Day 357- Hannelore Baron- A Complete Thing

It’s Day 357 and I had a very busy day with filming and also have a holiday party this evening.  I was still able to get today’s piece done.  I wish I had more time to focus on it.  Please join me in honoring Hannelore Baron today.

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron 1978

Hannelore Baron 1978

Hannelore Baron (June 8, 1926 – April 28, 1987) was an artist whose work has become known for the highly personal, book-sized, abstract collages and box constructions that she began exhibiting in the late 1960s. Born in Dillingen/Saar, Germany, she and her family fled persecution in Nazi Germany, illegally crossing the border into Luxembourg in 1939. In 1941 Baron’s family sailed from Lisbon to New York and setteled in the Bronx, New York City.

By the time she graduated from the Staubenmiller Textile High School in Manhattan, Baron was avidly reading eastern philosophy, making increasingly abstract paintings and probably already experiencing the symptoms of claustrophobia and depression that would lead to a series of nervous breakdowns throughout her life. In the late 1950s Baron combined a variety of techniques and began making her first collages. Occupied with raising two children (daughter Julie and son Mark) and beset by psychological problems, Hannelore nevertheless exhibited her work and in 1969, the year of her one-person exhibition at Ulster County Community College, she began to make the box constructions that would become her signature. In the early 1970s, Baron established a studio and devoted her time and energy completely to her artwork until her death in 1987. Hannelore Baron was self-taught.

Although her compositions are completely abstract, she considered them to be both personal and political statements. In her own words,

Everything I’ve done is a statement on the, as they say, human condition…the way other people march to

Hannelore Baron- Untitled Collage 1977

Hannelore Baron- Untitled Collage 1977

Washington, or set themselves on fire, or write protest letters, or go to assassinate someone. Well, I’ve had all the same feelings that these people had about various things, and my way out, because of my inability to do anything else for various reasons, has been to make the protest through my artwork… H.B.

Throughout the 1970s and 1980s her work garnered critical acclaim, along with gallery and museum exhibitions in the United States, Europe and Japan. In 1995, her work was the subject of a one-person exhibition at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. In 2001 her work was the subject of a traveling exhibition curated by Ingrid Schaffner and organized by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service. Her works can be found in the collections of The Museum of Modern Art, New York; the conSolomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Biography is from wikipedia.

Below bio is from artist’s website. www.hannelorebaron.net

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron practiced an art of concealment and protection. Out of rough and common materials she fashioned constructions, drawings and collages that transmuted the painful experiences of her life into indelible images of the darkness and mystery of being. Baron was born Hannelore Alexander in Dilligen, a small town in the Saar region of Germany in 1926. Her father, Julius, was a Jewish textile merchant, and almost as soon as Hitler came to power, the family began to feel the ominous consequences. Hannelore and her brother were sent to a special school for Jews only. On Kristallnacht, the family’s apartment was ransacked and her father beaten. Thus began a period of flight and border crossing that did not end until the family managed to emigrate from Lisbon to New York in 1941. In the midst of all this, one of Baron’s most vivid memories was that of a brief return to her family’s wrecked apartment, where the bloody handprints of her father were still visible on the walls.

By the time she graduated from the Staubenmiller Textile High School in Manhattan, Baron was avidly reading eastern philosophy, making increasingly abstract paintings and probably already experiencing the symptoms of claustrophobia and depression that would lead to a series of nervous breakdowns throughout her life. On one of her rare forays out, to sketch, she met Herman Baron, a book salesman for the Philosophical Library, and they

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron

married in 1950. The milieu was intellectually rich: Baron’s brother ran a small press and published works by avant-garde writers such as Maya Deren and Henry Miller, and Baron himself soon opened his own bookstore in the Bronx. Isolated by her mental distress, however, Hannelore developed her art without instruction and without direct knowledge of the currents that were changing the art world. Her abstract paintings betray no debt to Rothko, Gorky or Motherwell. But she did manage to visit an exhibition by John Heliker, a friend of Baron’s brother, and the experience was decisive: she saw how collage could combine all aspects of art, from drawing and painting to sculptural manipulation of materials. Over the next three decades, Hannelore would explore the implications of mixed media with depth, subtlety and daring.

