Day 343- Maurice Sendak- Beautiful Things in the World

It’s Day 343 and I have to say that I’m super duper excited about today’s artist.  He’s one of my favorite people ever and was such an influence on me as an artist and writer.  Please join me in honoring Maurice Sendak today!

Maurice Sendak

Maurice Sendak

Maurice Sendak

Maurice Sendak

Maurice Bernard Sendak (June 10, 1928 – May 8, 2012) was an American illustrator and writer of children’s books. He became widely known for his book Where the Wild Things Are, first published in 1963. Born to Jewish-Polish parents, his childhood was affected by the death of many of his family members during the Holocaust. Besides Where the Wild Things Are,Sendak also wrote works such as In the Night Kitchen and Outside Over There, and illustrated Little Bear.

Sendak was born in New York City in the borough of Brooklyn to Polish Jewish immigrant parents named Sadie (née Schindler) and Philip Sendak, a dressmaker. Sendak described his childhood as a “terrible situation” due to the death of members of his extended family during the Holocaust which exposed him at a young age to the concept of mortality. His love of books began when, as a child, he developed health problems and was confined to his bed. He decided to become an illustrator after watching Walt Disney’s film Fantasia at the age of twelve. One of his first professional commissions was to create window displays for the toy store F.A.O. Schwarz. His illustrations were first published in 1947 in a textbook titled Atomics for the Millions by Dr. Maxwell Leigh Eidinoff. He spent much of the 1950s illustrating children’s books written by others before beginning to write his own stories.

His older brother Jack Sendak also became an author of children’s books, two of which were illustrated by

'My Brother’s Book' by Maurice Sendak, 2013

‘My Brother’s Book’ by Maurice Sendak, 2013

Maurice in the 1950s.

Maurice was the youngest of three siblings. His sister, Natalie, was nine years older than he, and his brother, Jack, was five years older than he.

Sendak gained international acclaim after writing and illustrating Where the Wild Things Are, edited by Ursula Nordstrom at Harper & Row. It features Max, a boy who “rages against his mother for being sent to bed without any supper”. The book’s depictions of fanged monsters concerned some parents when it was first published, as his characters were somewhat grotesque in appearance. Before Where the Wild Things Are, Sendak was best known for illustrating Else Holmelund Minarik’s Little Bear series of books.

Sendak later recounted the reaction of a fan:

A little boy sent me a charming card with a little drawing on it. I loved it. I answer all my children’s letters – sometimes very hastily – but this one I lingered over. I sent him a card and I drew a picture of a Wild Thing on it. I wrote, ‘Dear Jim: I loved your card.’ Then I got a letter back from his mother and she said: ‘Jim loved your card so much he ate it.’ That to me was one of the highest compliments I’ve ever received. He didn’t care that it was an original Maurice Sendak drawing or anything. He saw it, he loved it, he ate it.
Where The Wild Things Are- Maurice Sendak

Where The Wild Things Are- Maurice Sendak

Almost fifty years later, School Library Journal sponsored a survey of readers which identified Where the Wild Things Are as top picture book. The librarian who conducted it observed that there was little doubt what would be voted number one and highlighted its designation by one reader as a watershed, “ushering in the modern age of picture books”. Another called it “perfectly crafted, perfectly illustrated … simply the epitome of a picture book” and noted that Sendak “rises above the rest in part because he is subversive”.

When Sendak saw a manuscript of Zlateh the Goat and Other Stories, the first children’s book by Isaac Bashevis Singer, on the desk of an editor at Harper & Row, he offered to illustrate the book. It was first published in 1966 and received a Newbery Honor. Sendak was delighted and enthusiastic about the collaboration. He once wryly remarked that his parents were “finally” impressed by their youngest child when he collaborated with Singer.

His book In the Night Kitchen, originally issued in 1970, has often been subjected to censorship for its drawings of a young boy prancing naked through the story. The book has been challenged in several American states including Illinois, New Jersey, Minnesota, and Texas. In the Night Kitchen regularly appears on the American Library Association’s list of “frequently challenged and banned books”. It was listed number 21 on the “100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 1990–1999”.

His 1981 book Outside Over There is the story of a girl, Ida, and her sibling jealousy and responsibility. Her

In the Night Kitchen- Maurice Sendak

In the Night Kitchen- Maurice Sendak

father is away and so Ida is left to watch her baby sister, much to her dismay. Her sister is kidnapped by goblins and Ida must go off on a magical adventure to rescue her. At first, she is not really eager to get her sister and nearly passes her sister right by when she becomes absorbed in the magic of the quest. In the end, she rescues her baby sister, destroys the goblins, and returns home committed to caring for her sister until her father returns home.

Sendak was an early member of the National Board of Advisors of the Children’s Television Workshop during the development stages of the Sesame Street television series. He also adapted his book Bumble Ardy into an animated sequence for the series, with Jim Henson as the voice of Bumble Ardy. He wrote and designed three other animated stories for the series: “Seven Monsters” (which never aired), “Up & Down”, and “Broom Adventures”.

Sendak produced an animated television production based on his work titled Really Rosie, featuring the voice of Carole King, which was broadcast in 1975 and is available on video (usually as part of video compilations of his work). An album of the songs was also produced. He contributed the opening segment to Simple Gifts, a Christmas collection of six animated shorts shown on PBS TV in 1977 and later issued on VHS in 1993. He adapted his book Where the Wild Things Are for the stage in 1979. Additionally, he designed sets for many operas and ballets, including the award-winning (1983) Pacific Northwest Ballet production of Tchaikovsky’s The Nutcracker, Houston Grand Opera’s productions of Mozart’s The Magic Flute (1981) and Humperdinck’s Hansel and Gretel (1997), Los Angeles County Music Center’s 1990 production of Mozart’s Idomeneo, and the New York City Opera’s 1981 production of Janáček’s The Cunning Little Vixen.

Maurice Sendak

Maurice Sendak

In the 1990s, Sendak approached playwright Tony Kushner to write a new English version of the Czech composer Hans Krása’s children’s Holocaust opera Brundibár. Kushner wrote the text for Sendak’s illustrated book of the same name, published in 2003. The book was named one of the New York Times Book Review’s 10 Best Illustrated Books of 2003.

In 2003, Chicago Opera Theatre produced Sendak and Kushner’s adaptation of Brundibár. In 2005, Berkeley Repertory Theatre, in collaboration with Yale Repertory Theatre and Broadway’s New Victory Theater, produced a substantially reworked version of the Sendak-Kushner adaptation.

In 2004 Sendak worked with the Shirim Klezmer Orchestra in Boston on their project “Pincus and the Pig: A Klezmer Tale”. This Klezmer version of Sergei Prokofiev’s famous musical story for children, Peter and the Wolf featured Maurice Sendak as the narrator. He also illustrated the cover art.

Sendak also created the children’s television program Seven Little Monsters.

Sendak mentioned in a September 2008 article in The New York Times that he was gay and had lived with his partner, psychoanalyst Dr. Eugene Glynn, for 50 years before Glynn’s death in May 2007. Revealing that he never told his parents, he said, “All I wanted was to be straight so my parents could be happy. They never, never,

Where The Wild Things Are- Maurice Sendak

Where The Wild Things Are- Maurice Sendak

never knew.”  Sendak’s relationship with Glynn had been mentioned by other writers before (e.g., Tony Kushner in 2003) and Glynn’s 2007 death notice had identified Sendak as his “partner of fifty years”. After his partner’s death, Sendak donated $1 million to the Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services in memory of Glynn who had treated young people there. The gift will name a clinic for Glynn.

Sendak was an atheist. In a 2011 interview he agreed that he didn’t believe in God and elaborated. He remarked that religion, and belief in God “must have made life much easier [for some religious friends of his]. It’s harder for us non-believers.”

Maurice Sendak drew inspiration and influences from a vast number of painters, musicians and authors. Going back to his childhood, one of his earliest memorable influences was actually his father, Philip Sendak. According to Maurice, his father would relate tales from the Old Testament; however, he would embellish them with racy details. Not realizing that this was inappropriate for children, little Maurice would frequently be sent home after retelling his father’s “softcore Bible tales” at school.

Nutshell Library- Maurice Sendak

Nutshell Library- Maurice Sendak

Growing up, Sendak developed from other influences, starting with Walt Disney’s Fantasia and Mickey Mouse. Sendak and Mickey Mouse were born in the same year and Sendak described Mickey as a source of joy and pleasure while growing up. He has been quoted as saying, “My gods are Herman Melville, Emily Dickinson, Mozart. I believe in them with all my heart.” Elaborating further, he has explained that reading Emily Dickinson’s works helps him to remain calm in an otherwise hectic world: “And I have a little tiny Emily Dickinson so big that I carry in my pocket everywhere. And you just read three poems of Emily. She is so brave. She is so strong. She is such a passionate little woman. I feel better.” Likewise, of Mozart, he has said, “When Mozart is playing in my room, I am in conjunction with something I can’t explain. […] I don’t need to. I know that if there’s a purpose for life, it was for me to hear Mozart.”

Sendak died on May 8, 2012, in Danbury, Connecticut, at Danbury Hospital, from complications of a stroke. His remains were cremated.

The New York Times obituary called Sendak “the most important children’s book artist of the 20th century.” Author Neil Gaiman remarked, “He was unique, grumpy, brilliant, gay, wise, magical and made the world better by creating art in it.” Author R. L. Stine called Sendak’s death “a sad day in children’s books and for the world.”

Maurice Sendak

Maurice Sendak

“We are all honored to have been briefly invited into his world,” remarked comedian Stephen Colbert.

The 2012 season of Pacific Northwest Ballet’s “The Nutcracker,” for which Sendak designed the set, was dedicated to his memory.

His final book, Bumble-Ardy, was published eight months before his death. A posthumous picture book, titled

My Brother’s Book, was published in February 2013.

The film Her was dedicated in memory of him and Where the Wild Things Are co-star James Gandolfini. The film had been directed by Spike Jonze, who had also directed the motion picture adaptation of Where the Wild Things Are.

Partial biography is from wikipedia.

“There are so many beautiful things in the world which I will have to leave when I die, but I’m ready, I’m ready, I’m ready.”- Maurice Sendak

I of course had to pay homage to Where the Wild Things Are since it was one of my all time favorite books growing up!  Instead of Max it’s me!  I hope you enjoy it and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 344…then one more until there’s only 20 paintings left!  Aaaah!

Best,

Linda

Me and my Monster- Tribute to Maurice Sendak Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor, Pencil & Ink on Paper mounted onto wood panel

Me and my Monster- Tribute to Maurice Sendak
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor, Pencil & Ink on Paper mounted onto wood panel

Side-View Me and my Monster- Tribute to Maurice Sendak Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor, Pencil & Ink on Paper mounted onto wood panel

Side-View
Me and my Monster- Tribute to Maurice Sendak
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor, Pencil & Ink on Paper mounted onto wood panel

Close-Up 1 Me and my Monster- Tribute to Maurice Sendak Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor, Pencil & Ink on Paper mounted onto wood panel

Close-Up 1
Me and my Monster- Tribute to Maurice Sendak
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor, Pencil & Ink on Paper mounted onto wood panel

Close-Up 2 Me and my Monster- Tribute to Maurice Sendak Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor, Pencil & Ink on Paper mounted onto wood panel

Close-Up 2
Me and my Monster- Tribute to Maurice Sendak
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor, Pencil & Ink on Paper mounted onto wood panel

Close-Up 3 Me and my Monster- Tribute to Maurice Sendak Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor, Pencil & Ink on Paper mounted onto wood panel

Close-Up 3
Me and my Monster- Tribute to Maurice Sendak
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor, Pencil & Ink on Paper mounted onto wood panel

Day 342- Odilon Redon- Ambiguous Realms

It’s Day 342 and I had a good time with today’s piece.  I was torn on what style I wanted to paint in because the artist did so many styles.  I decided to do a charcoal based piece because I wanted to experience charcoal a bit more before this project ended. 🙂  Thanks to my friend Mark Rachel for recommending today’s artist.  Please join me in honoring Odilon Redon today.

Odilon Redon

Odilon Redon

Cyclops- Odilon Redon

Cyclops- Odilon Redon

Odilon Redon (born Bertrand-Jean RedonFrench; April 20, 1840 – July 6, 1916) was a French symbolist painter, printmaker, draughtsman and pastellist.

Odilon Redon was born in Bordeaux, Aquitaine to a prosperous family. The young Bertrand-Jean Redon acquired the nickname “Odilon” from his mother, Odile. Redon started drawing as a child and at the age of ten he was awarded a drawing prize at school. He began the formal study of drawing at fifteen, but at his father’s insistence changed to architecture. Failure to pass the entrance exams at Paris’ École des Beaux-Arts ended any plans for a career as an architect, although he briefly studied painting there under Jean-Léon Gérôme in 1864. (His younger brother Gaston Redon would become a noted architect.)

Back home in his native Bordeaux, he took up sculpture, and Rodolphe

The Winged Man (The Fallen Angel) - Odilon Redon

The Winged Man (The Fallen Angel) – Odilon Redon

Bresdin instructed him in etching and lithography. His artistic career was interrupted in 1870 when he joined the army to serve in the Franco-Prussian War.

At the end of the war, he moved to Paris, and resumed working almost exclusively in charcoal and lithography. He called his visionary works, conceived in shades of black, his noirs. It was not until 1878 that his work gained any recognition with Guardian Spirit of the Waters; he published his first album of lithographs, titled Dans le Rêve, in 1879.

The Eye- Odilon Redon

The Eye- Odilon Redon

Still, Redon remained relatively unknown until the appearance in 1884 of a cult novel by Joris-Karl Huysmans titled À rebours (Against Nature). The story featured a decadent aristocrat who collected Redon’s drawings.

In the 1890s pastel and oils became his favored media; he produced no more noirs after 1900. In 1899, he exhibited with the Nabis at Durand-Ruel’s.

Redon had a keen interest in Hindu and Buddhist religion and culture. The figure of the Buddha increasingly showed in his work. Influences of Japonism blended into his art, such as the painting The Death of the Buddha around 1899, The Buddha in 1906, Jacob and the Angel in 1905, and Vase with Japanese warrior in 1905, amongst many others.

Baron Robert de Domecy (1867–1946) commissioned the artist in 1899 to create 17 decorative panels for the dining room of theChâteau de Domecy-sur-le-Vault near Sermizelles in Burgundy. Redon had created large decorative works for private residences in the past, but his compositions for the château de Domecy in 1900–1901 were his most radical compositions to that point and mark the transition from ornamental to abstract painting. The landscape details do not show a specific place or space.

Only details of trees, twigs with leaves, and budding flowers in an endless horizon can be seen. The colours used

Portrait of Violette Heymann- Odilon Redon

Portrait of Violette Heymann- Odilon Redon

are mostly yellow, grey, brown and light blue. The influence of the Japanese painting style found on folding screens byōbu is discernible in his choice of colours and the rectangular proportions of most of the up to 2.5 metres high panels. Fifteen of them are located today in the Musée d’Orsay, acquisitioned in 1988.

Domecy also commissioned Redon to paint portraits of his wife and their daughter Jeanne, two of which are in the collections of the Musée d’Orsay and the Getty Museum in California. Most of the paintings remained in the Domecy family collection until the 1960s.

Le Silence- Odilon Redon

Le Silence- Odilon Redon

In 1903 Redon was awarded the Legion of Honor. His popularity increased when a catalogue of etchings and lithographs was published by André Mellerio in 1913; that same year, he was given the largest single representation at the New York Armory Show.

Redon died on July 6, 1916. In 1923 Mellerio published Odilon Redon: Peintre Dessinateur et Graveur. An archive of Mellerio’s papers is held by the Ryerson & Burnham Libraries at the Art Institute of Chicago.

In 2005 the Museum of Modern Art launched an exhibition entitled “Beyond The Visible”, a comprehensive overview of Redon’s work showcasing more than 100 paintings, drawings, prints and books from The Ian Woodner Family Collection. The exhibition ran from October 30, 2005 to January 23, 2006.

The Fondation Beyeler in Basel, Switzerland is showing a retrospective from February to May 2014.

Redon’s work represents an exploration of his internal feelings and psyche. He himself wanted to “place the visible at the service of the invisible”; thus, although his work seems filled with strange beings and grotesque dichotomies, his aim was to represent pictorially the ghosts of his own mind. A telling source of Redon’s

Little Flowers (Human Heads), 1880. Charcoal on paper- Odilon Redon

Little Flowers (Human Heads), 1880. Charcoal on paper- Odilon Redon

inspiration and the forces behind his works can be found in his journalA Soi-même (To Myself). His process was explained best by himself when he said:

“I have often, as an exercise and as a sustenance, painted before an object down to the smallest accidents of its visual appearance; but the day left me sad and with an unsatiated thirst. The next day I let the other source run, that of imagination, through the recollection of the forms and I was then reassured and appeased.”

The mystery and the evocation of Redon’s drawings are described by Huysmans in the following passage:

“Those were the pictures bearing the signature: Odilon Redon. They held, between their gold-edged frames of unpolished pearwood, undreamed-of images: a Merovingian-type head, resting upon a cup; a bearded man, reminiscent both of a Buddhist priest and a public orator, touching an enormous cannon-ball with his finger; a spider with a human face lodged

Head on a Stem- Odilon Redon

Head on a Stem- Odilon Redon

in the centre of its body. Then there were charcoal sketches which delved even deeper into the terrors of fever-ridden dreams. Here, on an enormous die, a melancholy eyelid winked; over there stretched dry and arid landscapes, calcinated plains, heaving and quaking ground, where volcanos erupted into rebellious clouds, under foul and murky skies; sometimes the subjects seemed to have been taken from the nightmarish dreams of science, and hark back to prehistoric times; monstrous flora bloomed on the rocks; everywhere, in among the erratic blocks and glacial mud, were figures whose simian appearance—heavy jawbone, protruding brows, receding forehead, and flattened skull top—recalled the ancestral head, the head of the first Quaternary Period, the head of man when he was still fructivorous and without speech, the contemporary of the mammoth, of the rhinoceros with septate nostrils, and of the giant bear. These drawings defied classification; unheeding, for the most part, of the limitations of painting, they ushered in a very special type of the fantastic, one born of sickness and delirium.”

Redon also describes his work as ambiguous and undefinable:

“My drawings inspire, and are not to be defined. They place us, as does music, in the ambiguous realm of the undetermined.”

Biography is from wikipedia.

I was really drawn to Redon’s charcoal or “noir” drawings.  So I decided to focus on that style.  I hope you enjoy my piece for today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 343.

Best,

Linda

Chefs sur Arbres et de Fleurs- Tribute to Odilon Redon Linda Cleary 2014 Charcoal, Ink and Graphite of Canvas

Chefs sur Arbres et de Fleurs- Tribute to Odilon Redon
Linda Cleary 2014
Charcoal, Ink and Graphite of Canvas

Side-View Chefs sur Arbres et de Fleurs- Tribute to Odilon Redon Linda Cleary 2014 Charcoal, Ink and Graphite of Canvas

Side-View
Chefs sur Arbres et de Fleurs- Tribute to Odilon Redon
Linda Cleary 2014
Charcoal, Ink and Graphite of Canvas

Close-Up 1 Chefs sur Arbres et de Fleurs- Tribute to Odilon Redon Linda Cleary 2014 Charcoal, Ink and Graphite of Canvas

Close-Up 1
Chefs sur Arbres et de Fleurs- Tribute to Odilon Redon
Linda Cleary 2014
Charcoal, Ink and Graphite of Canvas

Close-Up 2 Chefs sur Arbres et de Fleurs- Tribute to Odilon Redon Linda Cleary 2014 Charcoal, Ink and Graphite of Canvas

Close-Up 2
Chefs sur Arbres et de Fleurs- Tribute to Odilon Redon
Linda Cleary 2014
Charcoal, Ink and Graphite of Canvas

Close-Up 3 Chefs sur Arbres et de Fleurs- Tribute to Odilon Redon Linda Cleary 2014 Charcoal, Ink and Graphite of Canvas

Close-Up 3
Chefs sur Arbres et de Fleurs- Tribute to Odilon Redon
Linda Cleary 2014
Charcoal, Ink and Graphite of Canvas

Day 336- Henry Darger Jr.- In the Realms of the Unreal

It’s Day 336 and I’ve been excited to do this artist for a long time.  I knew it was going to be challenging and I think I had too many ideas that my brain got a bit jumbled.  Well, I finally did it and I think I’m pretty happy with it.  Please join me in honoring Henry Darger Jr. today!

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

Hands of Fire- Henry Darger Jr.

Hands of Fire- Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Joseph Darger, Jr. (April 12, 1892 – April 13, 1973) was a reclusive American writer and artist who worked as a hospital custodian in Chicago, Illinois. He has become famous for his posthumously discovered 15,145-page, single-spaced fantasy manuscript called The Story of the Vivian Girls, in What is Known as the Realms of the Unreal, of the Glandeco-Angelinian War Storm, Caused by the Child Slave Rebellion, along with several hundred drawings and watercolor paintings illustrating the story.

The visual subject matter of his work ranges from idyllic scenes in Edwardian interiors and tranquil flowered landscapes populated by children and fantastic creatures, to scenes of horrific terror and

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

carnage depicting young children being tortured and massacred. Much of his artwork is mixed media with collage elements. Darger’s artwork has become one of the most celebrated examples of outsider art.

Darger was born in Chicago, Illinois, to Rosa Fullman and Henry Darger, Sr. on April 12, 1892. Cook County records show that he was born at his home, located at 350 W. 24th Street. When he was four years old, his mother died of puerperal fever after having given birth to a daughter, who was given up for adoption; Henry Darger never knew his sister. One of Darger’s biographers, the art historian and psychologist John M. MacGregor, discovered that Rosa had two children before Henry, but did not discover their whereabouts.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

By Darger’s own report, his father, Henry Sr., was kind and reassuring to him, and they lived together until 1900. In that year, the crippled and impoverished Darger Sr. had to be taken to live at St. Augustine’s Catholic Mission home and his son was placed in a Catholic boys’ home. Darger Sr. died in 1905, and his son was institutionalized in the Illinois Asylum for Feeble-Minded Children in Lincoln, Illinois, with the diagnosis, according to Stephen Prokopoff, that “Little Henry’s heart is not in the right place”. According to John MacGregor, the diagnosis was actually “self-abuse” (at the time, this term was a euphemism for masturbation, rather than self-injury).

Darger himself felt that much of his problem was being able to see through adult lies and becoming a ‘smart-aleck’ as a result, which often led to his being disciplined by teachers and ganged up on by classmates. He also went through a lengthy phase of feeling compelled to make strange noises (perhaps as a result of Tourette Syndrome) which irritated others. The Lincoln asylum’s practices included forced labor and severe punishments, which Darger seems to have worked into In the Realms of the Unreal. He later said that, to be

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

fair, there were also good times there, he enjoyed some of the work, and he had friends as well as enemies. While he was there, he received word that his father had died. A series of attempted escapes ended successfully in 1908, the 16-year-old returned to Chicago and, with the help of his godmother, found menial employment in a Catholic hospital and in this fashion continued to support himself until his retirement in 1963.

Except for a brief stint in the U.S. Army during World War I, his life took on a pattern that seems to have varied little: he attended Mass daily, frequently returning for as many as five services; he collected and saved a bewildering array of trash from the streets. His dress was shabby, although he attempted to keep his clothes clean and mended. He was largely solitary; his one close friend, William Schloeder, was of like mind on the subject of protecting abused and neglected children, and the pair proposed founding a “Children’s Protective Society”, which would put such children up for adoption to loving families. Schloeder left Chicago sometime in the mid-1930s, but he and Darger stayed in touch through letters until Schloeder’s death in 1959. Darger biographer Jim Elledge suggests that Darger and Schloeder may have had a romantic relationship while Schloeder lived in Chicago.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

In 1930, Darger settled into a second-floor room on Chicago’s North Side, at 851 W. Webster Avenue, in the Lincoln Park section of the city, near the DePaul Universitycampus. It was in this room, for 43 years, that Darger imagined and wrote his massive tomes (in addition to a 10-year daily weather journal and assorted diaries) until his death in April 1973 in St. Augustine’s Catholic Mission home (the same institution in which his father had died). In the last entry in his diary, he wrote: “January 1, 1971. I had a very poor nothing like Christmas. Never had a good Christmas all my life, nor a good new year, and now… I am very bitter but fortunately not revengeful, though I feel should be how I am…”

Darger is buried in All Saints Cemetery in Des Plaines, Illinois, in a plot called “The Old People of the Little Sisters of the Poor Plot”. Darger’s headstone is inscribed “Artist” and “Protector of Children”.

In the Realms of the Unreal is a 15,145-page work bound in fifteen immense, densely typed volumes (with three of them consisting of several hundred illustrations, scroll-like watercolor paintings on paper derived from magazines and coloring books) created over six decades. The majority of the book, The Story of the Vivian Girls,

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

in What is Known as the Realms of the Unreal, of the Glandeco-Angelinian War Storm Caused by the Child Slave Rebellion, follows the adventures of the daughters of Robert Vivian, seven princesses of the Christian nation of Abbieannia who assist a daring rebellion against the evil regime of child slavery imposed by John Manley and the Glandelinians.

Children take up arms in their own defense and are often slain in battle or viciously tortured by the Glandelinian overlords. The elaborate mythology includes the setting of a large planet, around which Earth orbits as a moon (where most people are Christian and mostly Catholic), and a species called the “Blengigomeneans” (or Blengins for short), gigantic winged beings with curved horns who occasionally take human or part-human form, even disguising themselves as children. They are usually benevolent, but some Blengins are extremely suspicious of all humans, due to Glandelinian atrocities. Darger illustrated his stories using a technique of traced images cut from magazines and catalogues, arranged in large panoramic landscapes and painted in watercolours, some as large as 30 feet wide and painted on both sides. He wrote himself into the narrative as the children’s protector.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

Once released from the asylum, Darger repeatedly attempted to adopt a child, but his efforts failed. Images of children often served as his inspiration, particularly a portrait from the Chicago Daily News from May 9, 1911: a five-year-old murder victim, named Elsie Paroubek. The girl had left home on April 8 of that year telling her mother she was going to visit her aunt around the corner from her home. She was last seen listening to an organ grinder with her cousins. Her body was found a month later in a sanitary district channel near the screen guards of the powerhouse at Lockport, Illinois. An autopsy found she had probably been suffocated—not strangled, as is often stated in articles about Darger. Paroubek’s disappearance and murder, her funeral, and the subsequent investigation, were the subjects of a huge amount of coverage in the Daily News and other papers at the time.

This newspaper photo was part of a growing personal archive of clippings Darger had been gathering. There is no indication that the murder or the news photo and article had any particular significance for Darger, until one day he could not find it. Writing in his journal at the time, he began to process this forfeiture of yet another

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

child, lamenting that “the huge disaster and calamity” of his loss “will never be atoned for”, but “shall be avenged to the uttermost limit”. According to his autobiography, Darger believed the photo was among several items that were stolen when his locker at work was broken into. He never found his copy of the photograph again. Because he couldn’t remember the exact date of its publication, he couldn’t locate it in the newspaper archive. He carried out an elaborate series of novenas and other prayers for the picture to be returned.

The fictive war that was sparked by Darger’s loss of the newspaper photograph of the murdered girl, whose killer was never found, became Darger’s magnum opus. He had been working on some version of the novel before this time (he makes reference to an early draft which was also lost or stolen), but now it became an all-consuming creation.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

In The Realms of the Unreal, Elsie is imagined as Annie Aronburg, the leader of the first child slave rebellion. “The assassination of the child labor rebel Annie Aronburg… was the most shocking child murder ever caused by the Glandelinian Government” and was the cause of the war. Through their sufferings, valiant deeds and exemplary holiness, the Vivian Girls are hoped to be able to help bring about a triumph of Christianity. Darger provided two endings to the story, one in which the Vivian Girls and Christianity are triumphant and another in which they are defeated and the godless Glandelinians reign.

Darger’s human figures were rendered largely by tracing, collage, or photo enlargement from popular magazines and children’s books (much of the “trash” he collected was old magazines and newspapers, which he clipped for source material). Some of his favorite figures were the Coppertone Girl and Little Annie Rooney. He is praised for his natural gift for composition and the brilliant use of color in his watercolors. The images of daring escapes, mighty battles, and painful torture are reminiscent not only of epic films such as Birth of a Nation (which Darger might easily have seen) but of events in Catholic history; the text makes it clear that the child victims are heroic martyrs like the early saints.

One idiosyncratic feature of Darger’s artwork is its apparent transgenderism. Many of his subjects which appear

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

to be girls are shown to have penises when unclothed or partially clothed. Darger biographer Jim Elledge speculates that this represents a reflection of Darger’s own childhood issues with gender identity and homosexuality.  Darger’s second novel, Crazy House, deals with these subjects more explicitly.

In a paraphrase of the Declaration of Independence, Darger wrote of children’s right “to play, to be happy, and to dream, the right to normal sleep of the night’s season, the right to an education, that we may have an equality of opportunity for developing all that are in us of mind and heart”.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

A second work of fiction, provisionally titled Crazy House: Further Adventures in Chicago, contains over 10,000 handwritten pages. Written after The Realms, it takes that epic’s major characters—the seven Vivian sisters and their companion/secret brother, Penrod—and places them in Chicago, with the action unfolding during the same years as that of the earlier book. Begun in 1939, it is a tale of a house that is possessed by demons and haunted by ghosts, or has an evil consciousness of its own. Children disappear into the house and are later found brutally murdered. The Vivians and a male friend are sent to investigate and discover that the murders are the work of evil ghosts. The girls go about exorcising the place, but have to resort to arranging for a full-scale Holy Mass to be held in each room before the house is clean. They do this repeatedly, but it never works. The narrative ends mid-scene, with Darger having just been rescued from the Crazy House.

In 1968, Darger became interested in tracing some of his frustrations back to his childhood and began writing The History of My Life. Spanning eight volumes, the book only spends 206 pages detailing Darger’s early life before veering off into 4,672 pages of fiction about a huge twister called “Sweetie Pie”, probably based on memories of a tornado he had witnessed in 1908.

Despite Darger’s unusual lifestyle and strange behavior, he has not generally been considered mentally ill. This

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

topic is addressed in the biographical film In the Realms of the Unreal, in which Darger, while certainly described as eccentric, is also mentioned to be “in complete control of his life”. MacGregor, in the appendix to his book on Darger, speculates that the most fitting diagnosis is autism, of an Asperger syndrome type.

Darger’s landlords, Nathan and Kiyoko Lerner, came across his work shortly before his death, a day after his birthday, on April 13, 1973. Nathan Lerner, an accomplished photographer whose long career the New York Times wrote “was inextricably bound up in the history of visual culture in Chicago”, immediately recognized the artistic merit of Darger’s work. By this time Darger was in the Catholic mission St. Augustine’s, operated by the Little Sisters of the Poor, where his father had died.

The Lerners took charge of the Darger estate, publicizing his work and contributing to projects such as the 2004 documentary In the Realms of the Unreal. In cooperation with Kiyoko Lerner, Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art dedicated the Henry Darger Room Collection in 2008 as part of its permanent collection. Darger has become internationally recognized thanks to the efforts of people who knew to save his works. After Nathan Lerner’s death in 1997, Kiyoko Lerner became the sole figure in charge of both her husband’s and Darger’s estates. The U.S. copyright representative for the Estate of Henry Darger and the Estate of Nathan Lerner is the Artists Rights Society.

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

Darger is today one of the most famous figures in the history of outsider art. At the Outsider Art Fair, held every January in New York City, and at auction, his work is among the highest-priced of any self-taught artist. The American Folk Art Museum, New York City, opened a Henry Darger Study Center in 2001. His work now commands upwards of $80,000.

Since his death in 1973 and the discovery of his massive opus, and especially since the 1990s, there have been many references in popular culture to Darger’s work by other visual artists including, but not limited to, artists of comics and graphic novels; numerous popular songs; a 1999 book-length poem, Girls on the Run, by John Ashbery; a multi-player online game, SiSSYFiGHT 2000, and a 2004 multimedia piece by choreographer Pat Graney incorporating Darger images. Jesse Kellerman’s 2008 novel The Genius took part of its inspiration from Darger’s story. These artists have variously drawn from and responded to Darger’s artistic style, his themes (especially the Vivian Girls, the young heroines of Darger’s massive illustrated novel), and the events in his life.

Jessica Yu’s 2004 documentary In the Realms of the Unreal details Darger’s life and artworks.

Comic book artist Scott McCloud refers to Darger’s work in his book Making Comics, while describing the danger artists encounter in the creation of a character’s back-story. McCloud says that complicated narratives can easily spin out of control when too much unseen information is built up around the characters.

Darger and his work have been an inspiration for several music artists. The Vivian Girls were an all-girl indie/punk trio from Brooklyn; “Henry Darger” is a song by Natalie Merchant on her album Motherland,

Henry Darger Jr.

Henry Darger Jr.

“Vivian Girls” is song by the band Wussy on their album Left for Dead. “The Vivian Girls Are Visited in the Night by Saint Dargarius and His Squadron of Benevolent Butterflies” is a song by Sufjan Stevens on his album The Avalanche: Outtakes and Extras from the Illinois Album, “The Story of the Vivian Girls” is a song by Comet Gain on their 2005 album City Fallen Leaves, and “Segue: In the Realms of the Unreal” is song by the band …And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead on their album So Divided, “The Vivian Girls” is a 1979 song by Snakefinger (Philip Lithman Roth) also recorded by the Monks of Doom on their album The Cosmodemonic Telegraph Company, “Vivian girls” is a song by the band Fucked Up on their album Hidden World, and “Lost girls” (about Darger’s work) is a song by Tilly and the Wall on their album Bottoms of Barrels. On their 1994 album Triple Mania II, San Diego’s industrial noise performance outfit Crash Worship reworked several Darger images and screen printed them on a copper foil foldout discfolio; as well as the insert and disc.

Darger is the subject of a radio play, Darger and the Detective, by Mike Walker performed by members of the Chicago-based Steppenwolf Theatre Company for BBC Radio 3.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I love his story so I decided to include all the the page.  I hope you enjoy my piece for today and I will see you tomorrow on Day 336.

Best,

Linda

Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr. Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Side-View Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr. Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Side-View
Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr. Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr. Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr. Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Sky Demon- Tribute to Henry Darger Jr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Ink on Canvas

 

Day 335- David Shrigley- Nervous Introspections

It’s Day 335 and I have to admit that I had fun with today’s piece even though it’s a piece of poop. 🙂  Join me in honoring David Shrigley today.  I want all his art on t-shirts.

David Shrigley

David Shrigley

David Shrigley

David Shrigley

David Shrigley (born 17 September 1968) is a British visual artist. He lives and works in Glasgow.

Shrigley was born in Macclesfield, Cheshire, the younger of two children born to Rita (née Bowring) and Joseph Shrigley. He moved with his parents and sister to Oadby, Leicestershire when he was two years old. He took the Art and Design Foundation course at the Leicester Polytechnic in 1987, and then studied environmental art at the Glasgow School of Art from 1988 to 1991.

Although Shrigley works in various media, he is best known for his mordantly humorous cartoons released in softcover books or postcard packs.

He finds humour in flat depictions of the inconsequential, the unavailing, and the bizarre, although he is far fonder of violent or otherwise disquieting

David Shrigley

David Shrigley

subject matter. His work has two of the characteristics often encountered in outsider art: an odd viewpoint and, in some of his work, a deliberately limited technique.

David Shrigley

David Shrigley

His freehand line is often weak (which jars with his frequent use of a ruler), his forms are often very crude, and annotations in his drawings are poorly executed and frequently contain crossings-out. In authentic outsider art, the artist has no choice but to produce work in his or her own way, even if that work is unconventional in content and inept in execution. In contrast, it is likely that Shrigley has chosen his style and range of subject matter for comic effect.

As well as authoring several books, he directed the video for Blur’s “Good Song” and also for Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy’s “Agnes, Queen of Sorrow”. In 2005 designed a London Underground leaflet cover. Since 2005, he has

David Shrigley

David Shrigley

contributed a cartoon for The Guardian ’​s Weekend magazine every Saturday. Other projects have included the album Worried Noodles (Tom Lab, 2007) where musicians interpret his writings as lyrics, including collaborations by David Byrne, Hot Chip, and Franz Ferdinand.

David Shrigley

David Shrigley

Shrigley co-directed a film with director Chris Shepherd called Who I Am And What I Want, based on Shrigley’s book of the same title. Kevin Eldon voiced its main character, Pete. Shrigley also produced a series of drawings and T-shirt designs for the 2006 Triptych festival, a Scottish music festival lasting for three to four days in three cities.

He also designed twelve different covers for Deerhoof’s 2007 record, Friend

David Shrigley

David Shrigley

Opportunity. In the same year he also designed the title sequence for the film Hallam Foe, as well as the drawings and the writing in Hallam’s on-screen diaries.

Shrigley was nominated for the 2013 Turner Prize. His Thumbs Up sculpture is expected to be installed on Trafalgar Square’s Fourth Plinth during 2016. He was awarded an honorary doctorate by Leicester’s De Montfort University in a ceremony on 17th July 2014.

David Shrigley

David Shrigley

Recent notable solo exhibitions include Animate, The Turku art Museum, Finland (2011); Kelvingrove Museum, Glasgow International Festival of Visual Arts, Glasgow, Scotland (2010); New Powers, Kunsthalle Mainz, Germany (2009); David Shrigley, Museum Ludwig, Cologne, Germany (2008); BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead, UK (2008); Everything Must Have a Name, Konsthall, Malmo, Sweden (2007) and David Shrigley, Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee, Scotland (2006).

Shrigley is represented by Stephen Friedman Gallery, London and Yvon Lambert Gallery, Paris.

Jason Mraz took the name of his album We Sing. We Dance. We Steal Things. from a work by Shrigley.

Pinakothek der Moderne, München, Germany (2014)

In 2006, Shrigley’s first spoken-word album Shrigley Forced To Speak With Others was released by Azuli Records. In October 2007, Tomlab released Worried Noodles, a double-CD of artists including David Byrne,

David Shrigley

David Shrigley

Islands, Liars, Grizzly Bear, Mount Eerie, R. Stevie Moore and Final Fantasy putting Shrigley’s 2005 book of the same name to music. Moore went on to record an entire album of new songs set to Shrigley’s Worried Noodles lyrics called Shrigley Field.

His spoken-word readings are used on the Late Night Tales series of recordings, with a track from Shrigley closing each album.

Above biography is from wikipedia.

Shrigley’s acrylic paintings combine visceral figures or abstractions with text; dark and at times uncomfortable, they tackle moments of confused trauma or nervous introspection. The classically trained artist has often been associated with “outsider art,” given the roughness of his lines and his apparent disregard for precision; in this latest series, his reverence for simplicity and gut-level emotional honesty is clear. The text accompanying each image—scrawled and wobbly, as if tacked as an afterthought—reads as an inner monologue, supplying each of his mangled objects with a level of humanity. “I suspect that the deformity displayed in my work,” he has said, “is a natural curse, as I am not very good at rendering beauty.” Particularly of note is the way in which he, like a disobedient child, plants red herrings in his work, mislabeling crude red streetlights as “go” or scrawling “eat the poisonous fruit if you must.”

—Molly Osberg

David Shrigley

David Shrigley

David Shrigley finds meaning in snippets of text and overheard conversations. His crude and cartoonish ink drawings, usually exhibited salon-style, recall pages from the sketchbook of a cheeky adolescent. Tackling serious issues, such as unemployment and child welfare, as well as more absurd subjects, including sexual fantasies about a squirrel, his fragmented narratives can be both poignant and funny. In a 2011 exhibition, Shrigley included a dead stuffed kitten that stood on its hind legs carrying a hand-lettered protest sign that read, “I’M DEAD.”

Above blurb and bio is from artsy.net.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I did the poop a little more in my style…but that’s okay.  I love the cleverness and absurdity of his pieces.  I laughed at everything I found online.  LOVE it!  Very inspiring.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 336!

Best,

Linda

Can't Handle Shit- Tribute to David Shrigley Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Can’t Handle Shit- Tribute to David Shrigley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Side-View Can't Handle Shit- Tribute to David Shrigley Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Side-View
Can’t Handle Shit- Tribute to David Shrigley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Can't Handle Shit- Tribute to David Shrigley Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Can’t Handle Shit- Tribute to David Shrigley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Can't Handle Shit- Tribute to David Shrigley Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Can’t Handle Shit- Tribute to David Shrigley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Can't Handle Shit- Tribute to David Shrigley Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Can’t Handle Shit- Tribute to David Shrigley
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

 

 

Day 329- Doze Green- Infinite Perspectives

It’s Day 329 and I had a fun time with today’s piece.  Please join me in honoring Doze Green today.  I love his style.

Doze Green

Doze Green

Doze Green

Doze Green

Doze Green translates complex metaphysical concepts through his paintings, such as the possible manipulation of energy and matter to create a timeless space. He explores meditations on matter and anti-matter, layers of consciousness, and different possibilities based on cosmology.

Through stream-of-consciousness painting, Doze Green creates fractured imagery to convey infinite possibilities. His intention is to reveal works with an ever-changing narrative. Multi-dimensional planes and illusion of time are presented through fragmented, incomplete figures.

He believes by depicting beings that are not fully materialized, these beings are not of this realm. He presents

DOZE-GREEN-Luminosity-preview-14

DOZE-GREEN-Luminosity-preview-14

possibilities of immortality through paintings where narratives are interminable. His collection of paintings is an extension of this metaphysical concept.

Cubist influences include ascending and descending planes and repetitive, overlapping, and concentric lines in an otherwise undefined landscape. For Doze Green, this energy and motion of created forms exist in a visual meeting place of ideas.

Doze Green

Doze Green

Influenced by Edo period paintings, Doze Green mixes black gesso with Sumi ink and applies “creatively chaotic, and intuitive brushstrokes,” in a calligraphy-inspired and graffiti aesthetic. Doze Green translates these primitive markings as “biological entities, a swarm of arrows coming in from infinite perspective.”

Doze Green is also known for his live painting performances. Doze Green’s work is in many public and private collections throughout the United States, Japan, Europe, and Australia. His works have been published in

Detail of painting- Doze Green

Detail of painting- Doze Green

BlackBook, Anthem, Juxtapoz, Tokion, and­­ Vibe and reviewed on CNN.

Biography above is from www.dozegreen.com.

Below blurb is from http://www.artsy.com.

In the 1970s, Doze Green was a Hip-Hop pioneer. A member of the legendary Rock Steady Crew—the group that pioneered breakdancing (also known as B-Boying)—the subway-tagging graffiti artist often participated in breakdance performances at SoHo and Lower East Side galleries.

Doze Green

Doze Green

Moving from walls to canvas, Green’s recent paintings, influenced by the art of the Edo Period in Japan and created with gesso and sumi ink, incorporate his signature style of figurative abstraction and use of letterforms while at the same time posing metaphysical questions about the nature of narrative, the physics of time, and the possibility of immortality. He calls them “biological entities, a swarm of arrows coming in from infinite perspective.”

~

I hope you enjoy my tribute today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 330!  35 to go…I almost can’t believe it.  I’m

Doze Green

Doze Green

happy, proud and sad all at the same time.

Best,

Linda

Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green Linda Cleary 2014 Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green
Linda Cleary 2014
Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green Linda Cleary 2014 Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green
Linda Cleary 2014
Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green Linda Cleary 2014 Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green
Linda Cleary 2014
Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green Linda Cleary 2014 Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green
Linda Cleary 2014
Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green Linda Cleary 2014 Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green
Linda Cleary 2014
Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Day 311- Fred Sandback- Perceiving Forms

It’s Day 311 and it’s a pretty hectic day…gotta post this and then get things done before heading out to my improv show tonight.  Join me in honoring Fred Sandback today!

Fred Sandback

Fred Sandback

Fred Sandback

Fred Sandback

Fred Sandback (August 29, 1943 – June 23, 2003) was a minimalist conceptual-based sculptor known for his yarn sculptures, drawings, and prints. His estate is represented by David Zwirner, New York.

Frederick Lane Sandback was born in Bronxville, New York where, as a young man,

Fred Sandback Print

Fred Sandback Print

he made banjos and dulcimers. He majored in philosophy at Yale University (BA, 1966) before studying sculpture at Yale School of Art (MFA, 1969) where he studied with, among others, visiting instructors Donald Judd and Robert Morris.

Sandback is primarily known for his Minimalist works made from lengths of colored yarn. The artist’s early interest in stringed musical instruments led him to make dulcimers and banjos as a teenager. In 1967, he produced the sculpture that would establish the terms of his mature work. Using string and wire, he outlined the shape of a 12-foot-long 2-by-4 board lying on the floor. 

Fred Sandback Untitled, 1979

Fred Sandback
Untitled, 1979

Though he employed metal wire and elastic cord early in his career, the artist soon dispensed with mass and weight by using acrylic yarn. His yarn, elastic cord, and wire sculptures define edges of virtual shapes that ask the viewer’s brain to perceive the rest of the form.

In that way his work can be considered visionary or imaginative, as well as minimal

Fred Sandback Untitled, 1984

Fred Sandback
Untitled, 1984

and literal. Indeed Sandback was fond of installing “corner” pieces whose shadows assist with this form completion process.

In describing his work he stated, “It’s a consequence of wanting the volume of sculpture without the opaque mass that I have the lines.” and “I did have a strong gut feeling from the beginning though, and that was wanting to be able to make sculpture that didn’t have an inside.” Sandback himself referred to his sculptures operating in pedestrian space, acknowledging both the viewer’s movement through a space and as something to be engaged actively.

Fred Sandback Untitled, 1984

Fred Sandback
Untitled, 1984

Sandback’s first one-person exhibitions were at the Galerie Konrad Fischer, Düsseldorf, and the Galerie Heiner Friedrich, Munich, both in 1968, while the artist was still a graduate student. Following this debut, Sandback exhibited widely his minimalist sculptures and prints in the United States, Europe and elsewhere.

His artwork was included in the 1968 Annual Exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Biennale of Sydney in 1976, and the Seventy-third American Exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago in 1979. In 2003, several large Sandback sculptures were permanently installed at Dia’s museum in Beacon, New York. That same year, Sandback created Mikado (Sculptural study for the Pinakothek der Moderne) as site-specific at the then newly opened Pinakothek der Moderne.

Sandback’s work was the subject of an extensive survey exhibition organized in 2005 by the Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein, Vaduz (which traveled to the Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh and the Neue Galerie am Joanneum, Graz, in 2006). His work is represented in many public collections including the Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Museum für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt am Main, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo.

Sandback was one of a small group of avant garde artists sponsored by the Dia Center for the Arts. In 1981 the Dia Art Foundation initiated and maintained a museum of his work, The Fred Sandback Museum in Winchendon, Massachusetts, which was closed in

Fred Sandback Untitled (Jahn #35), 1975

Fred Sandback
Untitled (Jahn #35), 1975

1996. Dia presented exhibitions of his works in 1988 and in 1996–97. In 2007 the Fred Sandback Archive, a non-profit organization was established primarily to create and maintain an archival resource on Sandback’s work. At Christie’s New York, his four-part installation Untitled (1968) was sold for $266,500 in November 2010.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 312.

Best,

Linda

Untitled 311- Tribute to Fred Sandback Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Pen on Canvas

Untitled 311- Tribute to Fred Sandback
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Pen on Canvas

Side-View Untitled 311- Tribute to Fred Sandback Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Pen on Canvas

Side-View
Untitled 311- Tribute to Fred Sandback
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Untitled 311- Tribute to Fred Sandback Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Untitled 311- Tribute to Fred Sandback
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Untitled 311- Tribute to Fred Sandback Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Untitled 311- Tribute to Fred Sandback
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Untitled 311- Tribute to Fred Sandback Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Untitled 311- Tribute to Fred Sandback
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Pen on Canvas

Day 300- Gary Baseman- Bittersweetness of Life

It’s Day 300!  I cannot believe this is my 300th painting.  I originally wanted to do Da Vinci today, but I ran out of time so I am pushing it back to another day.  I did have a blast painting today’s painting and he’s one of my faves.  Join me in honoring Gary Baseman today!

Gary Baseman

Gary Baseman

Gary Baseman-Open Wounds

Gary Baseman-Open Wounds

Gary Baseman (born September 27, 1960) is a contemporary artist who works in illustration, fine art, toy design, and animation. He is the creator of the ABC/Disney cartoon series, Teacher’s Pet, and the artistic designer of Cranium, a popular board game. Baseman’s aesthetic combines pop art images, pre- and post-war vintage motifs, cross-cultural mythology and literary and psychological archetypes.

Baseman’s art is frequently associated with the lowbrow pop movement, also known as pop

"For the Love of Toby"- Gary Baseman

“For the Love of Toby”- Gary Baseman

surrealism.

Baseman was born and raised in the Fairfax District of Los Angeles. He is the fourth child of Holocaust survivors from Ukraine. Baseman’s mother worked at the famous Canter’s Deli and his father was an electrician.  Baseman cites Warner Bros. cartoons, MAD Magazine, and Disneyland as early sources of inspiration. In junior high school, Baseman met Barry Smolin, who is now a radio host and musician, and Seth Kurland, a writer and TV producer. They remain close friends.

Baseman studied communications at UCLA. He graduated magna cum laude as a member of the Phi Beta Kappa society.

A Moment Ago Everything Was Beautiful Paintings- Gary Baseman

A Moment Ago Everything Was Beautiful Paintings- Gary Baseman

Baseman cites Yoshitomo Nara, Takashi Murakami, and the illustrator William Joyce as contemporaries.

Baseman coined the term ‘pervasive art’ as an alternative to the lowbrow art label. He has stated that his goal is to “blur the lines between fine art and commercial art.”  According to Baseman, pervasive art can take any medium, and need not be “limited to one world, whether [that] is the gallery world, editorial world, or art toy world.”

Baseman exemplifies pervasive art in that he works commercially and also remains an independent artist.  He creates products that are sold to a mass market, and also shows in museums and galleries, selling original artworks to collectors. Baseman employs traditional art practices such as painting, printmaking, sculpture, drawing, and collage.

From 1986 to 1996, Baseman worked as an illustrator in New York City. He earned several awards from American Illustration, Art

GARY BASEMAN “THE EXPLOSION OF DREAM REALITY”

GARY BASEMAN “THE EXPLOSION OF DREAM REALITY”

Directors Club, and Communication Arts. Baseman refers to his illustration work, and to his general process, as message-making.

Baseman’s drawings have been published in The New YorkerThe Atlantic MonthlyClutter MagazineTimeRolling StoneThe New York Times, and The Los Angeles Times. He has had major independent and corporate clients such as AT&T Corporation, Gatorade, Nike, Inc., and Mercedes-Benz. Baseman illustrated the best-selling board game Cranium. After ten years in New York, Baseman returned to Los Angeles to explore opportunities in art and entertainment.

Gary Baseman

Gary Baseman

In 1999, Baseman exhibited “Dumb Luck and Other Paintings About Lack of Control” at the Mendenhall Gallery in Los Angeles. The exhibition established Baseman’s transition from illustration to fine art, during a time when many of his artist-friends, like Mark Ryden, the Clayton Brothers, and Eric White made similar moves. Since then, Baseman has shown in close to twenty independent exhibitions, notably, “Happy Idiot and Other Paintings About Vulnerability” at the Earl McGrath Gallery in New York City; “For the Love of Toby” at Billy Shire Fine Arts in Los Angeles; “I Melt in Your Presence” at the Modernism Gallery in San Francisco; and “Hide and Seek in the Forest of ChouChou,” also at Billy Shire.

Baseman has exhibited in museums and galleries throughout the US and in Brazil, Germany, Israel, Italy, Russia, Spain, and Taiwan. Baseman’s work is featured in the permanent collections of the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. and the Museum of Modern Art in Rome.

n 2009, Baseman added performance art to his oeuvre with “La Noche de la Fusión,” a mythical holiday festival. Over two thousand

The Contemplation of the Uga- Gary Baseman

The Contemplation of the Uga- Gary Baseman

attendees celebrated a melding of cultural practices and ideas. Along with games, live music, and dancers, the event featured live models in costume playing Baseman’s female characters Skeleton Girl, Hickey Bat Girl, Bubble Girl, and Butterfly Girl. Displayed at the exhibition was the Enlightened Chou, a new character inspired by Baseman’s international travels.

In June 2010, Baseman presented “Giggle and Pop!” at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Live action costumed ChouChous played in the La Brea Tar Pits along with models dressed as Baseman’s Wild Girls, who were renamed “Tar Pit Girls” for the occasion. The characters performed a dance choreographed by Sarah Elgart, and the audience joined in with singer-songwriter Carina Round, who performed a song she composed for the event.

Partial biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece for today!  I really enjoyed creating it.  He’s such a fun artist.  I love staring at his art and I wish I had more time to work on it.  I didn’t start painting until late this afternoon.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 301!

Best,

Linda

Let Me Show You My Dreams- Tribute to Gary Baseman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Let Me Show You My Dreams- Tribute to Gary Baseman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Let Me Show You My Dreams- Tribute to Gary Baseman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Let Me Show You My Dreams- Tribute to Gary Baseman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Let Me Show You My Dreams- Tribute to Gary Baseman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Let Me Show You My Dreams- Tribute to Gary Baseman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Let Me Show You My Dreams- Tribute to Gary Baseman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Let Me Show You My Dreams- Tribute to Gary Baseman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Let Me Show You My Dreams- Tribute to Gary Baseman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Let Me Show You My Dreams- Tribute to Gary Baseman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 297- William Anastasi- Master of Accretion

It’s Day 297 and I happened to find this artist randomly and I’m so glad I did!  I was in the mood to do some conceptual art and I like the way this artist thinks.  Please join me in honoring William Anastasi today.

William Anastasi

William Anastasi

Untitled- William Anastasi

Untitled- William Anastasi

William Anastasi (b. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1933) is an American painter and visual artist. He has lived and worked in New York City since the early 1960s.

His work is predominantly abstract and conceptual. Early works such as Relief (1961) and Issue (1966) incorporate the use of industrial and construction materials. His works are held by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Guggenheim Museum, the Whitney Museum, the Walker Art Center, the National Gallery of Art, and the Art Institute of Chicago. In 2010 Anastasi was awarded The John Cage Award, an unrestricted grant awarded biennially, from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts.

Currently exhibited works include “Nine Polaroid Photographs of a Mirror”,

Subway Drawing- William Anastasi

Subway Drawing- William Anastasi

currently at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Biography above is from wikipedia.

American, b. 1933

William Anastasi, 60 Minutes, 1987

William Anastasi, 60 Minutes, 1987

A primary player in the first generation of American Conceptual artists, William Anastasi is a “classmate” of such artists as Andy Warhol, Sol LeWitt, and Hans Haacke. Though his name may not be as well known as his more famous contemporaries, his work is no less compelling. Anastasi’s formal education includes and is limited to high school, however he has lectured at numerous institutions including The School of Visual Arts where he taught for 18 years; University of North Carolina, and Yale University.

Well known for his delving concepts, the media of his work takes all forms. Anastasi’s subway drawings which prevail as some of his most

Pocket drawing 9.9.11, 2011 pencil on chinese silk paper- William Anastasi

Pocket drawing 9.9.11, 2011
pencil on chinese silk paper- William Anastasi

subtle albeit engaging works. Stemming from his Blind Drawing series, the Subway Drawings take their shape from the motion of the subway cars on which he rides. Placing the pencil on the page, the turns of the track and ridges in the wheels push the artist’s hand this way and that creating a cacophony of marks, reminiscent of a naive scribble. The chance taken in this manner of working is what drives the mystery and tension that is inherent to the process of making.

Untitled, 2013 one gallon of industrial high-gloss enamel, thrown- William Anastasi

Untitled, 2013
one gallon of industrial high-gloss enamel, thrown- William Anastasi

Anastasi’s work has enjoyed a star studded collection of showings nationally and internationally including Dwan Gallery, New York; The Mattress Factory Museum, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; The Guggenheim Museum, New York; and Stalke Galleri, Copenhagen.

Info above is from artsy.com.

One day, Anastasi was taking a ride on the New York city subway to play chess with a friend across town. He had his drawing supplies with him, so he taped a piece of paper to a board, put the board in his lap, held a pencil in his hand touching the paper, and closed his eyes. Then he let the bouncing and tilting of the subway car move the pencil. The drawing that he made on the way to see his friend that day was – in a way – a drawing of his trip.

When William Anastasi took art classes at school, he learned to draw in the regular way – with his eyes open, looking at the paper. He wondered what his drawings would look like if he didn’t use his eyes, so he began to experiment. He discovered that he liked drawing this way, and even liked the drawings themselves better than when he looked at what he was doing.

Sometimes Anastasi will tie a piece of cloth over his eyes like a blindfold and take a pencil in each hand, drawing for a specific length of

In Heat Portfolio: Semiconscious, 2007- William Anastasi

In Heat Portfolio: Semiconscious, 2007- William Anastasi

time. He calls these his “timed blind drawings.” That’s what he did at the Mattress Factory.

Untitled (July 25, 2010 Laporte), 2010 Ink & graphite on paper- William Anastasi

Untitled (July 25, 2010 Laporte), 2010
Ink & graphite on paper- William Anastasi

For one drawing, called April 15, 1989, 32 minutes, 4B, he held a 4B pencil in each hand. With his eyes covered, he moved from one end of the room to the other for exactly 32 minutes, marking the wall in big, sweeping movements as far as his arms could reach.

Excerpt above is from The Mattress Factory Art Museum.

Read this wonderful interview with him here on artsy.net.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I painted with a blindfold on and with a timer for 10 minutes.

I decided to do it with white pen on a

Me drawing blind-folded...10 minutes.

Me drawing blind-folded…10 minutes.

black background.  There were moments while scribbling where I thought things like, I want to draw a bird, a face, a lightning bolt, a cloud, etc.  There is something magical about not knowing at all how things will turn out.  I love my end result.  It was a release!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 298.

Best,

Linda

10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Side-View 10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Side-View
10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 1 10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 1
10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 2 10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 2
10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 3 10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 3
10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Day 290- Kathe Kollwitz- Let Not Another Man Fall

It’s Day 290 and my friend Paul asked me if I had paid tribute to today’s artist and I hadn’t even heard of her.  I decided to do some research and she’s amazing.  I was also excited to attempt a charcoal portrait since I don’t have much experience (except my first year of art school) with that medium.  I had tons of fun and got really dirty.  Join me in honoring Kathe Kollwitz today.

Kathe Kollwitz

Kathe Kollwitz

Kathe Kollwitz- Woodcut

Kathe Kollwitz- Woodcut

Käthe Kollwitz (8 July 1867 – 22 April 1945) was a German painter, printmaker, and sculptor whose work offered an eloquent and often searing account of the human condition, and the tragedy of war, in the first half of the 20th century. Her empathy for the less fortunate, expressed most famously through the graphic means of drawing, etching, lithography, and woodcut, embraced the victims of poverty, hunger, and war. Initially her work was grounded in Naturalism, and later took on Expressionistic qualities.

Kollwitz was born as Käthe Schmidt in Königsberg (now Kaliningrad, Russia), East Prussia, the fifth child in her family. Her father, Karl Schmidt, was a radical Social democrat

Mother with Two Children- Kathe Kollwitz

Mother with Two Children- Kathe Kollwitz

who became a mason and house builder. Her mother, Katherina Schmidt, was the daughter of Julius Rupp, a Lutheran pastor who was expelled from the official Evangelical State Church in Prussia and founded an independent congregation. Her education was greatly influenced by her grandfather’s lessons in religion and socialism.

Recognizing her talent, Kollwitz’s father arranged for her to begin lessons in drawing and copying plaster casts when she was twelve. At sixteen she began

Widows and Orphans- Kathe Kollwitz

Widows and Orphans- Kathe Kollwitz

making drawings of working people, the sailors and peasants she saw in her father’s offices. Wishing to continue her studies at a time when no colleges or academies were open to young women, Kollwitz enrolled in an art school for women in Berlin. There she studied with Karl Stauffer-Bern, a friend of the artist Max Klinger. The etchings of Klinger, their technique and social concerns, were an inspiration to Kollwitz.

At the age of seventeen, Kollwitz became engaged to Karl Kollwitz, a medical student. In 1888, she went to Munich to study at the Women’s Art School, where she realized her strength was not as a painter, but a draughtsman. In 1890, she returned to Königsberg, rented her first studio, and continued to draw labourers.

In 1891, Kollwitz married Karl, by this time a doctor, who tended to the poor in

Germany's Children Are Starving- Kathe Kollwitz

Germany’s Children Are Starving- Kathe Kollwitz

Berlin, where the couple moved into the large apartment that would be Kollwitz’s home until it was destroyed in World War II. The proximity of her husband’s practice proved invaluable:

“The motifs I was able to select from this milieu (the workers’ lives) offered me, in a simple and forthright way, what I discovered to be beautiful…. People from the bourgeois sphere were altogether without appeal or interest. All middle-class life seemed pedantic to me. On the other hand, I felt the proletariat had guts. It was not until much later…when I got to know the women who would come to my husband for help, and incidentally also to me, that I was powerfully moved by the fate of the proletariat and everything connected with its way of life…. But what I would like to emphasize once more is that compassion and commiseration were at first of very little importance in attracting me to the representation of proletarian life; what mattered was simply that I found it beautiful.”

Survivors- Kathe Kollwitz

Survivors- Kathe Kollwitz

It is believed Kollwitz suffered from anxiety during her childhood due to the death of her siblings, including the early death of her younger brother, Benjamin. More recent research suggests that Kollwitz may have suffered from a childhood neurological disorder called Alice in Wonderland syndrome, commonly associated with migraines and sensory hallucinations.

Between the births of her sons — Hans in 1892 and Peter in 1896 — Kollwitz saw a performance of Gerhart Hauptmann’s The Weavers, which dramatized the oppression of the Silesian weavers in Langembielau and their failed revolt in 1842. Inspired, the artist ceased work on a series of etchings she had intended to illustrate Émile Zola’s Germinal, and produced a cycle of six works on the weavers theme, three lithographs (PovertyDeath, and Conspiracy) and three etchings with aquatint and sandpaper (March of the WeaversRiot, and The End). Not a literal illustration of the drama, the works were a free and naturalistic expression of the workers’ misery, hope, courage, and, eventually, doom. The cycle was exhibited publicly in 1898 to wide acclaim. But when Adolf Menzel nominated her work for the gold medal of the Große Deutsche Kunstausstellung in Berlin, Kaiser Wilhelm II withheld his approval. Nevertheless, The Weavers became Kollwitz’ most widely acclaimed work.

Kollwitz’s second major cycle of works was the Peasant War, which, subject to many preliminary drawings and discarded ideas in

Self-Portrait- Kathe Kollwitz

Self-Portrait- Kathe Kollwitz

lithography, occupied her from 1902 to 1908. The German Peasants’ War was a violent revolution which took place in Southern Germany in the early years of the Reformation, beginning in 1525; peasants who had been treated as slaves took arms against feudal lords and the church. As was The Weavers, this subject, too, might have been suggested by a Hauptmann drama, Florian Geyer. However, the initial source of Kollwitz’s interest dated to her youth, when she and her brother Konrad playfully imagined themselves as barricade fighters in a revolution. The artist identified with the character of Black Anna, a woman cited as a protagonist in the uprising. When completed, the Peasant Warconsisted of pieces in etching, aquatint, and soft ground: PlowingRapedSharpening the ScytheArming in the VaultOutbreakAfter the Battle (which, eerily premonitory, features a mother searching through corpses in the night, looking for her son), and The Prisoners. In all, the works were technically more impressive than those of The Weavers, owing to their greater size and dramatic command of light and shadow. They are Kollwitz’s highest achievements as an etcher.

Kathe Kollwitz

Kathe Kollwitz

While working on Peasant War, Kollwitz twice visited Paris, and enrolled in classes at the Académie Julian in order to learn how to sculpt. The etching Outbreak was awarded the Villa Romana prize, which provided for a year’s stay, in 1907, in a studio in Florence. Although Kollwitz did no work, she later recalled the impact of early Renaissance art.

After her return, Kollwitz continued to exhibit her work, but was impressed by the work of younger compatriots—the Expressionists andBauhaus—and resolved to simplify her means of expression. Subsequent works such as Runover, 1910, and Self-Portrait, 1912, show this new direction. She also continued to work on sculpture.

Kollwitz lost her youngest son, Peter, on the battlefield in World War I in October 1914, prompting a prolonged depression. By the end of the year she had made drawings for a monument to Peter and his fallen comrades; she destroyed the monument in 1919 and began again in 1925. The memorial, titled The Grieving Parents, was finally completed and placed in the Belgian cemetery of Roggevelde in 1932. Later, when Peter’s grave was moved to the nearby Vladslo German war cemetery, the statues were also moved.

In 1917, on her fiftieth birthday, the galleries of Paul Cassirer provided a retrospective exhibition of one hundred and fifty drawings by

Self Portrait with Hand on Brow- Kathe Kollwitz

Self Portrait with Hand on Brow- Kathe Kollwitz

Kollwitz.

Kollwitz was a committed socialist and pacifist, who was eventually attracted to communism; her political and social sympathies found expression in the “memorial sheet for Karl Liebknecht” and in her involvement with the Arbeitsrat für Kunst, a part of the Social Democratic Party government in the first few weeks after the war. As the war wound down and a nationalistic appeal was made for old men and children to join the fighting, Kollwitz implored in a published statement:

“There has been enough of dying! Let not another man fall!”

Beggars- Kathe Kollwitz

Beggars- Kathe Kollwitz

While working on the sheet for Karl Liebknecht, she found etching insufficient for expressing monumental ideas. After viewing woodcuts by Ernst Barlach at the Secessionexhibitions, she completed the Liebknecht sheet in the new medium and made about thirty woodcuts by 1926.

In 1920 Kollwitz was elected a member of the Prussian Academy of Arts, the first woman to be so honored. Membership entailed a regular income, a large studio, and a full professorship.

In 1933, after the establishment of the National-Socialist regime, the Nazi Party authorities forced her to resign her place on the faculty of the Akademie der Künste following her support of the Dringender Appell. Her work was removed from museums. Although she was banned from exhibiting, one of her “mother and child” pieces was used by the Nazis for propaganda.

Working now in a smaller studio, in the mid-1930s she completed her last major cycle of lithographs, Death, which consisted of eight stones: Woman Welcoming DeathDeath with Girl in LapDeath Reaches for a Group of ChildrenDeath Struggles with a WomanDeath on the HighwayDeath as a FriendDeath in the Water, and The Call of Death.

In July 1936, she and her husband were visited by the Gestapo, who threatened her with arrest and deportation to a Nazi concentration

Kathe Kollwitz

Kathe Kollwitz

camp; they resolved to commit suicide if such a prospect became inevitable. However, Kollwitz was by now a figure of international note, and no further action was taken. On her seventieth birthday, she “received over one hundred and fifty telegrams from leading personalities of the art world”, as well as offers to house her in the United States, which she declined for fear of provoking reprisals against her family.

She outlived her husband (who died from an illness in 1940) and her grandson Peter, who died in action in World War II two years later.

She was evacuated from Berlin in 1943. Later that year, her house was bombed and many drawings, prints, and documents were lost. She moved first to Nordhausen, then to Moritzburg, a town near Dresden, where she lived her final months as a guest of Prince Ernst Heinrich of Saxony. Kollwitz died just before the end of the war.

Kollwitz made a total of 275 prints, in etching, woodcut and lithography. Virtually the only portraits she made during her life were images of herself, of which there are at least fifty. These self-portraits constitute a lifelong honest self-appraisal; “they are psychological milestones”.

Partial biography is from wikipedia.

I decided just to do a self portrait and not make a commentary on anything political.  Although the more I think about it, I should’ve at least done a portrait of me in pain…crying or something.  I love the story of this artist’s life and I think her artwork is harrowingly beautiful and haunting.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 291!

Best,

Linda

Self-Portrait- Tribute to Kathe Kollwitz Linda Cleary 2014 Stain & Charcoal on Canvas

Self-Portrait- Tribute to Kathe Kollwitz
Linda Cleary 2014
Stain & Charcoal on Canvas

Side-View Self-Portrait- Tribute to Kathe Kollwitz Linda Cleary 2014 Stain & Charcoal on Canvas

Side-View
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Kathe Kollwitz
Linda Cleary 2014
Stain & Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Kathe Kollwitz Linda Cleary 2014 Stain & Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Kathe Kollwitz
Linda Cleary 2014
Stain & Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Kathe Kollwitz Linda Cleary 2014 Stain & Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Kathe Kollwitz
Linda Cleary 2014
Stain & Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Kathe Kollwitz Linda Cleary 2014 Stain & Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Kathe Kollwitz
Linda Cleary 2014
Stain & Charcoal on Canvas

 

Day 272- Douglas A. Kinsey- Zen-Like Economy

It’s Day 272 and I really wanted to work with charcoal before the year was over!  I found today’s artist randomly and fell in love with his artwork and philosophy. 🙂  Join me in honoring Douglas A. Kinsey today.

Douglas A. Kinsey

Douglas A. Kinsey

As If Things Were Less Spoken Of 5- Douglas A. Kinsey

As If Things Were Less Spoken Of 5- Douglas A. Kinsey

Doug Kinsey (b. 1956) has been prolific as a painter for over thirty years. His first solo-exhibit was held at Mount St. Vincent University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada in 1972. As a young man Kinsey had the good fortune to work and study under two of Canada’s more notable color-field minimalists Jean Goguen and Guido Molinari while attending what is now known as Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Over a 7 year period Paul Reed of the Washington D.C. Colorists mentored Kinsey. Kinsey is a graduate of The Otis College of Art and Design, Los Angeles, CA.

Doug approaches the development of his imagery with an expressed Zen-like economy. The

Coal Mine 17- Douglas A. Kinsey

Coal Mine 17- Douglas A. Kinsey

strong subtle spiritual component remains as the most compelling attitude seen in his work. This abiding stillness expressed in the dark blue forms can at times produce a roaring sense of complete mystical silence. During this experience the viewer is asked to join and participate in the deeper mysteries which can occur during profound moments of inner-contemplation.

By allowing the physical landscape aspects of his Ohio River Valley home to influence his primary shapes and forms a strong organic quality is defined.

The Borderline Revisited 5- Douglas A. Kinsey

The Borderline Revisited 5- Douglas A. Kinsey

Intrinsically haptic by nature, Doug’s work articulates the combining of the intellect with the spiritual truths to be found in nature.

A native of California, Kinsey has resided in Pittsburgh, PA for almost ten years. He received his Masters degree in theology from Trinity Episcopal School for Ministry and currently teaches art to severely “at risk” children at The Holy Family Institute for Learning in Pittsburgh, PA.

Kinsey has exhibited widely in the US and abroad. Most notably are exhibitions at The Carnegie Museum of Art in 2001 which was curated by David Carrier, critic for Artforum and Art in America, In 2003 he received notice from Thomas Sokolowski, Director of The Andy Warhol Museum when he was awarded Best in Show at The Hoyt Institute of Art.

Kinsey has been included in exhibitions at the State Museum of Pennsylvania for an unprecedented two years in a row 2003-2004.

Also in 2004 his work was included in Westmoreland Museum of American Art Biennial, The Andy Warhol Museum of Art, and Gallery Ginza Himawari, Tokyo, Japan.

Two large canvases were selected for The Butler Institute of American Art 70th Summer Annual. 2006 (Youngstown, Ohio). The curator

Waking Into The Desert Dream 39- Douglas A. Kinsey

Waking Into The Desert Dream 39- Douglas A. Kinsey

was noted painter and art critic for NEWSWEEK Magazine, Peter Plagens. “Interval Series, exodus” received an Honorable Mention award.

Kinsey’s work is often described as maintaining the coolness of Rothko while expressing the strength of Kline.

When looking at my work the viewer should consider them as configurations of spiritual geography. In this manner I refer them as “Interior/Exterior Landscapes”. The primary blue shape will refer to geological forms found in geographical landscape. As such they mark unspoken borders much like a rock cairn would. This marking indicates a place of spiritual solace and point of reflection. My intention is to explore the subconscious symbols of an ‘interior’ spiritual reality when consecrated by the borders of ‘external’ physical reality.’

All artwork and biography is from www.absolutearts.com.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today.  It was so fun to work with charcoal again.  I haven’t really worked with it since art school!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 273.

Best,

Linda

The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey Linda Cleary 2014 Charcoal on Canvas

The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey
Linda Cleary 2014
Charcoal on Canvas

Side-View The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey Linda Cleary 2014 Charcoal on Canvas

Side-View
The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey
Linda Cleary 2014
Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 1 The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey Linda Cleary 2014 Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 1
The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey
Linda Cleary 2014
Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 2 The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey Linda Cleary 2014 Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 2
The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey
Linda Cleary 2014
Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 3 The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey Linda Cleary 2014 Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 3
The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey
Linda Cleary 2014
Charcoal on Canvas