Day 332- Georges Braque- Temporal Spaces

It’s Day 332 and I’ve been a little ahead of myself with painting because of the holidays.  I worked on this last night and finished up this morning.  I was very intimidated with today’s artist because of his painting style and I hope today’s piece helps me when I get to Duchamp!  Join me in honoring Georges Braque today. 🙂

Georges Braque

Georges Braque

Georges Braque 1882-1963

Violin and Candlestick- Georges Braque

Violin and Candlestick- Georges Braque

Georges Braque was at the forefront of the revolutionary art movement of Cubism. Braque’s work throughout his life focused on still lifes and means of viewing objects from various perspectives through color, line, and texture. While his collaboration with Pablo Picasso and their Cubist works are best known, Braque had a long painting career that continued beyond Cubism. Braque was also often dedicated to quiet periods in his studio rather than to being a personality in the art world.

Though Braque started out as a member of the Fauves, he began developing a Cubist style after meeting Pablo Picasso. While their paintings shared many similarities in palette, style and subject matter, Braque stated that unlike Picasso, his work was “devoid of iconological commentary,” and was concerned purely with pictorial space and composition.
Braque sought balance and harmony in his compositions, especially through papier colles, a pasted paper collage technique that Picasso and

Bottle of Run 1914- Georges Braque

Bottle of Run 1914- Georges Braque

Braque invented in 1912. Braque, however, took collage one-step further by gluing cut-up advertisements into his canvases. This foreshadowed modern art movements concerned with critiquing media, such as Pop art.

Braque stenciled letters onto paintings, blended pigments with sand, and copied wood grain and marble to achieve great levels of dimension in his paintings. His depictions of still lifes are so abstract that they border on becoming patterns that express an essence of the objects viewed rather than direct representations.
Georges Braque, Portugalczyk, 1911

Georges Braque, Portugalczyk, 1911

Childhood

Georges Braque was guided from a young age toward creative painting techniques. His father managed a decorative painting business and Braque’s interest in texture and tactility perhaps came from working with him as a decorator. In 1899, at age seventeen, Braque moved from Argenteuil into Paris, accompanied by friends Othon Friesz and Raoul Dufy.

Early Training

Braque’s earliest paintings were made in the Fauvist style. From 1902-1905, after giving up work as a decorator to pursue painting full-time he pursued Fauvist ideas and coordinated with Henri Matisse. He contributed his Fauvist colorful paintings to his first exhibition at the Salon des Independants in 1906. However, he was extremely affected by a visit to Pablo Picasso’s studio in 1907, to see Picasso’s breakthrough work – Les Demoiselles d’Avignon.

After this encounter, the two artists forged an intimate friendship and artistic camaraderie. “We would get

Baluster and Skull- Georges Braque

Baluster and Skull- Georges Braque

together every single day,” Braque said, “to discuss and assay the ideas that were forming, as well as to compare our respective works”. The drastic change in Braque’s painting style can be directly attributed to Picasso. Once he understood Picasso’s goals, Braque aimed to strengthen “the constructive elements in his works while foregoing the expressive excesses of Fauvism”. His landscape paintings in which scenes were distilled into basic shapes and colors inspired French art critic, Louis Vauxcelles, to coin the term Cubism by describing Braque’s work as “bizarreries cubiques.”

Braque and Picasso worked in synchronicity until Braque’s return from war in 1914. When Picasso began to paint figuratively, Braque felt his friend had betrayed their Cubist systems and rules, and continued on his own. However, he continued to remain influenced by Picasso’s work, especially in regards to papier colles, a collage technique pioneered by both artists using only pasted paper. His collages featured geometric shapes interrupted by musical instruments, grapes, or furniture. These were so three-dimensional that they are considered important in the development of Cubist sculpture. By 1918, Braque felt he had sufficiently explored papier colles, and returned to still life painting.

Musical Instruments 1908- Georges Braque

Musical Instruments 1908- Georges Braque

Viewers noted a more limited palette at Braque’s first post-war solo show in 1919. Yet he steadfastly adhered to Cubist rules about depicting objects from multi-faceted perspectives in geometrically patterned ways. In this, he continued as a true Analytical Cubist longer than did Picasso, whose style, subject matter and palettes changed continuously. Braque was most interested in showing how objects look when viewed over time in different temporal spaces and pictorial planes. As a result of his dedication to depicting space in various ways, he naturally gravitated towards designing sets and costumes for theater and ballet performances, doing this throughout the 1920s.

In 1929, Braque took up landscape painting once again, using new, bright colors influenced by Picasso and Matisse. Then in the 1930s, Braque began to portray Greek heroes and deities, though he claimed the subjects were stripped of their symbolism and ought to be viewed through a purely formal lens.

He called these works exercises in calligraphy, possibly because they were not strictly about figures but more about sheer line and shape. In the latter half of the 1930s, Braque embarked on painting his Vanitas series, through which he existentially considered death and suffering. Growing increasingly obsessed with the

Still Life with Clarinet 1927- Georges Braque

Still Life with Clarinet 1927- Georges Braque

physicality of his paintings, he explored the ways in which brushstrokes and paint qualities could enhance his subject matter.

The objects used in his still lifes were highly personal to Braque, however, he did not reveal these meanings. Skulls, for example, were objects he painted repeatedly at the onset of World War II. In 1944, when World War II ended, Braque began to embrace lighter subjects like flowers, billiard tables, and garden chairs.

His final series of eight canvases made from 1948-1955, each titled Atelier, or Studio, depicted imagery that represented the artist’s inner thoughts on each object rather than clues to the outside world. At the very end of his life, Braque painted birds repeatedly, as the perfect symbol of his obsession with space and movement.

Woman with a Guitar 1913- Georges Braque

Woman with a Guitar 1913- Georges Braque

Braque is remembered as a progenitor of Cubism, who was both rational and sensuous in his still life paintings. He was a classic painter in this sense, and has influenced the likes of Jim Dine andWayne Thiebaud, who focused on still life painting. Braque is also a celebrated colorist, and can be traced through contemporary art to those painters who work with color in similar ways. Perhaps Braque is most remembered for his use of collage, as many contemporary artists, from sculptors like Jessica Stockholder to painters like Mark Bradford, apply paper to their works as a means to comment on society and its products.

“To work from nature is to improvise.”

“One must not imitate what one wants to create.”

“One must beware of an all-purpose formula that will serve to interpret the other arts as well as reality, and that instead of creating will only produce a style, or rather a stylization.”

Biography is from www.artstory.org.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  It was a very educational experience and interesting as well!  I wish I had more time to work on it.  It’s not perfect, but I think I did well.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 333.

Best,

Linda

Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Side-View Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Side-View
Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Day 278- Michael Staniak- Processes

It’s Day 278 and I spent most of the day on working on music, but I was able to finish my painting early.  The drying process is what took most the time!  Join me in honoring Michael Staniak today.

Michael Staniak

Michael Staniak

Michael Staniak. New Acquisitions Vol.III

Michael Staniak. New Acquisitions Vol.III

MICHAEL STANIAK (b. 1982)

Lives and works in Melbourne, Australia.

Michael Staniak is a painter whose interests are aligned with artists who use digital strategies to create objects or make works of art inspired by the culture of the web.

Michael Staniak earned a BFA and an MFA from the Victorian College of the Arts,

Michael Staniak

Michael Staniak

Melbourne as well as a BA from Middle Tennessee State University.

He is the founder and Director of Paradise Hills Gallery, an artist run initiative in Melbourne Victoria. He has had solo exhibitions at Nellie Castan, Metro Gallery and Blockprojects, Melbourne and Artereal Gallery, Sydney.

Michael Staniak

Michael Staniak

His international representation and reputation is growing with a solo show in 2014, Image DNA, at Steve Turner Contemporary, Los Angeles, USA who took Staniak’s new works to Brussels Art Fair and he has been included in group shows at Horton Gallery and Charles Bank, New York. In the remainder of 2014 and in 2015 he has showings in Vienna, Naples, Brussels, South America, Italy, Los Angeles and Istanbul scheduled.

Biography is from www.artereal.com.au.  It was difficult to find an extensive biography.

Here’s a blurb about his painting from www.rhizome.org.

Steve Turner Contemporary is pleased to present Image DNA, a solo exhibition by Melbourne-

Michael Staniak

Michael Staniak

based artist Michael Staniak, featuring paintings that seamlessly combine attributes of analog and digital processes. Although Staniak creates the paintings mostly by hand—he builds up texture with uneven layers of plaster and then paints the surface in a range of ways—the paintings bear an uncanny resemblance to flat digital prints. Indeed, one must view the works up close to perceive any texture or depth, and as such, they behave like contemporary trompe l’oeil paintings that baffle the senses. Some paintings do however utilize digital methods of output and in so doing create a dialogue between the two modes of production.

~

I hope you enjoy my tribute today.  It was another day that was nice to honor an artist around

my age. 🙂  I decided to do a monochromic painting because his paint work seems so difficult to emulate without using an airbrush or maybe the proper type of paint.  I’m not sure!  I still like my piece and had a great time creating it.  It was very inspiring!

I will see you on Day 279.  Best, Linda

 

Static- Tribute to Michael Staniak Linda Cleary 2014 Modeling Paste on Canvas

Static- Tribute to Michael Staniak
Linda Cleary 2014
Modeling Paste on Canvas

Side-View Static- Tribute to Michael Staniak Linda Cleary 2014 Modeling Paste on Canvas

Side-View
Static- Tribute to Michael Staniak
Linda Cleary 2014
Modeling Paste on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Static- Tribute to Michael Staniak Linda Cleary 2014 Modeling Paste on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Static- Tribute to Michael Staniak
Linda Cleary 2014
Modeling Paste on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Static- Tribute to Michael Staniak Linda Cleary 2014 Modeling Paste on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Static- Tribute to Michael Staniak
Linda Cleary 2014
Modeling Paste on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Static- Tribute to Michael Staniak Linda Cleary 2014 Modeling Paste on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Static- Tribute to Michael Staniak
Linda Cleary 2014
Modeling Paste on Canvas

Day 243- Gillian Ayres- Bright and Succulent

It’s Day 243 and I had so much fun painting today’s colorful piece!  I also went on a nice dog hike with my husband.  Such a beautiful day.  Join me in honoring Gillian Ayres today.

Gillian Ayres

Gillian Ayres

'Tivoli' by Gillian Ayres

‘Tivoli’ by Gillian Ayres

Gillian Ayres, CBE (born 3 February 1930) is an English painter.

Ayres was born on 3 February 1930 in Barnes, London, the youngest of three sisters. Ayres started school when she was six. Her parents, a prosperous couple, sent her to Ibstock, a progressive school in Roehampton run on Fröbel principles. In 1941 Ayres was sent to Colet Court, the junior school for St Paul’s, in Hammersmith, where on her eleventh birthday she finally learnt to read.  

She passed the entrance exam for St Paul’s Girls’ School the following year, and

Antony and Cleopatra- Gillian Ayres

Antony and Cleopatra- Gillian Ayres

developed an interest in art while there. Among her best schoolfriends was Shirley Williams, with whom she taught art to children in bomb-ravaged parts of London.  Ayres then decided to go to art school. In 1946, she applied to the Slade School of Fine Art and was accepted. However, at sixteen, she was too young to enrol. She was advised to apply to the Camberwell School of Art and studied there from 1946 to 1950.

High Summer World of Light- Gillian Ayres

High Summer World of Light- Gillian Ayres

Ayres worked part-time at the AIA Gallery in Soho from 1951 to 1959 before starting a teaching career.  Ayres held a number of teaching posts through the 1960s and 1970s, becoming friends with painters such as Howard Hodgkin, Robyn Denny and Roger Hilton. In 1959, Ayres was asked to teach at Bath Academy of Art, Corsham for six weeks.

She remained on the teaching staff until 1965. For much of her time at Corsham she shared a teaching studio with Malcolm Hughes.  She was a senior lecturer at Saint Martin’s School of Art, London, from 1965 to 1978 and became head of painting at Winchester School of Art in 1978. Ayres left teaching in 1981, and moved to an old rectory on the Llyn Peninsula in north-west Wales to become a full-time painter.  She moved again in 1987 to a 15th-century cottage at Morwenstowon the Devon-Cornwall border.

Her first solo exhibition was held at Gallery One, London in 1956. Ayres’ early works are typically made with thin vinyl paint in a limited

Gillian Ayres

Gillian Ayres

number of colours arranged in relatively simple forms, but later works in oil paint are more exuberant and very colourful, with a thick impasto being used. The titles of her paintings, such as Anthony and Cleopatra (1982) and A Midsummer Night (1990), are usually given after the painting is completed and do not directly describe the content of the painting, but rather are intended to resonate with the general mood of the work.

Ayres was shortlisted for the Turner Prize in 1989. She was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 1986, and in 1991 became a Royal Academician. She later temporarily resigned from the Academy, following the broadcast of a BBC Omnibus television documentary about the preparations for the controversial Sensation exhibition hosted by the Academy in 1997 show-casing the Young British Artists.

The documentary, according to Ayres, presented an unfair view of the older members

Shalimar 5, (2011), by Gillian Ayres (detail)

Shalimar 5, (2011), by Gillian Ayres (detail)

of the Academy.  Ayres also objected to the inclusion of Marcus Harvey’s portrait of the killer Myra Hindley in the exhibition. She is represented by the Alan Cristea Gallery, London.

She was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in the 2011 Birthday Honours.

Moonglade- Gillian Ayres

Moonglade- Gillian Ayres

Ayres married painter Henry Mundy in 1951. They divorced almost 30 years later but currently live together. They have two sons born 1958 and 1966.  Their younger son, Sam Mundy, is a painter.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 244.

Best,

Linda

Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 206- Keith Johnston- The Process of Spontaneity

It’s Day 206 and I found today’s artist on artsy.net as well.  I’m really enjoying that site.  Tonight is my first improv show with my new group, The Incidentalists and I’m excited and a little nervous so I wanted to get my blog and painting done a little earlier so that I could get other things done today before just being anxious.  Haha.  Join me in honoring Keith Johnston today.  I wish I would’ve bought an encaustic board to do this painting on, but that’s okay.  I also for the life of me could not find a portrait of him anywhere, so please forgive me for that.

Lemon Wedge, 2011 Encaustic and graphite on wood panel

Lemon Wedge, 2011
Encaustic and graphite on wood panel

Keith Johnston’s minimalist works are spare, tonal arrangements of light and dark forms, with tentative whispers of drawings. He conceives the work on wood panel in encaustic, which is often scraped and reapplied, and then adds graphite. There are no preliminary sketches.

He wants “to see the marking’s of the artist’s hand, the process of spontaneity, the

Chinese New Year, New York Encaustic and graphite on wood panel

Chinese New Year, New York
Encaustic and graphite on wood panel

economy—where subtlety, pitch, line or blocking, with the slightest of movement, can completely alter the work.”

The simplicity of his paintings reflects this vision by the inherent significance attached to each line, shape or form, given the minimalist quality of the work. His choice to use black and white intensifies the importance of line, form and composition as the central components of the painting.

As stated by Jean McCartney, Director of Calvin Klein, Inc., “Johnston’s work relies upon

Asian Elephant, 2011 Encaustic and graphite on wood panel

Asian Elephant, 2011
Encaustic and graphite on wood panel

evoking emotions and feeling, related not only to what appears on canvas—but as important, what he chooses to leave out.” In minimalist work such as Johnston’s, the void created by the absence of extraneous colors, lines, and details is equally significant in generating the ultimate feeling expressed by the piece. He aims to “convey a kind of energy … [that] this intensity will transmit to the viewer.”

Keith Johnston

Keith Johnston

Johnston lived and traveled extensively in Europe following his formal education, which he says “threw open my soul to the ultimate, living, breathing art history book, to take in daily, to feed on and digest.”

This experience served as inspiration for him to develop a painting style that can be seen as a precursor to his current minimalist work. His early paintings were in a figurative tradition, but at the millennium he decided that a new century required “a new outlook: back to drawing, back to basics, back to black and white.”

Johnston received his BFA from the School of Visual Arts in New York City in 1980. He first

Keith Johnston

Keith Johnston

exhibited his paintings in New York City in 1995.

Biography above is from artresourceboston.com.

I hope you enjoy my piece today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 207!

Best,

Linda

Doorways at Night- Tribute to Keith Johnston Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Doorways at Night- Tribute to Keith Johnston
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Doorways at Night- Tribute to Keith Johnston Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Doorways at Night- Tribute to Keith Johnston
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Doorways at Night- Tribute to Keith Johnston Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Doorways at Night- Tribute to Keith Johnston
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Doorways at Night- Tribute to Keith Johnston Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Doorways at Night- Tribute to Keith Johnston
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Doorways at Night- Tribute to Keith Johnston Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Doorways at Night- Tribute to Keith Johnston
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 205- Huguette Arthur Bertrand- Dazzling

It’s Day 205 and I really love today’s artists artwork.  I’m so exhausted from singing for three hours last night at improv.  I think today I’m going to just spend on painting, finishing up a chapter for my writing group and just chillaxing for once!  Join me in celebrating Huguette Arthur Bertrand today!  I had to translate her biography from French into English so it’s going to read a little strange.  I think instead of translating “her” it says “his”…oops!  Hope you don’t mind!  It’s from the French wikipedia.

Huguette Arthur Bertrand

Huguette Arthur Bertrand

L'amant cachalot, circa. 1990 Oil on canvas

L’amant cachalot, circa. 1990
Oil on canvas

Huguette Arthur Bertrand, born in 1920 and died in Ecouen 2005 in Paris, is a French non-figurative painter of the post-war related the adventure of the lyrical abstraction .

Rare woman painter of lyrical abstraction Postwar, Huguette Arthur Bertrand actively

Pirador, 1961 Oil on canvas

Pirador, 1961
Oil on canvas

involved in the Parisian art scene, alongsidePierre Soulages and Hans Hartung , Zao Wou-Ki and Chu Teh-Chun and others.

Huguette Arthur Bertrand has shown very early among the first representatives of abstract art French postwar designated under the name of the young and the new school of Paris .

Flèches en berges ensablées, circa. 1985 Oil on canvas

Flèches en berges ensablées, circa. 1985
Oil on canvas

Born in 1920 and after a childhood spent in the region of Saint-Étienne in contact with the textile tradition, she moved to Paris in the immediate post-war period, is befriended artists orbiting the Galerie Denise René and travel (purse Prague).

Its sensitivity and the ardor however take away from the smooth and cold geometry developed by his environment and encourage him to follow his own pictorial energy.Present in living May 1949, she participated in the group “The Hands dazzled” exposed by the Maeght Gallery in 1949-1950 and gained his first solo exhibitions at the gallery Niepce in 1951, then Galerie Arnaud from 1953 to 1959. Price Fénéon in 1955, she exhibited the following year in New York (Meltzer Gallery) to Copenhagen (Birch Gallery) and in England, Belgium, Germany and Japan.

In 1956, she participated in the exhibition of abstract art Adventure presented by Michel Ragon .

1950s to the 1990s, his work evolves very constructed compositions, organizing masses of color and lines in bundles, to smoother fields overgrown and covered in dazzling shades. His pictorial universe expands a reasoned implement a freedom won and matured, perceptible in erasing the line and the color distribution. The material is lighter and shapes disappear to make way for transparent clouds borne solvents, as to reach the essence of painting in a roll-overs (all over).

The transition takes place over several years gradually, in a slow and patient research. If progress is soft, energy is released and the gesture

Sans titre, 1957 Oil on canvas

Sans titre, 1957
Oil on canvas

says forcefully. Construction and organization values ​​always take precedence over the color used in small registers, often with dominant brown, red and orange, his favorite colors

“Neither geometrism or abstract landscape. A beautiful lyrical abstraction which takes its source in the fifties and has never ceased to swell its waters (…);strong beliefs that no user can shake, “writes Michel Ragon in the catalog of a recent exhibition of the painter (Galarté gallery, Paris, 1987).

Huguette Arthur Bertrand is also the author of numerous tapestry made in Aubusson, a form of loyalty to his parentage and origins (gallery La Demeure, Paris, 1975).

Works of Huguette Arthur Bertrand are collected worldwide, in major international museums including the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the Museum of Fine Arts of Quebec,the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, as well as in private collections and foundations such as the renowned Gandur Foundation for Art in Geneva.

In March 2012, the Galerie Diane de Polignac in Paris presented a solo booth artist Huguette Arthur Bertrand at the Pavilion of Art and Design, PAD Tuileries. The Gallery Diane de Polignac has also published a monographic catalog on the artist.

~

The paintings are from her page on artsy.net.  It’s such a wonderful site filled with great art.  Check it out!

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I feel that I may have made it a little busier than I wanted it to be.  Well, I still like it. 😉  I will see you tomorrow on Day 206!  Best, Linda

Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas