Day 347- Amedeo Modigliani- “When I know your soul, I will paint your eyes.”

It’s Day 347 and I’m honored to pay tribute to today’s artist.  I love his portrait paintings so of course I had to do another self portrait.  While researching him I kind of got a big crush.  Please join me in honoring Amedeo Modigliani today.

Amedeo Modigliani

Amedeo Modigliani

Portrait of Juan Gris- Amedeo Modigliani

Portrait of Juan Gris- Amedeo Modigliani

Amedeo Clemente Modigliani (Italian pronunciation: [ameˈdɛo modiʎˈʎani]; July 12, 1884 – January 24, 1920) was an Italian painter and sculptor who worked mainly in France. He is known for portraits and nudes in a modern style characterized by elongation of faces and figures. His production is known for its nudes, which were not received well during his lifetime, but later found acceptance. Modigliani spent his youth in Italy, where he studied the art of antiquity and the Renaissance, until he moved to Paris in 1906. There he came into contact with prominent artists such as Pablo Picasso and Constantin Brâncuşi.

Modigliani’s oeuvre includes mainly paintings and drawings. From 1909 to 1914, however, he devoted himself mainly to sculpture. The main subject is portraits and full figures of humans, both in the images and in the sculptures. During his

The Beautiful Confectioner- Amedeo Modigliani

The Beautiful Confectioner- Amedeo Modigliani

life, Amedeo Modigliani had little success, but after his death he achieved greater popularity and his works of art achieved high prices. He died at age 35 in Paris of tubercular meningitis.

Modigliani was born into a Jewish family in Livorno, Italy. A port city, Livorno had long served as a refuge for those persecuted for their religion, and was home to a large Jewish community. His maternal great-great-grandfather, Solomon Garsin, had immigrated to Livorno in the 18th century as a refugee.

Modigliani’s mother (Eugénie Garsin), who was born and grew up in Marseille, was descended from an intellectual, scholarly family of Sephardic Jews, generations of whom had resided along the Mediterranean coastline. Her ancestors were learned people, fluent in many languages, known authorities on sacred Jewish texts, and founders of a school of Talmudic studies. Family legend traced the Garsins’ lineage to the 17th-century Dutch philosopher Baruch Spinoza. The family business was believed to be a credit agency with branches in Livorno, Marseille, Tunis, and London. Their financial fortunes ebbed and flowed.

Reclining Nude from the Back- Amedeo Modigliani

Reclining Nude from the Back- Amedeo Modigliani

Modigliani’s father, Flaminio, hailed from a family of successful businessmen and entrepreneurs. While not as culturally sophisticated as the Garsins, they knew how to invest in and develop thriving business endeavors. When the Garsin and Modigliani families announced the engagement of their children, Flaminio was a wealthy young mining engineer. He managed the mine in Sardinia and also managed the almost 30,000 acres of timberland the family owned. A reversal in fortune occurred to this prosperous family in 1883. An economic downturn in the price of metal plunged the Modiglianis into bankruptcy. Ever resourceful, Modigliani’s mother used her social contacts to establish a school and, along with her two sisters, made the school into a successful enterprise.

Modigliani was the fourth child, whose birth coincided with the disastrous financial collapse of his father’s business interests. Amedeo’s birth saved the family from ruin; according to an ancient law, creditors could not

Portrait of Frans Hellens- Amedeo Modigliani

Portrait of Frans Hellens- Amedeo Modigliani

seize the bed of a pregnant woman or a mother with a newborn child. The bailiffs entered the family’s home just as Eugenia went into labour; the family protected their most valuable assets by piling them on top of her.

Modigliani had a close relationship with his mother, who taught him at home until he was 10. Beset with health problems after an attack of pleurisy when he was about 11, a few years later he developed a case of typhoid fever. When he was 16 he was taken ill again and contracted the tuberculosis which would later claim his life. After Modigliani recovered from the second bout of pleurisy, his mother took him on a tour of southern Italy: Naples, Capri, Rome and Amalfi, then north to Florence and Venice.

Portrait of Woman in Hat - Great Artist Amedeo Modigliani

Portrait of Woman in Hat – Great Artist Amedeo Modigliani

His mother was, in many ways, instrumental in his ability to pursue art as a vocation. When he was 11 years of age, she had noted in her diary: “The child’s character is still so unformed that I cannot say what I think of it. He behaves like a spoiled child, but he does not lack intelligence. We shall have to wait and see what is inside this chrysalis. Perhaps an artist?”

Modigliani is known to have drawn and painted from a very early age, and thought himself “already a painter”, his mother wrote, even before beginning formal studies. Despite her misgivings that launching him on a course of studying art would impinge upon his other studies, his mother indulged the young Modigliani’s passion for the subject.

At the age of fourteen, while sick with typhoid fever, he raved in his delirium that he wanted, above all else, to see the paintings in the Palazzo Pitti and the Uffizi in Florence. As Livorno’s local museum housed only a sparse few paintings by the Italian Renaissance masters, the tales he had heard about the great works held in Florence intrigued him, and it was a source of considerable despair to him, in his sickened state, that he might never get the chance to view them in person. His mother promised that she would take him to Florence herself, the moment he was recovered. Not only did she fulfil this promise, but she also undertook to enroll him with the best painting master in Livorno, Guglielmo Micheli.

Modigliani worked in Micheli’s Art School from 1898 to 1900. Among his colleagues in that studio would have been Llewelyn Lloyd, Giulio Cesare Vinzio, Manlio Martinelli, Gino Romiti, Renato Natali, and Oscar Ghiglia.

Marie Daughter of the People- Amedeo Modigliani

Marie Daughter of the People- Amedeo Modigliani

Here his earliest formal artistic instruction took place in an atmosphere steeped in a study of the styles and themes of 19th-century Italian art. In his earliest Parisian work, traces of this influence, and that of his studies of Renaissance art, can still be seen. His nascent work was shaped as much by such artists as Giovanni Boldini as by Toulouse-Lautrec.

Modigliani showed great promise while with Micheli, and ceased his studies only when he was forced to, by the onset of tuberculosis.

In 1901, whilst in Rome, Modigliani admired the work of Domenico Morelli, a painter of dramatic religious and literary scenes. Morelli had served as an inspiration for a group of iconoclasts who were known by the title “the Macchiaioli” (from macchia —”dash of colour”, or, more derogatively, “stain”), and Modigliani had already been exposed to the influences of the Macchiaioli. This localized landscape movement reacted against the bourgeois stylings of the academic genre painters. While sympathetically connected to (and actually pre-dating) the French Impressionists, the Macchiaioli did not make the same impact upon international art culture as did the contemporaries and followers of Monet, and are today largely forgotten outside Italy.

Jeanne Hebuterne with Hat and Necklace- Amedeo Modigliani

Jeanne Hebuterne with Hat and Necklace- Amedeo Modigliani

Modigliani’s connection with the movement was through Guglielmo Micheli, his first art teacher. Micheli was not only a Macchiaiolo himself, but had been a pupil of the famous Giovanni Fattori, a founder of the movement. Micheli’s work, however, was so fashionable and the genre so commonplace that the young Modigliani reacted against it, preferring to ignore the obsession with landscape that, as with French Impressionism, characterized the movement. Micheli also tried to encourage his pupils to paint en plein air, but Modigliani never really got a taste for this style of working, sketching in cafés, but preferring to paint indoors, and especially in his own studio. Even when compelled to paint landscapes (three are known to exist), Modigliani chose a proto-Cubist palette more akin to Cézanne than to the Macchiaioli.

While with Micheli, Modigliani studied not only landscape, but also portraiture, still life, and the nude. His fellow students recall that the last was where he displayed his greatest talent, and apparently this was not an entirely academic pursuit for the teenager: when not painting nudes, he was occupied with seducing the household maid.

Despite his rejection of the Macchiaioli approach, Modigliani nonetheless found favour with his teacher, who referred to him as “Superman”, a pet name reflecting the fact that Modigliani was not only quite adept at his art,

Amedeo Modigliani painting: Woman with Black Cravat

Amedeo Modigliani painting: Woman with Black Cravat

but also that he regularly quoted from Nietzsche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra. Fattori himself would often visit the studio, and approved of the young artist’s innovations.

In 1902, Modigliani continued what was to be a lifelong infatuation with life drawing, enrolling in the Scuola Libera di Nudo, or “Free School of Nude Studies”, of the Accademia di Belle Arti in Florence. A year later, while still suffering from tuberculosis, he moved to Venice, where he registered to study at the Regia Accademia ed Istituto di Belle Arti.

The Servant- Amedeo Modigliani

The Servant- Amedeo Modigliani

It is in Venice that he first smoked hashish and, rather than studying, began to spend time frequenting disreputable parts of the city. The impact of these lifestyle choices upon his developing artistic style is open to conjecture, although these choices do seem to be more than simple teenage rebellion, or the cliched hedonism and bohemianism that was almost expected of artists of the time; his pursuit of the seedier side of life appears to have roots in his appreciation of radical philosophies, including those of Nietzsche.

Partial biography is from wikipedia.

“When I know your soul, I will paint your eyes”
― Amedeo Modigliani

I hope you enjoy my tribute today!  I was about to take a reference photo of myself and then saw a cloche that I had sitting around and decided to use it for

My reference photo...

My reference photo…

my piece!  I felt that it was appropriate. 🙂  I felt chills while reading Modigliani’s quote above.  And realized that he hardly painted people’s eyes fully.  Just filled them in with blue, black or a solid color.  There’s only a few portraits where he fully painted the eyes.  Fascinating!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 348.  I can’t believe how fast the days are flying by.

Best,

Linda

Self Portrait in a Blue Hat- Tribute to Amedeo Modigliani  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Self Portrait in a Blue Hat- Tribute to Amedeo Modigliani
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Self Portrait in a Blue Hat- Tribute to Amedeo Modigliani  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Self Portrait in a Blue Hat- Tribute to Amedeo Modigliani
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Self Portrait in a Blue Hat- Tribute to Amedeo Modigliani  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Self Portrait in a Blue Hat- Tribute to Amedeo Modigliani
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Self Portrait in a Blue Hat- Tribute to Amedeo Modigliani  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Self Portrait in a Blue Hat- Tribute to Amedeo Modigliani
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Self Portrait in a Blue Hat- Tribute to Amedeo Modigliani  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Self Portrait in a Blue Hat- Tribute to Amedeo Modigliani
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 255- Marcello Lo Guidice- Metamorphism

It’s Day 255 and I had a really great time painting this piece today.  I think my piece is a little different than his pieces, but it’s definitely inspired by him.  Join me in honoring Marcello Lo Guidice today!

Marcello Lo Guidice

Marcello Lo Guidice

Eden Blu- Marcello Lo Guidice

Eden Blu- Marcello Lo Guidice

Marcello Lo Giudice b. 1957 Taormina Sicily “…Where light’s energy blends with

metamorphism of the material to create remote geological views” (Pierre Restany)

Marcello Lo Giudice’s art is centered around an affection for the subtle and profound, geological substance of the matter. His multifaceted projects include paintings, installations and sculptures, in which the mediums often blend into each other. Across these different

LO GIUDICE Marcello,DALLA PRIMAVERA DI BOTTICELLI

LO GIUDICE Marcello,DALLA PRIMAVERA DI BOTTICELLI

media, the ambition to uniquely and globally bring attention to the cyclical alliance between cosmic energy and the human becomes immanent. Issues faced by his paintings and installations are an appreciation for and cohabitation with nature, human dignity and the rejection of war and barbary.

His paintings are structured by colors, oils and pigments that are spread thickly on the canvas; laid one upon the other, buried and then reemerged on the surface in various phases. Through this painting technique the surface develops interlaced designs, crossroads and interferences.

With his Totem series, Lo Giudice explores ways to translate images of violence, war and atrocities seen in the media on a daily basis into his art work. Burned, slashed and emptied mattresses, painted with

Close-up- Marcello Lo Guidice

Close-up- Marcello Lo Guidice

vibrant layers of color are a reflection of these images. Totems became an emblem of violence and a symbol of the obligation to bring violent events to attention. At the same time, Lo Giudice’s intention is to recuperate their original shamanic religious use as objects or symbols representing protection and liberation.

Since 2000, his oeuvre is enriched with a new sculptural variant inspired by Botticelli’s “Spring”. In these projects, the mattress is completely emptied and his primary structure accommodates a large number of Albisola’s ceramic butterflies which represent “ the beauty laying on violence and war”.

Lo Giudice’s butterflies – as emblematic symbols of spring, rebirth and evolution – represent a hope that humanity entrusts in next

Marcello Lo Giudice. Eden Giallo, 2013

Marcello Lo Giudice. Eden Giallo, 2013

generations with respect to a new consciousness and awareness of wars and collective violence committed in the last century. “With Totem and Primavera’s I didn’t leave painting for sculpture, its more a perpetuation of it: I just amplified painting experimenting new materials like ceramic” (Marcello Lo Giudice)

Eden Red- Marcello Lo Guidice

Eden Red- Marcello Lo Guidice

Born in 1955 in Taormina, Sicily, Lo Giudice lives and works in Milan, Paris and Noto. In 1988, the artist graduated from the University of Bologna. He attended the Academy of Fine Arts in Venice In 1989, where he studied under three protagonists of modern Italian Art: Emilio Vedova (1919 – 2006), Giuseppe Santomaso (1907 – 1990), and Virgilio Guidi (1892 – 1984).

Marcello Lo Giudice

Marcello Lo Giudice

As an accomplished and well-renowned artist in Europe, his has participated in a number of solo and group exhibitions throughout Europe, the USA and Asia, including Samuel Lallouz Gallery, Montreal (1987), Bennnetter Gallery, Stockholm (1990), Royal Fine Arts Society, Muscat (2003), Cipriani, New York (2006) and Artcurial “red-rouge”, Paris (2009). Since 2002, Lo Giudice’s art has been auctioned by Christie’s and Sotheby’s respectively.

Biography is from the artist’s website.

Marcello Lo Giudice

Marcello Lo Giudice

My tribute definitely morphed and transformed as the layers dried and I have a feeling it’s going to keep changing.  I used acrylics mixed with modeling paste and crackle paint.  It was so much fun to watch the painting create itself in a sense.  I hope you enjoy my piece today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 256!

Best,

Linda

 

Blu e Nero- Tribute to Marcello Lo Guidice Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Blu e Nero- Tribute to Marcello Lo Guidice
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View Blu e Nero- Tribute to Marcello Lo Guidice Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View
Blu e Nero- Tribute to Marcello Lo Guidice
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Blu e Nero- Tribute to Marcello Lo Guidice Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Blu e Nero- Tribute to Marcello Lo Guidice
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Blu e Nero- Tribute to Marcello Lo Guidice Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Blu e Nero- Tribute to Marcello Lo Guidice
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Blu e Nero- Tribute to Marcello Lo Guidice Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Blu e Nero- Tribute to Marcello Lo Guidice
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Day 225- Mimmo Paladino- Beyond Avant-Garde

It’s Day 225 and I’ve been wanting to paint a colorful piece today.  I’m also kind of pooped because of various activities…including a nice doggie hike in the heat today!  Join me in celebrating Mimmo Paladino today!

Mimmo Paladino

Mimmo Paladino

Mimmo Paladino, Italia, 1948

Mimmo Paladino

Mimmo Paladino (born 18 December 1948) is an Italian sculptor, painter and printmaker.

Mimmo Paladino was born Domenico Paladino in Paduli, Campania, southern Italy. He attended the Liceo Artistico of Benevento (Benevento Art High School) from 1964 to 1968, when minimalism and conceptualism dominated the international art scene. He played a leading part in the international revival of painting towards the end of the 1970s.

His first work, in line with the prevailing conceptual climate at

Mimmo Paladino- Calce 1995

Mimmo Paladino- Calce 1995

the time, showed an interest in photography, but in 1977 he had already moved on to the creation of two major tempera murals, one at the Toselli gallery in Milan and one at the Lucio Amelio gallery in Naples.

Mimmo Paladino, Italia, 1948

Mimmo Paladino

In 1980, he exhibited his work at the Venice Biennale, in the “Aperto 80” exhibition. Other Italian artists present included Sandro Chia, Francesco Clemente, Enzo Cucchi and Nicola de Maria: the leaders of the Transavantgarde movement. However, it was largely thanks to a picture exhibition held in a range of Central European museums, from the Kunsthalle in Basel, to the Museum Folkwang in Essen and the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, that Paladino finally consolidated his international fame. Meanwhile, two personal exhibitions were held simultaneously in New York that year, by Annina Nosei and Marian Goodman, extending his fame to the United States.

In 1981, the Kunstmuseum in Basel organised a major

Mimmo Paladino- Untitled Green Painting

Mimmo Paladino- Untitled Green Painting

personal exhibition of paintings, curated by Dieter Koepplin. This was then also put on at the Kestner-Gesellschaft inHanover, the Mannheimer Kunstverein in Mannheim and the Groninger Museum in Groningen. The Galleria d’Arte Moderna in Bologna also dedicated a personal exhibition to him that year.

In 2001, the general catalogue of his graphic work was published (Opera Grafica 1974-2001), curated by Enzo di Martino, for Art of this Century, New York – Paris. The Centro d’Arte Contemporanea Luigi Pecci, Prato, granted him the most comprehensive retrospective exhibition ever organised by an Italian museum, curated by Bruno Corà (2002).

The Perfect Room- Mimmo Paladino

The Perfect Room- Mimmo Paladino

In 2003, together with Sandro Chia, Francesco Clemente, Enzo Cucchi, and Nicola de Maria, he put on “Transavanguardia 1979-1985” at the Castello di Rivoli Museo di Arte Contemporanea, curated by Ida Gianelli. He also put on personal exhibitions at the Reggia di Caserta, and in Galleria Scognamiglio in Naples and Galleria Valentina Bonomo, Rome (2004). He presented a travelling exhibition on Pinocchio at modern art museums across eight Japanese cities, in Venice’s 17th-century Scola dei Battioro and then at the Museo Civico di Udine, the Museo di Palazzo Pio a Carpi and in Rotterdam (2004–2006).

In 2004, he created the doors for the Padre Pio church in San Giovanni Rotondo, designed by Renzo Piano. In 2005 he exhibited at the Museum der Moderne Rupertinum in Salzburg, and the Loggetta Lombardesca in Ravenna put on “Paladino in Scena”, a major exhibition of his theatre work, curated by Claudio Spadoni. In June that year, he put on an exhibition of major sculptures at the Galleria Internazionale d’Arte Moderna Ca’ Pesaro in Venice, curated by Enzo di Martino, for the Biennale.

At the end of 2005, he put on a major exhibition dedicated to Cervantes’ Don Quixote, featuring

Matemática 2 de Mimmo Paladino

Matemática 2 de Mimmo Paladino

Mimmo Paladino, Mathematica Portfolio with 6 Etchings.

Mimmo Paladino, Mathematica Portfolio with 6 Etchings.

paintings, sculptures, drawings and a film, at the Museo Capodimonte in Naples. As requested by Marco Müller, the film was presented at the 2006 Venice Film Festival, with great success. That year, he also created the doors for the San Giovanni Battista church in Lecce (designed by Franco Purini), concluded the intervention in piazza dei Conti Guidi, in Vinci, and exhibited at the Cardi and Christian Stein Gallery in Milan, and the Waddington Gallery in London.

In 2007, he produced two theatre set designs for OEdipus Rex and Cavalleria rusticana, for the Teatro Regio in Turin, and put on a personal exhibition at the Galleria Civica in Modena. In 2008 he presented a major installation at the Museo dell’Ara Pacis in Rome, set to music by Brian Eno. That year, the University of Lugano granted him an honoris causa degree in Architecture. In June 2008, “Porta di Lampedusa – Porta d’Europa”, an important monument in memory of migrants deceased at sea, was inaugurated.

In 2009, a group of his sculptures was shown “en plein air” in Orta San Giulio, Lake of Orta, in a show curated by Flavio Arensi; among the various works it was a horse floating to the shore in front of Villa Bossi, the Town Hall. On 10 April the same year he installed a big blue horse over four metres high (13 feet) at the Amphitheatre of Vittoriale degli Italiani di Gardone Riviera (BS), house-museum of the novelist Gabriele D’Annunzio.

He is interested in the relationship between visual art and sound and has worked with the sound

Mimmo Paladino

Mimmo Paladino

artist Brian Eno on the installation I Dormienti for the Roundhouse, London in 1999 and on a piece for the Ara Pacis Museum in Rome in 2008. Paladino’s works have been featured in Piran Coastal Galleries.

Paladino currently lives and works in Rome, Paduli and Mattinata.

Partial biography is from wikipedia.

I had a great time painting today’s piece.  I hope you enjoy it!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 226!

Best, Linda

Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Altro Auto- Tribute to Mimmo Paladino
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

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