Day 364- Karli Donna Young- Detach This Part

It’s Day 364 and I’m so happy and excited to do a tribute in honor of my very best friend who happens to be a great artist as well.  I’m so lucky to live with her and see her art everyday AND see her create her art.  Please join me in honoring Karli Donna Young today!

Karli Donna Young

Karli Donna Young

1921- Karli Donna Young

1921- Karli Donna Young

In the beginning there was Me, Carley Young, born and raised in a small town just outside of Vancouver, Canada. Growing up I loved horror movies, Stephen King novels, cartoons and making stuff out of other stuff (a gift from my mother, a crafty person in her own right).

I was an only child early on and spent lots of time pretending I lived inside of a John Bellairs book. I started painting in high school, but it didn’t really stick.

Me Me Me- Karli Donna Young

Me Me Me- Karli Donna Young

I couldn’t focus on just one thing. I tried sewing and knitting, photography and writing poetry. Again, nothing really stuck. I wanted to do too many things all at once. That’s still kinda true.

My mom says, lovingly, that I am like a lump of coal….there is a diamond in there somewhere, I just need to apply the appropriate pressure and time. I think she’s right.

Detach This Part- Karli Donna Young

Detach This Part- Karli Donna Young

I don’t want to be ONE thing. I want to be ALL the things. A painter, a quilter, a photographer and a ukulele superstar. I want to build furniture and sew dresses, paint signs and tap dance.

It’s hard to say why I make art, or why I make art the way that I do. I think I like to make things that are aesthetically pleasing to me or things that tap into

That Dream I had that One Time- Karli Donna Young

That Dream I had that One Time- Karli Donna Young

my own sense of nostalgia. I am in love with my childhood and all the magic that it holds for me.

I think that love comes through in all the things that I do, artistic or otherwise. I guess I just like to stand back once a project is complete, point and say “I MADE THAT”. I like the sense of accomplishment.

Drippy Painting- Karli Donna Young

Drippy Painting- Karli Donna Young

Oh, and I like to put glitter on everything.

I currently live on top of a big hill in El Cerrito, CA. where I ride bikes, make art, play ukulele and pretend I live inside a John Bellairs book.

~

Yay! I had so much fun doing today’s penultimate piece.  Glitter and great colors.  How lucky was I to be able to ask the artist herself throughout my creation any questions I had while creating my piece?  She also accompanied me to the art store to buy supplies this morning!  Including some oils for tomorrow’s Bob Ross tribute!  The FINAL painting!  I will see you then…on Day 365!  Woweeeee!

Best,

Linda

Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Side-View Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Side-View
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

 

Day 361- Yuko Shimizu- Living Her Childhood Dream

It’s Day 361 and I had so much fun creating today’s piece.  It took a large portion of the day, but I think it was worth it.  I didn’t use the same materials that the artist uses so it was a bit challenging, but I still think it turned out all right.  Please join me in honoring Yuko Shimizu…one of my new favorite artists!

Yuko Shimizu

Yuko Shimizu

Melancholy of Mechagirl book cover- Yuko Shimizu

Melancholy of Mechagirl book cover- Yuko Shimizu

YUKO SHIMIZU (清水裕子) is a Japanese illustrator based in New York City and instructor at School of Visual Arts.  Newsweek Japan has chosen Yuko as one of “100 Japanese People The World Respects(世界が尊敬する日本人100)” in 2009. Her first self-titled monograph was released world-wide from German publisher Gestalten in 2011. The first childrens book Barbed Wire Baseball (written by Marissa Moss) came out from Abrams in April, 2013.

You may have seen her work on The Gap T-shirts, Pepsi cans,  VISA billboards, Microsoft and Target ads, as well as on the book covers of Penguin, Scholastic, DC Comics, and on the pages of NY Times, Time, Rolling Stone, New Yorker and  in many other publications over last ten years.

But illustration is actually Yuko’s second career.  Although art has always been

Narayama Cover- Yuko Shimizu

Narayama Cover- Yuko Shimizu

her passion, she had initially chosen a more practical path of studying advertising and marketing at Waseda University and took a job in corporate PR in Tokyo. It never quite made her happy. At age 22, she was in mid-life crisis.

SCRUBS magazine Swimming in Fear- Yuko Shimizu

SCRUBS magazine Swimming in Fear- Yuko Shimizu

Yuko ended up working the corporate job for 11 years, so she could figure out what she really wanted in life, as well as to save up just enough to play a biggest gamble of her life: She moved to New York City in 1999, where she briefly spent her childhood, to study art for the first time. Yuko graduated with MFA from SVA’s Illustration as Visual Essay Program in 2003 and  has been illustrating since.  She has also been teaching the next generation of talents at the alma mater.

She works at her studio in midtown Manhattan, and fulfills her passion of world travel by giving lectures and

Now Hear CD cover- Yuko Shimizu

Now Hear CD cover- Yuko Shimizu

workshops around the world and various cities in the US. She has not gotten into mid-life crisis since she has became an artist.

Please do not mix her up with another Yuko Shimizu. This Yuko did NOT create Hello Kitty.

Above bio is from her website www.yukoart.com.

Shimizu was born in Tokyo, Japan, and grew up mostly in Kanagawa Prefecture though she and her family spent four years in Westchester County, New York, during her teenage years.

The Unwritten #50 Unwritten Fables 1 of 5- Yuko Shimizu

The Unwritten #50 Unwritten Fables 1 of 5- Yuko Shimizu

She graduated from Waseda University’s School of Commerce in 1988 as valedictorian and soon began her first job in the corporate PR department of one of Tokyo’s largest sogo shoshas.

Eleven years later, she resigned and moved to New York City to pursue her childhood dream of becoming an artist. She set out to earn a second bachelor’s degree, this time in illustration at the School of Visual Arts. However, after finishing her sophomore year, she was accepted into the MFA Illustration as Visual Essay program. She graduated in May 2003.

Shimizu began getting editorial illustration work soon after she completed her master’s degree, at first occasional assignments from the Village Voice and the New York Times, and soon after semi-regular ones for The New Yorker and Financial Times magazine. Now, she counts numerous well-known publications, publishing houses, and brands as clients.

In 2008, Shimizu illustrated P. Craig Russell’s comic book adaptations of Neil Gaiman’s The Sandman: The Dream Hunters, her first cover illustrations for Vertigo (DC Comics). She continued her relationship with the

Yuko x GoodSon T shirts project- Yuko Shimizu

Yuko x GoodSon T shirts project- Yuko Shimizu

imprint in 2009 when she began creating cover art for their ongoing comic book series The Unwritten, by Mike Carey (writer). The series was nominated for Eisner Awards in the Best Cover Artist category in 2011 and 2012.

In 2009, Shimizu collaborated with The Gap‘s AIDS charity line Product RED to create five limited-edition T-shirts (two for men, three for women) for the North American market. They quickly sold out both online and in stores.

Under the auspices of the Robin Hood Foundation and Pentagram’s charitable L!brary Initiative, Shimizu collaborated with graphic designer Stefan Sagmeister on an 11-panel mural for P.S. 96 in the Bronx. The project was showcased in the New York Times and in the commemorative book L!brary (Princeton Architectural Press, 2010).

Shimizu’s other notable works include her children’s book Barbed Wire Baseball (written by Marissa Moss, Abrams Books) to be published in Spring 2013 and her 2008 London billboards for Tiger Beer.

Above is from wikipedia.  All art is from artist’s website…link above.

I hope you enjoy today’s piece…I still can’t believe there’s only a handful of paintings left.  Whew.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 362.

Best,

Linda

セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 357- Hannelore Baron- A Complete Thing

It’s Day 357 and I had a very busy day with filming and also have a holiday party this evening.  I was still able to get today’s piece done.  I wish I had more time to focus on it.  Please join me in honoring Hannelore Baron today.

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron 1978

Hannelore Baron 1978

Hannelore Baron (June 8, 1926 – April 28, 1987) was an artist whose work has become known for the highly personal, book-sized, abstract collages and box constructions that she began exhibiting in the late 1960s. Born in Dillingen/Saar, Germany, she and her family fled persecution in Nazi Germany, illegally crossing the border into Luxembourg in 1939. In 1941 Baron’s family sailed from Lisbon to New York and setteled in the Bronx, New York City.

By the time she graduated from the Staubenmiller Textile High School in Manhattan, Baron was avidly reading eastern philosophy, making increasingly abstract paintings and probably already experiencing the symptoms of claustrophobia and depression that would lead to a series of nervous breakdowns throughout her life. In the late 1950s Baron combined a variety of techniques and began making her first collages. Occupied with raising two children (daughter Julie and son Mark) and beset by psychological problems, Hannelore nevertheless exhibited her work and in 1969, the year of her one-person exhibition at Ulster County Community College, she began to make the box constructions that would become her signature. In the early 1970s, Baron established a studio and devoted her time and energy completely to her artwork until her death in 1987. Hannelore Baron was self-taught.

Although her compositions are completely abstract, she considered them to be both personal and political statements. In her own words,

Everything I’ve done is a statement on the, as they say, human condition…the way other people march to

Hannelore Baron- Untitled Collage 1977

Hannelore Baron- Untitled Collage 1977

Washington, or set themselves on fire, or write protest letters, or go to assassinate someone. Well, I’ve had all the same feelings that these people had about various things, and my way out, because of my inability to do anything else for various reasons, has been to make the protest through my artwork… H.B.

Throughout the 1970s and 1980s her work garnered critical acclaim, along with gallery and museum exhibitions in the United States, Europe and Japan. In 1995, her work was the subject of a one-person exhibition at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. In 2001 her work was the subject of a traveling exhibition curated by Ingrid Schaffner and organized by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service. Her works can be found in the collections of The Museum of Modern Art, New York; the conSolomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Biography is from wikipedia.

Below bio is from artist’s website. www.hannelorebaron.net

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron practiced an art of concealment and protection. Out of rough and common materials she fashioned constructions, drawings and collages that transmuted the painful experiences of her life into indelible images of the darkness and mystery of being. Baron was born Hannelore Alexander in Dilligen, a small town in the Saar region of Germany in 1926. Her father, Julius, was a Jewish textile merchant, and almost as soon as Hitler came to power, the family began to feel the ominous consequences. Hannelore and her brother were sent to a special school for Jews only. On Kristallnacht, the family’s apartment was ransacked and her father beaten. Thus began a period of flight and border crossing that did not end until the family managed to emigrate from Lisbon to New York in 1941. In the midst of all this, one of Baron’s most vivid memories was that of a brief return to her family’s wrecked apartment, where the bloody handprints of her father were still visible on the walls.

By the time she graduated from the Staubenmiller Textile High School in Manhattan, Baron was avidly reading eastern philosophy, making increasingly abstract paintings and probably already experiencing the symptoms of claustrophobia and depression that would lead to a series of nervous breakdowns throughout her life. On one of her rare forays out, to sketch, she met Herman Baron, a book salesman for the Philosophical Library, and they

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron

married in 1950. The milieu was intellectually rich: Baron’s brother ran a small press and published works by avant-garde writers such as Maya Deren and Henry Miller, and Baron himself soon opened his own bookstore in the Bronx. Isolated by her mental distress, however, Hannelore developed her art without instruction and without direct knowledge of the currents that were changing the art world. Her abstract paintings betray no debt to Rothko, Gorky or Motherwell. But she did manage to visit an exhibition by John Heliker, a friend of Baron’s brother, and the experience was decisive: she saw how collage could combine all aspects of art, from drawing and painting to sculptural manipulation of materials. Over the next three decades, Hannelore would explore the implications of mixed media with depth, subtlety and daring.

Occupied with raising two children (daughter Julie and son Mark) and beset by psychological problems, Hannelore nevertheless exhibited her work and in 1969, the year of her one-person exhibition at Ulster County Community College, she began to make the box constructions that would become her signature. In these works, damaged wood and metal, often tied or nailed together, enclose secrets that can only be guessed at: scraps of

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron

her past, mysterious games without rules, concealed objects. In their rawness and obscurity they form the necessary counterpart to Joseph Cornell’s elegant enigmas. In these works and in her collages, Hannelore was able to convey her sense of the fragility of life, the mythic substratum of human experience, and broader concerns for the environment, the injustices of war, especially the Vietnam conflict, and the physical pain of existence. In 1973, she was diagnosed with cancer and would struggle with various forms of the disease until it took her life in 1987. After her death, Hannelore’s work was the subject of a one-person exhibition at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York and, in 2002, a national touring exhibition organized by the Smithsonian Institution. She once remarked of one of her works, “The solution didn’t come only from my head, it was lived out and worked out. It is a complete thing.”

~

I hope you enjoy my tribute today!  It was a therapeutic experience creating it.  Her style is very distinct and hard to emulate because of it’s subtlety, so I tried to get into a mind frame of my own while creating this piece.

I will see you tomorrow on Day 358!

Best,

Linda

Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View
Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Day 352- Alice Neel- “Art is Art”

It’s Day 352 and it was fun painting today’s piece.  I’m not sure if I got the artist’s style quite right, but I did choose quite the awkward photo to paint…so hopefully I captured the artist’s spirit.  Please join me in honoring Alice Neel today.  She was such a great artist.  I love the subjects of her pieces and in my opinion I thought she was way ahead of her time with her style and content.

Alice Neel

Alice Neel

Geoffrey Hendricks and Brian, 1978- Alice Neel

Geoffrey Hendricks and Brian, 1978- Alice Neel

Alice Neel (January 28, 1900 – October 13, 1984) was an American visual artist, who was particularly well known for oil painting and for her portraits depicting friends, family, lovers, poets, artists and strangers. Her paintings are notable for their expressionistic use of line and color, psychological acumen, and emotional intensity. Neel was called “one of the greatest portrait artists of the 20th century” by Barry Walker, curator of modern and contemporary art at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, which organized a retrospective of her work in 2010.

Alice Neel was born on January 28, 1900 in Merion Square, Pennsylvania to George Washington Neel, an accountant for the Pennsylvania Railroad, and Alice Concross Hartley Neel. In mid-1900, her family moved to the rural town of Colwyn, Pennsylvania. She was the third of four children. She was raised into a straight-laced middle-class family during a time when there were limited expectations and opportunities for women. Her mother had said to her, “I don’t know what you expect to do in the world, you’re only a girl.

In 1918, after graduating High School, she took the Civil Service exam and got a high-paying clerical position in order to help support her parents. After three years of work, taking art classes by night in Philadelphia, Neel enrolled in the Fine Art program at the Philadelphia School of Design for

Self-Portrait- Alice Neel

Self-Portrait- Alice Neel

Women (now Moore College of Art) in 1921. She graduated in 1925.  Neel often said that she chose to attend an all-girls school so as not to be distracted from her art by the temptations of the opposite sex.

She met an upper-class Cuban painter in 1924 named Carlos Enríquez at the Chester Springs summer school run by PAFA. They were wed on 1 June 1925 in Colwyn, Pennsylvania. After marrying Neel eventually moved to Havana to live with Enríquez’s family. In Havana, Neel was embraced by the burgeoning Cuban avant-garde, a set of young writers, artists and musicians. In this environment Neel developed the foundations of her lifelong political consciousness and commitment to equality.  During this time, she had 7 servants and lived in a mansion.

Nancy And Olivia- Alice Neel

Nancy And Olivia- Alice Neel

Neel’s daughter, Santillana, was born on 26 December 1926 in Havana. In 1927, though, the couple returned to the United States to live in New York. Just a month before Santillana’s first birthday, she died of diphtheria. The trauma caused by Santillana’s death infused the content of Neel’s paintings, setting a precedent for the themes of motherhood, loss, and anxiety that permeated her work for the duration of her career.

Shortly following Santillana’s death, Neel became pregnant with her second child. On 24 November 1928, Isabella Lillian (called Isabetta) was born in New York City. Isabetta’s birth was the inspiration for Neel’s “Well Baby Clinic”, a bleak portrait of mothers and babies in a maternity clinic more reminiscent of an insane asylum than a nursery.

In the spring of 1930, Carlos had given the impression that he was going overseas to look for a place to life in

Andy Warhol- Alice Neel

Andy Warhol- Alice Neel

Paris. Instead, he returned to Cuba, taking Isabetta with him. Mourning the loss of her husband and daughter, Neel suffered a massive nervous breakdown, was hospitalized, and attempted suicide. She was placed in the suicide ward of the Philadelphia General Hospital.

Even in the insane asylum, she painted. Alice loved a wretch. She loved the wretch in the hero and the hero in the wretch. She saw that in

all of us, I think.

— Ginny Neel, Alice’s daughter-in-law

Abe's Grandchildren- Alice Neel

Abe’s Grandchildren- Alice Neel

Deemed stable almost a year later, Neel was released from the sanatorium in 1931 and returned to her parents’ home. Following an extended visit with her close friend and frequent subject, Nadya Olyanova, Neel returned to New York.

There Neel painted the local characters, including Joe Gould, whom she famously depicted in 1933 with multiple penises, which represented his inflated ego and “self-deception” about who he was and his unfulfilled ambitions. The painting, a rare survivor of her early works, has been shown at Tate Modern.

During the Depression, Neel was one of the first artists to work for the Works Progress Administration. At the end of 1933, Neel was hired to make a painting every six weeks. She had been living in poverty. She had an affair with a man named Kenneth Doolittle who was a heroin addict and a sailor. In 1934, he set afire 350 of her watercolors, paintings and drawings.  At this time, her husband Carlos proposed to reunite, although in the end the couple neither reunited nor officially filed for divorce.

Her world was composed of artists, intellectuals, and political leaders of the Communist Party, all of whom became

The De Vegh Twins, 1975- Alice Neel

The De Vegh Twins, 1975- Alice Neel

subjects for her paintings.  Her work glorified subversion and sexuality, depicting whimsical scenes of lovers and nudes, like a watercolor she made in 1935, Alice Neel And John Rothschild In The Bathroom, which showed the naked pair peeing. In the 1930s Neel gained a degree of notoriety as an artist, and established a good standing within her circle of downtown intellectuals and Communist Party leaders. While Neel was never an official Communist Party member, her affiliation and sympathy with the ideals of Communism remained constant.

Babies- Alice Neel

Babies- Alice Neel

In 1939 Neel gave birth to her first son, Richard, the child of Jose Santiago, a Puerto Rican night-club singer whom Neel met in 1935. Neel moved to Spanish Harlem.  She began painting her neighbors, particularly women and children. José left Neel in 1940.

Neel’s second son, Hartley, was born in 1941 to Neel and her lover, the communist intellectual Sam Brody. During this Forties, Neel made illustrations for the Communist publication, Masses & Mainstream, and continued to paint portraits from her uptown home. However, in 1943 the Works Progress Administration ceased working with Neel

, which made it harder for the artist to support her two sons. During this time Neel would shoplift and was on welfare to help make ends meet. Between 1940 and 1950, Neel’s art virtually disappeared from galleries, save for one solo show in 1944. In the 1950s, Neel’s friendship with Mike Goldand his admiration for her social realist work garnered her a show at the Communist-inspired New Playwrights Theatre. In 1959, Neel even made a film appearance after the director Robert Frank asked her to appear alongside a young Allen Ginsberg in his classic Beatnik film, Pull My Daisy. The following year, her work was first reproduced in ARTnews magazine.

Toward the end of the 1960s, interest in Neel’s work intensified. The momentum of the women’s movement led to increased attention, and Neel became an icon for feminists. In 1970, she was commissioned to paint the feminist activist Kate Millett for the cover of Time magazine. Millett refused

White Chapel- Alice Neel

White Chapel- Alice Neel

to sit for Neel; consequently, the magazine cover was based off a photograph.

By the mid-1970s, Neel had gained celebrity and stature as an important American artist. In 1979, President Jimmy Carter presented her with a National Women’s Caucus for Artaward for outstanding achievement. Neel’s reputation was at its height at the time of her death in 1984.

Neel’s life and works are featured in the documentary Alice Neel, which premiered at the 2007 Slamdance Film Festival and was directed by her grandson, Andrew Neel. The film was given a New York theatrical release in April of that year.

In 1974, Neel’s work was given a retrospective exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art, and posthumously, in the summer of 2000, also at the Whitney. The first exhibition dedicated to Neel’s works

Alice Neel

Alice Neel

in Europe was held in London in 2004 at the Victoria Miro Gallery. Jeremy Lewison, who had worked at the Tate, was the curator of the collection. In 2001 the Philadelphia Museum of Art organized a retrospective of her art entitled Alice Neel. She was the subject of a retrospective entitled Alice Neel: Painted Truths organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston in Texas, which was on view from March 21-June 15, 2010. The exhibition traveled to Whitechapel Gallery, London, and Moderna Museet Malmö, Malmö, Sweden. In 2013, the first major presentation of the artist’s watercolors and drawings was on view at Nordiska Akvarellmuseet in Skärhamn, Sweden.

Biography is from wikipedia.

When I was in my studio I didn’t give a damn what sex I was… I thought art is art. (Alice Neel)

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  It was taken from a real life awkward photo.  I feel like if I had more time I could’ve perfected her style a bit more, but that’s okay.  I enjoyed it and I will see you tomorrow on Day 352.

Best,

Linda

 

Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Side-View Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Side-View
Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas