Day 357- Hannelore Baron- A Complete Thing

It’s Day 357 and I had a very busy day with filming and also have a holiday party this evening.  I was still able to get today’s piece done.  I wish I had more time to focus on it.  Please join me in honoring Hannelore Baron today.

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron 1978

Hannelore Baron 1978

Hannelore Baron (June 8, 1926 – April 28, 1987) was an artist whose work has become known for the highly personal, book-sized, abstract collages and box constructions that she began exhibiting in the late 1960s. Born in Dillingen/Saar, Germany, she and her family fled persecution in Nazi Germany, illegally crossing the border into Luxembourg in 1939. In 1941 Baron’s family sailed from Lisbon to New York and setteled in the Bronx, New York City.

By the time she graduated from the Staubenmiller Textile High School in Manhattan, Baron was avidly reading eastern philosophy, making increasingly abstract paintings and probably already experiencing the symptoms of claustrophobia and depression that would lead to a series of nervous breakdowns throughout her life. In the late 1950s Baron combined a variety of techniques and began making her first collages. Occupied with raising two children (daughter Julie and son Mark) and beset by psychological problems, Hannelore nevertheless exhibited her work and in 1969, the year of her one-person exhibition at Ulster County Community College, she began to make the box constructions that would become her signature. In the early 1970s, Baron established a studio and devoted her time and energy completely to her artwork until her death in 1987. Hannelore Baron was self-taught.

Although her compositions are completely abstract, she considered them to be both personal and political statements. In her own words,

Everything I’ve done is a statement on the, as they say, human condition…the way other people march to

Hannelore Baron- Untitled Collage 1977

Hannelore Baron- Untitled Collage 1977

Washington, or set themselves on fire, or write protest letters, or go to assassinate someone. Well, I’ve had all the same feelings that these people had about various things, and my way out, because of my inability to do anything else for various reasons, has been to make the protest through my artwork… H.B.

Throughout the 1970s and 1980s her work garnered critical acclaim, along with gallery and museum exhibitions in the United States, Europe and Japan. In 1995, her work was the subject of a one-person exhibition at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. In 2001 her work was the subject of a traveling exhibition curated by Ingrid Schaffner and organized by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service. Her works can be found in the collections of The Museum of Modern Art, New York; the conSolomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Biography is from wikipedia.

Below bio is from artist’s website. www.hannelorebaron.net

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron practiced an art of concealment and protection. Out of rough and common materials she fashioned constructions, drawings and collages that transmuted the painful experiences of her life into indelible images of the darkness and mystery of being. Baron was born Hannelore Alexander in Dilligen, a small town in the Saar region of Germany in 1926. Her father, Julius, was a Jewish textile merchant, and almost as soon as Hitler came to power, the family began to feel the ominous consequences. Hannelore and her brother were sent to a special school for Jews only. On Kristallnacht, the family’s apartment was ransacked and her father beaten. Thus began a period of flight and border crossing that did not end until the family managed to emigrate from Lisbon to New York in 1941. In the midst of all this, one of Baron’s most vivid memories was that of a brief return to her family’s wrecked apartment, where the bloody handprints of her father were still visible on the walls.

By the time she graduated from the Staubenmiller Textile High School in Manhattan, Baron was avidly reading eastern philosophy, making increasingly abstract paintings and probably already experiencing the symptoms of claustrophobia and depression that would lead to a series of nervous breakdowns throughout her life. On one of her rare forays out, to sketch, she met Herman Baron, a book salesman for the Philosophical Library, and they

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron

married in 1950. The milieu was intellectually rich: Baron’s brother ran a small press and published works by avant-garde writers such as Maya Deren and Henry Miller, and Baron himself soon opened his own bookstore in the Bronx. Isolated by her mental distress, however, Hannelore developed her art without instruction and without direct knowledge of the currents that were changing the art world. Her abstract paintings betray no debt to Rothko, Gorky or Motherwell. But she did manage to visit an exhibition by John Heliker, a friend of Baron’s brother, and the experience was decisive: she saw how collage could combine all aspects of art, from drawing and painting to sculptural manipulation of materials. Over the next three decades, Hannelore would explore the implications of mixed media with depth, subtlety and daring.

Occupied with raising two children (daughter Julie and son Mark) and beset by psychological problems, Hannelore nevertheless exhibited her work and in 1969, the year of her one-person exhibition at Ulster County Community College, she began to make the box constructions that would become her signature. In these works, damaged wood and metal, often tied or nailed together, enclose secrets that can only be guessed at: scraps of

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron

her past, mysterious games without rules, concealed objects. In their rawness and obscurity they form the necessary counterpart to Joseph Cornell’s elegant enigmas. In these works and in her collages, Hannelore was able to convey her sense of the fragility of life, the mythic substratum of human experience, and broader concerns for the environment, the injustices of war, especially the Vietnam conflict, and the physical pain of existence. In 1973, she was diagnosed with cancer and would struggle with various forms of the disease until it took her life in 1987. After her death, Hannelore’s work was the subject of a one-person exhibition at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York and, in 2002, a national touring exhibition organized by the Smithsonian Institution. She once remarked of one of her works, “The solution didn’t come only from my head, it was lived out and worked out. It is a complete thing.”

~

I hope you enjoy my tribute today!  It was a therapeutic experience creating it.  Her style is very distinct and hard to emulate because of it’s subtlety, so I tried to get into a mind frame of my own while creating this piece.

I will see you tomorrow on Day 358!

Best,

Linda

Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View
Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Day 265- Gary John- Always a Street Artist

It’s Day 265…only 100 left to go!  Wow…Join me in honoring Gary John today.  I found this artist and fell in love with his story and artwork!  I hope you will too.  Below is an article about him from the Santa Monica Mirror that I liked .

From Santa Monica Mirror- Artist Gary John (center) has gone from living on the streets of Venice to becoming an emerging artist in the past eight months thanks to gallery owners Bruce (left) and Scot Lurie.

From Santa Monica Mirror- Artist Gary John (center) has gone from living on the streets of Venice to becoming an emerging artist in the past eight months thanks to gallery owners Bruce (left) and Scot Lurie.

Four Chairs- Gary John

Four Chairs- Gary John

Painting A New Life After Living On The Streets

POSTED NOV. 28, 2013, 8:59 AM JYNARRA BRINSON / MIRROR CONTRIBUTOR

Eight months ago, homeless street artist Gary John was up to his usual one day – painting for

Big Boy Act- Gary John

Big Boy Act- Gary John

nearly 10 hours non-stop on the Venice boardwalk – when something told him to put his brush down, pack his things, and check out Culver City’s art gallery loop.

“I never stop painting,” John says. “I don’t break my routine and more than that, I hem and haw for everything.”

But on that day, John listened to what he describes as nothing more than “divine intervention.”

During this journey to Culver City, he walked into the Bruce Lurie Gallery near the corner of La Cienega and Washington boulevards.

Gary John

Gary John

Perhaps it was the dried-up paint on John that tipped gallery owner Bruce Lurie off, or maybe the same “something” that spoke to John hours earlier, whatever it was compelled Lurie to address him, knowingly, when he said, “Hi artist.”

The salutation did not strike John as particularly significant. He walked about the gallery before heading toward the exit when he heard a voice behind him.

“What kind of art do you do?” John recalls being asked.

He told Lurie about his art – his abstract pop culture images on cardboard, newspaper,

Gary John

Gary John

canvas, and just about any low-cost material he could get his hands on.

For years John met several people, celebrities included, who filled his ears and heart with colorful hopes. They promised to help him find representation and to get his work on t-shirts, skateboards, and other commercial exposure – which never happened.

Hoax Man- Gary John

Hoax Man- Gary John

When Lurie expressed curiosity and asked him to bring his work in, John assumed the usual would transpire: He’d bring his things in, lay them out, be told his work wasn’t actually what they were looking for and sent on his way, with good wishes, of course.

However, this time was different. The decision was unanimous. All three Lurie brothers – Bruce, Evan, and Scot, all gallery owners themselves, happened to be in town that day – decided John was precisely who they were looking for.

“They said come back tomorrow and we’ll do some paperwork,” John says. “I think he took

Modern Art- Gary John

Modern Art- Gary John

everything I had. It was like a dream. They were telling me my stuff is fantastic, we’re going to promote you, not only that, represent you and take you all over the country and it was too much.”

Overwhelmed nearly to hysteria, John asked them to stop talking, said it was too much for one day and left. He walked halfway down the block, found a front porch and sat. He recalls bawling like a baby but more like someone whose wildest dreams had just come true.

Gary John

Gary John

Nearly a decade ago, John visited Los Angeles to seek a brighter backdrop than the grey and rain from his native Seattle. At the insistence of his friend Dan Corley, he said he visited LA for what he intended to be a two-week trial.

“I owe everything to Dan Corley,” John says. “He encouraged me when I wanted to give up. If it weren’t for him I would not be where I am today. No one could ask for a better friend.”

When he arrived, he says, he knew LA would be his new home. The sole earnings from his art sales on the boardwalk sustained him to a minor degree. John struggled with homelessness, finding himself in and out of motels and living on the streets of Venice.

“I was able to pull myself in and out,” John says. “After 10 years of gutting it out on

Queen in a Balloon- Gary John

Queen in a Balloon- Gary John

Venice Beach, I had all but given up. Things really improved when Bruce took me on.”

Today, John lives in an apartment in Culver City.

His art is reminiscent of Haring and Basquiat, and it’s with comparable abandon that vivid hues take shape (or not) on his canvas.

John says he’ll never forget the first time he saw his paintings on the wall.

“It was beautiful,” he says from under a dark green baseball cap and sunglasses, his hands tucked deep into his pockets. “Here were my paintings on this beautiful wall and Bruce came up to me and said, you’re where you belong – he said that to me.”

John himself won’t be at Art Basel Miami Beach 2013 next month, but his art will. The highly selective annual international show attracted 50,000 international visitors last year. Artists, collectors, gallerists, curators, art enthusiasts, and the like descend on Miami Beach for four days to celebrate work from masters of Modern and contemporary art as well as pieces by emerging stars.

Paris Shoe- Gary John

Paris Shoe- Gary John

Art Basel is not John’s first show appearance, but it is the most high profile. His acceptance to the show is something not many established artists can’t boast. Past show appearances include the Affordable Art Fair in New York, Houston Art Fair, as well as shows in the Hamptons and Palm Springs.

Bruce Lurie says he always sells out John’s artwork each show.

“His art is something that reminds us of the purity of our childhood,” Lurie says. “The iconic images, drawn spontaneously yet perfectly have a deeper psychological meaning, and connect today with yesteryears. You might initially think the images are innocent, but they can be provocative and erotic – the fine art collector is attracted to those.”

In the past few weeks John’s work appeared in an auction hosted by The Skirball Museum; Children’s Hospital Los Angeles recently purchased a few of his works; and a curator from the Gothenburg Museum of Art in Sweden expressed interest in showing his work.

John wants his story to serve as encouragement for artists who remain steadfast as well as for those who struggle with persevering through the odds.

“If you hang in there long enough, you keep pushing, your dreams can come true. I never believed it because I went through so many hardships,” John says.

Even though his art is receiving attention he never thought possible, John still paints and sells 8×10 inch pieces along the Venice boardwalk.

“People say you have success now, why are you still on Venice beach,” John says. “I always tell them – because I was a street artist, I am a street artist and I’ll always be a street artist.”

Visit Gary John’s website at streetartgaryjohn.com. Alternatively, you can find him in person most days along the Venice boardwalk across from Figtree’s Café.

Above is article from the Santa Monica Mirror website.

Isn’t his story lovely?  I love it.  I really enjoyed painting this piece today and I hope you like it!  Only a hundred paintings to go for this project!  I can’t believe it.  Well, I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 266.

Best,
Linda

Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View
Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Day 246- Jan Dibbets- Perspectives

It’s Day 246 and because I’m a little rundown and also working on other projects…painting for my high school art teacher, some new songs and writing, I decided to do something simpler today.  A photography/decollage piece.  I really like today’s artist.  I made some mistakes regarding adhesives etc. but I got it done. 🙂  Please join me in honoring Jan Dibbets today.

Jan Dibbets

Jan Dibbets

Jan Dibbets, Saenredam-Zadkine II et VII, 2003

Jan Dibbets, Saenredam-Zadkine II et VII, 2003

Jan Dibbets (born 9 May 1941, Weert), is a Dutch conceptual artist.

In 1994, he was commissioned by the Arago Association to create a memorial to the French astronomer François Arago, known as Hommage à Arago. Dibbets set 135 bronze medallions into the ground along the Paris Meridian between the north and south limits of Paris.

Dibbets works are included in museums around the world, including the Stedelijk

Jan Dibbets, Saenredam-Zadkine V

Jan Dibbets, Saenredam-Zadkine V

Museum, Amsterdam, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, De Pont Gallery in Tilburg, and the Van Abbemuseum in Eindhoven.

Above is from wikipedia.

Dutch artist who works mainly with photography. Born in Weert. Trained as an art teacher at the Tilburg Academy 1959-63 and studied painting with Jan Gregoor in Eindhoven 1961-3. Taught art at a training college 1964-7. First one-man exhibition at Galerie 845, Amsterdam, 1965. Painted some abstract shaped canvases, then gave up painting in 1967.

Jan Dibbets

Jan Dibbets

Shortly afterwards visited London on a British Council scholarship and met Richard Long and other artists involved with Land art. On return to Holland, settled in Amsterdam and began to make ‘Plough Projects’, ‘Beach Projects’ etc., followed by his first ‘Perspective Corrections’.

Started in 1967 to use photography to create a dialogue between nature and cool

Jan Dibbets

Jan Dibbets

geometrical design by rotating the camera on its axis, taking series of photographs systematically increasing the shutter speed, etc.

Also experimented with videos, films and conceptual works. His exhibition in the Dutch pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 1972 established his international reputation. Lives in Amsterdam.

Above is from tate.org.uk online.

I hope you enjoy my piece.  I used a stupid glue that bled through the paper…and I should’ve used photo paper as well.  Oh well, I will agree to fail graciously with this one.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 247 when I get back to painting!

Best,

Linda

Gezichtseinder- Tribute to Jan Dibbets Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media

Gezichtseinder- Tribute to Jan Dibbets
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media

Side-View Gezichtseinder- Tribute to Jan Dibbets Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media

Side-View
Gezichtseinder- Tribute to Jan Dibbets
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media

Close-Up 1 Gezichtseinder- Tribute to Jan Dibbets Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media

Close-Up 1
Gezichtseinder- Tribute to Jan Dibbets
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media

Close-Up 2 Gezichtseinder- Tribute to Jan Dibbets Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media

Close-Up 2
Gezichtseinder- Tribute to Jan Dibbets
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media

Close-Up 3 Gezichtseinder- Tribute to Jan Dibbets Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media

Close-Up 3
Gezichtseinder- Tribute to Jan Dibbets
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media

Day 238- Mimmo Rotella- The Poster Ripper

It’s Day 238 and I had a bit of a hectic day so I decided to do something fun and maybe quick…a décollage!  Please join me in honoring Mimmo Rotella today!

Mimmo Rotella

Mimmo Rotella

Marilyn 1963- Mimmo Rotella

Marilyn 1963- Mimmo Rotella

Mimmo Rotella was born in Catanzaro on the 7th of October 1918, the son of a milliner. Following high school he moved to Naples where he began art studies (in 1941 he went to Rome after having obtained a post at the Ministry of Postal and Telecommunication Services). He did not stay long in the capital, however: on being called up he joined the course in the Officer-training School in Nocera. From here he was sent to the School for Non-commissioned Officers in Caserta (Campania). In 1944 he left the armed forces and then obtained his diploma at the Naples Art Academy. From 1944 until 1945 he taught draftsmanship at his city’s Institute for Surveyors.

In 1945 he moved to Rome: following his figurative beginnings and first experimentations he elaborated a manner of pictorial expression of neo-geometrical matrix. His participation in exhibitions began in 1947 at the Mostra Sindacale di Arti Figurative. He also took part in all the annual exhibitions of the Art Club up until 1951, both in Rome and Turin. As an alternative expressive method 1949 saw him invent phonetic poetry which the artist called ‘epistaltic’ (a neologism lacking sense): this was a collection of words (also invented ones), whistles, sounds, numbers and onomatopoeic reiterate. In the same year he wrote its Manifesto which in 1955 was published by Leonardo Sinisgalli in “Civiltà delle Macchine”. His first one-man exhibition, with abstract-geometrical works, was held in 1951 at the Galleria Chiurazzi in Rome (an exhibition which enjoyed little favour on the part of criticism).

Also in 1951 he had his first contact with French artists, exhibiting in Paris at the “Salon des Realistes Nouvelles”. For the period bridging

Casablanca- Mimmo Rotella

Casablanca- Mimmo Rotella

1951-1952 he obtained a scholarship on the part of the Fullbright Foundation, thanks to which he was able to sojourn in the United States at the University of Kansas City with the appointment as Artist in Residence. Here he created a large mural composition and recorded phonetic poems with the accompaniment of percussion instruments. At Harvard University in Boston he held a performance of phonetic poetry and recorded other pieces for the Library of Congress in Washington.

In 1952 he also held a second one-man exhibition at the Rockhill Nelson Gallery in Kansas City. His sojourn in the United States offered the possibility of getting to know the works of the protagonists of the new art currents: Rauschenberg, Oldenburg, Twombly, Pollock and Kline.

Following his return to Rome in 1953 he experienced a drawn-out crisis during which he interrupted his pictorial production. Convinced that everything in art had already been done he improvised what he himself has defined as “Zen illumination”: in short, the discovery of the advertising poster as artistic expression, as the message of the city. This saw the origin of the décollage – initially the collage – by way of glueing pieces of posters ripped off on the street onto canvas. Here Rotella adopted the collage as used by the cubists, ‘contaminating’ it with the dadaist and desecrating matrix of the objet trouvé. In Rome he showed the ‘torn poster’ for the first time in an exhibition entitled “Esposizione d’arte attuale” (1955).

Mimmo Rotella

Mimmo Rotella

He carried out the so-called “double décollage”: that is, the poster firstly removed from the wall and then torn up in the studio. In this period he also made use of the retros d’affiche, using the verso of the posters with the result obtained of non-figurative and monochrome works.

He began to receive acknowledgements in 1956 with the Graziano Award, followed in 1957 by the Battistoni e della Pubblica Istruzione Award. With the Cinecittà series of 1958 he chose both the figures and faces of film posters, orientating his production towards works of a more figurative type.

Already recognized by criticism at the close of the 1950’s as being an exponent of the “Young Roman Painting, Rotella was labelled as the ‘poster ripper’ or the ‘painter of glued paper’. At night, armed with a penknife, he not only ripped off posters but also pieces of the metal sheeting and zinc of the mounting frames of the billboard zones of the Rome City Council. In 1958 he was visited in Rome by the French critic Pierre Restany, a meeting which was to lead to a long friendship. In the same year he was included in the Roman exhibition entitled “Nuove tendenze dell’arte italiana”, organized by Lionello Venturi and held in the seat of the Rome-New York Art Foundation. In 1959 one of his works was reproduced in the review “Azimuth”, founded in Milan by Enrico Castellani and Piero Manzoni.

The curiosity on the part of the public for the artist’s extravagances, for a person who decidedly led a bohémien life, was crystallized in 1960 by way of a short film directed by Enzo Nasso dedicated to the Pittori arrabbiati [Angry Painters]. Here Rotella directed the ‘soundtrack’.

In 1960 he ‘joined’ the Nouveau Réalisme group (although he did not sign its manifesto). The theoretician of this movement was Pierre

Lo Spettacolo- Mimmo Rotella

Lo Spettacolo- Mimmo Rotella

Restany and included – amongst others – names like Klein, Tinguely, César, Spoerri, Arman and Christo. The group also included the French artists Hains, Villeglé and Dufrêne who in fact also worked on the collage, albeit in an autonomous way. By working in the most total isolation Rotella had anticipated the path of his French colleagues who were only exhibited for the first time in 1957 at the Galerie Colette Allendy in Paris.

Together with his décollages Rotella also created assemblages of objects bought from junk dealers: bottle caps and stoppers, pieces of rope, twine etc.  American Pop Art and Abstract Expressionism, together with the Informal and the spatial and matteric research works carried out in Italy at the time by Fontana and Burri, played an important role in directing Rotella’s pictorial orientation. In 1960 he met De Kooning and Rothko in Rome.  In 1961 he took part in the historical Parisian exhibition entitled “A 40° au-dessus de Dada”, supervised by Pierre Restany. In 1962 he talked about his own artistic operations at the School of Visual Arts in New York. In 1964 he was invited to take part in the Venice Biennial.

Mimmo Rotella

Mimmo Rotella

While the press increasingly more talked about the phenomenon of Affichisme Rotella moved to Paris where he began to elaborate a procedure of serial production by way of the projection of images in the negative on emulsified canvas. This operation was to be given the definition of Reportage by the artist or, and more specifically, Mec-Art in 1965 together with the art critic Otto Hanh and the painter Alain Jaquet. The same year saw his Parisian exhibition at the Galerie J.

Using typographical products, between 1967 and 1973 he created his Art-typo works, printing proofs freely chosen and reproduced on canvas. With this procedure he amused himself in insetting and superimposing advertising images: «I inverted my old approach: first I tried to disintegrate, now I try to reintegrate that matter, that reality».

At the beginning of the 1970’s he carried out a number of works by directly acting on the advertising pages of magazines with the use of solvents, reducing these either to the state of the imprint (frottage) or quite simply cancelling them (effaçage). Two years later, in 1972, he published an audacious autobiography titled “Autorotella”.

The “Plastiforme” were created in 1975: ripped posters placed on a polyurethane support with the intention of giving them tridimensionality.
In the same year he recorded his first Italian LP of phonetic poems, presented by Alfredo Todisco. In 1976 he took part in the International Recital of Sound Poetry – Poetry Action at the Atelier Annick Le Moine. Another experimentation carried out in those years was that of rolling up posters and closing them in plexiglass cubes.

On having left Paris in order to set up home and studio in Milan (1980), during the 1980’s he elaborated his “Blanks” or coperture d’affiches :

Minuit- Mimmo Rotella

Minuit- Mimmo Rotella

zeroed advertising posters covered with white sheets of paper – as happens for posters that are replaced or have finished their billboard lease – following a conceptual operation. 1984 saw him once again using brushes and acrylic colours in order to create the second cycle of works dedicated to the cinema: Cinecittà 2.

In 1986 he visited Cuba, exhibiting his works at the Havana University. During his stay he also took part in a performance: the laceration of posters in the Square of the city. During the same year he held a series of talks at the Domus Academy in Milan.

He then created his sovrapitture (overpaintings), inspired by the up-to-date theme of graffiti, pictorially intervening on the advertising posters that were torn and then glued on canvas (and from 1987 also ripped posters glued on a support of sheet metal). He drew anonymous writings, like the ones it is possible to read on city walls: signs, love notes and political slogans/epithets in a double message.

Mimmo Rotella

Mimmo Rotella

In 1990 he took part in the “Art et Pub” exhibition held at the Centre Pompidou in Paris and in the “High and Low” exhibition held in New York at the Museum of Modern Art.  In 1991 he married the young Russian economist, Inna Agarounova, who in 1993 gave birth to Asya.
In 1992 he was conferred the title of Officiel des arts et des Lettres by the French Minister of Culture, Jack Lang.

In 1994 he was invited to take part in “Italian Metamorphosis” held at the Guggenheim Museum in

Mimmo Rotella

Mimmo Rotella

New York. In 1996 he took part in “Face … l’Histoire” at the Centre Pompidou and in the exhibition entitled “Halls of Mirrors” held at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles (an exhibition that was to tour the world, Rome included). 1996 also saw the Internet inauguration of a one-man exhibition which was diffused online – the first event of its kind in Italy.

In 1997 Rotella dedicated the cycle of works entitled “Felliniana” to the films by Federico Fellini.  In 1999 the Mayor of his natal city, Sergio Abramo, signed a City Council order authorizing Rotella to freely remove posters in Catanzaro and its environs.

Biography above is from Ro Gallery’s website.

I decided to use Marilyn Monroe movie posters for my piece today since after researching the artist I noticed he used her a lot.  I really enjoyed creating today’s piece.  There was something very relaxing about ripping the paper and adhering it in patterns on the canvas.  I hope you enjoy my piece today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 239!

Best,
Linda

Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View
Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Bella Stella- Tribute to Mimmo Rotella
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

photo 2 photo 3 photo 4 photo 5

Day 221- François Dufrene- Lettrist

It’s Day 221 and it was nice to have another decollage day!  This was another artist that I found difficult in a way that’s hard to describe.  You would think by looking at his art that it’d be an easy piece to create, but it took me a while to do until I got the feeling of the piece right.  Join me in honoring François Dufrene today!

Francois Dufrene

Francois Dufrene

 François Dufrêne- Chant de l'heure, Dessous d'affiches

François Dufrêne-
Chant de l’heure, Dessous d’affiches

Francois Dufrene (François Dufrêne) (born Paris, September 21, 1930 – died Paris, December 12, 1982) was a French Nouveau realist visual artist, Lettrist and Ultra-Lettristpoet. He is primarily known as a pioneer in sound poetry and for his use of décollage within Nouveau réalisme.

Dufrene, along with Gil J Wolman and Brion Gysin, was one of the stalwarts of the experimental poetry in France. Dufrene’s abstract poetry has led many to regard him as a member of the first generation sound poets – following in the footsteps of Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Richard Huelsenbeck, Hugo Ball, Tristan Tzara, Kurt Schwitters and Antonin Artaud (among others).

Francois Dufrene joined Isidore Isou and the Lettrist movement in 1946 and continued to

Francois Dufrene

Francois Dufrene

participate until 1964. Dufrene’s talent was evident in the fact that he was already a member of the Lettrist Group at only 16 years old.

François Dufrêne ou "L'envers vaut l'endroit"

François Dufrêne ou “L’envers vaut l’endroit”

Dufrene then created a phonetic poetry which breaks the structures of language he called Ultra-Lettrist. The Ultra-Lettrist movement was an art form developed by Dufrene along with Jean-Louis Brau and Gil J Wolman in the 1950s, when they split from Isidore Isou’s Lettrism. Dufrene explored vocal possibilities of concrete music, a form of expression based on spontaneity directly recorded to tape, exploiting the noise music of sound, meaning and nonsense.

Dufrene became friends with Yves Klein in 1950 and with Raymond Hains and Jacques Villeglé in 1954. In 1957 he discovered décollage and in 1960 – with Pierre Restany,Yves Klein, Jean Tinguely, Arman, Hains and Villeglé – and helped found the art group known as Nouveau réalisme. He is considered one of the important artists in that Neo-Dada art movement.

Dufrene earned fame for his performances called Crirythmes, which was in a vocal style of sound art different from those of his

François Dufrene - Untitled. Original 1959

François Dufrene – Untitled. Original 1959

contemporaries. The Crirythme work inspired generations of experimental poets, such as Henri Chopin, Bernard Heidsieck, Ake Hodell, Charles Amirkhanian, Bob Cobbing, Gregory Whitehead, bp Nichol, Tracie Morris, Clive Fencott, Ada Verdun Howell, Mitch Corber and Jaap Blonk.

Here’s an example of a performance of his on You Tube.

Francois Dufrene

Francois Dufrene

Dufrene is the author of a film called Tambours du jugement premier (Drums of the first judgment) (1952), a fantasy film presented on the sidelines of the Cannes Film Festival the same year. In 1973 it was presented at the Atelier de Création (France Culture), in 1981 as part of the exhibition Paris-Paris at the Centre Georges Pompidou, and in 1982 at Thirty Years of Experimental Cinema in France also at the Centre Georges Pompidou.

Tambours du jugement premier is a “film” without screen, projector or film, which eliminates not only the dictatorship of the image over the word, but abandons the projected image altogether, because it’s no longer a matter of perceiving it passively, but rather one of imagining or recreating it. Originally however, Dufrene had indeed anticipated a visual part of the film, never taken to fruition, which was not even complete when the script was published. The weight of the work lay clearly in its soundtrack, which is all that the initial project finally became. It could therefore be considered a piece of sound art rather than a film in the conventional sense.

The first presentation of Tambours du jugement premier as an imaginary film without screen or film took place in Cannes in 1952, at the

Francois Dufrene

Francois Dufrene

Alexandre III cinema. The scant resources it required enabled the imaginary film to be improvised. The voices were situated in the four corners of the hall and while the performers recited the texts, the house lights flashed on and off and the stage curtain opened and closed repeatedly. Dufrene’s Tambours du jugement premier is a play on the exhaustion of cinematographicmedium, situating itself as a film beyond film projection machinery. The frustration of the public’s expectations – and its invitation to the viewer’s imagination – is what creates a rupture and liberation from the impositions of the standard image.

The soundtrack for Tambours du jugement premier contains an important phonetic work which includes almost all of the compositions and scores that Dufrene had produced up to that time in the form of lettrist poems and sung aphorisms as experimental sound poetry. The compositions renounced any type of discursive content and consisted in improvisations recorded on a tape recorder, employing all the possible capabilities of voice and body.

Biography above is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 222!  Best, Linda

Subliminal- Tribute to Francois Dufrene Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Subliminal- Tribute to Francois Dufrene
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View Subliminal- Tribute to Francois Dufrene Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View
Subliminal- Tribute to Francois Dufrene
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Subliminal- Tribute to Francois Dufrene Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Subliminal- Tribute to Francois Dufrene
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Subliminal- Tribute to Francois Dufrene Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Subliminal- Tribute to Francois Dufrene
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Subliminal- Tribute to Francois Dufrene Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Subliminal- Tribute to Francois Dufrene
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas