Day 364- Karli Donna Young- Detach This Part

It’s Day 364 and I’m so happy and excited to do a tribute in honor of my very best friend who happens to be a great artist as well.  I’m so lucky to live with her and see her art everyday AND see her create her art.  Please join me in honoring Karli Donna Young today!

Karli Donna Young

Karli Donna Young

1921- Karli Donna Young

1921- Karli Donna Young

In the beginning there was Me, Carley Young, born and raised in a small town just outside of Vancouver, Canada. Growing up I loved horror movies, Stephen King novels, cartoons and making stuff out of other stuff (a gift from my mother, a crafty person in her own right).

I was an only child early on and spent lots of time pretending I lived inside of a John Bellairs book. I started painting in high school, but it didn’t really stick.

Me Me Me- Karli Donna Young

Me Me Me- Karli Donna Young

I couldn’t focus on just one thing. I tried sewing and knitting, photography and writing poetry. Again, nothing really stuck. I wanted to do too many things all at once. That’s still kinda true.

My mom says, lovingly, that I am like a lump of coal….there is a diamond in there somewhere, I just need to apply the appropriate pressure and time. I think she’s right.

Detach This Part- Karli Donna Young

Detach This Part- Karli Donna Young

I don’t want to be ONE thing. I want to be ALL the things. A painter, a quilter, a photographer and a ukulele superstar. I want to build furniture and sew dresses, paint signs and tap dance.

It’s hard to say why I make art, or why I make art the way that I do. I think I like to make things that are aesthetically pleasing to me or things that tap into

That Dream I had that One Time- Karli Donna Young

That Dream I had that One Time- Karli Donna Young

my own sense of nostalgia. I am in love with my childhood and all the magic that it holds for me.

I think that love comes through in all the things that I do, artistic or otherwise. I guess I just like to stand back once a project is complete, point and say “I MADE THAT”. I like the sense of accomplishment.

Drippy Painting- Karli Donna Young

Drippy Painting- Karli Donna Young

Oh, and I like to put glitter on everything.

I currently live on top of a big hill in El Cerrito, CA. where I ride bikes, make art, play ukulele and pretend I live inside a John Bellairs book.

~

Yay! I had so much fun doing today’s penultimate piece.  Glitter and great colors.  How lucky was I to be able to ask the artist herself throughout my creation any questions I had while creating my piece?  She also accompanied me to the art store to buy supplies this morning!  Including some oils for tomorrow’s Bob Ross tribute!  The FINAL painting!  I will see you then…on Day 365!  Woweeeee!

Best,

Linda

Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Side-View Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Side-View
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

 

Day 363- Aubrey Beardsley- The Beautifully Grotesque

It’s Day 363 and after today I only have 2 more left!  I can hardly believe it.  I’m sad and also excited to work on my other passions…my challenge for next year will be writing every day and hopefully finishing/submitting my books and short stories out into the world. 🙂  Also organizing an art show and designing a book of this project.  It’s going to be hard work, but it’s worth it.  I love today’s artist so please join me in honoring Aubrey Beardsley today!

Aubrey Beardsley

Aubrey Beardsley

The Climax - Aubrey Beardsley

The Climax – Aubrey Beardsley

Aubrey Vincent Beardsley (21 August 1872 – 16 March 1898) was an English illustrator and author. His drawings in black ink, influenced by the style of Japanese woodcuts, emphasized the grotesque, the decadent, and the erotic. He was a leading figure in the Aesthetic movement which also included Oscar Wilde and James A. McNeill Whistler. Beardsley’s contribution to the development of the Art Nouveau and poster styles was significant, despite the brevity of his career before his early death from tuberculosis.

Beardsley was born in Brighton, England, on 21 August 1872, and christened on 24 October 1872. His father, Vincent Paul Beardsley (1839–1909), was the son of a tradesman; Vincent had no trade himself, however, and instead relied

The Dancer's Reward- Aubrey Beardsley

The Dancer’s Reward- Aubrey Beardsley

on a private income from an inheritance that he received from his maternal grandfather when he was twenty-one years of age. Vincent’s wife, Ellen Agnus Pitt (1846–1932), was the daughter of Surgeon-Major William Pitt of the Indian Army.

Lucians Strange Creatures - Aubrey Beardsley

Lucians Strange Creatures – Aubrey Beardsley

The Pitts were a well-established and respected family in Brighton, and Beardsley’s mother married a man of lesser social status than might have been expected. Soon after their wedding, Vincent was obliged to sell some of his property in order to settle a claim for his “breach of promise” from another woman who claimed that he had promised to marry her. At the time of his birth, Beardsley’s family, which included his sister Mabel who was one year older, were living in Ellen’s familial home at 12 Buckingham Road.

In 1883 his family settled in London, and in the following year he appeared in public as an “infant musical phenomenon”, playing at several concerts with his sister.  In January 1885 he began to attend Brighton, Hove and Sussex Grammar School, where he would spend the next four years. His first poems, drawings and cartoons appeared in print in “Past and Present”, the school’s magazine. In 1888 he obtained a post in an architect’s office, and afterwards

Birth from the Calf of the Leg- Aubrey Beardsley

Birth from the Calf of the Leg- Aubrey Beardsley

one in the Guardian Life and Fire Insurance Company. In 1891, under the advice of Sir Edward Burne-Jones and Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, he took up art as a profession. In 1892 he attended the classes at the Westminster School of Art, then under Professor Fred Brown.

In 1892, Beardsley travelled to Paris, where he discovered the poster art of Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, and the Parisian fashion for Japanese prints, both of which would be major influences on his own style. Beardsley’s first commission was Le Morte d’Arthur by Thomas Malory (1893), which he illustrated for the publishing house J. M. Dent and Company.

His six years of major creative output can be divided into several periods, identified by the form of his signature. In the early period his work is mostly unsigned. During 1891 and 1892 he progressed to using his initials, A.V.B. In mid-1892, the period of Le Morte d’Arthur and The Bon Mots he used a Japanese-influenced mark which became progressively more graceful, sometimes accompanied by A.B. in block capitals.

Dragon Illustration- Aubrey Beardsley

Dragon Illustration- Aubrey Beardsley

He co-founded The Yellow Book with American writer Henry Harland, and for the first four editions he served as Art Editor and produced the cover designs and many illustrations for the magazine. He was also closely aligned with Aestheticism, the British counterpart of Decadence and Symbolism. Most of his images are done in ink, and feature large dark areas contrasted with large blank ones, and areas of fine detail contrasted with areas with none at all.

Beardsley was the most controversial artist of the Art Nouveau era, renowned for his dark and perverse images and grotesque erotica, which were the main themes of his later work. His illustrations were in black and white, against a white background. Some of his drawings, inspired by Japanese shunga artwork, featured enormous genitalia. His most famous erotic illustrations concerned themes of history and mythology; these include his

Aubrey Beardsley

Aubrey Beardsley

illustrations for a privately printed edition of Aristophanes’ Lysistrata, and his drawings for Oscar Wilde’s play Salome, which eventually premiered in Paris in 1896. Other major illustration projects included an 1896 edition of The Rape of the Lock by Alexander Pope, and the collection A Book of Fifty Drawings by Aubrey Beardsley (1897).

He also produced extensive illustrations for books and magazines (e.g. for a deluxe edition of Sir Thomas Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur) and worked for magazines such as The Studio and The Savoy, of which he was a co-founder. As a cofounder of The Savoy, Beardsley was able to pursue his writing as well as illustration, and a number of his writings, including Under the Hill (a story based on the Tannhäuser legend) and “The Ballad of a Barber” appeared in the magazine.

Aubrey Beardsley - Design for chapter heading from Le Morte Darthur, 1893

Aubrey Beardsley – Design for chapter heading from Le Morte Darthur, 1893

Beardsley was a caricaturist and did some political cartoons, mirroring Wilde’s irreverent wit in art. Beardsley’s work reflected the decadence of his era and his influence was enormous, clearly visible in the work of the French Symbolists, the Poster art Movement of the 1890s and the work of many later-period Art Nouveau artists such as Pape and Clarke.

Beardsley was a public as well as private eccentric. He said, “I have one aim—the grotesque. If I am not grotesque I am nothing.” Wilde said he had “a face like a silver hatchet, and grass green hair.” Beardsley was meticulous about his attire: dove-grey suits, hats, ties; yellow gloves. He would appear at his publisher’s in a morning coat and patent leather pumps.

Although Beardsley was associated with the homosexual clique that included Oscar Wilde and other English aesthetes, the details of his sexuality remain in question. He was generally regarded as asexual. Speculation about his sexuality include rumours of an incestuous relationship with his elder sister, Mabel, who

Illustrations to Lysistrata- Aubrey Beardsley

Illustrations to Lysistrata- Aubrey Beardsley

may have become pregnant by her brother and miscarried. During his entire career, Beardsley had recurrent attacks of the disease that would end it. He suffered frequent lung hemorrhages and was often unable to work or leave his home.

Beardsley converted to Roman Catholicism in March 1897, and subsequently begged his publisher, Leonard Smithers, to “destroy all copies of Lysistrata and bad drawings… by all that is holy all obscene drawings.” Smithers ignored Beardsley’s wishes, and actually continued to sell reproductions as well as forgeries of Beardsley’s work.

Aubrey Beardsley

Aubrey Beardsley

In 1897 deteriorating health prompted his move to the French Riviera, where he died a year later on 16 March 1898 at the Cosmopolitan Hotel in Menton, France, attended by his mother and sister. He was 25 years of age and the cause of death was tuberculosis. Following a Requiem Mass in Menton Cathedral the following day, his remains were interred in the adjacent cemetery.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece for today!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 364…which will be my penultimate painting and one done in tribute to my best friend!  Then it’s Bob Ross time!

Best,

Linda

Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Side-View Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Side-View
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Aubrey Beardsley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Day 361- Yuko Shimizu- Living Her Childhood Dream

It’s Day 361 and I had so much fun creating today’s piece.  It took a large portion of the day, but I think it was worth it.  I didn’t use the same materials that the artist uses so it was a bit challenging, but I still think it turned out all right.  Please join me in honoring Yuko Shimizu…one of my new favorite artists!

Yuko Shimizu

Yuko Shimizu

Melancholy of Mechagirl book cover- Yuko Shimizu

Melancholy of Mechagirl book cover- Yuko Shimizu

YUKO SHIMIZU (清水裕子) is a Japanese illustrator based in New York City and instructor at School of Visual Arts.  Newsweek Japan has chosen Yuko as one of “100 Japanese People The World Respects(世界が尊敬する日本人100)” in 2009. Her first self-titled monograph was released world-wide from German publisher Gestalten in 2011. The first childrens book Barbed Wire Baseball (written by Marissa Moss) came out from Abrams in April, 2013.

You may have seen her work on The Gap T-shirts, Pepsi cans,  VISA billboards, Microsoft and Target ads, as well as on the book covers of Penguin, Scholastic, DC Comics, and on the pages of NY Times, Time, Rolling Stone, New Yorker and  in many other publications over last ten years.

But illustration is actually Yuko’s second career.  Although art has always been

Narayama Cover- Yuko Shimizu

Narayama Cover- Yuko Shimizu

her passion, she had initially chosen a more practical path of studying advertising and marketing at Waseda University and took a job in corporate PR in Tokyo. It never quite made her happy. At age 22, she was in mid-life crisis.

SCRUBS magazine Swimming in Fear- Yuko Shimizu

SCRUBS magazine Swimming in Fear- Yuko Shimizu

Yuko ended up working the corporate job for 11 years, so she could figure out what she really wanted in life, as well as to save up just enough to play a biggest gamble of her life: She moved to New York City in 1999, where she briefly spent her childhood, to study art for the first time. Yuko graduated with MFA from SVA’s Illustration as Visual Essay Program in 2003 and  has been illustrating since.  She has also been teaching the next generation of talents at the alma mater.

She works at her studio in midtown Manhattan, and fulfills her passion of world travel by giving lectures and

Now Hear CD cover- Yuko Shimizu

Now Hear CD cover- Yuko Shimizu

workshops around the world and various cities in the US. She has not gotten into mid-life crisis since she has became an artist.

Please do not mix her up with another Yuko Shimizu. This Yuko did NOT create Hello Kitty.

Above bio is from her website www.yukoart.com.

Shimizu was born in Tokyo, Japan, and grew up mostly in Kanagawa Prefecture though she and her family spent four years in Westchester County, New York, during her teenage years.

The Unwritten #50 Unwritten Fables 1 of 5- Yuko Shimizu

The Unwritten #50 Unwritten Fables 1 of 5- Yuko Shimizu

She graduated from Waseda University’s School of Commerce in 1988 as valedictorian and soon began her first job in the corporate PR department of one of Tokyo’s largest sogo shoshas.

Eleven years later, she resigned and moved to New York City to pursue her childhood dream of becoming an artist. She set out to earn a second bachelor’s degree, this time in illustration at the School of Visual Arts. However, after finishing her sophomore year, she was accepted into the MFA Illustration as Visual Essay program. She graduated in May 2003.

Shimizu began getting editorial illustration work soon after she completed her master’s degree, at first occasional assignments from the Village Voice and the New York Times, and soon after semi-regular ones for The New Yorker and Financial Times magazine. Now, she counts numerous well-known publications, publishing houses, and brands as clients.

In 2008, Shimizu illustrated P. Craig Russell’s comic book adaptations of Neil Gaiman’s The Sandman: The Dream Hunters, her first cover illustrations for Vertigo (DC Comics). She continued her relationship with the

Yuko x GoodSon T shirts project- Yuko Shimizu

Yuko x GoodSon T shirts project- Yuko Shimizu

imprint in 2009 when she began creating cover art for their ongoing comic book series The Unwritten, by Mike Carey (writer). The series was nominated for Eisner Awards in the Best Cover Artist category in 2011 and 2012.

In 2009, Shimizu collaborated with The Gap‘s AIDS charity line Product RED to create five limited-edition T-shirts (two for men, three for women) for the North American market. They quickly sold out both online and in stores.

Under the auspices of the Robin Hood Foundation and Pentagram’s charitable L!brary Initiative, Shimizu collaborated with graphic designer Stefan Sagmeister on an 11-panel mural for P.S. 96 in the Bronx. The project was showcased in the New York Times and in the commemorative book L!brary (Princeton Architectural Press, 2010).

Shimizu’s other notable works include her children’s book Barbed Wire Baseball (written by Marissa Moss, Abrams Books) to be published in Spring 2013 and her 2008 London billboards for Tiger Beer.

Above is from wikipedia.  All art is from artist’s website…link above.

I hope you enjoy today’s piece…I still can’t believe there’s only a handful of paintings left.  Whew.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 362.

Best,

Linda

セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 359- Paul Duhem- Locked Doors

It’s Day 359 and it’s Christmas Day!  Merry Christmas to you all.  I had a great time doing today’s piece and now I have to cook a bunch of food for my husband, brother and myself and try to have a nice relaxing day.  Please join me in honoring Paul Duhem today!  I wanted to honor his style, but also honor today’s holiday. 🙂

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem was born in Blandain, Belgium. He left school at 14 and worked as a farmhand for various agricultural concerns. During the Second World War he went to Germany, where he laid rails for the railways. Going to France at the end of the war, he was arrested for his collaboration with the Germans. But not being in full possession of all his faculties, he was transferred from prison to a psychiatric hospital before being employed as a labourer in farms in the region.

In 1977 he was admitted to a home where he did horticulture. Twelve years later, at the age of 70, Paul Duhem started to draw within the framework of a

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

workshop. He devoted himself to this activity, continuing until he died.

The human figure is a recurrent motif in his compositions. He drew the same face, which can be interpreted as a self-portrait, over and over again in an obsessive manner, declining it in series, introducing subtle variations in shape, rhythm and color.

Biography above is from Art Brut.com’s website.

Paul Duhem had been institutionalized for more than 40 years and was well into his seventies when he established a grueling quota for himself. He made up his mind that he wanted to produce six artworks a day, every day, for the remainder

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

of his life. Each morning after taking breakfast at a hospital for mental patients in southern Belgium, he brought out his crayons and jars of paint and crayons and, in the three or four hours before lunch, produced three new drawings. Then, in the hours between lunch time and dinner, he turned out three more works. Duhem’s subjects mostly took just two forms — a sad-eyed homme whom everybody understood to be Paul himself, and also the locked doors that he encountered everywhere in the mental institution.

Duhem was born in Blandain, a farming region. Because his parents were too poor to care for all their children, he was mostly

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

raised by grandparents. He attended school until his fourteenth year, and then left to work on a farm. Duhem was serving in the Belgium Army during World War II when, after being wounded and suffering shell shock, he was taken captive and held for two years in a German concentration camp.

Duhem finally resumed the life of a farmhand, but the war and prison years had taken a toll on his mentalstability. Diagnosed as schizophrenic, he was admitted to a mental institution in 1977. Because of his years as a farm worker, Duhem was given assignments as a gardener and groundskeeper at the institution.

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

In 1990, after beginning to show fragility of health, he was retired as a day worker. Soon after, he started producing colored drawings, at first turning out works with a variety of subjects, including birds, floral still-lifes and windmills, and then gradually limited his art to his own visage and the locked doors. He was 81 when he died in the summer of 1999.

Duhem’s work is widely admired art brut enthusiasts today, and is to be found

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

in nearly every significant museum collection of art brut in Europe. A large Paul Duhem museum show was presented in Brussels in 2001. The show then traveled to museums in France and The Netherlands.

Biography is from Dean Jensen Gallery’s website.
I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I had a great time painting it.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 360.  Then only 5 paintings left.  I can hardly believe it.
Best,
Linda
Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 358- Mark Ryden- “True Magic is All Around Us”

It’s Day 358 and I can’t believe my project is coming to an end.  It’s also Christmas eve and I think my plan is to try and relax tonight!  My arm is hurting and last night we had a holiday get together with friends.  I’m ready to give my elbow a huge rest in the new year!  BUT today I spent a large portion of my day tackling my painting.  It was extremely challenging and difficult.  One of my favorite artists and one of the most difficult in my opinion regarding his style and the materials I dealt with.  Please join me in honoring Mark Ryden today.

Mark Ryden

Mark Ryden

Mark Ryden

Mark Ryden

Mark Ryden (born January 20, 1963) is an American painter, part of the Lowbrow (or Pop Surrealist) art movement. He was dubbed “the god-father of pop surrealism” by Interview Magazine. Ryden’s aesthetic is developed from subtle amalgams of many sources: from Ingres, David and other French classicists to Little Golden Books. Ryden also draws his inspiration from anything that will evoke mystery; old toys, anatomical models, stuffed animals, skeletons and religious ephemera found in flea markets.

Ryden was born in Medford, Oregon on January 20, 1963, but raised in Southern California. Ryden is the son of Barbara and Keith Ryden. His

Mark Ryden

Mark Ryden

father made a living painting, restoring and customizing cars.  He has two sisters and two brothers, one a fellow artist named Keyth Ryden, who works under the name KRK. Ryden graduated from the Art Center College of Design inPasadena, in 1987.

From 1988 to 1998 Ryden made his living as a commercial artist. During this period Ryden created numerous album covers including, Michael Jackson’s Dangerous, Red Hot Chili Peppers’ One Hot Minute, and Aerosmith’s Love in an Elevator.

Fur Girl- Mark Ryden

Fur Girl- Mark Ryden

Also during this time, Ryden created book covers including Stephen King’s novel Desperation and The Regulators. Ryden made a living as a commercial artist until his work was taken up by Robert Williams, a former member of the Zap Comix collective, who in 1994 put it on the cover of Juxtapoz, a magazine devoted to “lowbrow art”.

Ryden’s solo debut show entitled “The Meat Show” was in Pasadena, California in 1998. Meat is a reoccurring theme in Ryden’s work. Ryden observes the disconnect in our contemporary culture between meat we use for food and the living, breathing creature it comes from. “I suppose it is this contradiction that

Mark Ryden

Mark Ryden

brings me to return to meat in my art.” According to Ryden, meat is the physical substance that makes all of us alive and through which we exist in this reality. All of us are wearing our bodies, which are like a garment of meat.

A midcareer retrospective, “Wondertoonel,” which refers to a cabinet of curiosities or Wunderkammer (“wonder-room”), was co-organized in 2004 by the Frye Museum in Seattle and the Pasadena Museum of California Art. It was the best attended exhibition since the Frye Art Museum opened in 1952, and also broke attendance records in Pasadena. Debra Byrne, curator at the Frye at the time of Ryden’s exhibition, placed Ryden’s work in the camp of the

Yoshi the Forest Spirit- Mark Ryden

Yoshi the Forest Spirit- Mark Ryden

carnivalesque—a strain of visual culture rooted in such works as Hieronymous Bosch’s Garden of Earthly Delights. According to the Russian author and literary critic Mikhail Bakhtin (1895–1975), there are three forms of carnivalesque art—the ritualized spectacle, the comic composition and various genres of billingsgate (foul language)—all three of which are interwoven in Ryden’s work.

In 2007, “The Tree Show” opened at the Michael Kohn Gallery, Los Angeles. In this show Ryden explores the modern human experience of nature.  Ryden explains “Some people look at these massive trees and feel a sort of spiritual awe looking at them, and then other people just want to cut them up and sell them, they only see a commodity”. Ryden has created limited editions of his art to raise money for the Sierra Club and Nature Conservancy.

In 2009, Ryden’s exhibition “The Snow Yak Show” was shown at the Tomio Koyama Gallery in Tokyo. In this

The Butcher Bunny- Mark Ryden

The Butcher Bunny- Mark Ryden

exhibition Ryden’s compositions were more serene and suggestive of solitude, peacefulness and introspection.

In 2010, “The Gay 90’s: Old Tyme Art Show” debuted at Paul Kasmin Gallery in New York. The central theme the show referenced the idealism and sentimentalism of the 1890s while addressing the role of kitsch and nostalgia in our current culture. Here Ryden explores the line between attraction and repulsion to kitsch. According to The New York Times, “Ryden’s pictures hint at the psychic stuff that pullulates beneath the sentimental, nostalgic and naïve surface of modern kitsch.”

Ryden’s “The Tree of Life” painting was included in the exhibition “The Artist’s Museum, Los Angeles Artists 1980-2010” at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA). The exhibition showcased artists who have helped shape the artistic dialogue in Los Angeles since the founding of MOCA over 30 years ago. Ryden hung on the same wall as Robert Williams.

Mark Ryden

Mark Ryden

On May 13, 2014, Ryden released an album entitled ‘The Gay Nineties Old Tyme Music: Daisy Bell,’ that features Tyler the Creator,Weird Al, Katy Perry, Stan Ridgway of Wall Of Voodoo, and Danny Elfman, Mark Mothersbaugh of Devo, Nick Cave, Kirk Hammettof Metallica, and Everlast, all giving a different rendition of the same song, Daisy Bell (Bicycle Built for Two). The proceeds from the signed and limited edition record, benefited Little Kids Rock, a nonprofit that supports musical education in disadvantaged elementary schools.

Ryden has two children, Rosie and Jasper. In 2009 he married artist Marion Peck in the Pacific Northwest rainforest. He currently lives in Eagle Rock, California, where he shares a studio with his wife.

Biography is from wikipedia.

“There is a very dark and painful side to life, but that is natural. People in our culture think they should never be unhappy. They think that being unhappy is unnatural. They try to make it go away. They take pills or they go to therapy to “fix” themselves. They blame themselves or others for their suffering. We need to understand that sadness is as much a part of life as joy. It would be easy just to get bitter and cold while focusing on the dark side, but there is also an amazing, wonderful side of life. If you look for it, there is true magic all around us. Maybe that sounds trite to the hardened, self-protective modern ego, but there is magiv in this miraculous life. If you open yourself up, you do make yourself vulnerable to pain but the deeper the pain you experience, the deeper joy you have.”   ― Mark Ryden

I decided to do a simple Mark Ryden tribute…painting on the wood was a little more challenging than I expected.  Again, I’m using acrylics and not oils so blending was hard and I don’t think I primed and prepped the wood as good I as I could’ve.  His paintings have such a soft look to them which for me is especially hard to emulate.  But I did something!  I think it turned out okay.  🙂  I’m sad, but also kind of excited to have this project end soon.  I think my body and brain need a rest and to get back to doing some of my other passions…like writing!

I will see you tomorrow on Day 359!  Best, Linda

Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Side-VIew Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Side-VIew
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 1 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 1
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 2 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 2
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 3 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Wood Panel

Close-Up 3
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Mark Ryden
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Wood Panel

 

Day 356- R. Black- Simplicity

It’s Day 356.  I want to thank my friend Peter DeMarco for suggesting today’s artist a while back and letting me borrow a book of his art.  I had a good time with today’s piece once I figured out exactly what I wanted to paint.  His artwork is intimidating and I believe he does some of it digitally so painting the entire piece in his style took quite a bit of time and was challenging.  But I like the result.  Please join me in honoring R. Black today.

Rich Black

Oakland-based artist R. Black, who designed posters for the Occupy movement and has completed a series of posters for the San Diego Opera, poses in the San Diego Civic Center Concourse on Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2012.

Oakland-based artist R. Black, who designed posters for the Occupy movement and has completed a series of posters for the San Diego Opera, poses in the San Diego Civic Center Concourse on Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2012.

Occupy Nation- R. Black

Occupy Nation- R. Black

Below is from an interview for Voice of San Diego.  It was difficult to find an extensive biography anywhere.

From Occupy to Opera: The Education of R. Black

The artist R. Black designed posters for the Occupy movement in Oakland last year, and they picked up some steam as the movement grew nationally. A publisher chose his work for the cover of a book about Occupy.

In interviews after that, he told reporters he had a different project in his sights: opera posters.

“Anything I want to do in life, I figure out how to make a poster so I can get to it,” he said earlier this month.

Black, who’s lived in San Diego a couple of times in his life, once wanted to be a comic book artist, but began designing posters for his friends’ rock shows and it stuck. San Diego Opera’s media relations director, Edward

Underworld- R. Black

Underworld- R. Black

Wilensky, a former record store buyer, was familiar with Black’s work. He asked the artist to design posters for San Diego Opera’s upcoming season.

Though still based in the Bay Area, Black converted an orange cargo truck into a living and working quarters and lives an itinerant life these days. We caught up with him earlier this month in the Civic Center Plaza, the place where Occupy’s San Diego contingent gathered last year, also in front of the theater where San Diego Opera performs.

Seems like a pretty wide gulf between Occupy and opera.

I disagree. Opera’s made by artists. Artists are typically liberal-type people. Opera’s all about high art. Maybe more a gulf with the audience.

But when I view opera, I view the stage. I view the artists. I view how stage theater has been so instrumental in changing people’s minds, and working with movements, and creating revolutions.

Bjork Poster- R. Black

Bjork Poster- R. Black

Have you gone to much opera in your life?

I’ve been to two. I’ve listened to a lot of operas.

What strikes you about the art form?

Melodrama. High art. The costumers, the sets, the singers. They’re living instruments. People who are just getting into opera — I think people get too wrapped up in trying to watch a production like a stage show. A lot of times people lose track of the voice. The whole thing is structured around this one voice. Just a glorified singer on stage, really.

I think if people just went and listened to the voice — there’s a living instrument on stage — and really key in on that, I think it would blow people’s minds. People who are already opera-lovers are already there. But young people need to focus. Once you start listening and tapping into that singer’s emotion, and understanding what the scene’s about even if you can’t understand the language, then you can start really losing yourself. But I think a lot of young people are blocked — by the Italian or by long things that they have no clue what’s going on.

Did you know all of these operas before you did ‘em?

No. This is my university right now. Especially thinking: Opera, that’s going to be a tough crowd to appeal to. I

Show Poster- R. Black

Show Poster- R. Black

wanted to make sure I knew a lot about it. I like to watch the opera, study it, read about it, ask a bunch of questions and try to get it.

Can you tell me about your decision-making on some of these? Let’s start with “Murder in the Cathedral.”

Well, Thomas Becket gets his head cut off by four knights. So, uh, that’s what I drew.

Growing up with comic books and pulp novels and stuff, my mom was a big romance reader, so very melodramatic covers. But with comic books especially, usually the comic book has an element that doesn’t really happen in the comic. So like Spiderman’s fighting a villain, and on the cover you’ll have the villain choking his neck and hanging him over the edge. Like, “Oh, Spiderman’s getting his butt kicked by this guy!”

Murder in the Cathedral- R. Black

Murder in the Cathedral- R. Black

In the book, that scene never happens. But it doesn’t matter, because when you’re seeing the book on the shelf, it’s like, ‘Oh, Spiderman’s in trouble’ — which he is — and he’s in a fight and he could die. It’s a cliffhanger. They heighten the story from inside the comic book for the cover.

I wanted to depict the key emotion of the play and highlight that. On “Murder in the Cathedral,” I think I might’ve been watching a lot of [Quentin] Tarantino while I was doing the posters, and then influenced by movies I love as well, old 1970s samurai movies. In every samurai movie, you cut somebody’s head off and you have a fountain of blood.

Without having to use crosses — I didn’t want to make it religious — I wanted to find a way to make his collar work and make it look like his head was separated.

I love posters with couples on them, in love. Especially for an art form like opera. So many people are involved in a partnership. When in relationships, I like looking at posters and feeling that — “Aw, falling in love again!”

So you’re watching an opera you’ve never seen before. Then what happens? Do you walk around with a sketchbook?

The hardest part is thinking about the poster, thinking of the idea. I spend lots of hours walking, sitting around,

Show Poster- R. Black

Show Poster- R. Black

mulling, going into depression sometimes, thinking about how to convey a message. Once in my mind I’ve got the idea, I don’t need to spend much time at my computer at all. My style is not a very complicated style. It’s not the style; it’s coming up with the idea that’s the hard part.

I generally walk about three or four hours a day.

What’s still out there; what’s the holy grail?

I would like to go bigger — directing something. Set designs, production designs, movie designs. Anything more grandiose that someone wants to throw a bunch of money behind. If someone just had that faith, because I haven’t done it yet.

I was thinking space tourism is coming up relatively soon. I’d love to be one of the first to do a space tourism poster. Like the old travel posters.

R. Black

R. Black

Do you make a living in art?

I say when you want to be an artist full time, you have to know how to live simply. It comes in waves. You can be rich one moment and poor the next. But if you don’t know how to be poor, you’re screwed. I think the reason why most people stop doing art is because it’s not a high-level living and they don’t know how to live simply. They need a house, they need a car. And all are great things. But, like being a monk, you have to know how to live very simply. And you have to make sacrifices.

I really focused my life on practicing what I preach: simplicity.

Description of R. Black’s Art Book Futura from Dark Horse Comics.

Sparkling as polished chrome, slick as oiled leather, hard as a scorned woman’s stare, the poster art of R. Black is renowned for its elegant line, razor-sharp design, and dark pulp motifs, creating an instantly recognizable synergy of cool elegance and hot eroticism. R. Black’s dark world is a steamy landscape of leggy sirens, gleaming

Futura Cover- R. Black

Futura Cover- R. Black

bikes, spiked heels, and leather-clad devils. Black’s voluminous catalog of work includes striking images created for Bauhaus, Elvis Costello, Misfits, GWAR, Ministry, and countless more, plus numerous album covers, t-shirt designs, and magazine covers, plus a memorable series of images for Original Sin Hard Cider, featured in this volume. Futura: The Art of R. Black is the first published collection of Black’s striking designs. Foreword by Brian Ewing.

* R. Black’s work is well known among rock fans and amongst collectors of the booming rock poster market.

~

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I had a great time creating it.  I took his advice and kept it simple. 🙂  I will see you tomorrow on Day 357!

Best,

Linda

L' Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

L’ Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View L' Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
L’ Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 L' Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
L’ Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 L' Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
L’ Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 L' Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
L’ Art De Linda Cleary- Tribute to R. Black
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 353- Pierre-Auguste Renoir- “The pain passes, but the beauty remains”

It’s Day 353 and I was a little nervous about today’s artist.  First of all, his style is the most challenging (to me at least) and his artwork is so wonderful.  I kept describing his paintings as whispers…since they are so soft looking.  I find this type of impressionistic painting so difficult to do since I tend to paint bolder lines than this.  Please join me in honoring Pierre- Auguste Renoir today.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Dance in the Country (Aline Charigot and Paul Lhote), 1883- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Dance in the Country (Aline Charigot and Paul Lhote), 1883- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Pierre-Auguste Renoir (25 February 1841 – 3 December 1919) was a French artist who was a leading painter in the development of the Impressionist style. As a celebrator of beauty, and especially feminine sensuality, it has been said that “Renoir is the final representative of a tradition which runs directly from Rubens to Watteau.”

Pierre-Auguste was the father of actor Pierre Renoir (1885–1952), filmmaker Jean Renoir (1894–1979) and ceramic artist Claude Renoir (1901–69). He was the grandfather of the filmmaker Claude Renoir (1913–1993), son of Pierre.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir was born in Limoges, Haute-Vienne, France, the child of a working-class family. As a boy, he worked in a porcelain factory where his drawing talents led to his being chosen to paint designs on fine china. Before he enrolled in art school, he also painted hangings for overseas missionaries and decorations on fans.  During those early years, he often visited the Louvre to study the French master painters.

In 1862, he began studying art under Charles Gleyre in Paris. There he met Alfred Sisley, Frédéric Bazille, and Claude Monet. At times, during the 1860s, he did not have enough money to buy paint. Although Renoir first

Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Pierre-Auguste Renoir

started exhibiting paintings at the Paris Salon in 1864, recognition did not come for another ten years, due, in part, to the turmoil of the Franco-Prussian War.

During the Paris Commune in 1871, while Renoir painted on the banks of the Seine River, some Communards thought he was a spy and were about to throw him into the river when a leader of the Commune, Raoul Rigault, recognized Renoir as the man who had protected him on an earlier occasion.

In 1874, a ten-year friendship with Jules Le Cœur and his family ended, and Renoir lost not only the valuable support gained by the association, but also a generous welcome to stay on their property near Fontainebleau and its scenic forest. This loss of a favorite painting location resulted in a distinct change of subjects.

Le Moulin de la Galette- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Le Moulin de la Galette- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Renoir experienced his initial acclaim when six of his paintings were hung in the first Impressionist exhibition in 1874. In the same year, two of his works were shown with Durand-Ruel in London.

In 1881, he traveled to Algeria, a country he associated with Eugène Delacroix, then to Madrid, to see the work of Diego Velázquez. Following that, he traveled to Italy to see Titian’s masterpieces in Florence and the paintings of Raphael in Rome. On 15 January 1882 Renoir met the composer Richard Wagner at his home in Palermo, Sicily. Renoir painted Wagner’s portrait in just thirty-five minutes. In the same year, after contracting pneumonia which permanently damaged his respiratory system, Renoir convalesced for six weeks in Algeria.

In 1883, Renoir spent the summer in Guernsey, creating fifteen paintings in little over a month. Most of these feature Moulin Huet, a bay in Saint Martin’s, Guernsey. Guernsey is one of the Channel Islands in the English Channel, and it has a varied landscape that includes beaches, cliffs and bays. These paintings were the subject of a set of commemorative postage stamps issued by the Bailiwick of Guernsey in 1983.

While living and working in Montmartre, Renoir employed Suzanne Valadon as a model, posing for him (The Bathers, 1885–87; Dance at Bougival, 1883) and many of his fellow painters while studying their techniques; eventually she became one of the leading painters of the day.

In 1887, the year when Queen Victoria celebrated her Golden Jubilee, and upon the request of the queen’s associate, Phillip Richbourg, Renoir

La Grenouillere (Bathing at la Grenouiller) -Pierre-Auguste Renoir

La Grenouillere (Bathing at la Grenouiller) -Pierre-Auguste Renoir

donated several paintings to the “French Impressionist Paintings” catalog as a token of his loyalty.

In 1890, he married Aline Victorine Charigot, who, along with a number of the artist’s friends, had already served as a model for Le Déjeuner des canotiers (Luncheon of the Boating Party, 1881), and with whom he had already had a child, Pierre, in 1885. After his marriage, Renoir painted many scenes of his wife and daily family life including their children and their nurse, Aline’s cousin Gabrielle Renard. The Renoirs had three sons, Jean Renoir became a filmmaker of note, Pierre Renoir, became a stage and film actor.

The Two Sister on the Terrace- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

The Two Sister on the Terrace- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Around 1892, Renoir developed rheumatoid arthritis. In 1907, he moved to the warmer climate of “Les Collettes,” a farm at Cagnes-sur-Mer, close to the Mediterranean coast. Renoir painted during the last twenty years of his life even when he was wheelchair-bound and arthritis severely limited his movement. He developed progressive deformities in his hands and ankylosis of his right shoulder, requiring him to change his painting technique. It has often been reported that in the advanced stages of his arthritis, he painted by having a brush strapped to his paralyzed fingers, but this is erroneous; Renoir remained able to grasp a brush, although he required an assistant to place it in his hand. The wrapping of his hands with bandages, apparent in late photographs of the artist, served to prevent skin irritation.

In 1919, Renoir visited the Louvre to see his paintings hanging with those of the old masters. During this period, he created sculptures by cooperating with a young artist,Richard Guino, who worked the clay. Due to his limited joint mobility, Renoir also used a moving canvas, or picture roll, to facilitate painting large works.

Renoir’s portrait of Austrian actress Tilla Durieux (1914) contains playful flecks of vibrant color on her shawl that offset the classical pose of the actress and highlight Renoir’s skill just 5 years before his death.

Renoir died in the village of Cagnes-sur-Mer, Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur, on 3 December 1919.

Renoir’s paintings are notable for their vibrant light and saturated colour, most often focusing on people in intimate and candid compositions. The female nude was one of his primary subjects. In characteristic Impressionist style, Renoir suggested the details of a scene through freely brushed

La Roge- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

La Roge- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

touches of color, so that his figures softly fuse with one another and their surroundings.

His initial paintings show the influence of the colorism of Eugène Delacroix and the luminosity of Camille Corot. He also admired the realism of Gustave Courbet and Édouard Manet, and his early work resembles theirs in his use of black as a color. Renoir admired Edgar Degas’ sense of movement. Another painter Renoir greatly admired was the 18th-century master François Boucher.[14]

A fine example of Renoir’s early work and evidence of the influence of Courbet’s realism, is Diana, 1867. Ostensibly a mythological subject, the painting is a naturalistic studio work; the figure carefully observed, solidly modeled and superimposed upon a contrived landscape. If the work is a ‘student’ piece, Renoir’s heightened personal response to female sensuality is present. The model was Lise Tréhot, the artist’s mistress at that time, and inspiration for a number of paintings.

In the late 1860s, through the practice of painting light and water en plein air (outdoors), he and his friend Claude Monet discovered that the color of shadows is not brown or black, but the reflected color of the objects surrounding them; an effect today known as diffuse reflection. Several pairs of paintings exist in which Renoir and Monet worked side-by-side, depicting the same scenes (La Grenouillère, 1869).

A Girl with a Watering Can, 1876- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

A Girl with a Watering Can, 1876- Pierre-Auguste Renoir

One of the best known Impressionist works is Renoir’s 1876 Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette (Bal du moulin de la Galette). The painting depicts an open-air scene, crowded with people at a popular dance garden on the Butte Montmartre close to where he lived. The works of his early maturity were typically Impressionist snapshots of real life, full of sparkling color and light. By the mid-1880s, however, he had broken with the movement to apply a more disciplined formal technique to portraits and figure paintings, particularly of women, as in The Bathers, created during 1884–87. It was a trip to Italy in 1881, when he saw works by Raphael and other Renaissance masters, that convinced him that he was on the wrong path, and for the next several years he painted in a more severe style in an attempt to return to classicism. Concentrating on his drawing and emphasizing the outlines of figures, this is sometimes called his “Ingres period”.

After 1890 he changed direction again. To dissolve outlines, as in his earlier work, he returned to thinly brushed color. From this period onward he concentrated on monumental nudes and domestic scenes, fine examples of which are Girls at the Piano, 1892, and Grandes Baigneuses, 1887. The latter painting is the most typical and successful of Renoir’s late, abundantly fleshed nudes.

A prolific artist, he created several thousand paintings. The warm sensuality of Renoir’s style made his paintings some of the most well-known and frequently-reproduced works in the history of art. The single largest collection of his works—181 paintings in all—is at the Barnes Foundation, in Philadelphia.

Biography is from wikipedia.

“The pain passes, but the beauty remains.”
― Pierre-Auguste Renoir

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  It was quite a challenge, but I think I pulled it off. 🙂 It’s a self-portrait of myself as a child. I will see you tomorrow on Day 354.

Best,

Linda

Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Petite Fille dans le Manteau Rouge Chinois- Tribute to Pierre-Auguste Renoir
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 352- Alice Neel- “Art is Art”

It’s Day 352 and it was fun painting today’s piece.  I’m not sure if I got the artist’s style quite right, but I did choose quite the awkward photo to paint…so hopefully I captured the artist’s spirit.  Please join me in honoring Alice Neel today.  She was such a great artist.  I love the subjects of her pieces and in my opinion I thought she was way ahead of her time with her style and content.

Alice Neel

Alice Neel

Geoffrey Hendricks and Brian, 1978- Alice Neel

Geoffrey Hendricks and Brian, 1978- Alice Neel

Alice Neel (January 28, 1900 – October 13, 1984) was an American visual artist, who was particularly well known for oil painting and for her portraits depicting friends, family, lovers, poets, artists and strangers. Her paintings are notable for their expressionistic use of line and color, psychological acumen, and emotional intensity. Neel was called “one of the greatest portrait artists of the 20th century” by Barry Walker, curator of modern and contemporary art at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, which organized a retrospective of her work in 2010.

Alice Neel was born on January 28, 1900 in Merion Square, Pennsylvania to George Washington Neel, an accountant for the Pennsylvania Railroad, and Alice Concross Hartley Neel. In mid-1900, her family moved to the rural town of Colwyn, Pennsylvania. She was the third of four children. She was raised into a straight-laced middle-class family during a time when there were limited expectations and opportunities for women. Her mother had said to her, “I don’t know what you expect to do in the world, you’re only a girl.

In 1918, after graduating High School, she took the Civil Service exam and got a high-paying clerical position in order to help support her parents. After three years of work, taking art classes by night in Philadelphia, Neel enrolled in the Fine Art program at the Philadelphia School of Design for

Self-Portrait- Alice Neel

Self-Portrait- Alice Neel

Women (now Moore College of Art) in 1921. She graduated in 1925.  Neel often said that she chose to attend an all-girls school so as not to be distracted from her art by the temptations of the opposite sex.

She met an upper-class Cuban painter in 1924 named Carlos Enríquez at the Chester Springs summer school run by PAFA. They were wed on 1 June 1925 in Colwyn, Pennsylvania. After marrying Neel eventually moved to Havana to live with Enríquez’s family. In Havana, Neel was embraced by the burgeoning Cuban avant-garde, a set of young writers, artists and musicians. In this environment Neel developed the foundations of her lifelong political consciousness and commitment to equality.  During this time, she had 7 servants and lived in a mansion.

Nancy And Olivia- Alice Neel

Nancy And Olivia- Alice Neel

Neel’s daughter, Santillana, was born on 26 December 1926 in Havana. In 1927, though, the couple returned to the United States to live in New York. Just a month before Santillana’s first birthday, she died of diphtheria. The trauma caused by Santillana’s death infused the content of Neel’s paintings, setting a precedent for the themes of motherhood, loss, and anxiety that permeated her work for the duration of her career.

Shortly following Santillana’s death, Neel became pregnant with her second child. On 24 November 1928, Isabella Lillian (called Isabetta) was born in New York City. Isabetta’s birth was the inspiration for Neel’s “Well Baby Clinic”, a bleak portrait of mothers and babies in a maternity clinic more reminiscent of an insane asylum than a nursery.

In the spring of 1930, Carlos had given the impression that he was going overseas to look for a place to life in

Andy Warhol- Alice Neel

Andy Warhol- Alice Neel

Paris. Instead, he returned to Cuba, taking Isabetta with him. Mourning the loss of her husband and daughter, Neel suffered a massive nervous breakdown, was hospitalized, and attempted suicide. She was placed in the suicide ward of the Philadelphia General Hospital.

Even in the insane asylum, she painted. Alice loved a wretch. She loved the wretch in the hero and the hero in the wretch. She saw that in

all of us, I think.

— Ginny Neel, Alice’s daughter-in-law

Abe's Grandchildren- Alice Neel

Abe’s Grandchildren- Alice Neel

Deemed stable almost a year later, Neel was released from the sanatorium in 1931 and returned to her parents’ home. Following an extended visit with her close friend and frequent subject, Nadya Olyanova, Neel returned to New York.

There Neel painted the local characters, including Joe Gould, whom she famously depicted in 1933 with multiple penises, which represented his inflated ego and “self-deception” about who he was and his unfulfilled ambitions. The painting, a rare survivor of her early works, has been shown at Tate Modern.

During the Depression, Neel was one of the first artists to work for the Works Progress Administration. At the end of 1933, Neel was hired to make a painting every six weeks. She had been living in poverty. She had an affair with a man named Kenneth Doolittle who was a heroin addict and a sailor. In 1934, he set afire 350 of her watercolors, paintings and drawings.  At this time, her husband Carlos proposed to reunite, although in the end the couple neither reunited nor officially filed for divorce.

Her world was composed of artists, intellectuals, and political leaders of the Communist Party, all of whom became

The De Vegh Twins, 1975- Alice Neel

The De Vegh Twins, 1975- Alice Neel

subjects for her paintings.  Her work glorified subversion and sexuality, depicting whimsical scenes of lovers and nudes, like a watercolor she made in 1935, Alice Neel And John Rothschild In The Bathroom, which showed the naked pair peeing. In the 1930s Neel gained a degree of notoriety as an artist, and established a good standing within her circle of downtown intellectuals and Communist Party leaders. While Neel was never an official Communist Party member, her affiliation and sympathy with the ideals of Communism remained constant.

Babies- Alice Neel

Babies- Alice Neel

In 1939 Neel gave birth to her first son, Richard, the child of Jose Santiago, a Puerto Rican night-club singer whom Neel met in 1935. Neel moved to Spanish Harlem.  She began painting her neighbors, particularly women and children. José left Neel in 1940.

Neel’s second son, Hartley, was born in 1941 to Neel and her lover, the communist intellectual Sam Brody. During this Forties, Neel made illustrations for the Communist publication, Masses & Mainstream, and continued to paint portraits from her uptown home. However, in 1943 the Works Progress Administration ceased working with Neel

, which made it harder for the artist to support her two sons. During this time Neel would shoplift and was on welfare to help make ends meet. Between 1940 and 1950, Neel’s art virtually disappeared from galleries, save for one solo show in 1944. In the 1950s, Neel’s friendship with Mike Goldand his admiration for her social realist work garnered her a show at the Communist-inspired New Playwrights Theatre. In 1959, Neel even made a film appearance after the director Robert Frank asked her to appear alongside a young Allen Ginsberg in his classic Beatnik film, Pull My Daisy. The following year, her work was first reproduced in ARTnews magazine.

Toward the end of the 1960s, interest in Neel’s work intensified. The momentum of the women’s movement led to increased attention, and Neel became an icon for feminists. In 1970, she was commissioned to paint the feminist activist Kate Millett for the cover of Time magazine. Millett refused

White Chapel- Alice Neel

White Chapel- Alice Neel

to sit for Neel; consequently, the magazine cover was based off a photograph.

By the mid-1970s, Neel had gained celebrity and stature as an important American artist. In 1979, President Jimmy Carter presented her with a National Women’s Caucus for Artaward for outstanding achievement. Neel’s reputation was at its height at the time of her death in 1984.

Neel’s life and works are featured in the documentary Alice Neel, which premiered at the 2007 Slamdance Film Festival and was directed by her grandson, Andrew Neel. The film was given a New York theatrical release in April of that year.

In 1974, Neel’s work was given a retrospective exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art, and posthumously, in the summer of 2000, also at the Whitney. The first exhibition dedicated to Neel’s works

Alice Neel

Alice Neel

in Europe was held in London in 2004 at the Victoria Miro Gallery. Jeremy Lewison, who had worked at the Tate, was the curator of the collection. In 2001 the Philadelphia Museum of Art organized a retrospective of her art entitled Alice Neel. She was the subject of a retrospective entitled Alice Neel: Painted Truths organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston in Texas, which was on view from March 21-June 15, 2010. The exhibition traveled to Whitechapel Gallery, London, and Moderna Museet Malmö, Malmö, Sweden. In 2013, the first major presentation of the artist’s watercolors and drawings was on view at Nordiska Akvarellmuseet in Skärhamn, Sweden.

Biography is from wikipedia.

When I was in my studio I didn’t give a damn what sex I was… I thought art is art. (Alice Neel)

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  It was taken from a real life awkward photo.  I feel like if I had more time I could’ve perfected her style a bit more, but that’s okay.  I enjoyed it and I will see you tomorrow on Day 352.

Best,

Linda

 

Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Side-View Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Side-View
Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Day 349- Jeffrey Alan Love- Living His Dream

It’s Day 349 and I have to say that today’s painting was so much fun, but equally difficult.  His pieces are so detailed and he has this style that is hard to emulate.  I am not only paying tribute a wonderful artist (who’s become one of my faves the past couple years) but I am also honored to call him a friend.

I went to Seoul American High School with him and haven’t seen him since then.  He has moved close by recently so hopefully I’ll see him in person again soon.  I was  excited to get back in touch with him and been super proud of his accomplishments as an artist and love the subject matter of his work.  He’s an example of someone who is living his dream.  Inspiration!  Join me in honoring Jeffrey Alan Love today.  PS it was so hard to emulate his lovely style, but I did my best with the materials I had.  Hopefully I captured his essence.

Jeffrey Alan Love

Jeffrey Alan Love

Wolves Cover for Simon Ing's Book, Gollancz- Jeffrey Alan Love

Wolves Cover for Simon Ing’s Book, Gollancz- Jeffrey Alan Love

Jeffrey Alan Love was born in Charleston, South Carolina and grew up in Germany, South Korea, Hawaii, and many points in-between. He attended The Colorado College and graduated with a B.A. in English: Creative Writing. He attended the Illustration Academy in 2008 and 2010, and was invited back as a Visiting Artist in 2013. From 2009 to 2011 he apprenticed with Sterling Hundley. He taught at Virginia Commonwealth University.

His work has been recognized by the Society of Illustrators (54), Spectrum (20), American Illustration (31), 3×3 No. 9, EXPOSÉ 11 and he received a Gold Medal from the Richmond Illustrator’s Club in 2011. He has worked for various clients

Night Upon the Mountain- Jeffrey Alan Love

Night Upon the Mountain- Jeffrey Alan Love

including The New Yorker, Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Tomb Raider, Gollancz, and The Progressive.

He currently lives in California.

Biography is from his website Drawger.  You can also view his art at his main website.

Below is a Q&A I found.

What are some of your favorite things about living and working in Richmond, VA?

I was born in South Carolina and have since lived in Germany, Texas, North Carolina, Nebraska, South Korea, Hawaii, Colorado, Florida, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Virginia. Some of my favorite things about Richmond are the community of artists that I’ve shared a studio with (Ally Hodges, Josh George, Sterling Hundley, Aaron Riley, Edward Kinsella, Andrew R. Wright, Leslie Herman) and that the low cost of living allows me to work less and enjoy my life outside of the studio.

How and when did you first become interested in art and illustration?

Cover for the book "Dreams of Shreds and Tatters" by Amanda Downum- Jeffrey Alan Love

Cover for the book “Dreams of Shreds and Tatters” by Amanda Downum- Jeffrey Alan Love

When I lived in Germany and was around 6 or 7, my parents brought back from England a book for me called Tales of King Arthur that was illustrated by Victor Ambrus—I was instantly hooked.

Do you keep a sketchbook? What is the balance between the art you create on paper versus In the computer?

I do keep a sketchbook. It used to be a lot more media studies and experimentation, rendered drawings and paintings, but in the last few years it has become mostly drawing from observation and lots of notes. It is honestly probably 80% writing these days.

What is the most important item in your studio?

I hope this doesn’t sound conceited, but I think it is my brain. I don’t think that people hire me for a specific media or technique that I use, as I tend to slip and slide around from piece to piece, sometimes traditional, sometimes digital, often a mix of many things—I think people seek me out for my personal voice, the way

Illustration for The New Yorker- Jeffrey Alan Love

Illustration for The New Yorker- Jeffrey Alan Love

that I solve problems, the way that I think.

What is the best book you’ve recently read?

Wolfhound Century by Peter Higgins. I was working with the publisher Gollancz and they sent me a copy and I was blown away by it. Find it and read it.

Who and what are some of your strongest influences?

I apprenticed with Sterling Hundley for a few years and that was hugely influential. Leonard Baskin, Ben Shahn,

Illustration for PLANSPONSOR- Jeffrey Alan Love

Illustration for PLANSPONSOR- Jeffrey Alan Love

and Henry Moore are always rolling around in the back of my mind as well. The books of Gene Wolfe, Frank Herbert, Iain M. Banks, Eiji Yoshikawa, and Cormac McCarthy.

What was your first professional assignment and how did you get it?

It was for The Progressive, working with Nick Jehlen. I think I got it through an email I had sent him, but Sterling Hundley may have had something to do with it as well.

What was the last art exhibition you saw and what did you take away from it?

The last art exhibition I saw was of an artist creating collages from xeroxes of old photos and newspaper clippings.  I actually really disliked the final pieces, but enjoyed how seemingly random color choices from the garish newsprint ads created an unexpected color palette to work with.

What is your favorite part of the creative process?

My favorite part of the creative process is when I find a way to fulfill the client’s need while also making the piece personal and meaningful to me.

Skyrim Poster- Jeffrey Alan Love

Skyrim Poster- Jeffrey Alan Love

How do you go about finding great clients?

Looking through the various illustration annuals is great for seeing who is working where, and if they are being adventurous in their choice of illustrators.

What is/would be your karaoke song?

Islands in the Stream by Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton

What is your hobby?

I love football (soccer). Growing up in Germany I somehow became a fan of Liverpool FC and have followed them ever since.

Where do you teach—and what do you like best about teaching?

I teach at Virginia Commonwealth University. My favorite thing about teaching is seeing students start to believe in themselves and their work as they improve. Self-confidence is so powerful at that stage of development.

What advice would you give a young artist on selecting an art school or college?

Research what classes are actually offered, and research the work of the faculty to see if they are doing the sort

Jeffrey Alan Love

Jeffrey Alan Love

of work that you would like to do yourself. But also don’t feel like you have to go to art school or college to be a success. I had to drop out of VCU during my sophomore year and no one has ever asked to see my degree, and somehow I now teach there. Anything is possible and there are many roads that lead to where you want to go.

Above is from AI-AP/DART (Design Arts Daily).

~

I hope you enjoy my tribute today!  I based it on a book that I am writing.  I wish I had more time to work on this piece…but I guess that’s a part of the whole challenge.  Of course when I was finished at the end of the day…I had all these other ideas how to make it better.  Sheesh.  I’m realizing that it’s harder to do tributes for friends than for artists like Picasso.  I think it’s because I personally know them and want to do their work justice!  I’m pretty sure Picasso’s not going to come haunt me from the grave.  Whew…only 16 to go?  I will see you tomorrow on Day 350…no only 15!!  Eeeek.

Best,

Linda

Home Sweet Helheim- Tribute to Jeffrey Alan Love Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Home Sweet Helheim- Tribute to Jeffrey Alan Love
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View Home Sweet Helheim- Tribute to Jeffrey Alan Love Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View
Home Sweet Helheim- Tribute to Jeffrey Alan Love
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Home Sweet Helheim- Tribute to Jeffrey Alan Love Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Home Sweet Helheim- Tribute to Jeffrey Alan Love
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Home Sweet Helheim- Tribute to Jeffrey Alan Love Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Home Sweet Helheim- Tribute to Jeffrey Alan Love
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Home Sweet Helheim- Tribute to Jeffrey Alan Love Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Home Sweet Helheim- Tribute to Jeffrey Alan Love
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Day 348- Robert Yellowhair- Vibrant Navajo Art

It’s Day 348 and I am excited about today’s artist that was recommended by my daddy-in-law Andy Lavin.  The story of how he acquired his Yellowhair painting is below.  Please join me in honoring Robert Yellowhair today!

Robert Yellowhair

Robert Yellowhair

Robert Yellowhair

Robert Yellowhair

A full blooded Navajo, Yellowhair was born Aug. 8, 1937 in a hogan at Na-Ah-Tee Canyon, 35 miles north of Holbrook, Arizona. Yellowhair would frequent the trading post with his father, and this was the site of his first art show. Waiting patiently one day he found some colored rock, he began sketching on a nearby wall. His audience was some of the older Navajos, who were giving him advice on every subject he drew. They were his teachers, critics as well as his teachers. Soon he would have to mstand on his horse to reach the blank areas of the barn. Today some of those barn drawings are still visible. In the early 1950’s the trader Charley McGee gave Yellowhair his first watercolor set. A few days later he sold his first painting to McGee for 50 cents.

Considered one of the Navajo nation’s finest painters. His award-winning work is featured in many fine southwestern galleries, and one of his pieces can found in the White House.

The distinguishing hallmark of Yellowhair’s work is the fresh, clean, vibrant color and the intricate detail which gives his paintings a three dimensional quality.

His love of art began at an early age. As a youngster, while waiting for his father outside the trading post, he began sketching on the side of a rusty old tin barn. Soon the entire side of the old building was filled with his sketches.

Yellowhair attended the Carson Indian School in Carson, Nevada, and there fell in love with the paintings of

Robert Yellowhair

Robert Yellowhair

Charles Russell. He spent hours studying the reproductions and in 1955 began to paint seriously, hoping to someday emulate the man who had impressed him so.

His primary medium is oil on canvas. His style is realistic impressionism and he is very accomplished at this. Yellowhair certainly achieved his goal of emulating his idol.

Biography is from his Facebook page and various pages I found online including Adobe Gallery.  Many of the photos are also from his Facebook page.

Robert Yellowhair

Robert Yellowhair

Here’s a story that my father-in-law (who recommended I do this artist!) sent to me about acquiring his Robert Yellowhair painting.

I am not really an art collector, so buying this painting was an impulse purchase for sure and this story only proves this point.

We had moved to Arizona so I could get my MBA from Arizona State University in the summer of 1976.  I had moved out in advance of Ann and the boys in July to set up our new home and get acclimated to Arizona.  They joined me later that summer once Matthew was old enough to travel.  He was all of 6 weeks old.

Our plan was to for me to complete the degree in a year and then move back to our home in Ohio and find work.  But Ann fell in love with Arizona and we decided to sell the Ohio

Robert Yellowhair

Robert Yellowhair

house and buy a horse property in Scottsdale instead.  Of course, I still needed to find work and thankfully, Motorola was willing to give me a chance as a two way radio salesperson.  I got a car, health insurance, $11,000 base salary with a potential to make another $5,000 to $10,000 in commissions.  I was thrilled.

The good news was that I had a job, the not so good news was my sales territory was 100 miles from my house and covered some of the most unpopulated land in the Northern Arizona.  I had to leave our home every Monday early and drive two hours on back country roads just to get to the nearest part of my territory.  I stayed in the territory until Thursday evening and then drove home to my family.  I remember every turn and bump on that drive.  It was beautiful, but could be treacherous especially in the winter.  This was mountain country and really in the middle of nowhere.

The most central town with some amenities was Show Low Arizona.  This was the quintessential western cowboy town.  The name of the town was a result of two ranchers not being able to

The art studio at casa de Yellowhair

The art studio at casa de Yellowhair

decide who should be the mayor so they decided to draw cards with who drew the low card being declared the winner.  In other words, “show low” and you win.  I did not make this up.

I stayed at one of the two motels in Show Low, the Paint Pony.  It was newer, but did not have a restaurant so I ate breakfast and dinner every day at the other motel across the street.  Both motels, the bank, one of the gas stations, and several other businesses where owned by the same pioneer family and the matriarch used hang out at the restaurant all the time.  She seemed ancient to me, but probably was not much older then 60 and she would tell tales and gossip with all the regulars.  Everyone called her Mama.

Robert Yellowhair

Robert Yellowhair

The motel had a very nice collection of Indian art, baskets, pottery, etc. and I always wondered how such a simple place could have such beautiful things.  Then one day as I was eating breakfast an older Indian gentleman walked in with some pottery and went directly to see Mama.  She spoke with him briefly, some money changed hands and a few pieces of pottery were added to the collection.

That evening over dinner, I asked Mama about the transaction and she explained that every once in a while one of the Indian artist from the nearly Hopi and Navajo reservation would drop by to offer her some art.  She said that they knew to only come if they were willing to give it up for a good price.  I told her that I might be interested and could she let me know if such an opportunity came by again.  She said she would and I left hoping I could “steal” a great piece of art.

Now I didn’t know anything about Native American art but I had been to the galleries in Scottsdale, and I knew that some

Detail of Robert Yellowhair painting

Detail of Robert Yellowhair painting

of it brought a very handsome price and it sure looked like the same stuff Mama had in her motel, so I was pretty excited about the prospects.  I felt that since I was a regular customer and someone she would see over and over again, that she would not try to play me for a rube, but the thought did cross my mind.  Then sure enough, a few weeks later, Mama approached me and let me know that she had heard from an artist who was a little hard up for cash and wanted to sell her some paintings.  She told me to be at the restaurant at 8:00 that night and she would introduce me to Robert Yellowhair.

Robert Yellowhair

Robert Yellowhair

The Navajo and Hope reservations were part of my territory and I even had a famous artist as a customer, Charles Laloma.  Charles was a Hopi and so was Robert, so I was hoping for something special.  Robert looked the part, kind of big and round with a inscrutable expression.

A man of few  words, but nice enough.  He showed me four painting and I choose the one you have seen.  I asked him to write a description on the back of the painting and to sign it and he

Robert Yellowhair

Robert Yellowhair

graciously obliged.  I gave him some cash.  It could not have been much since I didn’t have much at the time, but he seemed satisfied and Mama thought it was a good deal so I was happy.

The painting is probably not worth much, but the experience was special to me.  I felt like I became part of a place that I would not likely ever be again and had just a little brush with the history of Arizona.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today and my father-in-law’s lovely story!  It was such a challenging painting because Yellowhair’s art is so vibrant and detailed.  I’m still contemplating sending a message to him to let him know that I did a tribute…but it always makes me nervous even though I know most people would be honored.  I probably will!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 349.  The countdown begins!  Only 17 left…

Best,

Linda

Navajo Dancers- Tribute to Robert Yellowhair Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Navajo Dancers- Tribute to Robert Yellowhair
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Navajo Dancers- Tribute to Robert Yellowhair Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Navajo Dancers- Tribute to Robert Yellowhair
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Navajo Dancers- Tribute to Robert Yellowhair Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Navajo Dancers- Tribute to Robert Yellowhair
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Navajo Dancers- Tribute to Robert Yellowhair Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Navajo Dancers- Tribute to Robert Yellowhair
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Navajo Dancers- Tribute to Robert Yellowhair Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Navajo Dancers- Tribute to Robert Yellowhair
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas