Day 364- Karli Donna Young- Detach This Part

It’s Day 364 and I’m so happy and excited to do a tribute in honor of my very best friend who happens to be a great artist as well.  I’m so lucky to live with her and see her art everyday AND see her create her art.  Please join me in honoring Karli Donna Young today!

Karli Donna Young

Karli Donna Young

1921- Karli Donna Young

1921- Karli Donna Young

In the beginning there was Me, Carley Young, born and raised in a small town just outside of Vancouver, Canada. Growing up I loved horror movies, Stephen King novels, cartoons and making stuff out of other stuff (a gift from my mother, a crafty person in her own right).

I was an only child early on and spent lots of time pretending I lived inside of a John Bellairs book. I started painting in high school, but it didn’t really stick.

Me Me Me- Karli Donna Young

Me Me Me- Karli Donna Young

I couldn’t focus on just one thing. I tried sewing and knitting, photography and writing poetry. Again, nothing really stuck. I wanted to do too many things all at once. That’s still kinda true.

My mom says, lovingly, that I am like a lump of coal….there is a diamond in there somewhere, I just need to apply the appropriate pressure and time. I think she’s right.

Detach This Part- Karli Donna Young

Detach This Part- Karli Donna Young

I don’t want to be ONE thing. I want to be ALL the things. A painter, a quilter, a photographer and a ukulele superstar. I want to build furniture and sew dresses, paint signs and tap dance.

It’s hard to say why I make art, or why I make art the way that I do. I think I like to make things that are aesthetically pleasing to me or things that tap into

That Dream I had that One Time- Karli Donna Young

That Dream I had that One Time- Karli Donna Young

my own sense of nostalgia. I am in love with my childhood and all the magic that it holds for me.

I think that love comes through in all the things that I do, artistic or otherwise. I guess I just like to stand back once a project is complete, point and say “I MADE THAT”. I like the sense of accomplishment.

Drippy Painting- Karli Donna Young

Drippy Painting- Karli Donna Young

Oh, and I like to put glitter on everything.

I currently live on top of a big hill in El Cerrito, CA. where I ride bikes, make art, play ukulele and pretend I live inside a John Bellairs book.

~

Yay! I had so much fun doing today’s penultimate piece.  Glitter and great colors.  How lucky was I to be able to ask the artist herself throughout my creation any questions I had while creating my piece?  She also accompanied me to the art store to buy supplies this morning!  Including some oils for tomorrow’s Bob Ross tribute!  The FINAL painting!  I will see you then…on Day 365!  Woweeeee!

Best,

Linda

Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Side-View Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Side-View
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

 

Day 363- Aubrey Beardsley- The Beautifully Grotesque

It’s Day 363 and after today I only have 2 more left!  I can hardly believe it.  I’m sad and also excited to work on my other passions…my challenge for next year will be writing every day and hopefully finishing/submitting my books and short stories out into the world. 🙂  Also organizing an art show and designing a book of this project.  It’s going to be hard work, but it’s worth it.  I love today’s artist so please join me in honoring Aubrey Beardsley today!

Aubrey Beardsley

Aubrey Beardsley

The Climax - Aubrey Beardsley

The Climax – Aubrey Beardsley

Aubrey Vincent Beardsley (21 August 1872 – 16 March 1898) was an English illustrator and author. His drawings in black ink, influenced by the style of Japanese woodcuts, emphasized the grotesque, the decadent, and the erotic. He was a leading figure in the Aesthetic movement which also included Oscar Wilde and James A. McNeill Whistler. Beardsley’s contribution to the development of the Art Nouveau and poster styles was significant, despite the brevity of his career before his early death from tuberculosis.

Beardsley was born in Brighton, England, on 21 August 1872, and christened on 24 October 1872. His father, Vincent Paul Beardsley (1839–1909), was the son of a tradesman; Vincent had no trade himself, however, and instead relied

The Dancer's Reward- Aubrey Beardsley

The Dancer’s Reward- Aubrey Beardsley

on a private income from an inheritance that he received from his maternal grandfather when he was twenty-one years of age. Vincent’s wife, Ellen Agnus Pitt (1846–1932), was the daughter of Surgeon-Major William Pitt of the Indian Army.

Lucians Strange Creatures - Aubrey Beardsley

Lucians Strange Creatures – Aubrey Beardsley

The Pitts were a well-established and respected family in Brighton, and Beardsley’s mother married a man of lesser social status than might have been expected. Soon after their wedding, Vincent was obliged to sell some of his property in order to settle a claim for his “breach of promise” from another woman who claimed that he had promised to marry her. At the time of his birth, Beardsley’s family, which included his sister Mabel who was one year older, were living in Ellen’s familial home at 12 Buckingham Road.

In 1883 his family settled in London, and in the following year he appeared in public as an “infant musical phenomenon”, playing at several concerts with his sister.  In January 1885 he began to attend Brighton, Hove and Sussex Grammar School, where he would spend the next four years. His first poems, drawings and cartoons appeared in print in “Past and Present”, the school’s magazine. In 1888 he obtained a post in an architect’s office, and afterwards

Birth from the Calf of the Leg- Aubrey Beardsley

Birth from the Calf of the Leg- Aubrey Beardsley

one in the Guardian Life and Fire Insurance Company. In 1891, under the advice of Sir Edward Burne-Jones and Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, he took up art as a profession. In 1892 he attended the classes at the Westminster School of Art, then under Professor Fred Brown.

In 1892, Beardsley travelled to Paris, where he discovered the poster art of Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, and the Parisian fashion for Japanese prints, both of which would be major influences on his own style. Beardsley’s first commission was Le Morte d’Arthur by Thomas Malory (1893), which he illustrated for the publishing house J. M. Dent and Company.

His six years of major creative output can be divided into several periods, identified by the form of his signature. In the early period his work is mostly unsigned. During 1891 and 1892 he progressed to using his initials, A.V.B. In mid-1892, the period of Le Morte d’Arthur and The Bon Mots he used a Japanese-influenced mark which became progressively more graceful, sometimes accompanied by A.B. in block capitals.

Dragon Illustration- Aubrey Beardsley

Dragon Illustration- Aubrey Beardsley

He co-founded The Yellow Book with American writer Henry Harland, and for the first four editions he served as Art Editor and produced the cover designs and many illustrations for the magazine. He was also closely aligned with Aestheticism, the British counterpart of Decadence and Symbolism. Most of his images are done in ink, and feature large dark areas contrasted with large blank ones, and areas of fine detail contrasted with areas with none at all.

Beardsley was the most controversial artist of the Art Nouveau era, renowned for his dark and perverse images and grotesque erotica, which were the main themes of his later work. His illustrations were in black and white, against a white background. Some of his drawings, inspired by Japanese shunga artwork, featured enormous genitalia. His most famous erotic illustrations concerned themes of history and mythology; these include his

Aubrey Beardsley

Aubrey Beardsley

illustrations for a privately printed edition of Aristophanes’ Lysistrata, and his drawings for Oscar Wilde’s play Salome, which eventually premiered in Paris in 1896. Other major illustration projects included an 1896 edition of The Rape of the Lock by Alexander Pope, and the collection A Book of Fifty Drawings by Aubrey Beardsley (1897).

He also produced extensive illustrations for books and magazines (e.g. for a deluxe edition of Sir Thomas Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur) and worked for magazines such as The Studio and The Savoy, of which he was a co-founder. As a cofounder of The Savoy, Beardsley was able to pursue his writing as well as illustration, and a number of his writings, including Under the Hill (a story based on the Tannhäuser legend) and “The Ballad of a Barber” appeared in the magazine.

Aubrey Beardsley - Design for chapter heading from Le Morte Darthur, 1893

Aubrey Beardsley – Design for chapter heading from Le Morte Darthur, 1893

Beardsley was a caricaturist and did some political cartoons, mirroring Wilde’s irreverent wit in art. Beardsley’s work reflected the decadence of his era and his influence was enormous, clearly visible in the work of the French Symbolists, the Poster art Movement of the 1890s and the work of many later-period Art Nouveau artists such as Pape and Clarke.

Beardsley was a public as well as private eccentric. He said, “I have one aim—the grotesque. If I am not grotesque I am nothing.” Wilde said he had “a face like a silver hatchet, and grass green hair.” Beardsley was meticulous about his attire: dove-grey suits, hats, ties; yellow gloves. He would appear at his publisher’s in a morning coat and patent leather pumps.

Although Beardsley was associated with the homosexual clique that included Oscar Wilde and other English aesthetes, the details of his sexuality remain in question. He was generally regarded as asexual. Speculation about his sexuality include rumours of an incestuous relationship with his elder sister, Mabel, who

Illustrations to Lysistrata- Aubrey Beardsley

Illustrations to Lysistrata- Aubrey Beardsley

may have become pregnant by her brother and miscarried. During his entire career, Beardsley had recurrent attacks of the disease that would end it. He suffered frequent lung hemorrhages and was often unable to work or leave his home.

Beardsley converted to Roman Catholicism in March 1897, and subsequently begged his publisher, Leonard Smithers, to “destroy all copies of Lysistrata and bad drawings… by all that is holy all obscene drawings.” Smithers ignored Beardsley’s wishes, and actually continued to sell reproductions as well as forgeries of Beardsley’s work.

Aubrey Beardsley

Aubrey Beardsley

In 1897 deteriorating health prompted his move to the French Riviera, where he died a year later on 16 March 1898 at the Cosmopolitan Hotel in Menton, France, attended by his mother and sister. He was 25 years of age and the cause of death was tuberculosis. Following a Requiem Mass in Menton Cathedral the following day, his remains were interred in the adjacent cemetery.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece for today!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 364…which will be my penultimate painting and one done in tribute to my best friend!  Then it’s Bob Ross time!

Best,

Linda

Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Side-View Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Side-View
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Day 362- Michael Kupperman- Serious Absurdity

It’s Day 362 and I was super excited and a little nervous about doing a piece for today’s artist.  He’s one of my comic heroes and also a friend.  He’s accomplished so much the past years and I’m honored to honor him today.

Snake N' Bacon's Cartoon Cabaret- Michael Kupperman (My Bible for years...)

Snake N’ Bacon’s Cartoon Cabaret- Michael Kupperman (My Bible for years…)

I discovered his comic book, Snake N’ Bacon’s Cartoon Cabaret years ago and since then it’s changed my life and I can safely say a few people I know as well.

Funky Obsessed Robot- Michael Kupperman (First comic I read by him!)

Funky Obsessed Robot- Michael Kupperman (First comic I read by him!)

When I first read his comics I couldn’t believe that I had found something that embodied my sense of humor and absurdity so well.  I mentioned it and included a link to buy his book on my website years ago and shortly received an email from him.

At first I didn’t believe it was really him and he told me to check for his comic in The New Yorker in two weeks time.  I did and boy was my face red. We kept in touch via email and phone calls for quite a while and became friends.  To this day I’ve never met him in person and I don’t keep in touch with him as much, but I still consider him one of my favorite illustrators and authors.  I highly recommend everything he does to anyone who likes to laugh.  Please join me in honoring Michael Kupperman today!

 

 

 

Self-Portrait- Michael Kupperman

Self-Portrait- Michael Kupperman

My name is Michael Kupperman. I’m a comic artist, illustrator, and writer who lives in New York City. I’m the

Pagus- Michael Kupperman

Pagus- Michael Kupperman

author of three books of comics: Snake’N’Bacon’s Cartoon Cabaret, Tales Designed to Thrizzle Volume 1, and Tales Designed to Thrizzle Volume 2.

Twain and Einstein- Michael Kupperman

Twain and Einstein- Michael Kupperman

I also wrote and illustrated the humorous book Mark Twain’s Autobiography 1910-2010. Some of my work has been translated into animation, and I sometimes perform, occasionally dressed as Mark Twain.  I also enjoy reading my work in front of audiences. I also collect old books and magazines, and visit flea markets whenever possible. I hope you enjoy looking around my website.

Above is from his website.

Michael Kupperman, also known by the pseudonym P. Revess, is an American cartoonist and illustrator.

Snake N' Bacon- Michael Kupperman

Snake N’ Bacon- Michael Kupperman

He created the comic strips Up All Night and Found in the Street, and has written scripts for DC Comics. His work often dwells in surrealism and absurdity “played as seriously as possible.”

Tales Designed to Thrizzle #6 Cover- Michael Kupperman

Tales Designed to Thrizzle #6 Cover- Michael Kupperman

His work has appeared in The New YorkerThe New York TimesLA WeeklyThe Wall Street JournalScrewFortuneThe Independent on SundayLibérationNickelodeon MagazineThe Believer, and Heavy Metal, as well as in comics anthologiessuch as HotwireSnake EyesZero ZeroHyenaHodags and HodaddiesBlood OrangeRosetta106U, and Legal Action Comics. He has also worked on many books and projects for McSweeney’s.

Kupperman spent part of his childhood in England. Later on, back in the United States, his parents became professors at the University of Connecticut. His father is Joel J. Kupperman, the most famous of the original 1940s Quiz Kids. When Michael was young, between ages ten and twelve, he was fascinated with editorial cartoons, particularly the work of Pat Oliphant. As a young man, Kupperman did a political strip for the Washington City Paper.

HarperCollins published Kupperman’s book, Snake ‘n’ Bacon’s Cartoon Cabaret, in 2000. Parts of his work

Toilet Training Costumes- Michael Kupperman

Toilet Training Costumes- Michael Kupperman

were animated later that year for the Comedy Central show TV Funhouse, produced by Robert Smigel and Dino Stamatopoulos. In 2005, he started a comic book series called Tales Designed To Thrizzle, published by Fantagraphics. Currently Kupperman is writing sketches for a new comedy series starring Peter Serafinowicz, and he created a one-off pilot called Snake ‘N’ Bacon for the Adult Swim Network.

Biography above is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today.  Twain and Einstein are some of my favorite characters…it was VERY difficult to choose what I wanted to do.  Honestly, I think that’s why I put this tribute off for so long.  At this point, I can’t really put off the last of the artists, so while I was researching his art and reading his comics last night I fell upon a drawing of Twain that he did and had the idea for this piece.  I pretty much recreated that drawing and was going to just have me kissing Twain when I pictured Einstein in the background…then all the pieces fell together.  I really wanted to capture his artistic style and humor.  Although I’m sure I couldn’t completely capture his humor.  He is a genius.  Enjoy and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 363…only 3 left!  Eek.

Best,

Linda

Choosing Twain- Tribute to Michael Kupperman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Choosing Twain- Tribute to Michael Kupperman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Choosing Twain- Tribute to Michael Kupperman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Choosing Twain- Tribute to Michael Kupperman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Choosing Twain- Tribute to Michael Kupperman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Choosing Twain- Tribute to Michael Kupperman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Choosing Twain- Tribute to Michael Kupperman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Choosing Twain- Tribute to Michael Kupperman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Choosing Twain- Tribute to Michael Kupperman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Choosing Twain- Tribute to Michael Kupperman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 361- Yuko Shimizu- Living Her Childhood Dream

It’s Day 361 and I had so much fun creating today’s piece.  It took a large portion of the day, but I think it was worth it.  I didn’t use the same materials that the artist uses so it was a bit challenging, but I still think it turned out all right.  Please join me in honoring Yuko Shimizu…one of my new favorite artists!

Yuko Shimizu

Yuko Shimizu

Melancholy of Mechagirl book cover- Yuko Shimizu

Melancholy of Mechagirl book cover- Yuko Shimizu

YUKO SHIMIZU (清水裕子) is a Japanese illustrator based in New York City and instructor at School of Visual Arts.  Newsweek Japan has chosen Yuko as one of “100 Japanese People The World Respects(世界が尊敬する日本人100)” in 2009. Her first self-titled monograph was released world-wide from German publisher Gestalten in 2011. The first childrens book Barbed Wire Baseball (written by Marissa Moss) came out from Abrams in April, 2013.

You may have seen her work on The Gap T-shirts, Pepsi cans,  VISA billboards, Microsoft and Target ads, as well as on the book covers of Penguin, Scholastic, DC Comics, and on the pages of NY Times, Time, Rolling Stone, New Yorker and  in many other publications over last ten years.

But illustration is actually Yuko’s second career.  Although art has always been

Narayama Cover- Yuko Shimizu

Narayama Cover- Yuko Shimizu

her passion, she had initially chosen a more practical path of studying advertising and marketing at Waseda University and took a job in corporate PR in Tokyo. It never quite made her happy. At age 22, she was in mid-life crisis.

SCRUBS magazine Swimming in Fear- Yuko Shimizu

SCRUBS magazine Swimming in Fear- Yuko Shimizu

Yuko ended up working the corporate job for 11 years, so she could figure out what she really wanted in life, as well as to save up just enough to play a biggest gamble of her life: She moved to New York City in 1999, where she briefly spent her childhood, to study art for the first time. Yuko graduated with MFA from SVA’s Illustration as Visual Essay Program in 2003 and  has been illustrating since.  She has also been teaching the next generation of talents at the alma mater.

She works at her studio in midtown Manhattan, and fulfills her passion of world travel by giving lectures and

Now Hear CD cover- Yuko Shimizu

Now Hear CD cover- Yuko Shimizu

workshops around the world and various cities in the US. She has not gotten into mid-life crisis since she has became an artist.

Please do not mix her up with another Yuko Shimizu. This Yuko did NOT create Hello Kitty.

Above bio is from her website www.yukoart.com.

Shimizu was born in Tokyo, Japan, and grew up mostly in Kanagawa Prefecture though she and her family spent four years in Westchester County, New York, during her teenage years.

The Unwritten #50 Unwritten Fables 1 of 5- Yuko Shimizu

The Unwritten #50 Unwritten Fables 1 of 5- Yuko Shimizu

She graduated from Waseda University’s School of Commerce in 1988 as valedictorian and soon began her first job in the corporate PR department of one of Tokyo’s largest sogo shoshas.

Eleven years later, she resigned and moved to New York City to pursue her childhood dream of becoming an artist. She set out to earn a second bachelor’s degree, this time in illustration at the School of Visual Arts. However, after finishing her sophomore year, she was accepted into the MFA Illustration as Visual Essay program. She graduated in May 2003.

Shimizu began getting editorial illustration work soon after she completed her master’s degree, at first occasional assignments from the Village Voice and the New York Times, and soon after semi-regular ones for The New Yorker and Financial Times magazine. Now, she counts numerous well-known publications, publishing houses, and brands as clients.

In 2008, Shimizu illustrated P. Craig Russell’s comic book adaptations of Neil Gaiman’s The Sandman: The Dream Hunters, her first cover illustrations for Vertigo (DC Comics). She continued her relationship with the

Yuko x GoodSon T shirts project- Yuko Shimizu

Yuko x GoodSon T shirts project- Yuko Shimizu

imprint in 2009 when she began creating cover art for their ongoing comic book series The Unwritten, by Mike Carey (writer). The series was nominated for Eisner Awards in the Best Cover Artist category in 2011 and 2012.

In 2009, Shimizu collaborated with The Gap‘s AIDS charity line Product RED to create five limited-edition T-shirts (two for men, three for women) for the North American market. They quickly sold out both online and in stores.

Under the auspices of the Robin Hood Foundation and Pentagram’s charitable L!brary Initiative, Shimizu collaborated with graphic designer Stefan Sagmeister on an 11-panel mural for P.S. 96 in the Bronx. The project was showcased in the New York Times and in the commemorative book L!brary (Princeton Architectural Press, 2010).

Shimizu’s other notable works include her children’s book Barbed Wire Baseball (written by Marissa Moss, Abrams Books) to be published in Spring 2013 and her 2008 London billboards for Tiger Beer.

Above is from wikipedia.  All art is from artist’s website…link above.

I hope you enjoy today’s piece…I still can’t believe there’s only a handful of paintings left.  Whew.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 362.

Best,

Linda

セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 356- R. Black- Simplicity

It’s Day 356.  I want to thank my friend Peter DeMarco for suggesting today’s artist a while back and letting me borrow a book of his art.  I had a good time with today’s piece once I figured out exactly what I wanted to paint.  His artwork is intimidating and I believe he does some of it digitally so painting the entire piece in his style took quite a bit of time and was challenging.  But I like the result.  Please join me in honoring R. Black today.

Rich Black

Oakland-based artist R. Black, who designed posters for the Occupy movement and has completed a series of posters for the San Diego Opera, poses in the San Diego Civic Center Concourse on Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2012.

Oakland-based artist R. Black, who designed posters for the Occupy movement and has completed a series of posters for the San Diego Opera, poses in the San Diego Civic Center Concourse on Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2012.

Occupy Nation- R. Black

Occupy Nation- R. Black

Below is from an interview for Voice of San Diego.  It was difficult to find an extensive biography anywhere.

From Occupy to Opera: The Education of R. Black

The artist R. Black designed posters for the Occupy movement in Oakland last year, and they picked up some steam as the movement grew nationally. A publisher chose his work for the cover of a book about Occupy.

In interviews after that, he told reporters he had a different project in his sights: opera posters.

“Anything I want to do in life, I figure out how to make a poster so I can get to it,” he said earlier this month.

Black, who’s lived in San Diego a couple of times in his life, once wanted to be a comic book artist, but began designing posters for his friends’ rock shows and it stuck. San Diego Opera’s media relations director, Edward

Underworld- R. Black

Underworld- R. Black

Wilensky, a former record store buyer, was familiar with Black’s work. He asked the artist to design posters for San Diego Opera’s upcoming season.

Though still based in the Bay Area, Black converted an orange cargo truck into a living and working quarters and lives an itinerant life these days. We caught up with him earlier this month in the Civic Center Plaza, the place where Occupy’s San Diego contingent gathered last year, also in front of the theater where San Diego Opera performs.

Seems like a pretty wide gulf between Occupy and opera.

I disagree. Opera’s made by artists. Artists are typically liberal-type people. Opera’s all about high art. Maybe more a gulf with the audience.

But when I view opera, I view the stage. I view the artists. I view how stage theater has been so instrumental in changing people’s minds, and working with movements, and creating revolutions.

Bjork Poster- R. Black

Bjork Poster- R. Black

Have you gone to much opera in your life?

I’ve been to two. I’ve listened to a lot of operas.

What strikes you about the art form?

Melodrama. High art. The costumers, the sets, the singers. They’re living instruments. People who are just getting into opera — I think people get too wrapped up in trying to watch a production like a stage show. A lot of times people lose track of the voice. The whole thing is structured around this one voice. Just a glorified singer on stage, really.

I think if people just went and listened to the voice — there’s a living instrument on stage — and really key in on that, I think it would blow people’s minds. People who are already opera-lovers are already there. But young people need to focus. Once you start listening and tapping into that singer’s emotion, and understanding what the scene’s about even if you can’t understand the language, then you can start really losing yourself. But I think a lot of young people are blocked — by the Italian or by long things that they have no clue what’s going on.

Did you know all of these operas before you did ‘em?

No. This is my university right now. Especially thinking: Opera, that’s going to be a tough crowd to appeal to. I

Show Poster- R. Black

Show Poster- R. Black

wanted to make sure I knew a lot about it. I like to watch the opera, study it, read about it, ask a bunch of questions and try to get it.

Can you tell me about your decision-making on some of these? Let’s start with “Murder in the Cathedral.”

Well, Thomas Becket gets his head cut off by four knights. So, uh, that’s what I drew.

Growing up with comic books and pulp novels and stuff, my mom was a big romance reader, so very melodramatic covers. But with comic books especially, usually the comic book has an element that doesn’t really happen in the comic. So like Spiderman’s fighting a villain, and on the cover you’ll have the villain choking his neck and hanging him over the edge. Like, “Oh, Spiderman’s getting his butt kicked by this guy!”

Murder in the Cathedral- R. Black

Murder in the Cathedral- R. Black

In the book, that scene never happens. But it doesn’t matter, because when you’re seeing the book on the shelf, it’s like, ‘Oh, Spiderman’s in trouble’ — which he is — and he’s in a fight and he could die. It’s a cliffhanger. They heighten the story from inside the comic book for the cover.

I wanted to depict the key emotion of the play and highlight that. On “Murder in the Cathedral,” I think I might’ve been watching a lot of [Quentin] Tarantino while I was doing the posters, and then influenced by movies I love as well, old 1970s samurai movies. In every samurai movie, you cut somebody’s head off and you have a fountain of blood.

Without having to use crosses — I didn’t want to make it religious — I wanted to find a way to make his collar work and make it look like his head was separated.

I love posters with couples on them, in love. Especially for an art form like opera. So many people are involved in a partnership. When in relationships, I like looking at posters and feeling that — “Aw, falling in love again!”

So you’re watching an opera you’ve never seen before. Then what happens? Do you walk around with a sketchbook?

The hardest part is thinking about the poster, thinking of the idea. I spend lots of hours walking, sitting around,

Show Poster- R. Black

Show Poster- R. Black

mulling, going into depression sometimes, thinking about how to convey a message. Once in my mind I’ve got the idea, I don’t need to spend much time at my computer at all. My style is not a very complicated style. It’s not the style; it’s coming up with the idea that’s the hard part.

I generally walk about three or four hours a day.

What’s still out there; what’s the holy grail?

I would like to go bigger — directing something. Set designs, production designs, movie designs. Anything more grandiose that someone wants to throw a bunch of money behind. If someone just had that faith, because I haven’t done it yet.

I was thinking space tourism is coming up relatively soon. I’d love to be one of the first to do a space tourism poster. Like the old travel posters.

R. Black

R. Black

Do you make a living in art?

I say when you want to be an artist full time, you have to know how to live simply. It comes in waves. You can be rich one moment and poor the next. But if you don’t know how to be poor, you’re screwed. I think the reason why most people stop doing art is because it’s not a high-level living and they don’t know how to live simply. They need a house, they need a car. And all are great things. But, like being a monk, you have to know how to live very simply. And you have to make sacrifices.

I really focused my life on practicing what I preach: simplicity.

Description of R. Black’s Art Book Futura from Dark Horse Comics.

Sparkling as polished chrome, slick as oiled leather, hard as a scorned woman’s stare, the poster art of R. Black is renowned for its elegant line, razor-sharp design, and dark pulp motifs, creating an instantly recognizable synergy of cool elegance and hot eroticism. R. Black’s dark world is a steamy landscape of leggy sirens, gleaming

Futura Cover- R. Black

Futura Cover- R. Black

bikes, spiked heels, and leather-clad devils. Black’s voluminous catalog of work includes striking images created for Bauhaus, Elvis Costello, Misfits, GWAR, Ministry, and countless more, plus numerous album covers, t-shirt designs, and magazine covers, plus a memorable series of images for Original Sin Hard Cider, featured in this volume. Futura: The Art of R. Black is the first published collection of Black’s striking designs. Foreword by Brian Ewing.

* R. Black’s work is well known among rock fans and amongst collectors of the booming rock poster market.

~

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I had a great time creating it.  I took his advice and kept it simple. 🙂  I will see you tomorrow on Day 357!

Best,

Linda

L' Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

L’ Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View L' Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
L’ Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 L' Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
L’ Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 L' Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
L’ Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 L' Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
L’ Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 349- Jeffrey Alan Love- Living His Dream

It’s Day 349 and I have to say that today’s painting was so much fun, but equally difficult.  His pieces are so detailed and he has this style that is hard to emulate.  I am not only paying tribute a wonderful artist (who’s become one of my faves the past couple years) but I am also honored to call him a friend.

I went to Seoul American High School with him and haven’t seen him since then.  He has moved close by recently so hopefully I’ll see him in person again soon.  I was  excited to get back in touch with him and been super proud of his accomplishments as an artist and love the subject matter of his work.  He’s an example of someone who is living his dream.  Inspiration!  Join me in honoring Jeffrey Alan Love today.  PS it was so hard to emulate his lovely style, but I did my best with the materials I had.  Hopefully I captured his essence.

Jeffrey Alan Love

Jeffrey Alan Love

Wolves Cover for Simon Ing's Book, Gollancz- Jeffrey Alan Love

Wolves Cover for Simon Ing’s Book, Gollancz- Jeffrey Alan Love

Jeffrey Alan Love was born in Charleston, South Carolina and grew up in Germany, South Korea, Hawaii, and many points in-between. He attended The Colorado College and graduated with a B.A. in English: Creative Writing. He attended the Illustration Academy in 2008 and 2010, and was invited back as a Visiting Artist in 2013. From 2009 to 2011 he apprenticed with Sterling Hundley. He taught at Virginia Commonwealth University.

His work has been recognized by the Society of Illustrators (54), Spectrum (20), American Illustration (31), 3×3 No. 9, EXPOSÉ 11 and he received a Gold Medal from the Richmond Illustrator’s Club in 2011. He has worked for various clients

Night Upon the Mountain- Jeffrey Alan Love

Night Upon the Mountain- Jeffrey Alan Love

including The New Yorker, Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Tomb Raider, Gollancz, and The Progressive.

He currently lives in California.

Biography is from his website Drawger.  You can also view his art at his main website.

Below is a Q&A I found.

What are some of your favorite things about living and working in Richmond, VA?

I was born in South Carolina and have since lived in Germany, Texas, North Carolina, Nebraska, South Korea, Hawaii, Colorado, Florida, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Virginia. Some of my favorite things about Richmond are the community of artists that I’ve shared a studio with (Ally Hodges, Josh George, Sterling Hundley, Aaron Riley, Edward Kinsella, Andrew R. Wright, Leslie Herman) and that the low cost of living allows me to work less and enjoy my life outside of the studio.

How and when did you first become interested in art and illustration?

Cover for the book "Dreams of Shreds and Tatters" by Amanda Downum- Jeffrey Alan Love

Cover for the book “Dreams of Shreds and Tatters” by Amanda Downum- Jeffrey Alan Love

When I lived in Germany and was around 6 or 7, my parents brought back from England a book for me called Tales of King Arthur that was illustrated by Victor Ambrus—I was instantly hooked.

Do you keep a sketchbook? What is the balance between the art you create on paper versus In the computer?

I do keep a sketchbook. It used to be a lot more media studies and experimentation, rendered drawings and paintings, but in the last few years it has become mostly drawing from observation and lots of notes. It is honestly probably 80% writing these days.

What is the most important item in your studio?

I hope this doesn’t sound conceited, but I think it is my brain. I don’t think that people hire me for a specific media or technique that I use, as I tend to slip and slide around from piece to piece, sometimes traditional, sometimes digital, often a mix of many things—I think people seek me out for my personal voice, the way

Illustration for The New Yorker- Jeffrey Alan Love

Illustration for The New Yorker- Jeffrey Alan Love

that I solve problems, the way that I think.

What is the best book you’ve recently read?

Wolfhound Century by Peter Higgins. I was working with the publisher Gollancz and they sent me a copy and I was blown away by it. Find it and read it.

Who and what are some of your strongest influences?

I apprenticed with Sterling Hundley for a few years and that was hugely influential. Leonard Baskin, Ben Shahn,

Illustration for PLANSPONSOR- Jeffrey Alan Love

Illustration for PLANSPONSOR- Jeffrey Alan Love

and Henry Moore are always rolling around in the back of my mind as well. The books of Gene Wolfe, Frank Herbert, Iain M. Banks, Eiji Yoshikawa, and Cormac McCarthy.

What was your first professional assignment and how did you get it?

It was for The Progressive, working with Nick Jehlen. I think I got it through an email I had sent him, but Sterling Hundley may have had something to do with it as well.

What was the last art exhibition you saw and what did you take away from it?

The last art exhibition I saw was of an artist creating collages from xeroxes of old photos and newspaper clippings.  I actually really disliked the final pieces, but enjoyed how seemingly random color choices from the garish newsprint ads created an unexpected color palette to work with.

What is your favorite part of the creative process?

My favorite part of the creative process is when I find a way to fulfill the client’s need while also making the piece personal and meaningful to me.

Skyrim Poster- Jeffrey Alan Love

Skyrim Poster- Jeffrey Alan Love

How do you go about finding great clients?

Looking through the various illustration annuals is great for seeing who is working where, and if they are being adventurous in their choice of illustrators.

What is/would be your karaoke song?

Islands in the Stream by Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton

What is your hobby?

I love football (soccer). Growing up in Germany I somehow became a fan of Liverpool FC and have followed them ever since.

Where do you teach—and what do you like best about teaching?

I teach at Virginia Commonwealth University. My favorite thing about teaching is seeing students start to believe in themselves and their work as they improve. Self-confidence is so powerful at that stage of development.

What advice would you give a young artist on selecting an art school or college?

Research what classes are actually offered, and research the work of the faculty to see if they are doing the sort

Jeffrey Alan Love

Jeffrey Alan Love

of work that you would like to do yourself. But also don’t feel like you have to go to art school or college to be a success. I had to drop out of VCU during my sophomore year and no one has ever asked to see my degree, and somehow I now teach there. Anything is possible and there are many roads that lead to where you want to go.

Above is from AI-AP/DART (Design Arts Daily).

~

I hope you enjoy my tribute today!  I based it on a book that I am writing.  I wish I had more time to work on this piece…but I guess that’s a part of the whole challenge.  Of course when I was finished at the end of the day…I had all these other ideas how to make it better.  Sheesh.  I’m realizing that it’s harder to do tributes for friends than for artists like Picasso.  I think it’s because I personally know them and want to do their work justice!  I’m pretty sure Picasso’s not going to come haunt me from the grave.  Whew…only 16 to go?  I will see you tomorrow on Day 350…no only 15!!  Eeeek.

Best,

Linda

Home Sweet Helheim- Tribute to Jeffrey Alan Love Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Home Sweet Helheim- Tribute to Jeffrey Alan Love
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View Home Sweet Helheim- Tribute to Jeffrey Alan Love Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View
Home Sweet Helheim- Tribute to Jeffrey Alan Love
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Home Sweet Helheim- Tribute to Jeffrey Alan Love Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Home Sweet Helheim- Tribute to Jeffrey Alan Love
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Home Sweet Helheim- Tribute to Jeffrey Alan Love Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Home Sweet Helheim- Tribute to Jeffrey Alan Love
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Home Sweet Helheim- Tribute to Jeffrey Alan Love Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Home Sweet Helheim- Tribute to Jeffrey Alan Love
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Day 343- Maurice Sendak- Beautiful Things in the World

It’s Day 343 and I have to say that I’m super duper excited about today’s artist.  He’s one of my favorite people ever and was such an influence on me as an artist and writer.  Please join me in honoring Maurice Sendak today!

Maurice Sendak

Maurice Sendak

Maurice Sendak

Maurice Sendak

Maurice Bernard Sendak (June 10, 1928 – May 8, 2012) was an American illustrator and writer of children’s books. He became widely known for his book Where the Wild Things Are, first published in 1963. Born to Jewish-Polish parents, his childhood was affected by the death of many of his family members during the Holocaust. Besides Where the Wild Things Are,Sendak also wrote works such as In the Night Kitchen and Outside Over There, and illustrated Little Bear.

Sendak was born in New York City in the borough of Brooklyn to Polish Jewish immigrant parents named Sadie (née Schindler) and Philip Sendak, a dressmaker. Sendak described his childhood as a “terrible situation” due to the death of members of his extended family during the Holocaust which exposed him at a young age to the concept of mortality. His love of books began when, as a child, he developed health problems and was confined to his bed. He decided to become an illustrator after watching Walt Disney’s film Fantasia at the age of twelve. One of his first professional commissions was to create window displays for the toy store F.A.O. Schwarz. His illustrations were first published in 1947 in a textbook titled Atomics for the Millions by Dr. Maxwell Leigh Eidinoff. He spent much of the 1950s illustrating children’s books written by others before beginning to write his own stories.

His older brother Jack Sendak also became an author of children’s books, two of which were illustrated by

'My Brother’s Book' by Maurice Sendak, 2013

‘My Brother’s Book’ by Maurice Sendak, 2013

Maurice in the 1950s.

Maurice was the youngest of three siblings. His sister, Natalie, was nine years older than he, and his brother, Jack, was five years older than he.

Sendak gained international acclaim after writing and illustrating Where the Wild Things Are, edited by Ursula Nordstrom at Harper & Row. It features Max, a boy who “rages against his mother for being sent to bed without any supper”. The book’s depictions of fanged monsters concerned some parents when it was first published, as his characters were somewhat grotesque in appearance. Before Where the Wild Things Are, Sendak was best known for illustrating Else Holmelund Minarik’s Little Bear series of books.

Sendak later recounted the reaction of a fan:

A little boy sent me a charming card with a little drawing on it. I loved it. I answer all my children’s letters – sometimes very hastily – but this one I lingered over. I sent him a card and I drew a picture of a Wild Thing on it. I wrote, ‘Dear Jim: I loved your card.’ Then I got a letter back from his mother and she said: ‘Jim loved your card so much he ate it.’ That to me was one of the highest compliments I’ve ever received. He didn’t care that it was an original Maurice Sendak drawing or anything. He saw it, he loved it, he ate it.
Where The Wild Things Are- Maurice Sendak

Where The Wild Things Are- Maurice Sendak

Almost fifty years later, School Library Journal sponsored a survey of readers which identified Where the Wild Things Are as top picture book. The librarian who conducted it observed that there was little doubt what would be voted number one and highlighted its designation by one reader as a watershed, “ushering in the modern age of picture books”. Another called it “perfectly crafted, perfectly illustrated … simply the epitome of a picture book” and noted that Sendak “rises above the rest in part because he is subversive”.

When Sendak saw a manuscript of Zlateh the Goat and Other Stories, the first children’s book by Isaac Bashevis Singer, on the desk of an editor at Harper & Row, he offered to illustrate the book. It was first published in 1966 and received a Newbery Honor. Sendak was delighted and enthusiastic about the collaboration. He once wryly remarked that his parents were “finally” impressed by their youngest child when he collaborated with Singer.

His book In the Night Kitchen, originally issued in 1970, has often been subjected to censorship for its drawings of a young boy prancing naked through the story. The book has been challenged in several American states including Illinois, New Jersey, Minnesota, and Texas. In the Night Kitchen regularly appears on the American Library Association’s list of “frequently challenged and banned books”. It was listed number 21 on the “100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 1990–1999”.

His 1981 book Outside Over There is the story of a girl, Ida, and her sibling jealousy and responsibility. Her

In the Night Kitchen- Maurice Sendak

In the Night Kitchen- Maurice Sendak

father is away and so Ida is left to watch her baby sister, much to her dismay. Her sister is kidnapped by goblins and Ida must go off on a magical adventure to rescue her. At first, she is not really eager to get her sister and nearly passes her sister right by when she becomes absorbed in the magic of the quest. In the end, she rescues her baby sister, destroys the goblins, and returns home committed to caring for her sister until her father returns home.

Sendak was an early member of the National Board of Advisors of the Children’s Television Workshop during the development stages of the Sesame Street television series. He also adapted his book Bumble Ardy into an animated sequence for the series, with Jim Henson as the voice of Bumble Ardy. He wrote and designed three other animated stories for the series: “Seven Monsters” (which never aired), “Up & Down”, and “Broom Adventures”.

Sendak produced an animated television production based on his work titled Really Rosie, featuring the voice of Carole King, which was broadcast in 1975 and is available on video (usually as part of video compilations of his work). An album of the songs was also produced. He contributed the opening segment to Simple Gifts, a Christmas collection of six animated shorts shown on PBS TV in 1977 and later issued on VHS in 1993. He adapted his book Where the Wild Things Are for the stage in 1979. Additionally, he designed sets for many operas and ballets, including the award-winning (1983) Pacific Northwest Ballet production of Tchaikovsky’s The Nutcracker, Houston Grand Opera’s productions of Mozart’s The Magic Flute (1981) and Humperdinck’s Hansel and Gretel (1997), Los Angeles County Music Center’s 1990 production of Mozart’s Idomeneo, and the New York City Opera’s 1981 production of Janáček’s The Cunning Little Vixen.

Maurice Sendak

Maurice Sendak

In the 1990s, Sendak approached playwright Tony Kushner to write a new English version of the Czech composer Hans Krása’s children’s Holocaust opera Brundibár. Kushner wrote the text for Sendak’s illustrated book of the same name, published in 2003. The book was named one of the New York Times Book Review’s 10 Best Illustrated Books of 2003.

In 2003, Chicago Opera Theatre produced Sendak and Kushner’s adaptation of Brundibár. In 2005, Berkeley Repertory Theatre, in collaboration with Yale Repertory Theatre and Broadway’s New Victory Theater, produced a substantially reworked version of the Sendak-Kushner adaptation.

In 2004 Sendak worked with the Shirim Klezmer Orchestra in Boston on their project “Pincus and the Pig: A Klezmer Tale”. This Klezmer version of Sergei Prokofiev’s famous musical story for children, Peter and the Wolf featured Maurice Sendak as the narrator. He also illustrated the cover art.

Sendak also created the children’s television program Seven Little Monsters.

Sendak mentioned in a September 2008 article in The New York Times that he was gay and had lived with his partner, psychoanalyst Dr. Eugene Glynn, for 50 years before Glynn’s death in May 2007. Revealing that he never told his parents, he said, “All I wanted was to be straight so my parents could be happy. They never, never,

Where The Wild Things Are- Maurice Sendak

Where The Wild Things Are- Maurice Sendak

never knew.”  Sendak’s relationship with Glynn had been mentioned by other writers before (e.g., Tony Kushner in 2003) and Glynn’s 2007 death notice had identified Sendak as his “partner of fifty years”. After his partner’s death, Sendak donated $1 million to the Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services in memory of Glynn who had treated young people there. The gift will name a clinic for Glynn.

Sendak was an atheist. In a 2011 interview he agreed that he didn’t believe in God and elaborated. He remarked that religion, and belief in God “must have made life much easier [for some religious friends of his]. It’s harder for us non-believers.”

Maurice Sendak drew inspiration and influences from a vast number of painters, musicians and authors. Going back to his childhood, one of his earliest memorable influences was actually his father, Philip Sendak. According to Maurice, his father would relate tales from the Old Testament; however, he would embellish them with racy details. Not realizing that this was inappropriate for children, little Maurice would frequently be sent home after retelling his father’s “softcore Bible tales” at school.

Nutshell Library- Maurice Sendak

Nutshell Library- Maurice Sendak

Growing up, Sendak developed from other influences, starting with Walt Disney’s Fantasia and Mickey Mouse. Sendak and Mickey Mouse were born in the same year and Sendak described Mickey as a source of joy and pleasure while growing up. He has been quoted as saying, “My gods are Herman Melville, Emily Dickinson, Mozart. I believe in them with all my heart.” Elaborating further, he has explained that reading Emily Dickinson’s works helps him to remain calm in an otherwise hectic world: “And I have a little tiny Emily Dickinson so big that I carry in my pocket everywhere. And you just read three poems of Emily. She is so brave. She is so strong. She is such a passionate little woman. I feel better.” Likewise, of Mozart, he has said, “When Mozart is playing in my room, I am in conjunction with something I can’t explain. […] I don’t need to. I know that if there’s a purpose for life, it was for me to hear Mozart.”

Sendak died on May 8, 2012, in Danbury, Connecticut, at Danbury Hospital, from complications of a stroke. His remains were cremated.

The New York Times obituary called Sendak “the most important children’s book artist of the 20th century.” Author Neil Gaiman remarked, “He was unique, grumpy, brilliant, gay, wise, magical and made the world better by creating art in it.” Author R. L. Stine called Sendak’s death “a sad day in children’s books and for the world.”

Maurice Sendak

Maurice Sendak

“We are all honored to have been briefly invited into his world,” remarked comedian Stephen Colbert.

The 2012 season of Pacific Northwest Ballet’s “The Nutcracker,” for which Sendak designed the set, was dedicated to his memory.

His final book, Bumble-Ardy, was published eight months before his death. A posthumous picture book, titled

My Brother’s Book, was published in February 2013.

The film Her was dedicated in memory of him and Where the Wild Things Are co-star James Gandolfini. The film had been directed by Spike Jonze, who had also directed the motion picture adaptation of Where the Wild Things Are.

Partial biography is from wikipedia.

“There are so many beautiful things in the world which I will have to leave when I die, but I’m ready, I’m ready, I’m ready.”- Maurice Sendak

I of course had to pay homage to Where the Wild Things Are since it was one of my all time favorite books growing up!  Instead of Max it’s me!  I hope you enjoy it and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 344…then one more until there’s only 20 paintings left!  Aaaah!

Best,

Linda

Me and my Monster- Tribute to Maurice Sendak Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor, Pencil & Ink on Paper mounted onto wood panel

Me and my Monster- Tribute to Maurice Sendak
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor, Pencil & Ink on Paper mounted onto wood panel

Side-View Me and my Monster- Tribute to Maurice Sendak Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor, Pencil & Ink on Paper mounted onto wood panel

Side-View
Me and my Monster- Tribute to Maurice Sendak
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor, Pencil & Ink on Paper mounted onto wood panel

Close-Up 1 Me and my Monster- Tribute to Maurice Sendak Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor, Pencil & Ink on Paper mounted onto wood panel

Close-Up 1
Me and my Monster- Tribute to Maurice Sendak
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor, Pencil & Ink on Paper mounted onto wood panel

Close-Up 2 Me and my Monster- Tribute to Maurice Sendak Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor, Pencil & Ink on Paper mounted onto wood panel

Close-Up 2
Me and my Monster- Tribute to Maurice Sendak
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor, Pencil & Ink on Paper mounted onto wood panel

Close-Up 3 Me and my Monster- Tribute to Maurice Sendak Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor, Pencil & Ink on Paper mounted onto wood panel

Close-Up 3
Me and my Monster- Tribute to Maurice Sendak
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor, Pencil & Ink on Paper mounted onto wood panel

Day 290- Kathe Kollwitz- Let Not Another Man Fall

It’s Day 290 and my friend Paul asked me if I had paid tribute to today’s artist and I hadn’t even heard of her.  I decided to do some research and she’s amazing.  I was also excited to attempt a charcoal portrait since I don’t have much experience (except my first year of art school) with that medium.  I had tons of fun and got really dirty.  Join me in honoring Kathe Kollwitz today.

Kathe Kollwitz

Kathe Kollwitz

Kathe Kollwitz- Woodcut

Kathe Kollwitz- Woodcut

Käthe Kollwitz (8 July 1867 – 22 April 1945) was a German painter, printmaker, and sculptor whose work offered an eloquent and often searing account of the human condition, and the tragedy of war, in the first half of the 20th century. Her empathy for the less fortunate, expressed most famously through the graphic means of drawing, etching, lithography, and woodcut, embraced the victims of poverty, hunger, and war. Initially her work was grounded in Naturalism, and later took on Expressionistic qualities.

Kollwitz was born as Käthe Schmidt in Königsberg (now Kaliningrad, Russia), East Prussia, the fifth child in her family. Her father, Karl Schmidt, was a radical Social democrat

Mother with Two Children- Kathe Kollwitz

Mother with Two Children- Kathe Kollwitz

who became a mason and house builder. Her mother, Katherina Schmidt, was the daughter of Julius Rupp, a Lutheran pastor who was expelled from the official Evangelical State Church in Prussia and founded an independent congregation. Her education was greatly influenced by her grandfather’s lessons in religion and socialism.

Recognizing her talent, Kollwitz’s father arranged for her to begin lessons in drawing and copying plaster casts when she was twelve. At sixteen she began

Widows and Orphans- Kathe Kollwitz

Widows and Orphans- Kathe Kollwitz

making drawings of working people, the sailors and peasants she saw in her father’s offices. Wishing to continue her studies at a time when no colleges or academies were open to young women, Kollwitz enrolled in an art school for women in Berlin. There she studied with Karl Stauffer-Bern, a friend of the artist Max Klinger. The etchings of Klinger, their technique and social concerns, were an inspiration to Kollwitz.

At the age of seventeen, Kollwitz became engaged to Karl Kollwitz, a medical student. In 1888, she went to Munich to study at the Women’s Art School, where she realized her strength was not as a painter, but a draughtsman. In 1890, she returned to Königsberg, rented her first studio, and continued to draw labourers.

In 1891, Kollwitz married Karl, by this time a doctor, who tended to the poor in

Germany's Children Are Starving- Kathe Kollwitz

Germany’s Children Are Starving- Kathe Kollwitz

Berlin, where the couple moved into the large apartment that would be Kollwitz’s home until it was destroyed in World War II. The proximity of her husband’s practice proved invaluable:

“The motifs I was able to select from this milieu (the workers’ lives) offered me, in a simple and forthright way, what I discovered to be beautiful…. People from the bourgeois sphere were altogether without appeal or interest. All middle-class life seemed pedantic to me. On the other hand, I felt the proletariat had guts. It was not until much later…when I got to know the women who would come to my husband for help, and incidentally also to me, that I was powerfully moved by the fate of the proletariat and everything connected with its way of life…. But what I would like to emphasize once more is that compassion and commiseration were at first of very little importance in attracting me to the representation of proletarian life; what mattered was simply that I found it beautiful.”

Survivors- Kathe Kollwitz

Survivors- Kathe Kollwitz

It is believed Kollwitz suffered from anxiety during her childhood due to the death of her siblings, including the early death of her younger brother, Benjamin. More recent research suggests that Kollwitz may have suffered from a childhood neurological disorder called Alice in Wonderland syndrome, commonly associated with migraines and sensory hallucinations.

Between the births of her sons — Hans in 1892 and Peter in 1896 — Kollwitz saw a performance of Gerhart Hauptmann’s The Weavers, which dramatized the oppression of the Silesian weavers in Langembielau and their failed revolt in 1842. Inspired, the artist ceased work on a series of etchings she had intended to illustrate Émile Zola’s Germinal, and produced a cycle of six works on the weavers theme, three lithographs (PovertyDeath, and Conspiracy) and three etchings with aquatint and sandpaper (March of the WeaversRiot, and The End). Not a literal illustration of the drama, the works were a free and naturalistic expression of the workers’ misery, hope, courage, and, eventually, doom. The cycle was exhibited publicly in 1898 to wide acclaim. But when Adolf Menzel nominated her work for the gold medal of the Große Deutsche Kunstausstellung in Berlin, Kaiser Wilhelm II withheld his approval. Nevertheless, The Weavers became Kollwitz’ most widely acclaimed work.

Kollwitz’s second major cycle of works was the Peasant War, which, subject to many preliminary drawings and discarded ideas in

Self-Portrait- Kathe Kollwitz

Self-Portrait- Kathe Kollwitz

lithography, occupied her from 1902 to 1908. The German Peasants’ War was a violent revolution which took place in Southern Germany in the early years of the Reformation, beginning in 1525; peasants who had been treated as slaves took arms against feudal lords and the church. As was The Weavers, this subject, too, might have been suggested by a Hauptmann drama, Florian Geyer. However, the initial source of Kollwitz’s interest dated to her youth, when she and her brother Konrad playfully imagined themselves as barricade fighters in a revolution. The artist identified with the character of Black Anna, a woman cited as a protagonist in the uprising. When completed, the Peasant Warconsisted of pieces in etching, aquatint, and soft ground: PlowingRapedSharpening the ScytheArming in the VaultOutbreakAfter the Battle (which, eerily premonitory, features a mother searching through corpses in the night, looking for her son), and The Prisoners. In all, the works were technically more impressive than those of The Weavers, owing to their greater size and dramatic command of light and shadow. They are Kollwitz’s highest achievements as an etcher.

Kathe Kollwitz

Kathe Kollwitz

While working on Peasant War, Kollwitz twice visited Paris, and enrolled in classes at the Académie Julian in order to learn how to sculpt. The etching Outbreak was awarded the Villa Romana prize, which provided for a year’s stay, in 1907, in a studio in Florence. Although Kollwitz did no work, she later recalled the impact of early Renaissance art.

After her return, Kollwitz continued to exhibit her work, but was impressed by the work of younger compatriots—the Expressionists andBauhaus—and resolved to simplify her means of expression. Subsequent works such as Runover, 1910, and Self-Portrait, 1912, show this new direction. She also continued to work on sculpture.

Kollwitz lost her youngest son, Peter, on the battlefield in World War I in October 1914, prompting a prolonged depression. By the end of the year she had made drawings for a monument to Peter and his fallen comrades; she destroyed the monument in 1919 and began again in 1925. The memorial, titled The Grieving Parents, was finally completed and placed in the Belgian cemetery of Roggevelde in 1932. Later, when Peter’s grave was moved to the nearby Vladslo German war cemetery, the statues were also moved.

In 1917, on her fiftieth birthday, the galleries of Paul Cassirer provided a retrospective exhibition of one hundred and fifty drawings by

Self Portrait with Hand on Brow- Kathe Kollwitz

Self Portrait with Hand on Brow- Kathe Kollwitz

Kollwitz.

Kollwitz was a committed socialist and pacifist, who was eventually attracted to communism; her political and social sympathies found expression in the “memorial sheet for Karl Liebknecht” and in her involvement with the Arbeitsrat für Kunst, a part of the Social Democratic Party government in the first few weeks after the war. As the war wound down and a nationalistic appeal was made for old men and children to join the fighting, Kollwitz implored in a published statement:

“There has been enough of dying! Let not another man fall!”

Beggars- Kathe Kollwitz

Beggars- Kathe Kollwitz

While working on the sheet for Karl Liebknecht, she found etching insufficient for expressing monumental ideas. After viewing woodcuts by Ernst Barlach at the Secessionexhibitions, she completed the Liebknecht sheet in the new medium and made about thirty woodcuts by 1926.

In 1920 Kollwitz was elected a member of the Prussian Academy of Arts, the first woman to be so honored. Membership entailed a regular income, a large studio, and a full professorship.

In 1933, after the establishment of the National-Socialist regime, the Nazi Party authorities forced her to resign her place on the faculty of the Akademie der Künste following her support of the Dringender Appell. Her work was removed from museums. Although she was banned from exhibiting, one of her “mother and child” pieces was used by the Nazis for propaganda.

Working now in a smaller studio, in the mid-1930s she completed her last major cycle of lithographs, Death, which consisted of eight stones: Woman Welcoming DeathDeath with Girl in LapDeath Reaches for a Group of ChildrenDeath Struggles with a WomanDeath on the HighwayDeath as a FriendDeath in the Water, and The Call of Death.

In July 1936, she and her husband were visited by the Gestapo, who threatened her with arrest and deportation to a Nazi concentration

Kathe Kollwitz

Kathe Kollwitz

camp; they resolved to commit suicide if such a prospect became inevitable. However, Kollwitz was by now a figure of international note, and no further action was taken. On her seventieth birthday, she “received over one hundred and fifty telegrams from leading personalities of the art world”, as well as offers to house her in the United States, which she declined for fear of provoking reprisals against her family.

She outlived her husband (who died from an illness in 1940) and her grandson Peter, who died in action in World War II two years later.

She was evacuated from Berlin in 1943. Later that year, her house was bombed and many drawings, prints, and documents were lost. She moved first to Nordhausen, then to Moritzburg, a town near Dresden, where she lived her final months as a guest of Prince Ernst Heinrich of Saxony. Kollwitz died just before the end of the war.

Kollwitz made a total of 275 prints, in etching, woodcut and lithography. Virtually the only portraits she made during her life were images of herself, of which there are at least fifty. These self-portraits constitute a lifelong honest self-appraisal; “they are psychological milestones”.

Partial biography is from wikipedia.

I decided just to do a self portrait and not make a commentary on anything political.  Although the more I think about it, I should’ve at least done a portrait of me in pain…crying or something.  I love the story of this artist’s life and I think her artwork is harrowingly beautiful and haunting.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 291!

Best,

Linda

Self-Portrait- Tribute to Kathe Kollwitz Linda Cleary 2014 Stain & Charcoal on Canvas

Self-Portrait- Tribute to Kathe Kollwitz
Linda Cleary 2014
Stain & Charcoal on Canvas

Side-View Self-Portrait- Tribute to Kathe Kollwitz Linda Cleary 2014 Stain & Charcoal on Canvas

Side-View
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Kathe Kollwitz
Linda Cleary 2014
Stain & Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Kathe Kollwitz Linda Cleary 2014 Stain & Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Kathe Kollwitz
Linda Cleary 2014
Stain & Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Kathe Kollwitz Linda Cleary 2014 Stain & Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Kathe Kollwitz
Linda Cleary 2014
Stain & Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Kathe Kollwitz Linda Cleary 2014 Stain & Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Kathe Kollwitz
Linda Cleary 2014
Stain & Charcoal on Canvas

 

Day 194- Esphyr Slobodkina- Abstract Pioneer

It’s Day 194 and I know I’ve been focusing a lot on abstract artists because of my back to back house guests and being busy.  I found this artist while researching painters and fell in love with her style.  It’s nice to find woman artist pioneers in any art movement.  Been enjoying this style.  Join me in honoring Esphyr Slobodkina today!

Esphyr Slobodkina

Esphyr Slobodkina

Esphyr Slobodkina, Crossroad #2, ca. 1942-5, Oil on fiberboard

Esphyr Slobodkina, Crossroad #2, ca. 1942-5, Oil on fiberboard

Esphyr Slobodkina (September 22, 1908 – July 21, 2002) was a popular artist, author, and illustrator, best known for her classic 1940 children’s book Caps for Sale.

Esphyr Slobodkina (ESS-phere sloh-BOD-kee-nah) was born in Chelyabinsk, Siberia, Russia in

Esphyr Slobodkina

Esphyr Slobodkina

1908. During the Russian Revolution of 1917, she emigrated with her family to Harbin, Manchuria (China), where she studied art and architecture. Slobodkina immigrated to theUnited States in 1929. She enrolled at the National Academy of Design. It was there that she met her future husband, Russian-born Ilya Bolotowsky (they got divorced in 1938). Along with Ilya, Slobodkina was a founding member of the American Abstract Artists group, which began amid controversy in 1936. Like other Russian modernists, surrounded by ancient icons and a rich craft tradition, Slobodkina developed a lifelong appreciation of clear, rich colors, and flat, stylized forms.

In 1937 Slobodkina met the children’s author Margaret Wise Brown. In an effort to find work as an illustrator, Slobodkina wrote and illustrated a story with collage called Mary And The Poodies to present to Brown. This began a new career for Slobodkina, who illustrated many children’s stories for Ms. Brown (including Sleepy ABCs and the Big and Little series) while still continuing her work as an abstract artist.

"Mural Sketch No. 1," Esphyr Slobodkina, 1937, oil on Masonite, 9.5 x 22.5 inches, Samuel P. Harn Museum, University of Florida

“Mural Sketch No. 1,” Esphyr Slobodkina, 1937, oil on Masonite, 9.5 x 22.5 inches, Samuel P. Harn Museum, University of Florida

In the late 1930s, Slobodkina began to write and illustrate her own children’s books. Among her 24 published works Caps for Sale (1940) is considered a children’s book classic; it has sold more than two million copies and has been translated into more than a dozen languages. Caps for Sale won the Lewis Carroll Shelf Award in 1958. Other children’s works include The Wonderful Feast (written in 1928, first published in 1955), The Clock (1956), The Long Island Ducklings (1961), and Pezzo the Peddler and the Circus Elephant (1967), reissued as Circus Caps for Sale (2002). In 1948, feeling the need to get out of New York City and having saved some money, Slobodkina built a house in Great Neck, New York and moved there with her mother; they remained in the house until 1977.

During this period she was invited back to the Yaddo artist’s colony and also

Esphyr Slobodkina (Rus. 1908-2002) Untitled (Pink and Blue Abstraction) 1940's gouache on paperboard

Esphyr Slobodkina (Rus. 1908-2002) Untitled (Pink and Blue Abstraction) 1940’s gouache on paperboard

accepted a residency at the MacDowell Colony in New Hampshire. In 1960, Slobodkina married William Urquhart, a business owner whom she had met in 1942 at an American Abstract Artists show. They were married for three years, but in 1963, Urquhart died after suffering from a prolonged illness. Slobodkina stated that “it took me some six years to just recover from the grief and life in general was never the same”… In 1967, Slobodkina and her mother began travelling to Florida to be close to her sister. Annual trips to the southern state soon became impractical because of her mother’s failing health and in 1979, they permanently relocated to Hallandale, Florida. After the death of Slobodkina’s brother-in-law in 1974 and her mother in 1975, her sister Tamara joined her in her Hallandale home. The two sisters continued to live together for the rest of Slobodkina’s life, moving from Hallandale to West Hartford, CT, then back to Great Neck before settling in Glen Head, Long Island.

Esphyr Slobodkina

Esphyr Slobodkina

Slobodkina died in 2002.

Through the 1930s Slobodkina developed her unique method of working in oils; a flattened, abstracted style that incorporated line, suspended or interlocking forms. But by the late 30s and 40s Slobodkina was using a variety of techniques and materials. Many of her works are collages and constructions, integrating paint, wood, plastic, and metal with everyday objects such as parts of disassembled typewriters and computers into amusing and often great art. Slobodkina’s work eventually received high acclaim.

“Her life’s work pulled imagery and objects together into magnificent compositions time and time

Esphyr Slobodkina

Esphyr Slobodkina

again,” stated Harold Porcher, an authority on Slobodkina’s art. “I equate an artist like Esphyr to the American mockingbird. A mockingbird borrows and embellishes the songs of other birds around him. Often he changes the phrasing as he incorporates each element into an orchestration of birdsong. The abstract expressionist movement shifted the center of the art world from Paris to New York City – where it remains today – and Esphyr and her contemporaries were the torchbearers, establishing abstraction as a viable form of expression in America.”

Esphyr Slobodkina Composition, 1940. Oil on gessoed Masonite

Esphyr Slobodkina Composition, 1940. Oil on gessoed Masonite

In the last years of the 20th century, Slobodkina continued her productivity, alternating serious work on abstract paintings with the more relaxing activities – to her – of creating sculpture, wall hangings, multimedia constructions, dolls and jewelry, often made out of old typewriter and computer parts.

As Anne Cohen DePietro wrote, “Traversing nearly a century of inspiration, it is Slobodkina’s enduring delight in the creative act and her single-minded pursuit of her aesthetic vision in a multiplicity of media that continues to enchant.”

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece for today.  I enjoyed creating it.  It was challenging to pick colors, but I am happy with how it turned out.  Join me tomorrow on Day 195.  Best, Linda  PS I can’t believe I’m almost at Day 200!

Composition #194- Tribute to Esphyr Slobodkina Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Composition #194- Tribute to Esphyr Slobodkina
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Composition #194- Tribute to Esphyr Slobodkina Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Composition #194- Tribute to Esphyr Slobodkina
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Composition #194- Tribute to Esphyr Slobodkina Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Composition #194- Tribute to Esphyr Slobodkina
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Composition #194- Tribute to Esphyr Slobodkina Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Composition #194- Tribute to Esphyr Slobodkina
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Composition #194- Tribute to Esphyr Slobodkina Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Composition #194- Tribute to Esphyr Slobodkina
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas