Day 353- Pierre-Auguste Renoir- “The pain passes, but the beauty remains”

It’s Day 353 and I was a little nervous about today’s artist.  First of all, his style is the most challenging (to me at least) and his artwork is so wonderful.  I kept describing his paintings as whispers…since they are so soft looking.  I find this type of impressionistic painting so difficult to do since I tend to paint bolder lines than this.  Please join me in honoring Pierre- Auguste Renoir today.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Dance in the Country (Aline Charigot and Paul Lhote), 1883- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Dance in the Country (Aline Charigot and Paul Lhote), 1883- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Pierre-Auguste Renoir (25 February 1841 – 3 December 1919) was a French artist who was a leading painter in the development of the Impressionist style. As a celebrator of beauty, and especially feminine sensuality, it has been said that “Renoir is the final representative of a tradition which runs directly from Rubens to Watteau.”

Pierre-Auguste was the father of actor Pierre Renoir (1885–1952), filmmaker Jean Renoir (1894–1979) and ceramic artist Claude Renoir (1901–69). He was the grandfather of the filmmaker Claude Renoir (1913–1993), son of Pierre.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir was born in Limoges, Haute-Vienne, France, the child of a working-class family. As a boy, he worked in a porcelain factory where his drawing talents led to his being chosen to paint designs on fine china. Before he enrolled in art school, he also painted hangings for overseas missionaries and decorations on fans.  During those early years, he often visited the Louvre to study the French master painters.

In 1862, he began studying art under Charles Gleyre in Paris. There he met Alfred Sisley, Frédéric Bazille, and Claude Monet. At times, during the 1860s, he did not have enough money to buy paint. Although Renoir first

Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Pierre-Auguste Renoir

started exhibiting paintings at the Paris Salon in 1864, recognition did not come for another ten years, due, in part, to the turmoil of the Franco-Prussian War.

During the Paris Commune in 1871, while Renoir painted on the banks of the Seine River, some Communards thought he was a spy and were about to throw him into the river when a leader of the Commune, Raoul Rigault, recognized Renoir as the man who had protected him on an earlier occasion.

In 1874, a ten-year friendship with Jules Le Cœur and his family ended, and Renoir lost not only the valuable support gained by the association, but also a generous welcome to stay on their property near Fontainebleau and its scenic forest. This loss of a favorite painting location resulted in a distinct change of subjects.

Le Moulin de la Galette- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Le Moulin de la Galette- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Renoir experienced his initial acclaim when six of his paintings were hung in the first Impressionist exhibition in 1874. In the same year, two of his works were shown with Durand-Ruel in London.

In 1881, he traveled to Algeria, a country he associated with Eugène Delacroix, then to Madrid, to see the work of Diego Velázquez. Following that, he traveled to Italy to see Titian’s masterpieces in Florence and the paintings of Raphael in Rome. On 15 January 1882 Renoir met the composer Richard Wagner at his home in Palermo, Sicily. Renoir painted Wagner’s portrait in just thirty-five minutes. In the same year, after contracting pneumonia which permanently damaged his respiratory system, Renoir convalesced for six weeks in Algeria.

In 1883, Renoir spent the summer in Guernsey, creating fifteen paintings in little over a month. Most of these feature Moulin Huet, a bay in Saint Martin’s, Guernsey. Guernsey is one of the Channel Islands in the English Channel, and it has a varied landscape that includes beaches, cliffs and bays. These paintings were the subject of a set of commemorative postage stamps issued by the Bailiwick of Guernsey in 1983.

While living and working in Montmartre, Renoir employed Suzanne Valadon as a model, posing for him (The Bathers, 1885–87; Dance at Bougival, 1883) and many of his fellow painters while studying their techniques; eventually she became one of the leading painters of the day.

In 1887, the year when Queen Victoria celebrated her Golden Jubilee, and upon the request of the queen’s associate, Phillip Richbourg, Renoir

La Grenouillere (Bathing at la Grenouiller) -Pierre-Auguste Renoir

La Grenouillere (Bathing at la Grenouiller) -Pierre-Auguste Renoir

donated several paintings to the “French Impressionist Paintings” catalog as a token of his loyalty.

In 1890, he married Aline Victorine Charigot, who, along with a number of the artist’s friends, had already served as a model for Le Déjeuner des canotiers (Luncheon of the Boating Party, 1881), and with whom he had already had a child, Pierre, in 1885. After his marriage, Renoir painted many scenes of his wife and daily family life including their children and their nurse, Aline’s cousin Gabrielle Renard. The Renoirs had three sons, Jean Renoir became a filmmaker of note, Pierre Renoir, became a stage and film actor.

The Two Sister on the Terrace- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

The Two Sister on the Terrace- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Around 1892, Renoir developed rheumatoid arthritis. In 1907, he moved to the warmer climate of “Les Collettes,” a farm at Cagnes-sur-Mer, close to the Mediterranean coast. Renoir painted during the last twenty years of his life even when he was wheelchair-bound and arthritis severely limited his movement. He developed progressive deformities in his hands and ankylosis of his right shoulder, requiring him to change his painting technique. It has often been reported that in the advanced stages of his arthritis, he painted by having a brush strapped to his paralyzed fingers, but this is erroneous; Renoir remained able to grasp a brush, although he required an assistant to place it in his hand. The wrapping of his hands with bandages, apparent in late photographs of the artist, served to prevent skin irritation.

In 1919, Renoir visited the Louvre to see his paintings hanging with those of the old masters. During this period, he created sculptures by cooperating with a young artist,Richard Guino, who worked the clay. Due to his limited joint mobility, Renoir also used a moving canvas, or picture roll, to facilitate painting large works.

Renoir’s portrait of Austrian actress Tilla Durieux (1914) contains playful flecks of vibrant color on her shawl that offset the classical pose of the actress and highlight Renoir’s skill just 5 years before his death.

Renoir died in the village of Cagnes-sur-Mer, Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur, on 3 December 1919.

Renoir’s paintings are notable for their vibrant light and saturated colour, most often focusing on people in intimate and candid compositions. The female nude was one of his primary subjects. In characteristic Impressionist style, Renoir suggested the details of a scene through freely brushed

La Roge- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

La Roge- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

touches of color, so that his figures softly fuse with one another and their surroundings.

His initial paintings show the influence of the colorism of Eugène Delacroix and the luminosity of Camille Corot. He also admired the realism of Gustave Courbet and Édouard Manet, and his early work resembles theirs in his use of black as a color. Renoir admired Edgar Degas’ sense of movement. Another painter Renoir greatly admired was the 18th-century master François Boucher.[14]

A fine example of Renoir’s early work and evidence of the influence of Courbet’s realism, is Diana, 1867. Ostensibly a mythological subject, the painting is a naturalistic studio work; the figure carefully observed, solidly modeled and superimposed upon a contrived landscape. If the work is a ‘student’ piece, Renoir’s heightened personal response to female sensuality is present. The model was Lise Tréhot, the artist’s mistress at that time, and inspiration for a number of paintings.

In the late 1860s, through the practice of painting light and water en plein air (outdoors), he and his friend Claude Monet discovered that the color of shadows is not brown or black, but the reflected color of the objects surrounding them; an effect today known as diffuse reflection. Several pairs of paintings exist in which Renoir and Monet worked side-by-side, depicting the same scenes (La Grenouillère, 1869).

A Girl with a Watering Can, 1876- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

A Girl with a Watering Can, 1876- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

One of the best known Impressionist works is Renoir’s 1876 Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette (Bal du moulin de la Galette). The painting depicts an open-air scene, crowded with people at a popular dance garden on the Butte Montmartre close to where he lived. The works of his early maturity were typically Impressionist snapshots of real life, full of sparkling color and light. By the mid-1880s, however, he had broken with the movement to apply a more disciplined formal technique to portraits and figure paintings, particularly of women, as in The Bathers, created during 1884–87. It was a trip to Italy in 1881, when he saw works by Raphael and other Renaissance masters, that convinced him that he was on the wrong path, and for the next several years he painted in a more severe style in an attempt to return to classicism. Concentrating on his drawing and emphasizing the outlines of figures, this is sometimes called his “Ingres period”.

After 1890 he changed direction again. To dissolve outlines, as in his earlier work, he returned to thinly brushed color. From this period onward he concentrated on monumental nudes and domestic scenes, fine examples of which are Girls at the Piano, 1892, and Grandes Baigneuses, 1887. The latter painting is the most typical and successful of Renoir’s late, abundantly fleshed nudes.

A prolific artist, he created several thousand paintings. The warm sensuality of Renoir’s style made his paintings some of the most well-known and frequently-reproduced works in the history of art. The single largest collection of his works—181 paintings in all—is at the Barnes Foundation, in Philadelphia.

Biography is from wikipedia.

“The pain passes, but the beauty remains.”
― Pierre-Auguste Renoir

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  It was quite a challenge, but I think I pulled it off. 🙂 It’s a self-portrait of myself as a child. I will see you tomorrow on Day 354.

Best,

Linda

Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 274- Sophie Orlicki- Les Visages et les Danseurs de Rêve

It’s Day 274 and it’s been another hectic week!  I had such a wonderful time doing today’s tribute.  Today’s artist does some beautiful paintings and her technique is so beautiful that I couldn’t quite figure out how to paint in her style.  I still gave it a shot and liked my end result.  Not exactly like hers, but I think I captured her style and what a lovely style it is!  Join me in honoring Sophie Orlicki today!

Sophie Orlicki

Sophie Orlicki

Sophie Orlicki

Sophie Orlicki

Sophie Orlicki

Born in 1970 in Paris

She spent her childhood in Paris and then lived in the United States

Studied philosophy at the university, teaching in elementary school

Lives in Gironde since 1992

Sophie Orlicki drawing and painting since childhood. She began to draw at 7 years

Danseuse- Sophie Orlicki

Danseuse- Sophie Orlicki

on long rolls of computer paper, with a pencil, then when she was 16, she discovered oil painting.

Without feeling the need to attend classes, she worked alone and since then she painted heads, landscapes, trees and dancers

It’s a job and an expression on a daily basis, empowering inexhaustible creativity that brings her joy.

Some exhibitions and participations:

– “Taromania” with Puls’art association, the Cellier des Chartrons in Bordeaux (France) in May 2006

Sophie Orlicki

Sophie Orlicki

-exposure collective “United Souls” at the Museum of Creation Franche in Begles (France) in July-August 2006

– “I Margini dello Sguardo” in Reggio Emilia in Italy in October-November 2007

Personal -exposure Museum of Creation Franche in Begles in April-May 2008

– “Two” with the association Spark, in Artigues-pres-Bordeaux in February 2008

collective -exposure at Espace Lucretia, Paris in September 2008

-exposure the “Harvest of the Arts” in Beychac and Caillau (Gironde), the association with Spark in September 2009

collective -exposure “Lessons in Darkness” Illzach (Alsace) in February-March 2010

-Participation “Naive, seers, lone wolves and world savers XXI”, Dean Jensen

Danseuse- Sophie Orlicki

Danseuse- Sophie Orlicki

Gallery, Milwaukee (USA) in February-April 2010

– “5th Annual Outsider Art in the Hampton’s” gallery Belage, Westhampton Beach (USA) in July-September 2010

– “Global Movement” exhibition organized by the Olof Gallery (Leiden) and Outsider Art Gallery Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands), September-November 2010

-participation in “by Dance” festival, with the association Spark, to

St Germain du Puch (France), September 2010

-Works present at the Outsider Art Fair in New York (USA) in January 2011

-exposure “The wise step” in the Jean-Louis Stutter (France) in September 201

Sophie Orlicki

Sophie Orlicki

-Participation an exhibition of artists’ books: “Echoes of Silence” library Riedischem (France), September-October 2011

– “Of all the colors,” exhibition at the Citadel of Blaye (France) in October 2011

– “Imaginary Cities” Halle Chartrons, Bordeaux (France) with combination Delaba & Dissi, in January 2012

Participation & bi-annual sales at Drouot auction in Paris (France)

Work found in:

-the collection of the Museum of Creation Franche in Begles (Gironde)

-the collection Dino Menozzi the Print Room of Reggio Emilia (Italy)

Publications:

-ai Margini dello Sguardo, Biblioteca Panizzi, 2007

-Creation Franche, No. 32, 2010

-Catalogue of the Museum of Creation Franche, 2011

 

I attempted to emulate her style using a mixture of watercolors and acrylics.  It was so difficult and of course I only have a day.  I think it looks different, but hopefully I captured her spirit.  🙂 I hope you enjoy my tribute today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 275!

Best,

Linda

Visage d'un rêve- Tribute to Sophie Orlicki Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor and Acrylic on Canvas

Visage d’un rêve- Tribute to Sophie Orlicki
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor and Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Visage d'un rêve- Tribute to Sophie Orlicki Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor and Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Visage d’un rêve- Tribute to Sophie Orlicki
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor and Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Visage d'un rêve- Tribute to Sophie Orlicki Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor and Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Visage d’un rêve- Tribute to Sophie Orlicki
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor and Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Visage d'un rêve- Tribute to Sophie Orlicki Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor and Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Visage d’un rêve- Tribute to Sophie Orlicki
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor and Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Visage d'un rêve- Tribute to Sophie Orlicki Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor and Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Visage d’un rêve- Tribute to Sophie Orlicki
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor and Acrylic on Canvas

Day 264- Martin Barré- Designating Space

It’s Day 264 and I’m about to rush out and do some improv in a meadow today!  I had to get my painting done early.  I planned it out and it is an example of something that didn’t quite turn out how it did in my mind.  I had this specific image of what I wanted to create and it didn’t happen…BUT, I do like what did happen.  Definitely the epitome of improvisation happening.  Join me in honoring Martin Barré today.  This piece was inspired by his art, but I’m not sure if I exactly captured his style…since the result was kind of an accident! 🙂

Martin Barré

Martin Barré

Martin Barré

Martin Barré

Martin Barré

b. 1924, Nantes, France; d. 1993, Paris

Martin Barré was born Michel Barré on September 22, 1924, in Nantes, France. He trained at the École des beaux-arts, Nantes, first in architecture and then in painting, before moving to Paris in 1948. In 1955 he exhibited his first abstract paintings at the Galerie La Roue. However, it was not until around 1958 or 1959, after he had traveled to the Netherlands, where he saw the work of Russian artist Kazimir Malevich, that his art attained the expressive rigor that became its hallmark.

Barré designated space in his paintings by the distinct relationship between figure and

Martin Barré

Martin Barré

ground, using forms that are spare and reduced, thus leaving much of the surface of the canvas open. In an effort to avoid expressionistic gestures, he applied paint with a palette knife instead of a brush. In 1960, Barré exchanged the knife for the paint tube, mixing its contents himself and then squeezing the paint directly onto the canvas. In 1963 he turned to spray paint, a medium with properties he had come to appreciate when looking at graffiti in the Parisian metro.

Martin Barré

Martin Barré

Having found a matte black he liked, he used this method until 1967 and made paintings that either consist of white surfaces marked by subtle traces of spray paint in a corner, or are striped. In 1967 Barré decided to use stencils, and cut out the shape of an arrow from a large sheet of paper, for mark making that was controlled rather than intuitive. Then for five years Barré stopped painting altogether and concentrated on conceptual work, such as a group of photographs shown at Galerie Daniel Templon in 1968 that presented details of the Parisian gallery’s empty interior.

When he returned to painting in the early 1970s, Barré began using acrylics and a

Martin Barré

Martin Barré

brush, and adopted a slightly more expressive style. Perpetually restless and seeking new ways to challenge accepted modes of abstraction, Barré soon moved on, eventually making a series of paintings in which geometric shapes in bright hues abut the edge of the canvas, usually painted a soft pink, and creating an ambiguous delineation between figure and ground.

Martin Barré

Martin Barré

Barré showed regularly at Galerie Daniel Templon and had solo shows at a number of international museums, including the Museu de arte moderna, Rio de Janeiro (1965). He was featured in group shows at the Carnegie International, Pittsburgh (1961); Venice Biennale (1964, 1978); and Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris (1992).

Interest in Barré’s work has grown since his death; his work was the subject of two solo shows at Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York (2008, 2011), and was featured in La peinture après l’abstraction, 1955–1975: Martin Barré, Jean Degottex, Raymond Hains, Simon Hanta, Jacques Villeglé(Painting after abstraction, 1955–1975) at the Musée d’art moderne de la martin_barre_67-z-7_d5690568hVille de Paris (1999). Barré died on July 10, 1993, in Paris.

Biography is from Guggenheim Museum’s website.

I hope you enjoy my tribute piece today and I will see you tomorrow on Day 265!  ONLY 100 more paintings to go starting tomorrow.  I’m feeling a little sad about this, but also a little relief.  Now I just need to create newer, yet shorter challenges for next year. 🙂

Best,

Linda

Space and form- Tribute to Martin Barré Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Spraypaint on Canvas

Space and form- Tribute to Martin Barré
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Spraypaint on Canvas

Side-View Space and form- Tribute to Martin Barré Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Spraypaint on Canvas

Side-View
Space and form- Tribute to Martin Barré
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Spraypaint on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Space and form- Tribute to Martin Barré Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Spraypaint on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Space and form- Tribute to Martin Barré
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Spraypaint on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Space and form- Tribute to Martin Barré Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Spraypaint on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Space and form- Tribute to Martin Barré
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Spraypaint on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Space and form- Tribute to Martin Barré Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Spraypaint on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Space and form- Tribute to Martin Barré
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Spraypaint on Canvas

Day 250- Pierre Silvin- Beings From Another World

It’s Day 250 and I’ve been very excited to do today’s artist.  He is a friend and colleague of Gerard Sendrey who I paid tribute to on Day 165 (click on his name to visit that page).  He connected me to some other artists and I love their work.  Pierre wrote me and sent me information and I absolutely love his style!  It was hard to emulate, but I hope I captured his spirit and that he likes my tribute!  Join me in honoring Pierre Silvin today!  I had to translate his biography from French so please excuse any weird grammar. 😉

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin

Silvin Pierre was born in 1959 in Talence.

Without learning, he always painted or drawn, more or less, depending on the time of his life. It was at the

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin

age of thirty five years he deliberately plunged into the path of dedicating itself to creating a more consistent production.

He uses pencil, gouache and colored pencil on paper playing with layering effects and transparencies. Located on a corner table in the kitchen or the living room, under the watchful eye of his family who stirs around him, Pierre Silvin gives birth to beings from another world.

These strange forms, full origins are shrouded in a lunar light and sometimes surrounded by animals, boats, bicycles. Women on the necks of giraffes and powerful busts like trunks of mangrove, entwine their arms in arabesque their offspring. In this world of quiet tenderness, time hangs as to immobilize the creative moment that provides so much gratification that creator discreet.

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin resides Léogeats in Gironde. Exhibited in France, but also in the United States, Spain and more recently in Croatia and Russia, his work is included in numerous collections including that of the New Invention of Lausanne.

His work is rooted in his everyday life. He represents persons, objects that away, assembles, superimposed.

Like life, we met new people, we embark on new adventures, and can surprise us by happy

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin

meetings, Pierre Silvin built its high color images! As if he wanted to show us a compendium of life, a sample of times when everything is mixed: faces, animals, colors, materials. His characters or animals and colorful multitude of sizes and shapes are represented with boldness and spontaneity.

Would -this to mean that we all need each other? The originality, creativity and curiosity to discover new art forms should be a necessity, a need? That create

Pierre Silvin

Pierre Silvin

envy is always one step closer to new horizons to explore, to discover, tame, because having desire is also to be -Life, and this life, you have to chew, devour the tame.

His work has been involved since 1997 in various group and solo exhibitions in France but also in various countries including the United States, Russia, Japan …

Biography is from the artist himself and from The Musee Creation Franche website.

I hope you enjoy my piece in honor of this wonderful artist.  I feel like I could’ve done better with highlights and layering.  I tried to use the same materials, but I don’t have any gouache so I used watered down acrylics.  I feel like there’s a lack of luminosity that Pierre has in his pieces.  I also feel like his pieces are softer than mine turned out.  I had a great time painting and attempting his style!  I definitely learned a lot while painting this piece.  Thank you Pierre for being the inspiration to today’s piece!

I will see you tomorrow on Day 251!

Best,

Linda

SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Side-View SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Side-View
SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Close-Up 1 SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Close-Up 1
SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Close-Up 2 SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Close-Up 2
SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Close-Up 3 SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

Close-Up 3
SANS TITRE- Tribute to Pierre Silvin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Pencil on Canvas

 

Day 229- Jacques Pellegrin- Depicting the Time

It’s Day 229 and I had a great time painting today.  I found this artist a while back and was trying to figure out a fun way to emulate his work.  I think I did!  Join me in celebrating Jacques Pellegrin today.

Jacques Pellegrin

Jacques Pellegrin

Sunday at the Cafeteria by JACQUES PELLEGRIN

Sunday at the Cafeteria
by JACQUES PELLEGRIN

Jacques Pellegrin (born 17 June 1944) is a French painter.

Jacques Pellegrin paints portraits, landscapes and still lifes. He started to paint at age eight. When he

Summer in the South of France Jacques Pellegrin

Summer in the South of France
Jacques Pellegrin

was eleven years old, he carried off the first prize from the Aix-en-Provence city hall. His style connected first to classic and realist art movements, but then he discovered Impressionism.

After studying to be a translator in Munich, he obtained a German (language) licence in Aix-en-Provence. Teaching was quickly forsaken in favour of living a life of chance as a free artist.

In 1980 he devoted himself to painting and studied German Expressionism. Pellegrin was influenced by Fauvists and French Expressionists such as Vincent van Gogh, André Derain,Albert Marquet, Kees van Dongen, and Henri Matisse. He also followed artists of the Provence and Marseille schools, including Auguste Chabaud, Louis-Mathieu Verdilhan, and Pierre

The green dress by JACQUES PELLEGRIN

The green dress
by JACQUES PELLEGRIN

Ambrogiani. His fundamental guideline: to paint and depict his epoch, his time.

He frequently uses strong colors and underlines his figures with a thick, black stroke. Each painting

The Virgin of Longchamp by JACQUES PELLEGRIN

The Virgin of Longchamp
by JACQUES PELLEGRIN

tells a story, an anecdote, a memory. At the same time, strongly anchored in his epoch, when Pellegrin raises up the past, he does not emphasize nostalgia, only affection.

He is mentioned in the Benezit Dictionary of Artists (1999 and 2006).

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece in honor of this artist today!  You don’t even have to imagine how fun it was to paint with this much color today.  It was enjoyable to just go bold and vibrant not only with the colors, but with the lines and characters. 🙂  I will see you tomorrow on Day 230!

Best, Linda

Monster Cabaret- Tribute to Jacques Pellegrin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Monster Cabaret- Tribute to Jacques Pellegrin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Monster Cabaret- Tribute to Jacques Pellegrin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Monster Cabaret- Tribute to Jacques Pellegrin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Monster Cabaret- Tribute to Jacques Pellegrin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Monster Cabaret- Tribute to Jacques Pellegrin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Monster Cabaret- Tribute to Jacques Pellegrin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Monster Cabaret- Tribute to Jacques Pellegrin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Monster Cabaret- Tribute to Jacques Pellegrin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Monster Cabaret- Tribute to Jacques Pellegrin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 220- Martial Raysse- “Hygiene of Vision”

It’s Day 220 and I absolutely had a great time painting today’s piece!  So much that I made it my profile picture in the Day of the Artist’s Facebook page.  You can visit and “like” that page as well. http://www.facebook.com/dayoftheartist

The title of this blog was taken from an interview in the Wall Street Journal.

Join me in honoring Martial Raysse today!

Martial Raysse, Paris 1966

Martial Raysse, Paris 1966

Martial Raysse: Suddenly Last Summer, 1963

Martial Raysse: Suddenly Last Summer, 1963

Martial Raysse is a French artist born in Golfe-Juan on 12 February 1936. He lives in Issigeac, France.

Raysse was born in a ceramicist family in Vallauris and began to paint and write poetry at age 12. After studying and practising athleticism at a high level, he began to accumulate rubbish odds and ends that he preserved under plexiglas. In 1958, he exhibited some of his paintings with Jean Cocteau at Galerie Longchamp.

Fascinated by the beauty of plastic, he plundered low-costs shops with plastic items and

Martial Raysse Seventeen (Titre journalistique), 1962 Acrylic, assemblage and glitter on photographic base laid down on board

Martial Raysse Seventeen (Titre journalistique), 1962 Acrylic, assemblage and glitter on photographic base laid down on board

developed what became his “vision hygiene” concept; a vision that showcases consumer society. This work received attention and critical praise in 1961, and at a commercial gallery in Milan, his exhibition sold out 15 minutes before the opening. Raysse then traveled to the United States to get involved with the pop art scene in New York City.

Martial Raysse

Martial Raysse

In October 1960, Raysse, together with Arman, Yves Klein, François Dufrêne, Raymond Hains, Daniel Spoerri, Jean Tinguely, Jacques Villeglé and the art critic and philosopher Pierre Restany founded the group Nouveaux Réalistes. The group was later joined by César, Mimmo Rotella, Niki de Saint Phalle and Christo. This group of artists defined themselves as bearing in common a “new perspective approaches of reality”. Their work was an attempt at reassessing the concept of art and the artist in the context of a 20th Century consumer society by reasserting the humanistic ideals in the face of industrial expansion.

Biography above is from wikipedia.

French painter. He was a self-taught artist. His early works were assemblages which included plastic objects. This appropriationof prefabricated materials led to his association with Nouveau réalisme. Raysse exhibited a world, new, antiseptic

Made in Japan - La grande odalisque- Martial Raysse

Made in Japan – La grande odalisque- Martial Raysse

and modern. His approach anticipated that of the Pop artists, who likewise used objects and images deriving from advertising.

During the 1960s Raysse began to make more pictorial compositions, based on images from advertising as well as on high art. He also produced paintings in which a deliberate roughness of execution is emphasised by the superimposition of a single neon line. Raysse began at this time to create his own prototypes as another way of continuing to elevate bad taste and falsity to the level of art.

Martial Raysse's 'Last Year in Capri'

Martial Raysse’s ‘Last Year in Capri’

In the mid 1960s Raysse’s work developed around a number of recurrent themes; in particular he concentrated on the contours of a portrait, a mouth or an eye, repeating them endlessly using all kinds of visual formulae, and drawing on the most diverse types of materials.

He gave up his pictorial explorations in the atmosphere of the events of 1968 in France. When he returned to painting, his work had undergone an important change. Little by little he moved away from the urban world towards a return to nature, a bucolic ideal of a gentle and calm community with reminiscences of Poussin and of mythology. He used pastel and tempera to depict timeless magical or fantastic scenes, anticipating the vogue for mythological

Nissa Bella 1964- Martial Raysse

Nissa Bella 1964- Martial Raysse

subjects that appeared in the work of other painters in the 1980s.

Biography above is from tate.org.uk.

~

I hope you enjoy my piece I created today.  I printed a photo of myself onto paper.  Adhered it to the canvas, then painted it!  I love how it turned out.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 221!

Best, Linda

Neon Self-Portrait- Martial Raysse Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Neon Self-Portrait- Martial Raysse
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View Neon Self-Portrait- Martial Raysse Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View
Neon Self-Portrait- Martial Raysse
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Neon Self-Portrait- Martial Raysse Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Neon Self-Portrait- Martial Raysse
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Neon Self-Portrait- Martial Raysse Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Neon Self-Portrait- Martial Raysse
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Neon Self-Portrait- Martial Raysse Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Neon Self-Portrait- Martial Raysse
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Day 154- Pierre Fichet- Sacred Fire

It’s Day 154 and for some reason I’ve been doing an abundant amount of French painters recently…probably because I’ve been into Lyrical Abstraction also know as Tachisme?  Maybe not…who knows?  I had a good (I think) therapy session today…cried like a big old baby, which made my body feel great!  Lots of positive and uplifting things going on in my life, but for right now join me in celebrating Pierre Fichet today.  His wikipedia bio was a little scant so I tried my best in finding other sources for more backstory on him.  Enjoy!

Pierre Fichet

Pierre Fichet

Pierre Fichet

Pierre Fichet

Pierre Fichet belongs to the second generation of post second world war abstract painters and is a Lyrical Abstraction artist. His first abstract work was in 1947.

In 1952: first exhibition at la maison des Beaux-arts of Paris.

Pierre Fichet

Pierre Fichet

In 1954: first exhibition of an abstract work at galerie Arnaud in Paris.

In 1959, becomes an observer member of GIAP groupe international d’architecture prospective created by Michel Ragon withYona Friedman, Paul Maymont, Georges Patrix and Nicolas Schoeffer.

Pierre Fichet

Pierre Fichet

His funeral was held on January 13, 2007 at Saint-Léonard’s church in Croissy-sur-Seine (Yvelines, France).

Biography above is from wikipedia.

Okay, this may be funny, but I found a short bio in French and had to translate it…I

Pierre Fichet

Pierre Fichet

tried to make what didn’t make sense grammatically into something readable!  Here goes…

When a fourteen year old decides to devote his life to painting, he must be led by an unusual strength.

Pierre Fichet

Pierre Fichet

Pierre Fichet (1927-2007) was a painter of the energy, enthusiasm. Strongly influenced by religion, the painter began , in 1964 , a major study work on the theme of the Cross . In this second generation of abstract painting that reveals itself in the fifties, lyrical abstraction is supported by a number of renowned artists. Gesture, the whole body go into the painting. Chez Pierre Fichet , the sacred dimension underlies . When the artist spoke of his painting, his speech was borrowing an intense fervor, inhabited by a sacred fire.
” Face painting, he proclaimed , it may be that we are afraid it may happen that we have

Pierre Fichet

Pierre Fichet

a mad desire as the face of love , or whether we be comforted as prayer. This may seem excessive to gravity hedonists, supporters of the ” nice painting “, but this is precisely the gravity test which leads to greater joy and fulfillment of man. ”

I hope that bit made some sort of sense!  That was all I could find on this wonderful artist.  And I didn’t want to murder the French language any more than I had to.  I hope you enjoy my tribute to him and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 155!  I still can’t believe I’m still painting!

Bonheur- Tribute to Pierre Fichet Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Bonheur- Tribute to Pierre Fichet
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Bonheur- Tribute to Pierre Fichet Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Bonheur- Tribute to Pierre Fichet
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Bonheur- Tribute to Pierre Fichet Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Bonheur- Tribute to Pierre Fichet
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Bonheur- Tribute to Pierre Fichet Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Bonheur- Tribute to Pierre Fichet
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Bonheur- Tribute to Pierre Fichet Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Bonheur- Tribute to Pierre Fichet
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 153- Gustave Singier- Feeling in Paintings

It’s Day 153 and I’m just pooped today.  It’s a gray windy day and I’ve finished my painting and took the dogs on a little hike.  I’m now ready to just be lazy.  What will probably happen is that I’ll work on some writing and more painting and possibly do laundry.  I can never just be lazy…I’ll try though.  First join me honoring Gustave Singier today!

Gustave Singier

Gustave Singier

Gustave Singier

Gustave Singier

Gustave Singier (11 February 1909, Warneton – 5 May 1984, Paris) was a Belgian non-figurative painter active in France as part of the new Paris School of Lyrical Abstraction and the Salon de Mai.

He spent his childhood in German occupied Belgium, then moved to France in 1919.

Gustave Singier

Gustave Singier

From the age of 14, he started to paint. In 1923 he enrolled as a student at the Boulle school, attending until 1926. From 1927, he worked as a draughtsman, designing interior architecture and furniture until 1936.

1936 could be considered to be a turning point in Singier’s career as an artist: he met the painter Charles Walch who encouraged him as a painter, put him in contact with artistic circles and who began to exhibit Singier’s work at numerous Parisian Salons from 1936.

Gustave Singier

Gustave Singier

In 1940, with World War II now underway, Singier was mobilized in the Belgian army and sent to Bagnols-on-Ceze after the German invasion of Belgium. From 1941 to 1944, Singier worked in the workshop of his cabinet maker father.

In 1941, Singier joined a group of young artists who showed their work in the exhibition ‘Vingt Peintres de tradition francaise’ (Twenty

Gustave Singier

Gustave Singier

Painters of the French Tradition) at the Braun Gallery, an exhibition in defiance of the Nazi military occupation.

In 1945 he was one of the founding members of the Salon de Mai. In common with many other

painters of his generation, after the allied liberation of Western Europe, Singier discovered Kandinsky, Klee, Mondrian and – through them – abstract art.

Gustave Singier

Gustave Singier

In 1947 Singier was naturalized as a French citizen.

 

In 1949, he had his first solo exhibition at the Billiet-Caputo gallery.

From 1951 to 1954, Singier taught at the Ranson Academy, and from 1967 to 1978 at the Paris School of Art.

Singier died on 5 May 1984. He is buried in Paris, in the

Gustave Singier

Gustave Singier

Montparnasse Cemetery.

Biography is from wikipedia.

“…as for nature, it is neither my purpose to imitate nor to derive direct  inspiration from it; but to find the correspondence between my feeling of reality and the possibility I have of expressing this feeling in my painting”.  Gustave Singier

I enjoyed today’s painting, but I also feel like I could’ve slowed down and thought about the piece a little longer before starting it today.  I think I was distracted with other things and feeling pooped. 😉

I hope you enjoy it and that I captured the artist’s essence.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 154.  Best, Linda

Composition 153- Tribute to Gustave Singier Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Composition 153- Tribute to Gustave Singier
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Composition 153- Tribute to Gustave Singier Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Composition 153- Tribute to Gustave Singier
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Composition 153- Tribute to Gustave Singier Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Composition 153- Tribute to Gustave Singier
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Composition 153- Tribute to Gustave Singier Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Composition 153- Tribute to Gustave Singier
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Composition 153- Tribute to Gustave Singier Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Composition 153- Tribute to Gustave Singier
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 134- Pierre Soulages- The Painter of Black

It’s Day 124 and it is just as hot yesterday if not hotter!  I hosed down the dogs which they hated, but they are much cooler now.  I just need to stay cool and not fall into a sweat coma until I go to class in a few hours.  All I want to do is sleep…I fell in love with today’s artist.  I love his painting style.  Join me in celebrating Pierre Soulages today!

Pierre Soulages

Pierre Soulages

Pierre Soulages

Pierre Soulages

Pierre Soulages (French: [sulaʒ]; born 24 December 1919) is a French painter, engraver, and sculptor.

Born in Rodez, Aveyron, in 1919, Soulages also is known as “the painter of black”

1987 Peinture 11 Juillet 1987 [acrylic on canvas]- Pierre Soulages

1987 Peinture 11 Juillet 1987 [acrylic on canvas]- Pierre Soulages

because of his interest in the colour, “…both a colour and a non-colour. When light is reflected on black, it transforms and transmutes it. It opens up a mental field all of its own”. He sees light as a matter to work with; striations of the black surface of his paintings enable him to make the light reflect, allowing the black to come out from darkness and into brightness, thereby becoming a luminous colour.

Pierre Soulages

Pierre Soulages

Before World War II, Soulages already had toured museums in Paris seeking his vocation and after wartime military service, he opened a studio in Paris, holding his first exhibition at the Salon des Indépendants in 1947. He also worked as a designer of stage sets.

In 1979, Pierre Soulages was made a Foreign Honorary Member of the American

Pierre Soulages

Pierre Soulages

Academy of Arts and Letters.

From 1987 to 1994, he produced 104 stained glass windows for the Romanesque Abbey church Sainte-Foy in Conques (Aveyron, France).

Pierre Soulages 1963

Pierre Soulages 1963

Soulages is the first living artist invited to exhibit at the state Hermitage Museum of St. Petersburg and later with the Tretyakov Gallery of Moscow (2001).

A composition he created in 1959 sold for 1.200.000 euros at Sotheby’s in 2006.

In 2007, the Musée Fabre of Montpellier devoted an entire room to Soulages, presenting his donation to the city. This donation includes

Pierre Soulages

Pierre Soulages

twenty paintings dating from 1951 to 2006, among which are major works from the 1960s, two large plus-black works from the 1970s, and several large polyptychs.

A retrospective of his art was held at the Centre National d’Art et de Culture Georges Pompidou from October 2009 to March 2010. In 2010, the Museo de la Ciudad de Mexico presented a retrospective of Soulages’ paintings that also included an interview-video with the painter (Spanish subtitles).

Biography is from wikipedia.

I really enjoyed painting this piece today!  I created it entirely with a palette knife…so that was a new thing!  I hope you enjoy my painting today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 135!  Best, Linda

Peinture CXXXIV- Tribute to Pierre Soulages Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Peinture CXXXIV- Tribute to Pierre Soulages
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Peinture CXXXIV- Tribute to Pierre Soulages Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Peinture CXXXIV- Tribute to Pierre Soulages
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Peinture CXXXIV- Tribute to Pierre Soulages Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Peinture CXXXIV- Tribute to Pierre Soulages
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Peinture CXXXIV- Tribute to Pierre Soulages Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Peinture CXXXIV- Tribute to Pierre Soulages
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Peinture CXXXIV- Tribute to Pierre Soulages Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Peinture CXXXIV- Tribute to Pierre Soulages
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 118- Auguste Herbin- Le Fin

It’s Day 118 and I just spent hours trying to assist the vent hood installation guy (who was very wonderful)…then we didn’t have the tools to install it and I realized that I wasn’t getting paid to install it and that we were paying the design company to do it.  Needless, to say they are coming back tomorrow to finish the install.  He didn’t leave until 8pm and I didn’t finish my painting until now.  Sheesh!  I was able to finish my piece so join me in celebrating Auguste Herbin today.

Auguste Herbin

Auguste Herbin

Auguste Herbin

Auguste Herbin

Auguste Herbin (April 29, 1882 – January 30/31 1960) was a French painter.

Born in Quiévy, Nord, he studied drawing at the École des Beaux-Arts de Lille, from

Auguste Herbin

Auguste Herbin

1898 to 1901, when he settled in Paris.

The initial influence of Impressionism and Post-Impressionism visible in paintings that he sent to the Salon des Indépendants in 1906 gradually gave way to an involvement with Cubism after his move in 1909 to the Bateau-Lavoirstudios, where he met Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque and Juan Gris; he was also encouraged by his friendship withWilhelm Uhde. His work was exhibited in the same room as that of Jean Metzinger, Albert Gleizes and Fernand Léger in the Salon des Indépendants of 1910, and in 1912 he participated in the influential Section d’Or exhibition.

Auguste Herbin

Auguste Herbin

After producing his first abstract paintings in 1917, Herbin came to the attention of Léonce Rosenberg who, after World War I, made him part of the group centred on his Galerie de l’Effort Moderne and exhibited his work there on several occasions in March 1918 and 1921.

Herbin’s radical reliefs of simple geometric forms in painted wood, such as Coloured Wood Relief 

Auguste Herbin

Auguste Herbin

(1921; Paris, Musée National d’Art Moderne), challenged not only the status of the easel painting but also traditional figure–ground relationships.

The incomprehension that greeted these reliefs and related furniture designs, even from those critics most favourably disposed towards Cubism, was such that until 1926 or 1927 he followed Rosenberg’s advice to return to a representational style. Herbin himself later disowned landscapes, still lifes and genre scenes of this period, such as Bowls Players (1923; Paris, Musée National d’Art Moderne), in which the objects were depicted as schematized volumes.

Auguste Herbin

Auguste Herbin

Auguste Herbin died in Paris on 31 January 1960. One painting remained unfinished – the motif of the painting was constructed on the word Fin.

Biography is from wikipedia.

As with most painters who have painted for a long time it was difficult to choose which era I wanted to emulate.  I decided to focus on his colorful geometric period.  I really enjoyed his use of space, shapes and colors.  There is something different and playful in his pieces compared to other artists in this genre.

I hope you enjoy my piece.  After I finished I realized I should’ve used some yellow or other colors, but my husband looked at it and loved it so I decided to roll with it.  I am also exhausted and don’t want to be painting anymore today.  Especially after painting most of my ceiling of my art space yesterday!  Enjoy and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 119!  Best, Linda

Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 4 Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 4
Lundi- Tribute to Auguste Herbin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas