Day 364- Karli Donna Young- Detach This Part

It’s Day 364 and I’m so happy and excited to do a tribute in honor of my very best friend who happens to be a great artist as well.  I’m so lucky to live with her and see her art everyday AND see her create her art.  Please join me in honoring Karli Donna Young today!

Karli Donna Young

Karli Donna Young

1921- Karli Donna Young

1921- Karli Donna Young

In the beginning there was Me, Carley Young, born and raised in a small town just outside of Vancouver, Canada. Growing up I loved horror movies, Stephen King novels, cartoons and making stuff out of other stuff (a gift from my mother, a crafty person in her own right).

I was an only child early on and spent lots of time pretending I lived inside of a John Bellairs book. I started painting in high school, but it didn’t really stick.

Me Me Me- Karli Donna Young

Me Me Me- Karli Donna Young

I couldn’t focus on just one thing. I tried sewing and knitting, photography and writing poetry. Again, nothing really stuck. I wanted to do too many things all at once. That’s still kinda true.

My mom says, lovingly, that I am like a lump of coal….there is a diamond in there somewhere, I just need to apply the appropriate pressure and time. I think she’s right.

Detach This Part- Karli Donna Young

Detach This Part- Karli Donna Young

I don’t want to be ONE thing. I want to be ALL the things. A painter, a quilter, a photographer and a ukulele superstar. I want to build furniture and sew dresses, paint signs and tap dance.

It’s hard to say why I make art, or why I make art the way that I do. I think I like to make things that are aesthetically pleasing to me or things that tap into

That Dream I had that One Time- Karli Donna Young

That Dream I had that One Time- Karli Donna Young

my own sense of nostalgia. I am in love with my childhood and all the magic that it holds for me.

I think that love comes through in all the things that I do, artistic or otherwise. I guess I just like to stand back once a project is complete, point and say “I MADE THAT”. I like the sense of accomplishment.

Drippy Painting- Karli Donna Young

Drippy Painting- Karli Donna Young

Oh, and I like to put glitter on everything.

I currently live on top of a big hill in El Cerrito, CA. where I ride bikes, make art, play ukulele and pretend I live inside a John Bellairs book.

~

Yay! I had so much fun doing today’s penultimate piece.  Glitter and great colors.  How lucky was I to be able to ask the artist herself throughout my creation any questions I had while creating my piece?  She also accompanied me to the art store to buy supplies this morning!  Including some oils for tomorrow’s Bob Ross tribute!  The FINAL painting!  I will see you then…on Day 365!  Woweeeee!

Best,

Linda

Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Side-View Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Side-View
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

 

Day 361- Yuko Shimizu- Living Her Childhood Dream

It’s Day 361 and I had so much fun creating today’s piece.  It took a large portion of the day, but I think it was worth it.  I didn’t use the same materials that the artist uses so it was a bit challenging, but I still think it turned out all right.  Please join me in honoring Yuko Shimizu…one of my new favorite artists!

Yuko Shimizu

Yuko Shimizu

Melancholy of Mechagirl book cover- Yuko Shimizu

Melancholy of Mechagirl book cover- Yuko Shimizu

YUKO SHIMIZU (清水裕子) is a Japanese illustrator based in New York City and instructor at School of Visual Arts.  Newsweek Japan has chosen Yuko as one of “100 Japanese People The World Respects(世界が尊敬する日本人100)” in 2009. Her first self-titled monograph was released world-wide from German publisher Gestalten in 2011. The first childrens book Barbed Wire Baseball (written by Marissa Moss) came out from Abrams in April, 2013.

You may have seen her work on The Gap T-shirts, Pepsi cans,  VISA billboards, Microsoft and Target ads, as well as on the book covers of Penguin, Scholastic, DC Comics, and on the pages of NY Times, Time, Rolling Stone, New Yorker and  in many other publications over last ten years.

But illustration is actually Yuko’s second career.  Although art has always been

Narayama Cover- Yuko Shimizu

Narayama Cover- Yuko Shimizu

her passion, she had initially chosen a more practical path of studying advertising and marketing at Waseda University and took a job in corporate PR in Tokyo. It never quite made her happy. At age 22, she was in mid-life crisis.

SCRUBS magazine Swimming in Fear- Yuko Shimizu

SCRUBS magazine Swimming in Fear- Yuko Shimizu

Yuko ended up working the corporate job for 11 years, so she could figure out what she really wanted in life, as well as to save up just enough to play a biggest gamble of her life: She moved to New York City in 1999, where she briefly spent her childhood, to study art for the first time. Yuko graduated with MFA from SVA’s Illustration as Visual Essay Program in 2003 and  has been illustrating since.  She has also been teaching the next generation of talents at the alma mater.

She works at her studio in midtown Manhattan, and fulfills her passion of world travel by giving lectures and

Now Hear CD cover- Yuko Shimizu

Now Hear CD cover- Yuko Shimizu

workshops around the world and various cities in the US. She has not gotten into mid-life crisis since she has became an artist.

Please do not mix her up with another Yuko Shimizu. This Yuko did NOT create Hello Kitty.

Above bio is from her website www.yukoart.com.

Shimizu was born in Tokyo, Japan, and grew up mostly in Kanagawa Prefecture though she and her family spent four years in Westchester County, New York, during her teenage years.

The Unwritten #50 Unwritten Fables 1 of 5- Yuko Shimizu

The Unwritten #50 Unwritten Fables 1 of 5- Yuko Shimizu

She graduated from Waseda University’s School of Commerce in 1988 as valedictorian and soon began her first job in the corporate PR department of one of Tokyo’s largest sogo shoshas.

Eleven years later, she resigned and moved to New York City to pursue her childhood dream of becoming an artist. She set out to earn a second bachelor’s degree, this time in illustration at the School of Visual Arts. However, after finishing her sophomore year, she was accepted into the MFA Illustration as Visual Essay program. She graduated in May 2003.

Shimizu began getting editorial illustration work soon after she completed her master’s degree, at first occasional assignments from the Village Voice and the New York Times, and soon after semi-regular ones for The New Yorker and Financial Times magazine. Now, she counts numerous well-known publications, publishing houses, and brands as clients.

In 2008, Shimizu illustrated P. Craig Russell’s comic book adaptations of Neil Gaiman’s The Sandman: The Dream Hunters, her first cover illustrations for Vertigo (DC Comics). She continued her relationship with the

Yuko x GoodSon T shirts project- Yuko Shimizu

Yuko x GoodSon T shirts project- Yuko Shimizu

imprint in 2009 when she began creating cover art for their ongoing comic book series The Unwritten, by Mike Carey (writer). The series was nominated for Eisner Awards in the Best Cover Artist category in 2011 and 2012.

In 2009, Shimizu collaborated with The Gap‘s AIDS charity line Product RED to create five limited-edition T-shirts (two for men, three for women) for the North American market. They quickly sold out both online and in stores.

Under the auspices of the Robin Hood Foundation and Pentagram’s charitable L!brary Initiative, Shimizu collaborated with graphic designer Stefan Sagmeister on an 11-panel mural for P.S. 96 in the Bronx. The project was showcased in the New York Times and in the commemorative book L!brary (Princeton Architectural Press, 2010).

Shimizu’s other notable works include her children’s book Barbed Wire Baseball (written by Marissa Moss, Abrams Books) to be published in Spring 2013 and her 2008 London billboards for Tiger Beer.

Above is from wikipedia.  All art is from artist’s website…link above.

I hope you enjoy today’s piece…I still can’t believe there’s only a handful of paintings left.  Whew.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 362.

Best,

Linda

セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
セルフポートレート- Tribute to Yuko Shimizu
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 357- Hannelore Baron- A Complete Thing

It’s Day 357 and I had a very busy day with filming and also have a holiday party this evening.  I was still able to get today’s piece done.  I wish I had more time to focus on it.  Please join me in honoring Hannelore Baron today.

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron 1978

Hannelore Baron 1978

Hannelore Baron (June 8, 1926 – April 28, 1987) was an artist whose work has become known for the highly personal, book-sized, abstract collages and box constructions that she began exhibiting in the late 1960s. Born in Dillingen/Saar, Germany, she and her family fled persecution in Nazi Germany, illegally crossing the border into Luxembourg in 1939. In 1941 Baron’s family sailed from Lisbon to New York and setteled in the Bronx, New York City.

By the time she graduated from the Staubenmiller Textile High School in Manhattan, Baron was avidly reading eastern philosophy, making increasingly abstract paintings and probably already experiencing the symptoms of claustrophobia and depression that would lead to a series of nervous breakdowns throughout her life. In the late 1950s Baron combined a variety of techniques and began making her first collages. Occupied with raising two children (daughter Julie and son Mark) and beset by psychological problems, Hannelore nevertheless exhibited her work and in 1969, the year of her one-person exhibition at Ulster County Community College, she began to make the box constructions that would become her signature. In the early 1970s, Baron established a studio and devoted her time and energy completely to her artwork until her death in 1987. Hannelore Baron was self-taught.

Although her compositions are completely abstract, she considered them to be both personal and political statements. In her own words,

Everything I’ve done is a statement on the, as they say, human condition…the way other people march to

Hannelore Baron- Untitled Collage 1977

Hannelore Baron- Untitled Collage 1977

Washington, or set themselves on fire, or write protest letters, or go to assassinate someone. Well, I’ve had all the same feelings that these people had about various things, and my way out, because of my inability to do anything else for various reasons, has been to make the protest through my artwork… H.B.

Throughout the 1970s and 1980s her work garnered critical acclaim, along with gallery and museum exhibitions in the United States, Europe and Japan. In 1995, her work was the subject of a one-person exhibition at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. In 2001 her work was the subject of a traveling exhibition curated by Ingrid Schaffner and organized by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service. Her works can be found in the collections of The Museum of Modern Art, New York; the conSolomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Biography is from wikipedia.

Below bio is from artist’s website. www.hannelorebaron.net

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron practiced an art of concealment and protection. Out of rough and common materials she fashioned constructions, drawings and collages that transmuted the painful experiences of her life into indelible images of the darkness and mystery of being. Baron was born Hannelore Alexander in Dilligen, a small town in the Saar region of Germany in 1926. Her father, Julius, was a Jewish textile merchant, and almost as soon as Hitler came to power, the family began to feel the ominous consequences. Hannelore and her brother were sent to a special school for Jews only. On Kristallnacht, the family’s apartment was ransacked and her father beaten. Thus began a period of flight and border crossing that did not end until the family managed to emigrate from Lisbon to New York in 1941. In the midst of all this, one of Baron’s most vivid memories was that of a brief return to her family’s wrecked apartment, where the bloody handprints of her father were still visible on the walls.

By the time she graduated from the Staubenmiller Textile High School in Manhattan, Baron was avidly reading eastern philosophy, making increasingly abstract paintings and probably already experiencing the symptoms of claustrophobia and depression that would lead to a series of nervous breakdowns throughout her life. On one of her rare forays out, to sketch, she met Herman Baron, a book salesman for the Philosophical Library, and they

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron

married in 1950. The milieu was intellectually rich: Baron’s brother ran a small press and published works by avant-garde writers such as Maya Deren and Henry Miller, and Baron himself soon opened his own bookstore in the Bronx. Isolated by her mental distress, however, Hannelore developed her art without instruction and without direct knowledge of the currents that were changing the art world. Her abstract paintings betray no debt to Rothko, Gorky or Motherwell. But she did manage to visit an exhibition by John Heliker, a friend of Baron’s brother, and the experience was decisive: she saw how collage could combine all aspects of art, from drawing and painting to sculptural manipulation of materials. Over the next three decades, Hannelore would explore the implications of mixed media with depth, subtlety and daring.

Occupied with raising two children (daughter Julie and son Mark) and beset by psychological problems, Hannelore nevertheless exhibited her work and in 1969, the year of her one-person exhibition at Ulster County Community College, she began to make the box constructions that would become her signature. In these works, damaged wood and metal, often tied or nailed together, enclose secrets that can only be guessed at: scraps of

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron

her past, mysterious games without rules, concealed objects. In their rawness and obscurity they form the necessary counterpart to Joseph Cornell’s elegant enigmas. In these works and in her collages, Hannelore was able to convey her sense of the fragility of life, the mythic substratum of human experience, and broader concerns for the environment, the injustices of war, especially the Vietnam conflict, and the physical pain of existence. In 1973, she was diagnosed with cancer and would struggle with various forms of the disease until it took her life in 1987. After her death, Hannelore’s work was the subject of a one-person exhibition at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York and, in 2002, a national touring exhibition organized by the Smithsonian Institution. She once remarked of one of her works, “The solution didn’t come only from my head, it was lived out and worked out. It is a complete thing.”

~

I hope you enjoy my tribute today!  It was a therapeutic experience creating it.  Her style is very distinct and hard to emulate because of it’s subtlety, so I tried to get into a mind frame of my own while creating this piece.

I will see you tomorrow on Day 358!

Best,

Linda

Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View
Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Day 355- Marta Minujin- Everything is Art

It’s Day 355 and I had a blast doing today’s extra bold and colorful piece.  She did so many different forms of art, but I really wanted to do something insanely bright and colorful today.  Please join me in honoring Marta Minujin today!

Marta Minujin

Marta Minujin

Marta Minujín (born January 30, 1943) is an Argentine conceptual and performance artist.

Freaking on Fluo- Marta Minujin

Freaking on Fluo- Marta Minujin

Marta Minujín was born in the San Telmo neighborhood of Buenos Aires. She met a young economist, Juan Carlos Gómez Sabaini, and married him in secret in 1959; the couple had two children. A student in the National University Art Institute, she first exhibited her work in a 1959 show at the Teatro Agón. A scholarship from the National Arts Foundation allowed her to travel to Paris as one of the young Argentine artists featured in Pablo Curatella Manes and Thirty Argentines of the New Generation, a 1960 exhibit organized by the prominent sculptor and Paris Biennale judge.

Her time in Paris inspired her to create “livable sculptures,” notably La Destrucción, in which she assembled mattresses along the Impasse Roussin, only to invite other avant-garde artists in her entourage, including Christo and Paul-Armand Gette, to destroy the display. This 1963 creation would be the first of her “Happenings” – events as works of arts in themselves; among her hosts during her stay was Finance Minister Valéry Giscard d’Estaing (later President of France).

She earned a National Award in 1964 at Buenos Aires’ Torcuato di Tella Institute, where she prepared two happenings: Eróticos en technicolor and

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

the interactiveRevuélquese y viva (Roll Around in Bed and Live). Her Cabalgata (Cavalcade) aired on Public Television that year, and involved horses with paint buckets tied to their tails. These displays took her to nearby Montevideo, where she organized Sucesos (Events) at the Uruguayan capital’s Tróccoli Stadium with 500 chickens, artists of contrasting physical shape, motorcycles, and other elements.

Marta Minujin

Marta Minujin

She joined Rubén Santantonín at the di Tella Institute in 1965 to create La Menesunda (Mayhem), where participants were asked to go through sixteen chambers, each separated by a human-shaped entry. Led by neon lights, groups of eight visitors would encounter rooms with television sets at full blast, couples making love in bed, a cosmetics counter (complete with an attendant), a dental office from which dialing an oversized rotary phone was required to leave, a walk-in freezer with dangling fabrics (suggesting sides of beef), and a mirrored room with black lighting, falling confetti, and the scent of frying food. The use of advertising throughout suggested the influence of pop art in Minujín’s “mayhem.”

These works earned her a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1966, by which she relocated to New York. The coup d’état by General Juan Carlos Onganía in June of that year made her fellowship all the more fortuitous, as the new regime would frequently censor and ban irreverent displays such as hers. Minujín delved into psychedelic art in New York, of which among her best-known creations was that of the “Minuphone,” where patrons could enter a telephone booth, dial a number, and be surprised by colors projecting from the glass panels, sounds, and seeing themselves on a television screen in the floor. She was on hand in 1971 for the Buenos Aires premiere of Operación Perfume, and in New York, befriended fellow conceptual artist Andy Warhol.

She returned to Argentina in 1976, and afterwards created a series of reproductions of classical Greek sculptures in plaster of paris, as well as miniatures of the Buenos Aires Obelisk carved out of panettone, of the Venus de Milo carved from cheese, and of Tango vocalist Carlos Gardel for a

Geometria blanda, 2014- Marta Minujin

Geometria blanda, 2014- Marta Minujin

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

1981 display in Medellín. The latter, a sheet metal creation, was stuffed with cotton and lit, creating a metaphor for the legendary crooner’s untimely 1935 death in a Medellín plane crash. She was awarded the first of a series of Konex Awards, the highest in the Argentine cultural realm, in 1982.

The return of democracy in 1983, following seven years of a generally failed dictatorship, prompted Minujín to create a monument to a glaring, inanimate victim of the regime: freedom of expression. Assembling 30,000 banned books (including works as diverse as those by Freud, Marx, Sartre, Gramsci, Foucault, Raúl Scalabrini Ortiz, and Darcy Ribeiro, as well as satires such as Absalom and Achitophel, reference volumes such as Enciclopedia Salvat, and even children’s texts, notably The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint Exupéry), she designed the “Parthenon of Books,” and following President Raúl Alfonsín’s December 10 inaugural, had it mounted on a boulevard median along the Ninth of July Avenue. Dismantled after three weeks, its mass of newly-unbanned titles was distributed to the public below.

A conversation with Warhol in New York regarding the Latin American debt crisis inspired one of her most publicized “happenings:” The Debt. Purchasing a shipment of maize, Minujín dramatized the Argentine cost of servicing the foreign debt with a 1985 photo

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

series in which she symbolically handed the maize to Warhol “in payment” for the debt; she never again saw Warhol, who died in 1987.

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

Laberinto Minujinda, 1985- Marta Minujin

Minujín has continued to display her art pieces and happenings in the Buenos Aires Museum of Modern Art, the National Fine Arts Museum, the ArteBA festival, the Barbican Center, and a vast number of other international galleries and art shows, while continuing to satirize consumer culture (particularly relating to women). She is well known for her belief that “everything is art.”

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  My eyes hurt just a little after painting it, but I think it came out pretty nice.

I will see you tomorrow on Day 356!

Best,

Linda

 

Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Laberinto del Arco Iris- Tribute to Marta Minujin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 352- Alice Neel- “Art is Art”

It’s Day 352 and it was fun painting today’s piece.  I’m not sure if I got the artist’s style quite right, but I did choose quite the awkward photo to paint…so hopefully I captured the artist’s spirit.  Please join me in honoring Alice Neel today.  She was such a great artist.  I love the subjects of her pieces and in my opinion I thought she was way ahead of her time with her style and content.

Alice Neel

Alice Neel

Geoffrey Hendricks and Brian, 1978- Alice Neel

Geoffrey Hendricks and Brian, 1978- Alice Neel

Alice Neel (January 28, 1900 – October 13, 1984) was an American visual artist, who was particularly well known for oil painting and for her portraits depicting friends, family, lovers, poets, artists and strangers. Her paintings are notable for their expressionistic use of line and color, psychological acumen, and emotional intensity. Neel was called “one of the greatest portrait artists of the 20th century” by Barry Walker, curator of modern and contemporary art at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, which organized a retrospective of her work in 2010.

Alice Neel was born on January 28, 1900 in Merion Square, Pennsylvania to George Washington Neel, an accountant for the Pennsylvania Railroad, and Alice Concross Hartley Neel. In mid-1900, her family moved to the rural town of Colwyn, Pennsylvania. She was the third of four children. She was raised into a straight-laced middle-class family during a time when there were limited expectations and opportunities for women. Her mother had said to her, “I don’t know what you expect to do in the world, you’re only a girl.

In 1918, after graduating High School, she took the Civil Service exam and got a high-paying clerical position in order to help support her parents. After three years of work, taking art classes by night in Philadelphia, Neel enrolled in the Fine Art program at the Philadelphia School of Design for

Self-Portrait- Alice Neel

Self-Portrait- Alice Neel

Women (now Moore College of Art) in 1921. She graduated in 1925.  Neel often said that she chose to attend an all-girls school so as not to be distracted from her art by the temptations of the opposite sex.

She met an upper-class Cuban painter in 1924 named Carlos Enríquez at the Chester Springs summer school run by PAFA. They were wed on 1 June 1925 in Colwyn, Pennsylvania. After marrying Neel eventually moved to Havana to live with Enríquez’s family. In Havana, Neel was embraced by the burgeoning Cuban avant-garde, a set of young writers, artists and musicians. In this environment Neel developed the foundations of her lifelong political consciousness and commitment to equality.  During this time, she had 7 servants and lived in a mansion.

Nancy And Olivia- Alice Neel

Nancy And Olivia- Alice Neel

Neel’s daughter, Santillana, was born on 26 December 1926 in Havana. In 1927, though, the couple returned to the United States to live in New York. Just a month before Santillana’s first birthday, she died of diphtheria. The trauma caused by Santillana’s death infused the content of Neel’s paintings, setting a precedent for the themes of motherhood, loss, and anxiety that permeated her work for the duration of her career.

Shortly following Santillana’s death, Neel became pregnant with her second child. On 24 November 1928, Isabella Lillian (called Isabetta) was born in New York City. Isabetta’s birth was the inspiration for Neel’s “Well Baby Clinic”, a bleak portrait of mothers and babies in a maternity clinic more reminiscent of an insane asylum than a nursery.

In the spring of 1930, Carlos had given the impression that he was going overseas to look for a place to life in

Andy Warhol- Alice Neel

Andy Warhol- Alice Neel

Paris. Instead, he returned to Cuba, taking Isabetta with him. Mourning the loss of her husband and daughter, Neel suffered a massive nervous breakdown, was hospitalized, and attempted suicide. She was placed in the suicide ward of the Philadelphia General Hospital.

Even in the insane asylum, she painted. Alice loved a wretch. She loved the wretch in the hero and the hero in the wretch. She saw that in

all of us, I think.

— Ginny Neel, Alice’s daughter-in-law

Abe's Grandchildren- Alice Neel

Abe’s Grandchildren- Alice Neel

Deemed stable almost a year later, Neel was released from the sanatorium in 1931 and returned to her parents’ home. Following an extended visit with her close friend and frequent subject, Nadya Olyanova, Neel returned to New York.

There Neel painted the local characters, including Joe Gould, whom she famously depicted in 1933 with multiple penises, which represented his inflated ego and “self-deception” about who he was and his unfulfilled ambitions. The painting, a rare survivor of her early works, has been shown at Tate Modern.

During the Depression, Neel was one of the first artists to work for the Works Progress Administration. At the end of 1933, Neel was hired to make a painting every six weeks. She had been living in poverty. She had an affair with a man named Kenneth Doolittle who was a heroin addict and a sailor. In 1934, he set afire 350 of her watercolors, paintings and drawings.  At this time, her husband Carlos proposed to reunite, although in the end the couple neither reunited nor officially filed for divorce.

Her world was composed of artists, intellectuals, and political leaders of the Communist Party, all of whom became

The De Vegh Twins, 1975- Alice Neel

The De Vegh Twins, 1975- Alice Neel

subjects for her paintings.  Her work glorified subversion and sexuality, depicting whimsical scenes of lovers and nudes, like a watercolor she made in 1935, Alice Neel And John Rothschild In The Bathroom, which showed the naked pair peeing. In the 1930s Neel gained a degree of notoriety as an artist, and established a good standing within her circle of downtown intellectuals and Communist Party leaders. While Neel was never an official Communist Party member, her affiliation and sympathy with the ideals of Communism remained constant.

Babies- Alice Neel

Babies- Alice Neel

In 1939 Neel gave birth to her first son, Richard, the child of Jose Santiago, a Puerto Rican night-club singer whom Neel met in 1935. Neel moved to Spanish Harlem.  She began painting her neighbors, particularly women and children. José left Neel in 1940.

Neel’s second son, Hartley, was born in 1941 to Neel and her lover, the communist intellectual Sam Brody. During this Forties, Neel made illustrations for the Communist publication, Masses & Mainstream, and continued to paint portraits from her uptown home. However, in 1943 the Works Progress Administration ceased working with Neel

, which made it harder for the artist to support her two sons. During this time Neel would shoplift and was on welfare to help make ends meet. Between 1940 and 1950, Neel’s art virtually disappeared from galleries, save for one solo show in 1944. In the 1950s, Neel’s friendship with Mike Goldand his admiration for her social realist work garnered her a show at the Communist-inspired New Playwrights Theatre. In 1959, Neel even made a film appearance after the director Robert Frank asked her to appear alongside a young Allen Ginsberg in his classic Beatnik film, Pull My Daisy. The following year, her work was first reproduced in ARTnews magazine.

Toward the end of the 1960s, interest in Neel’s work intensified. The momentum of the women’s movement led to increased attention, and Neel became an icon for feminists. In 1970, she was commissioned to paint the feminist activist Kate Millett for the cover of Time magazine. Millett refused

White Chapel- Alice Neel

White Chapel- Alice Neel

to sit for Neel; consequently, the magazine cover was based off a photograph.

By the mid-1970s, Neel had gained celebrity and stature as an important American artist. In 1979, President Jimmy Carter presented her with a National Women’s Caucus for Artaward for outstanding achievement. Neel’s reputation was at its height at the time of her death in 1984.

Neel’s life and works are featured in the documentary Alice Neel, which premiered at the 2007 Slamdance Film Festival and was directed by her grandson, Andrew Neel. The film was given a New York theatrical release in April of that year.

In 1974, Neel’s work was given a retrospective exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art, and posthumously, in the summer of 2000, also at the Whitney. The first exhibition dedicated to Neel’s works

Alice Neel

Alice Neel

in Europe was held in London in 2004 at the Victoria Miro Gallery. Jeremy Lewison, who had worked at the Tate, was the curator of the collection. In 2001 the Philadelphia Museum of Art organized a retrospective of her art entitled Alice Neel. She was the subject of a retrospective entitled Alice Neel: Painted Truths organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston in Texas, which was on view from March 21-June 15, 2010. The exhibition traveled to Whitechapel Gallery, London, and Moderna Museet Malmö, Malmö, Sweden. In 2013, the first major presentation of the artist’s watercolors and drawings was on view at Nordiska Akvarellmuseet in Skärhamn, Sweden.

Biography is from wikipedia.

When I was in my studio I didn’t give a damn what sex I was… I thought art is art. (Alice Neel)

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  It was taken from a real life awkward photo.  I feel like if I had more time I could’ve perfected her style a bit more, but that’s okay.  I enjoyed it and I will see you tomorrow on Day 352.

Best,

Linda

 

Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Side-View Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Side-View
Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Bath Time!- Tribute to Alice Neel
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Watercolor on Canvas

Day 333- Bridget Bate Tichenor- Spiritual Guides

It’s Day 333 and I really enjoyed creating today’s piece.  I was stumped at first at what I wanted to paint, but when the ideas started flowing, I had a great time.  I also wanted to keep it somewhat simple, but also really capture the artist’s essence so to speak. 🙂  Join me in honoring Bridget Bate Tichenor.

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor (born Bridget Pamela Arkwright Bate on November 22, 1917 – died on October 20, 1990), also known as Bridget Tichenor or B.B.T., was a Mexican surrealist painter of fantastic art in the school of magic realism and a fashion editor. Born in Paris and of British descent, she later embraced Mexico as her home.

The mesmerizing story of the Magic Realist painter Bridget Bate Tichenor has never been told.  It is a riveting revelation of an extraordinary female artist who impacted the 20th Century world of fashion, art, and society, with enormous contributions.  Revealed are the intimacies and secrets of an outwardly beautiful, exotic, bold, and courageous, yet painfully shy and reclusive woman, who lived in extraordinary times, yet was unknown to her peers, colleagues, and the world at large.

Bridget lived in an astonishing way, in many contrasting countries, and in many revolutionary platforms. Her personal code of excellence has yet to be recognized or acknowledged, outside small and eccentric art circles. Bridget adhered to rarefied and noble standards of human pride, integrity, respect, discipline, and compassion.

Bridget Bate Tichenor, Líderes (Leaders) Close Up

Bridget Bate Tichenor, Líderes (Leaders) Close Up

She honored these humane traits above all else in life.  Bridget’s impeccable values, in tandem with her determination and prioritization to execute her artistic vision, are the essence of her story, and substantiates her historical value.

Bridget inherited a peripatetic world from her self-absorbed, famous, and creatively gifted parents. It fueled deep insecurities, and was equally fed by fears of abandonment. Subsequently, in order to survive, she reinvented herself by necessity, and chose to mold herself into whatever she needed at any given time.

Bridget’s mother, Vera Bate Lombardi (Sarah Gertrude Baring Arkwright Fitzgeorge Bate Lombardi) was an indomitable combination of beauty and bravado with the highest connections. From 1925-1939, Vera became Co Co Chanel’s muse and Public Relations liaison to several European Royal Families.

BRIDGET BATE TICHENOR (1917-1990) Gusanos y caracoles

BRIDGET BATE TICHENOR (1917-1990) Gusanos y caracoles

Her demeanor and style influenced the ‘English Look’, the very foundation for the House of Chanel. Vera Bate Lombardi’s mother was Rosa Frederica Baring of the Baring Banking family, who had rescued the British Royal family during difficult economic times. Vera was allegedly an illegitimate descendent of George III, through her reputed father, HRH Prince Adolphus Cambridge, 1st Marquess of Cambridge Duke of Teck. She was presented socially as Fitzgeorge, as she was the unadopted daughter of her stepfather, the morganatic and bastard Colonel Fitzgeorge, son of Prince George, Duke of Cambridge and his mistress Sarah Louisa Fairbrother.

Chanel craved Vera’s immense popularity and privileged patrician heritage, however shrouded in controversial

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

royal illegitimacies. Chanel came from humble beginnings, and was decidedly uneducated. She looked to Vera as a ‘social advisor’, who would be responsible for her societal launch and business triumph. It was evident that Chanel’s personal identity had been tragically dehumanized and shamed as an orphan, and she systematically absorbed Vera’s exotic mannerisms, from gestures to stance, with Cambridge and Oxford intonations, in a scheming and arrogant self-reinvention of entitlement.

Lombardi was a flawless British Royal Fashion icon to Chanel, and Chanel shamelessly used her to establish her fashion-identity-template, which became the legendary Chanel brand. Years later, Vera, retaliated against Chanel’s ruthless jealousies and manipulations, and exposed her as a Nazi spy to her cousin Sir Winston Churchill in Spain circa 1944. This disclosure shattered Chanel’s reputation for many years.

La Caja de Cristal- Bridget Bate Tichenor

La Caja de Cristal- Bridget Bate Tichenor

Until now, Vera Bate Lombardi has been relatively obscured in Chanel’s literary and film biographies. Chanel cunningly perpetuated her adapted character identity, and concealed the truths of her business cornerstone. What had begun as flattery for Vera, terminated in disgust.

Bridget’s father, Frederick Blantford Bate, was born in Virginia but lived in England for over 20 years, working as a British representative for NBC during World War I. Bate was a Mechanical Officer in the US Army, who, in 1916, was instrumental in establishing The Field Service of American Ambulance in Paris. Bate was an intimate friend of Vera’s cousin, the Duke of Windsor. He was the first news correspondent to receive the story of the Duke’s abdication and marriage to Wallis Simpson, and contacted his associate, Alistair Cooke, in the UK to broadcast it.

The beautiful, noble, artistic, and rich are patently different, often misunderstood or condemned, yet granted societal privileges few receive. These very qualities that embodied Bridget’s unique style, influenced and were

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

copied by some of the greatest names of the 20th century such as her rivals Diana Vreeland and Frida Kahlo. She was loved and envied, but most importantly, awe-inspiring to Man Ray, Diego Rivera, Ernst Lubitsch, James Whale, Laurence Olivier, Anais Nin, Greta Garbo, and Joan Crawford.

Bridget had an amazing, yet tragic, multidimensional life, which included an arranged marriage, true love, romantic and professional rivalry, artistic achievement, mysticism, fantasy, perfectionism, and shattered dreams. All of which were played out in the most glamorous settings, with famous personalities and eccentric nobility that she orchestrated in a dramatic metaphysical theater of remarkable relationships.

She was difficult to get to know, guarded, and very secretive. She revealed certain things to socially survive, while withholding her poetically rich emotional and spiritual communications to focus through her dedicated relationship with her sacred and sovereign art. She had a genius gift of observation and execution in cryptic detail, both in her character and painting.

Bridget Bate TIchenor

Bridget Bate TIchenor

Her controversial royal illegitimate background overshadowed her profound artistry and her sense of self worth.  In her era and society, it was important to be of royal lineage. Her achievement in the art world was diminished by who she was as an illegitimate royal family member, her ravishing beauty, her refined intelligence, and her commanding personality. Her controversial background was more important and interesting to her friends, which graciously made her celebrated and received on one hand, yet made her hide how great an artist she was on the other and never acknowledged. This is why she was so shy about showing who she was as a superlative painter.

She compartmentalized her life. She was deathly afraid to remove her complex multiple masks and reveal not only her precious art, but also her deepest intimate feelings to others. She was validated only by those relationships that had a higher profile than she, so that she could retreat behind her provocatively mysterious and seductive persona to hide her acute vulnerability.

She was difficult to get to know, guarded, and very secretive.  She revealed certain things to socially survive, while withholding her poetically rich emotional and spiritual communications to focus through her dedicated

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

relationship with her sacred and sovereign art.

Bridget spiritually adopted me and I became her protégé in 1971. Among her many gifts, she benevolently trained me in painting and introduced me to ancient occult religions, which included many lost esoteric sciences of Egyptian, Tantrika, and Mesoamerican Magick and Alchemy. She fed my hunger to learn, and I became her consummate student in a world that had received a death rattle to classically trained artists.

Just before her death, I promised my dear friend and genius mentor Bridget that the world would know who she was. One of the legacies she gave to me were her life stories. I began to document Bridget’s life in 1990 shortly after her death, recording her extensive and detailed personal accounts that she imparted to me over the nineteen years of our relationship. The following biography is a small part of my promise that perpetuates the significance of her life.

-Zachary Selig-

Biography is from www.bridgetbatetichenor.com.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I really had a blast painting it.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 334.

Best,

Linda

Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 331- Grandma Moses- Life, A Good Day’s Work

It’s Day 331…and it’s Thanksgiving!  I thought today’s artist was perfect to pay tribute to on a holiday!  Please join me in honoring Grandma Moses today.  If only we all can find fame (for the first time or again) at the age of 80 and live til the age of 101!  I give thanks to her for pursuing such creativity later in life.

Grandma Moses

Grandma Moses

Anna Mary Robertson Moses (September 7, 1860 – December 13, 1961), better known by her nickname of “Grandma Moses,”was a renowned American folk artist. Having begun painting in earnest at the age of 78, she is often cited as an example of an individual successfully beginning a career in the arts at an advanced age. Her works have been shown and sold in the United States and abroad and have been marketed on greeting cards and other merchandise. Moses’ paintings are among the collections of many museums. The Sugaring Off was sold for US$1.2 million in 2006.

The Burning of Troy- Grandma Moses

The Burning of Troy- Grandma Moses

Moses has appeared on magazine covers, television, and in a documentary of her life. She wrote an autobiography of her life, won numerous awards and was awarded two honorary doctoral degrees.

The New York Times said of her: “The simple realism, nostalgic atmosphere and luminous color with which Grandma Moses portrayed homely farm life and rural countryside won her a wide following. She was able to capture the excitement of winter’s first snow, Thanksgiving preparations and the new, young green of oncoming spring… In person, Grandma Moses charmed wherever she went. A tiny, lively woman with mischievous gray eyes and a quick wit, she could be sharp-tongued with a sycophant and stern with an errant grandchild. ”

Starting at 12 years of age and for a total of 15 years, she was a live-in housekeeper. One of the families that she

Grandma Moses - Christmas at Home

Grandma Moses – Christmas at Home

worked for, who noticed her appreciation for their prints made by Currier and Ives, supplied her with art materials to create drawings. Moses and her husband began their married life in Virginia, where they worked on farms. In 1905 they returned to Northeastern United States and settled in Eagle Bridge, New York. The couple had five children who survived infancy. Her interest in art was expressed throughout her life, including embroidery of pictures with yarn, until arthritis made this pursuit too painful.

Born in Greenwich on September 7, 1860, Anna Mary Robertson was the third of Margaret Shanahan Robertson and Russell King Robertson’s ten children. She was raised with four sisters and five

GRANDMA MOSES The Old Checkered House in Cambridge Valley

GRANDMA MOSES The Old Checkered House in Cambridge Valley

brothers. Her father ran a flax mill and was a farmer. Moses attended a one-room school for a short period of time as a child. That school is now the Bennington Museum in Vermont which has the largest collection of her works in the United States. Moses first painted as a child, using lemon and grape juice to make colors for her “lambscapes”. Other natural materials that she used to create works of art included ground ochre, grass, flour paste, slack lime and sawdust.

She left home and began to work for a wealthy neighboring family at 12 years of age, performing chores on their farm. She continued to keep house, cook and sew for wealthy families for 15 years. One of the families that she worked for, the Whitesides, noticed her interest in their Currier and Ives prints and purchased chalk and wax crayons so that she could create her own artwork.

She was 27 when she worked on the same farm as Thomas Salmon, a “hired man”. They married and established themselves nearStaunton, Virginia where they spent nearly two decades, living and working in turn

Moving Day on the Farm- Grandma Moses

Moving Day on the Farm- Grandma Moses

on four separate local farms. To supplement the family income, Moses made potato chips and churned butter from the milk of a cow that she purchased with her savings. Later, the couple bought a farm.

Moses and her husband had five of ten children born to them survive infancy. Although she loved living in the Shenandoah Valley, in 1905 Anna and Robert moved to a farm in Eagle Bridge, New York at her husband’s urging. Thomas Moses died in 1927 of a heart attack, after which her son Forrest helped her operate the farm. She retired and moved to a daughter’s home in 1936. Anna Mary was known as either “Mother Moses” or “Grandma Moses,” and although she first exhibited as “Mrs. Moses,” the press dubbed her “Grandma Moses,” and the nickname stuck.

Grandma Moses

Grandma Moses

As a young wife and mother, Moses had been creative in her home by, for example, using housepaint to decorate a fireboard in 1918. Moses made embroidered pictures of yarn for friends and family beginning in 1932.  She also created beautiful quilted objects, a form of “hobby art” as defined by Lucy R. Lippard.

Moses had developed arthritis by the age of 76, which made embroidery painful. It was suggested to her by Celestia, her sister, that painting would be easier for her, which spurred Moses’s painting career in her late 70s.

Moses painted scenes of rural life from earlier days, which she called “old-timey” New England landscapes. Moses said that she would “get an inspiration and start painting; then I’ll forget everything, everything except how things used to be and how to paint it so people will know how we used to live.” She omitted features of modern life, like tractors and telephone poles, from her works of art.

Her early style is less individual and more realistic or primitive, despite her lack of knowledge of, or perhaps rejection of, basic perspective. Initially she created simple compositions or copied existing images. As her career advanced she created complicated, panoramic compositions of rural life.

She was a prolific painter, generating over 1,500 canvasses in three decades. Initially Moses charged $3 to $5

Grandma Moses

Grandma Moses

for a painting, depending upon its size, and as her fame increased her works were sold for $8,000 to $10,000. Her winter paintings are reminiscent of some such of the known winter paintings of Pieter Bruegel the Elder, although she had never seen his work. A German fan of her work said, “There emanates from her paintings a light-hearted optimism; the world she shows us is beautiful and it is good. You feel at home in all these pictures, and you know their meaning. The unrest and the neurotic insecurity of the present day make us inclined to enjoy the simple and affirmative outlook of Grandma Moses.”

During a visit to Hoosick Falls in 1938, Louis J. Caldor, who collected art and worked as an engineer in the state of New York, discovered paintings made by Moses in the window of a drug store. He bought their supply and ten more from her Eagle Bridge house for $3 or $5 each. The next year, three Grandma Moses paintings were included in New York’s Museum of Modern Art exhibition entitled “Contemporary Unknown American Painters”. Her first solo exhibition, “What a Farm Wife Painted,” opened in the same city in October 1940 at Otto Kallir’s Galerie St. Etienne. A meet-and-greet with the artist

Grandma Moses

Grandma Moses

and an exhibition of 50 paintings at Gimbel’s Department Store was held next on November 15. Her art displays included samples of her baked goods and preserves that won Moses prizes at the county fair. Her third solo show in as many months, was held at the Whyte Gallery, Washington, D.C. In 1944 she began to be represented by the American British Art Center and the Galerie St. Etienne, which increased her sales. Her paintings were exhibited throughout Europe and the United States over the next 20 years. Otto Kallir established the Grandma Moses Properties, Inc. for her.

Grandma Moses’s paintings were used to publicize American holidays, including Thanksgiving, Christmas and Mother’s Day. During the 1950s, Grandma Moses’s exhibitions broke attendance records around the world. Art historian Judith Stein noted: “A cultural icon, the spry, productive nonagenarian was continually cited as an inspiration for housewives, widows and retirees.” Her paintings were reproduced on Hallmark greeting cards, tiles, fabrics, and ceramics. They were also used to market products, like coffee, lipstick, cigarettes, and cameras.

n 1950, the National Press Club cited her as one of the five most newsworthy women and the National Association of House Dress Manufacturers honored her as their 1951 Woman of the Year. At age 88, Mademoiselle magazine named Grandma Moses a “Young Woman of the Year.” She was awarded two honorary

So Long Till Next Year- Grandma Moses

So Long Till Next Year- Grandma Moses

doctoral degrees. The first was bestowed in 1949 from Russell Sage College and the second two years later from the Moore College of Art and Design.

President Harry S. Truman presented her with the Women’s National Press Club trophy Award for outstanding accomplishment in art in 1949. Jerome Hill directed the 1950 documentary of her life, which was nominated for an Academy Award. In 1952, she published My Life’s History, her autobiography. In it she said “I look back on my life like a good day’s work, it was done and I feel satisfied with it. I was happy and contented, I knew nothing better and made the best out of what life offered. And life is what we make it, always has been, always will be.” In 1955, she appeared as a guest on See It Now, a television program hosted by Edward R. Murrow.

Grandma Moses

Grandma Moses

She was a Society of Mayflower Descendants and Daughters of the American Revolution member. Her 100th birthday was named by New York Governor Nelson Rockefelleras “Grandma Moses Day”. LIFE magazine celebrated her birthday by featuring her on its September 19, 1960 cover. The children’s book “Grandma Moses Story Book” was published in 1961.

Grandma Moses died on December 13, 1961 at 101 years of age in Hoosick Falls, New York at the Health Center. She is buried there at the Maple Grove Cemetery. President John F. Kennedy memorialized her: “The death of Grandma Moses removed a beloved figure from American life. The directness and vividness of her paintings restored a primitive freshness to our perception of the American scene. Both her work and her life helped our nation renew its pioneer heritage and recall its roots in the countryside and on the frontier. All Americans mourn her loss.” After her death, her work was exhibited in several large traveling exhibitions in the United States and abroad.

Biography is from wikipedia.

Painting’s not important. The important thing is keeping busy.

Grandma Moses
Keep in mind that she lived to 101!  Keep busy folks! 😉

I hope you enjoy my piece for today!  I was going to add more figures, but kind of liked the solitude after painting the little girl ice skating. 🙂  I had a nice time doing today’s tribute.  I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 332!  Hope everyone is getting stuffed with food today!  And I am grateful to all these artists that inspire me and continue to inspire me!  I am thankful for art in general for always being there for me in all ways possible.  Aren’t we lucky to live in a world so full of creativity?

Best,

Linda

Next Year's Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Next Year’s Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Next Year's Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Next Year’s Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Next Year's Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Next Year’s Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Next Year's Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Next Year’s Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Next Year's Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Next Year’s Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 322- Ruzena (Anne Billon)- Teeming Overcrowded Worlds

It’s Day 322 and I’m starting to feel more normal (health-wise)…knock on wood!  I worked on today’s piece last night and today because of the amount of pen & ink detailing I had to do.  I forgot how much I miss working with pen & ink (which is one of my favorite mediums)!

Ruzena (Anne Billon)

Ruzena (Anne Billon)

Ruzena (Anne Billon)

Ruzena (Anne Billon)

I also had the pleasure of corresponding personally with today’s artist who lives in France.  She is a little elusive and I’ve read that she doesn’t like to talk too much about her art.  It was hard to find her biography and current pieces online so she emailed photos and a bio to me.

Her artwork has rapidly become one of my new favorites and I am so exhilarated and honored to do a tribute to Anne Billon A.K.A. Ruzena today!  I hope my tribute does her justice…It was hard to figure out what exact materials she uses and when I zoomed into her pieces…they just intimidated me with all their detail!  Such haunting and beautiful artwork!  I translated her biography and CV from French so please excuse any awkwardness. 🙂  I included tons of her artwork because I love it so much.

Anne Billon (Ruzena)

Born in 1971, Anne studied Social and Economic Administration and History of Art, which led her to work in the field of culture for fifteen years. She is now works

Ruzena (Anne Billon)

Ruzena (Anne Billon)

at an administrative job.

She has always drawn and is self-taught.

Ruzena (Anne Billon)

Ruzena (Anne Billon)

Anne’s maternal Czech grandfather wanted to call her Ruzena. It seemed more appropriate to her parents to choose a name for her to live a less detonating journey for a young French girl. But the reasonable choice was not enough to obscure innate predispositions for refractory behavior.

With exacting detail drawing, Ruzena expresses a world with teeming, overcrowded arabesques organized around angular shapes and mysteriously balanced chaotic compositions that express the ambiguity of being torn between legal requirements and thirst for total freedom.

But humor watches over this tragic universe to bring it a generous subtle tone; a secret humor, tender and painful, like a fragile bow playing on the sharp teeth of the suffering she wants to tame.

With a constant ironic wink, another way to ask the eternal questions that agitate humanity since its origins,

Ruzena (Anne Billon)

Ruzena (Anne Billon)

Ruzena built a profoundly original work that takes its strength in doubt, holder of any authentic creation.

Text is from:

Gerard Sendrey Catalog Extract and dissenting Visions Publishing 2001

Expositions:

  • 2009   . “The world of design and creativity,” group exhibition, Rives (France).
    • “Private Collection” collective, Alter-Art exhibition in Grenoble (France)
    • . Gallery Ex nihilo in Grenoble, France (exhibition organized by the Association Œil’Art)
  • 2010   . “Phantasmagoria”, group exhibition, Gallery Myiawaki, Kyoto (Japan).
    • “Young contemporary painting” sale at Drouot, Paris (France)
  • 2011   . Outsider Art Fair in New York, represented by the Henry Boxer Gallery.
    • “Young contemporary painting” sale at Drouot, Paris (France)
  • 2012   . Collective exhibition in honor of Postman Cheval Gallery Yutaka Miyawaki, Kyoto, Japan
    • . 4th Biennial art shared Rives (France)
    • Ruzena (Anne Billon)

      Ruzena (Anne Billon)

      . “Because what I write can be read in the dark,” solo exhibition, Dettinger Mayer Gallery in Lyon (France)

    • . Outsider Art Fair in New York, represented by the Henry Boxer Gallery
  • 2013. Outsider Art Fair in New York, represented by the Henry Boxer Gallery.
    • Shared collective exhibition in Saint-Trojan les Bains (France) art
  • 2008   . “Black Drawings”, group exhibition, Galerie Beatrice Soulie, Paris.
    • “Shared Art” group exhibition, Rives (France)
    • . Solo exhibition, Galerie Dettinger Mayer, Lyon (France)
    • . Group exhibition, Gallery Dettinger Mayer, Lyon (France)
  • 2007   . “Contemporary Cabinet of Curiosities” group show, Beatrice Soulie Gallery in the exhibition “The Art Elysées” in Paris (France)
    • . “I Margini dello Sguardo – Arte nella Collezione Irregolare Menozzi” group exhibition in Reggio Emilia (Italy)
  • 2006   . “Confinement,” group exhibition, Aubagne Art Festival Singular (France)
    • . “Shared Art” group exhibition, Rives (France)
    • . Personal exhibition, Museum of Creation Franche, Begles (France)
  • 2005   . Solo exhibition, Galerie Dettinger Mayer, Lyon (France)
    • . “Art Brut and Affiliated Works,” group exhibition, Institute for the Humanities, University of @19.04.13-30x20Michigan, Ann Arbor (USA)
  • 2004   . “Interlacing”, group exhibition, Staffelfelden (France)
  • 2003   . Group exhibition, Gallery A Sardine stuck to the wall, Geneva (Switzerland)
  • 2001   . “Visions and Creations dissident” group exhibition, Museum of Creation Franche, Begles (France)
    • . “Interlacing”, group exhibition, Staffelfelden (France)

 

Ruzena (Anne Billon)

Ruzena (Anne Billon)

Permanent:

. Henry Boxer Gallery in Richmond Hill (England)

. Dettinger Mayer Gallery in Lyon (France)

. Jeff Ross Collection in Seattle (USA)

. Collection Dino Menozzi, prints Reggio Emilia (Italy) Cabinet

Biography, CV and photos are courtesy of the artist.

I hope you enjoy my tribute for today.  I had so much fun creating it and it inspired me to do more pen and ink work.  I’ve been painting so much that sometimes I forget the other mediums I love so much.  My arm does feel a little like a zombie’s though.  I also forgot how taxing it is on my tennis elbow to draw so much…but it’s so worth it.  The biggest challenge was mixing the different mediums.  Ruzena’s style with that is seamless.  I wasn’t sure if she used colored pencils and it was hard to do that part.  I enjoyed the pen and pencil part, but I think I wasn’t successful with the color part!  Oh well!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 323!

Best,

Linda

My Little World- Tribute to Ruzena (Anne Billon) Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Paper mounted on Wood Panel

My Little World- Tribute to Ruzena (Anne Billon)
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Paper mounted on Wood Panel

Side-View My Little World- Tribute to Ruzena (Anne Billon) Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Paper mounted on Wood Panel

Side-View
My Little World- Tribute to Ruzena (Anne Billon)
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Paper mounted on Wood Panel

Close-Up 1 My Little World- Tribute to Ruzena (Anne Billon) Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Paper mounted on Wood Panel

Close-Up 1
My Little World- Tribute to Ruzena (Anne Billon)
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Paper mounted on Wood Panel

Close-Up 2 My Little World- Tribute to Ruzena (Anne Billon) Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Paper mounted on Wood Panel

Close-Up 2
My Little World- Tribute to Ruzena (Anne Billon)
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Paper mounted on Wood Panel

Close-Up 3 My Little World- Tribute to Ruzena (Anne Billon) Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Paper mounted on Wood Panel

Close-Up 3
My Little World- Tribute to Ruzena (Anne Billon)
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Paper mounted on Wood Panel

Day 243- Gillian Ayres- Bright and Succulent

It’s Day 243 and I had so much fun painting today’s colorful piece!  I also went on a nice dog hike with my husband.  Such a beautiful day.  Join me in honoring Gillian Ayres today.

Gillian Ayres

Gillian Ayres

'Tivoli' by Gillian Ayres

‘Tivoli’ by Gillian Ayres

Gillian Ayres, CBE (born 3 February 1930) is an English painter.

Ayres was born on 3 February 1930 in Barnes, London, the youngest of three sisters. Ayres started school when she was six. Her parents, a prosperous couple, sent her to Ibstock, a progressive school in Roehampton run on Fröbel principles. In 1941 Ayres was sent to Colet Court, the junior school for St Paul’s, in Hammersmith, where on her eleventh birthday she finally learnt to read.  

She passed the entrance exam for St Paul’s Girls’ School the following year, and

Antony and Cleopatra- Gillian Ayres

Antony and Cleopatra- Gillian Ayres

developed an interest in art while there. Among her best schoolfriends was Shirley Williams, with whom she taught art to children in bomb-ravaged parts of London.  Ayres then decided to go to art school. In 1946, she applied to the Slade School of Fine Art and was accepted. However, at sixteen, she was too young to enrol. She was advised to apply to the Camberwell School of Art and studied there from 1946 to 1950.

High Summer World of Light- Gillian Ayres

High Summer World of Light- Gillian Ayres

Ayres worked part-time at the AIA Gallery in Soho from 1951 to 1959 before starting a teaching career.  Ayres held a number of teaching posts through the 1960s and 1970s, becoming friends with painters such as Howard Hodgkin, Robyn Denny and Roger Hilton. In 1959, Ayres was asked to teach at Bath Academy of Art, Corsham for six weeks.

She remained on the teaching staff until 1965. For much of her time at Corsham she shared a teaching studio with Malcolm Hughes.  She was a senior lecturer at Saint Martin’s School of Art, London, from 1965 to 1978 and became head of painting at Winchester School of Art in 1978. Ayres left teaching in 1981, and moved to an old rectory on the Llyn Peninsula in north-west Wales to become a full-time painter.  She moved again in 1987 to a 15th-century cottage at Morwenstowon the Devon-Cornwall border.

Her first solo exhibition was held at Gallery One, London in 1956. Ayres’ early works are typically made with thin vinyl paint in a limited

Gillian Ayres

Gillian Ayres

number of colours arranged in relatively simple forms, but later works in oil paint are more exuberant and very colourful, with a thick impasto being used. The titles of her paintings, such as Anthony and Cleopatra (1982) and A Midsummer Night (1990), are usually given after the painting is completed and do not directly describe the content of the painting, but rather are intended to resonate with the general mood of the work.

Ayres was shortlisted for the Turner Prize in 1989. She was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 1986, and in 1991 became a Royal Academician. She later temporarily resigned from the Academy, following the broadcast of a BBC Omnibus television documentary about the preparations for the controversial Sensation exhibition hosted by the Academy in 1997 show-casing the Young British Artists.

The documentary, according to Ayres, presented an unfair view of the older members

Shalimar 5, (2011), by Gillian Ayres (detail)

Shalimar 5, (2011), by Gillian Ayres (detail)

of the Academy.  Ayres also objected to the inclusion of Marcus Harvey’s portrait of the killer Myra Hindley in the exhibition. She is represented by the Alan Cristea Gallery, London.

She was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in the 2011 Birthday Honours.

Moonglade- Gillian Ayres

Moonglade- Gillian Ayres

Ayres married painter Henry Mundy in 1951. They divorced almost 30 years later but currently live together. They have two sons born 1958 and 1966.  Their younger son, Sam Mundy, is a painter.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 244.

Best,

Linda

Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Twilight in Spring- Tribute to Gillian Ayres
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas