autumn, winter, and early spring, with a brief visit in the high summer. Though he had experienced the very short winter days of the far north, he had yet to see the midnight sun of a June night. When he did, he had what he describes as an intense revelation:

“Last night I had one of the very important visual experiences of my life. It was late,

John Schueler oil painting Mallaig Vaig Scotland 1958

John Schueler oil painting Mallaig Vaig Scotland 1958

11:30, when I looked out the studio window and was struck by the somberness of what I was able to see…I went out…The vision was intensely real, yet it was the most powerful abstraction…this vision of death, or of Nature beyond life, or of Nature as she must exist beyond that fantasy of life that we imagine…This abstraction of the sea and the sky and Sleat – I was possessed by it, wanted to walk into it, to disappear into it. I was exhausted afterward. There was no color I could define: The greys were not grey, the silver was not silver, the blacks were not black. It was all light and all darkness. Believe me, I have seen eternity, and it is frightening and it is most beautiful, more beautiful and more powerful than any man or any woman or the works of either…”

Horizontal lines had been a part of his compositions for some years. After this experience, he concentrated on developing this theme further, producing many paintings in which the picture surface is meant to “vibrate” with bands of color that depend on the effects of light during the changing seasons on the Sound of Sleat. This would remain the central element of his style for the next three decades.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece for today.  I really had a great time creating this piece.  I did a mix of watercolors and acrylic.  I do feel like my clouds came out too much like “clouds” if that makes any sense.  I realized this after doing the blog, but oh well!  At least I had a nice time painting. 🙂

I will see you tomorrow on Day 215!  Best, Linda

Sunset Sky- Tribute to Jon Schueler Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Sunset Sky- Tribute to Jon Schueler
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Side View Sunset Sky- Tribute to Jon Schueler Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Side View
Sunset Sky- Tribute to Jon Schueler
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Sunset Sky- Tribute to Jon Schueler Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Sunset Sky- Tribute to Jon Schueler
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Sunset Sky- Tribute to Jon Schueler Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Sunset Sky- Tribute to Jon Schueler
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Sunset Sky- Tribute to Jon Schueler Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Sunset Sky- Tribute to Jon Schueler
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Day 160- Giorgio Morandi- Natura Morta

It’s Day 160 and I think this may be the first “still life” painting I’ve done so far.  I think I had flashbacks from art school and that’s what was keeping me from doing a still life.  Flashbacks of weird naked models, drawing a sphere and cone with charcoal stained fingers with my art teacher walking around making condescending comments of people’s work.  Phew!  Despite all that I had fun and I thought I did “okay”.  Join me in honoring an artist who did still life or “natura morta” very well.  Giorgio Morandi.

giorgio-morandi

Giorgio Morandi

Giorgio Morandi

Giorgio Morandi (July 20, 1890 – June 18, 1964) was an Italian painter and printmaker who specialized in still life. His paintings are noted for their tonal subtlety in depicting apparently simple subjects, which were limited mainly to vases, bottles, bowls, flowers and landscapes.

Giorgio Morandi was born in Bologna to Andrea Morandi and Maria Maccaferri. He

Giorgio Morandi

Giorgio Morandi

lived first on Via Lame where his brother Giuseppe (who died in 1903) and his sister Anna were born. The family then moved to via Avesella n. 30, where his two other sisters were born, Dina in 1900 and Maria Teresa in 1906. From 1907 to 1913 he studied at the Accademia di Belle Arti di Bologna. After the death of his father in 1909, the family moved to via Fondazza n. 36, and Morandi became the head of the family.

Giorgio Morandi

Giorgio Morandi

At the Accademia, which based its traditions on 14th-century painting, Morandi taught himself to etch by studying books on Rembrandt. He was excellent at his studies, although his professors disapproved of the changes in his style during his final two years at the Accademia. Morandi, even if he lived his whole life in Bologna, was influenced by the works of Cézanne, Derain, and Picasso. However, in particular after a trip to Florence in 1910, he was also influenced by past artists such as Giotto, Masaccio, Piero Della Francesca, and Paolo Uccello. He had a brief digression into a Futurist style in 1914. In that same year, Morandi was appointed instructor of drawing for elementary schools in Bologna—a post he held until 1929.

In 1915, he joined the army but suffered a breakdown and was indefinitely discharged. During

Giorgio Morandi

Giorgio Morandi

the war, Morandi’s still lifes became more reduced in their compositional elements and purer in form, revealing his admiration for both Cézanne and the Douanier Rousseau.

The Metaphysical painting (Pittura Metafisica) phase in Morandi’s work lasted from 1918 to 1922. This was to be his last major stylistic shift; thereafter, he focused increasingly on subtle gradations of hue, tone, and objects arranged in a unifying atmospheric haze, establishing the direction his art was to take for the rest of his life. Morandi showed in the Novecento Italiano exhibitions of 1926 and 1929, but was more specifically associated with the regional Strapaese group by the end of the decade, a fascist-influenced group emphasizing local cultural traditions. He was sympathetic to the Fascist party in the 1920s, although his friendships with anti-Fascist figures led authorities to arrest him briefly in 1943. From 1928 Morandi participated in some of the Venice Biennale exhibitions, in the Quadriennale in Rome and also exhibited in different Italian and foreign cities.

Giorgio Morandi

Giorgio Morandi

In 1929 Giorgio Morandi illustrated the work Il sole a picco by Vincenzo Cardarelli, winner of the Premio Bagutta. From 1930 to 1956, Morandi was a professor of etching at Accademia di Belle Arti. The 1948 Venice Biennale awarded him first prize for painting. He visited Paris for the first time in 1956, and in 1957 he won the grand prize in São Paulo’s Biennial.

Quiet, polite both in his private and public life, Morandi was much talked about in

Giorgio Morandi

Giorgio Morandi

Bologna for his enigmatic yet very optimistic personality. Morandi lived on via Fondazza, in Bologna, with his three sisters Anna, Dina and Maria Teresa, until his death on June 18, 1964.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I went through my cabinets to find what I wanted to paint this morning.  I thought of inserting something silly like an action figure, but decided that for my first still life, I’d keep it simple. 🙂  I’m including a small reference photo of my still life as well.  I hope you enjoy it and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 161!  Best, Linda

My reference

My reference

Natura Morta I- Tribute to Giorgio Morandi Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Natura Morta I- Tribute to Giorgio Morandi
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Natura Morta I- Tribute to Giorgio Morandi Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Natura Morta I- Tribute to Giorgio Morandi
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Natura Morta I- Tribute to Giorgio Morandi Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Natura Morta I- Tribute to Giorgio Morandi
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Natura Morta I- Tribute to Giorgio Morandi Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Natura Morta I- Tribute to Giorgio Morandi
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Natura Morta I- Tribute to Giorgio Morandi Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Natura Morta I- Tribute to Giorgio Morandi
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day Fifty-One- Peter Lanyon- Powerful Environments

It’s Day 51 and that means 51 paintings!  The movers are coming the day after tomorrow and today I packed the god-forsaken kitchen.  I’m just so grateful that I live on a magical street.  I put the weirdest stuff out there and somehow it vanishes.  I feel like that’s my latent super-power that just emerged during the stress of this move.  I can make people take my garbage/junk!  Anyways, I was able to paint early this morning before packing.  Let’s celebrate Peter Lanyon today and get back to packing!

Peter Lanyon by Ida Kar, vintage bromide print, 1961

Peter Lanyon by Ida Kar, vintage bromide print, 1961

Peter Lanyon

Peter Lanyon

(George) Peter Lanyon (8 February 1918 – 31 August 1964) was a Cornish

Wreck 1963 by Peter Lanyon 1918-1964

Wreck 1963 by Peter Lanyon 1918-1964

painter of landscapes leaning heavily towards abstraction. Lanyon was one of the most important artists to emerge in post-war Britain. Despite his early death at the age of forty-six he achieved a body of work that is amongst the most original and important reappraisals of modernism in painting to be found anywhere. Combining abstract values with radical ideas about landscape and the figure, Lanyon navigated a course from Constructivism through Abstract Expressionism to a style close to Pop. He also made constructions, pottery and collage.

Lanyon was born in St Ives, Cornwall, the only son of W H Lanyon, an amateur

Blue Thermal- Peter Lanyon

Blue Thermal- Peter Lanyon

photographer and musician. He was educated at Clifton College. St Ives remained his base, and he received after-school painting lessons from Borlase Smart. In 1937 he met Adrian Stokes, who is thought to have introduced him to contemporary painting and sculpture and who advised him to go to the Euston Road School, where he studied for four months under Victor Pasmore. In 1936-37 he also attended Penzance School of Art. In 1939 he met established artists Ben Nicholson, Barbara Hepworth and Naum Gabo, who had moved to St Ives on the outbreak of war. Lanyon received private art tuition from Nicholson.

North Coast- Peter Lanyon

North Coast- Peter Lanyon

The character of his work changed completely and he became very involved with making constructions. Throughout the 1940s the influence of Nicholson and Gabo remained strongly visible in his work

From 1940 to 1945 he served with the Royal Air Force in the Western Desert, Palestine

Porthleven 1951 by Peter Lanyon 1918-1964

Porthleven 1951 by Peter Lanyon 1918-1964

and Italy. In 1946 he married Sheila St John Browne. Six children were born to the couple between 1947 and 1957. Also in 1946 he became an active member of the Crypt Group of Artists, St Ives. During the 1950s he became established as a leading figure in the St. Ives group of artists.

Lanyon took up gliding as a pastime and used the resulting experience extensively in his paintings. He died in Taunton, Somerset, as the result of injuries received in a gliding accident and is buried in St. Uny’s Church, Lelant.

Clevedon Night 1964- Peter Lanyon

Clevedon Night 1964- Peter Lanyon

In September 2010 Peter Lanyon’s work was honored with a large-scale retrospective exhibition: Peter Lanyon October 9, 2010 – January 23, 2011 at Tate St Ives. Curated by Chris Stephens, Head of Displays and Curator of Modern British Art at Tate Britain, it was the first thorough museum retrospective for almost forty years.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I decided to look up photographs for reference for my Lanyon piece…ideally, I

My reference

My reference

would’ve loved to go out and paint, but under my circumstances I didn’t really have the time to do that…maybe after my move I’ll do more of that.  I’m thinking for Van Gogh that would be appropriate.  I enjoyed doing this painting.  Painting a landscape, but without the pressure of having it be perfect was relaxing.  I think straight-up abstract expressionism has been a challenge for me, but somewhere in between is where I think I belong!

Be careful…don't be perfect! ;)

Be careful…don’t be perfect! 😉

So I had to keep in mind that I wasn’t painting exactly what I was seeing so I made sure to add some colors and switch to “abstract” mode after laying down a couple of the main colors.

Green!

Green!

I hope you enjoy my finished piece!  A part of me didn’t want to include my reference picture because I wanted it to be more abstract, but oh well…it’s good to know my whole process.  See you tomorrow on Day 52!

xoxo, Linda

Windmill- Tribute to Peter Lanyon Linda Cleary- 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Windmill- Tribute to Peter Lanyon
Linda Cleary- 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Windmill- Tribute to Peter Lanyon Linda Cleary- 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Windmill- Tribute to Peter Lanyon
Linda Cleary- 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Windmill- Tribute to Peter Lanyon Linda Cleary- 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Windmill- Tribute to Peter Lanyon
Linda Cleary- 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Windmill- Tribute to Peter Lanyon Linda Cleary- 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Windmill- Tribute to Peter Lanyon
Linda Cleary- 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Windmill- Tribute to Peter Lanyon Linda Cleary- 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Windmill- Tribute to Peter Lanyon
Linda Cleary- 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 4 Windmill- Tribute to Peter Lanyon Linda Cleary- 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 4
Windmill- Tribute to Peter Lanyon
Linda Cleary- 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

It is impossible for me to make a painting which has no reference to the powerful environment in which I live. (Peter Lanyon)