Occupied with raising two children (daughter Julie and son Mark) and beset by psychological problems, Hannelore nevertheless exhibited her work and in 1969, the year of her one-person exhibition at Ulster County Community College, she began to make the box constructions that would become her signature. In these works, damaged wood and metal, often tied or nailed together, enclose secrets that can only be guessed at: scraps of

Hannelore Baron

Hannelore Baron

her past, mysterious games without rules, concealed objects. In their rawness and obscurity they form the necessary counterpart to Joseph Cornell’s elegant enigmas. In these works and in her collages, Hannelore was able to convey her sense of the fragility of life, the mythic substratum of human experience, and broader concerns for the environment, the injustices of war, especially the Vietnam conflict, and the physical pain of existence. In 1973, she was diagnosed with cancer and would struggle with various forms of the disease until it took her life in 1987. After her death, Hannelore’s work was the subject of a one-person exhibition at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York and, in 2002, a national touring exhibition organized by the Smithsonian Institution. She once remarked of one of her works, “The solution didn’t come only from my head, it was lived out and worked out. It is a complete thing.”

~

I hope you enjoy my tribute today!  It was a therapeutic experience creating it.  Her style is very distinct and hard to emulate because of it’s subtlety, so I tried to get into a mind frame of my own while creating this piece.

I will see you tomorrow on Day 358!

Best,

Linda

Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View
Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Gone- Tribute to Hannelore Baron
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Day 345- Joseph Cornell- Poetic Theater

It’s Day 345 and I finally got to do a shadow box.  I love today’s artist.  The crazy storm that hit the Bay Area has caused power outages and flooding everywhere, but I still did my piece!  I am posting now just in case the power goes out.  Please join me in honoring Joseph Cornell today.

Joseph Cornell

Joseph Cornell

Untitled (Swan Box)- Joseph Cornell

Untitled (Swan Box)- Joseph Cornell

Joseph Cornell (December 24, 1903 – December 29, 1972) was an American artist and sculptor, one of the pioneers and most celebrated exponents of assemblage. Influenced by the Surrealists, he was also an avant-garde experimental filmmaker.

Joseph Cornell was born in Nyack, New York, to Joseph Cornell, a well-to-do designer and merchant of textiles, and Helen TenBroeck Storms Cornell, who had trained as a kindergarten teacher. The Cornells had four children: Joseph, Elizabeth (b. 1905), Helen (b. 1906), and Robert (b. 1910).

Both parents came from socially prominent families of Dutch ancestry, long-established in New York State. Cornell’s father died in 1917, leaving the family in strained circumstances. Following the elder Cornell’s death, his wife and children moved to the borough of Queens in New York City. Cornell attended Phillips Academy inAndover, Massachusetts, in the class of 1921, although he did not graduate.

Except for the three and a half years he spent at Phillips, he lived for most of his life in a small, wooden-frame

Untitled- Joseph Cornell

Untitled- Joseph Cornell

house on Utopia Parkway in a working-class area of Flushing, along with his mother and his brother Robert, whom cerebral palsy had rendered physically challenged.  Aside from the aforementioned period he spent at the academy in Andover, Cornell never traveled beyond the New York City area.

Cornell was wary of strangers. This led him to isolate himself and become a self-taught artist. Although he expressed attraction to unattainable women like Lauren Bacall, his shyness made romantic relationships almost impossible. In later life his bashfulness verged toward reclusiveness, and he rarely left the state of New York. However, he preferred talking with women, and often made their husbands wait in the next room when he discussed business with them. He also had numerous friendships with ballerinas, who found him unique, but too eccentric to be a romantic partner.

Pink Palace- Joseph Cornell

Pink Palace- Joseph Cornell

His last major exhibition was a show he arranged especially for children, with the boxes displayed at child height and with the opening party serving soft drinks and cake.

He devoted his life to caring for his younger brother Robert, who was disabled and lived with cerebral palsy. This was another factor in his lack of relationships. At some point in the 1920s, or possibly earlier, he read the writings of Mary Baker Eddy, including Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures. Cornell considered Eddy’s works to be among the most important books ever published after the Bible, and he became a lifelong Christian Science adherent.

He was also rather poor for most of his life, working during the 1920s as a wholesale fabric salesman to support his family. As a result of the American Great Depression, Cornell lost his textile industry job in 1931, and worked for a short time thereafter as a door-to-door appliance salesman. During this time, through her friendship with Ethel Traphagen, Cornell’s mother secured him a part-time position designing textiles. In the 1940s, Cornell also worked in a plant nursery (which would figure in his famous dossier “GC44”) and briefly in a defense plant, and designed covers and feature layouts for Harper’s BazaarViewDance Index, and other magazines. He only really began to sell his boxes for significant sums after his 1949 solo show at the Charles Egan Gallery.

Cornell was a highly regarded artist towards the end of his career, yet remained out of the spotlight. He

Hotel Eden- Joseph Cornell

Hotel Eden- Joseph Cornell

produced fewer box assemblages in the 1950s and 1960s, as his family responsibilities increased and claimed more of his time. He hired a series of young assistants, including both students and established artists, to help him organize material, make artwork, and run errands. At this time, Cornell concentrated on making collages, and collaborated with filmmakers like Rudy Burckhardt, Stan Brakhage, and Larry Jordan to make films that were evocative of moving collages.

In 1967 the artist was reported in possession of two or three original drawings from Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s The Little Prince. The exiled Saint-Exupéry’s wife, Consuelo, was similarly an artist and sculptor.

Cornell’s brother Robert died in 1965, and his mother in 1966. Joseph Cornell died of apparent heart failure on 29 December 1972, a few days after his sixty-ninth birthday.  The executors of his estate were Richard Ader and Wayne Andrews, as represented by the art dealers Leo Castelli, Richard Feigen, and James Corcoran. Later, the Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation was established, which administers the copyrights of Cornell’s works and represents the interests of his heirs. Currently, the Foundation is administered by Trustees, Richard Ader and Joseph Erdman.

Medici Princess- Joseph Cornell

Medici Princess- Joseph Cornell

Cornell’s most characteristic art works were boxed assemblages created from found objects. These are simple shadow boxes, usually fronted with a glass pane, in which he arranged eclectic fragments of photographs or Victorian bric a brac, in a way that combines the formal austerity of Constructivism with the lively fantasy of Surrealism. Many of his boxes, such as the famous Medici Slot Machine boxes, are interactive and are meant to be handled.

Like Kurt Schwitters, Cornell could create poetry from the commonplace. Unlike Schwitters, however, he was fascinated not by refuse, garbage, and the discarded, but by fragments of once beautiful and precious objects he found on his frequent trips to the bookshops and thrift stores of New York. His boxes relied on the Surrealist use of irrational juxtaposition, and on the evocation of nostalgia, for their appeal.

Cornell never regarded himself as a Surrealist; although he admired the work and technique of Surrealists like Max Ernst and René Magritte, he disavowed the Surrealists’ “black magic,” claiming that he only wished to make white magic with his art. Cornell’s fame as the leading American “Surrealist” allowed him to befriend several members of the Surrealist movement when they settled in the US during the Second World War. Later he was claimed as a herald of pop art and installation art.

Cornell often made series of boxed assemblages that reflected his various interests: the Soap Bubble Sets, the Medici Slot Machine series, the Pink Palace series, the Hotelseries, the Observatory series, and the Space

Object Abeilles- Joseph Cornell

Object Abeilles- Joseph Cornell

Object Boxes, among others. Also captivated with birds, Cornell created an Aviary series of boxes, in which colorful images of various birds were mounted on wood, cut out, & set against harsh white backgrounds.

In addition to creating boxes and flat collages and making short art films, Cornell also kept a filing system of over 160 visual-documentary “dossiers” on themes that interested him; the dossiers served as repositories from which Cornell drew material and inspiration for boxes like his “penny arcade” portrait of Lauren Bacall. He had no formal training in art, although he was extremely well-read and was conversant with the New York art scene from the 1940s through to the 1960s.

His methodology is described in a monograph by Charles Simic as follows:

Untitled (Grand Owl Habitat)- Joseph Cornell

Untitled (Grand Owl Habitat)- Joseph Cornell

Somewhere in the city of New York there are four or five still-unknown objects that belong together. Once together they’ll make a work of art. That’s Cornell’s premise, his metaphysics, and his religion….Marcel Duchamp and John Cage use chance operation to get rid of the subjectivity of the artist. For Cornell it’s the opposite. To submit to chance is to reveal the self and its obsessions.

Cornell was heavily influenced by the American Transcendentalists, Hollywood starlets (to whom he sent boxes he had dedicated to them), the French Symbolists such as Stéphane Mallarmé and Gérard de Nerval, and great dancers of the 19th century ballet such as Marie Taglioni and Fanny Cerrito.

Christian Science belief and practice informed Cornell’s art deeply, as art historian Sandra Leonard Starr has shown.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 346.

Best,

Linda

Start New- Tribute to Joseph Cornell Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media in a Shadow Box

Start New- Tribute to Joseph Cornell
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media in a Shadow Box

Side-View Start New- Tribute to Joseph Cornell Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media in a Shadow Box

Side-View
Start New- Tribute to Joseph Cornell
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media in a Shadow Box

Close-Up 1 Start New- Tribute to Joseph Cornell Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media in a Shadow Box

Close-Up 1
Start New- Tribute to Joseph Cornell
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media in a Shadow Box

Close-Up 2 Start New- Tribute to Joseph Cornell Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media in a Shadow Box

Close-Up 2
Start New- Tribute to Joseph Cornell
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media in a Shadow Box

Close-Up 3 Start New- Tribute to Joseph Cornell Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media in a Shadow Box

Close-Up 3
Start New- Tribute to Joseph Cornell
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media in a Shadow Box

Day 332- Georges Braque- Temporal Spaces

It’s Day 332 and I’ve been a little ahead of myself with painting because of the holidays.  I worked on this last night and finished up this morning.  I was very intimidated with today’s artist because of his painting style and I hope today’s piece helps me when I get to Duchamp!  Join me in honoring Georges Braque today. 🙂

Georges Braque

Georges Braque

Georges Braque 1882-1963

Violin and Candlestick- Georges Braque

Violin and Candlestick- Georges Braque

Georges Braque was at the forefront of the revolutionary art movement of Cubism. Braque’s work throughout his life focused on still lifes and means of viewing objects from various perspectives through color, line, and texture. While his collaboration with Pablo Picasso and their Cubist works are best known, Braque had a long painting career that continued beyond Cubism. Braque was also often dedicated to quiet periods in his studio rather than to being a personality in the art world.

Though Braque started out as a member of the Fauves, he began developing a Cubist style after meeting Pablo Picasso. While their paintings shared many similarities in palette, style and subject matter, Braque stated that unlike Picasso, his work was “devoid of iconological commentary,” and was concerned purely with pictorial space and composition.
Braque sought balance and harmony in his compositions, especially through papier colles, a pasted paper collage technique that Picasso and

Bottle of Run 1914- Georges Braque

Bottle of Run 1914- Georges Braque

Braque invented in 1912. Braque, however, took collage one-step further by gluing cut-up advertisements into his canvases. This foreshadowed modern art movements concerned with critiquing media, such as Pop art.

Braque stenciled letters onto paintings, blended pigments with sand, and copied wood grain and marble to achieve great levels of dimension in his paintings. His depictions of still lifes are so abstract that they border on becoming patterns that express an essence of the objects viewed rather than direct representations.
Georges Braque, Portugalczyk, 1911

Georges Braque, Portugalczyk, 1911

Childhood

Georges Braque was guided from a young age toward creative painting techniques. His father managed a decorative painting business and Braque’s interest in texture and tactility perhaps came from working with him as a decorator. In 1899, at age seventeen, Braque moved from Argenteuil into Paris, accompanied by friends Othon Friesz and Raoul Dufy.

Early Training

Braque’s earliest paintings were made in the Fauvist style. From 1902-1905, after giving up work as a decorator to pursue painting full-time he pursued Fauvist ideas and coordinated with Henri Matisse. He contributed his Fauvist colorful paintings to his first exhibition at the Salon des Independants in 1906. However, he was extremely affected by a visit to Pablo Picasso’s studio in 1907, to see Picasso’s breakthrough work – Les Demoiselles d’Avignon.

After this encounter, the two artists forged an intimate friendship and artistic camaraderie. “We would get

Baluster and Skull- Georges Braque

Baluster and Skull- Georges Braque

together every single day,” Braque said, “to discuss and assay the ideas that were forming, as well as to compare our respective works”. The drastic change in Braque’s painting style can be directly attributed to Picasso. Once he understood Picasso’s goals, Braque aimed to strengthen “the constructive elements in his works while foregoing the expressive excesses of Fauvism”. His landscape paintings in which scenes were distilled into basic shapes and colors inspired French art critic, Louis Vauxcelles, to coin the term Cubism by describing Braque’s work as “bizarreries cubiques.”

Braque and Picasso worked in synchronicity until Braque’s return from war in 1914. When Picasso began to paint figuratively, Braque felt his friend had betrayed their Cubist systems and rules, and continued on his own. However, he continued to remain influenced by Picasso’s work, especially in regards to papier colles, a collage technique pioneered by both artists using only pasted paper. His collages featured geometric shapes interrupted by musical instruments, grapes, or furniture. These were so three-dimensional that they are considered important in the development of Cubist sculpture. By 1918, Braque felt he had sufficiently explored papier colles, and returned to still life painting.

Musical Instruments 1908- Georges Braque

Musical Instruments 1908- Georges Braque

Viewers noted a more limited palette at Braque’s first post-war solo show in 1919. Yet he steadfastly adhered to Cubist rules about depicting objects from multi-faceted perspectives in geometrically patterned ways. In this, he continued as a true Analytical Cubist longer than did Picasso, whose style, subject matter and palettes changed continuously. Braque was most interested in showing how objects look when viewed over time in different temporal spaces and pictorial planes. As a result of his dedication to depicting space in various ways, he naturally gravitated towards designing sets and costumes for theater and ballet performances, doing this throughout the 1920s.

In 1929, Braque took up landscape painting once again, using new, bright colors influenced by Picasso and Matisse. Then in the 1930s, Braque began to portray Greek heroes and deities, though he claimed the subjects were stripped of their symbolism and ought to be viewed through a purely formal lens.

He called these works exercises in calligraphy, possibly because they were not strictly about figures but more about sheer line and shape. In the latter half of the 1930s, Braque embarked on painting his Vanitas series, through which he existentially considered death and suffering. Growing increasingly obsessed with the

Still Life with Clarinet 1927- Georges Braque

Still Life with Clarinet 1927- Georges Braque

physicality of his paintings, he explored the ways in which brushstrokes and paint qualities could enhance his subject matter.

The objects used in his still lifes were highly personal to Braque, however, he did not reveal these meanings. Skulls, for example, were objects he painted repeatedly at the onset of World War II. In 1944, when World War II ended, Braque began to embrace lighter subjects like flowers, billiard tables, and garden chairs.

His final series of eight canvases made from 1948-1955, each titled Atelier, or Studio, depicted imagery that represented the artist’s inner thoughts on each object rather than clues to the outside world. At the very end of his life, Braque painted birds repeatedly, as the perfect symbol of his obsession with space and movement.

Woman with a Guitar 1913- Georges Braque

Woman with a Guitar 1913- Georges Braque

Braque is remembered as a progenitor of Cubism, who was both rational and sensuous in his still life paintings. He was a classic painter in this sense, and has influenced the likes of Jim Dine andWayne Thiebaud, who focused on still life painting. Braque is also a celebrated colorist, and can be traced through contemporary art to those painters who work with color in similar ways. Perhaps Braque is most remembered for his use of collage, as many contemporary artists, from sculptors like Jessica Stockholder to painters like Mark Bradford, apply paper to their works as a means to comment on society and its products.

“To work from nature is to improvise.”

“One must not imitate what one wants to create.”

“One must beware of an all-purpose formula that will serve to interpret the other arts as well as reality, and that instead of creating will only produce a style, or rather a stylization.”

Biography is from www.artstory.org.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  It was a very educational experience and interesting as well!  I wish I had more time to work on it.  It’s not perfect, but I think I did well.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 333.

Best,

Linda

Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Side-View Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Side-View
Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Day 295- Fritz Bultman- Symbolism and Geometry

It’s Day 295 and I enjoyed the abstract piece I worked on today.  I’m also excited about my improv show tonight and need to do some research so join me in honoring Fritz Bultman today.

Fritz Bultman

Fritz Bultman

Rosa Park- Fritz Bultman

Rosa Park- Fritz Bultman

Fritz Bultman (April 4, 1919 – July 20, 1985) was an American Abstract expressionist painter, sculptor, and collagist and a member of the New York School of artists.

A. Fred Bultman was the second child and only son of A. Fred and Pauline Bultman. His family was prominent in New Orleans, where his father owned a Catholic funeral company. By the age of thirteen he was interested in art, and worked with Morris Graves, who was a family friend.

As a high school junior in 1935 Fritz went to study in Munich for two years, and there boarded with Maria Hofmann, the wife of artist and teacher Hans Hofmann.

King Zulu- Fritz Bultman

King Zulu- Fritz Bultman

After returning to the United States he studied with Hofmann in New York City and Provincetown, Massachusetts. Despite his father’s wishes that he become an architect, with Hofmann’s encouragement he decided instead to continue his study of art. In 1944 he bought a house in Provincetown, and thenceforth Bultman and his wife Jeanne divided their time between Cape Cod and New York City.

His early paintings have been described as “rough and painterly”, an amalgam of symbolism and geometry.

Red Rope- Fritz Bultman

Red Rope- Fritz Bultman

Bultman was exhibiting with other abstract expressionists by the late 1940s, and in 1950 was aligned with the group of New York School artists, nicknamed the “Irascibles” in an article in Life magazine, who signed a letter to the Metropolitan Museum of Art protesting the institution’s conservative policies. With the assistance of a grant from Italy he studied bronze casting in Florence in 1951; subsequently he was the sole abstract expressionist to fully integrate sculpture into his oeuvre.

Affected by anxiety and depression, Bultman worked little between 1952 and 1956, and resumed painting and sculpting after undergoing Freudian analysis. At a time when African Americans were prohibited from visiting white museums in the south, in 1963 Bultman and his wife led a group of prominent New York artists and writers in the creation of a collection of modern art for Tougaloo College, a black institution in Jackson, Mississippi. Bultman was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship in 1964-5 to work in Paris. In the 1960s Bultman began to make large collages, using pre-painted paper cut or torn and assembled into shapes reminiscent of his figurative drawings and more abstract sexual symbolism. In 1976 he started making stained glass windows with the aid of his wife.

Bultman died of cancer in 1985.

To Robert Motherwell, Bultman was “one of the most splendid, radiant and inspired painters of my generation.”, and David Houston,

Interior Game- Fritz Bultman

Interior Game- Fritz Bultman

curator of the Ogden Museum of Southern Art in New Orleans called him “an important artist from the South who was part of that great moment that changed the American cultural landscape.”

Idea I, 1958, by Fritz Bultman

Idea I, 1958, by Fritz Bultman

It has been suggested that Bultman’s career and subsequent reputation suffered from the vagaries of chance: he was not available for inclusion in the now iconic photo shoot for Life magazine that helped establish the reputations of the New York School painters; another possibility, according to Motherwell, was Bultman’s lack of interest in “art world politics”.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I’m really happy with it.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 295.

Best,

Linda

One Way- Tribute to Fritz Bultman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

One Way- Tribute to Fritz Bultman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View One Way- Tribute to Fritz Bultman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
One Way- Tribute to Fritz Bultman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 One Way- Tribute to Fritz Bultman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
One Way- Tribute to Fritz Bultman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 One Way- Tribute to Fritz Bultman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
One Way- Tribute to Fritz Bultman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 One Way- Tribute to Fritz Bultman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
One Way- Tribute to Fritz Bultman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 279- Italo Valenti- Narrative Dimensions

It’s Day 279 and I’m running around getting things done before going out and having dinner with my in-laws that are in town.  I haven’t done a collage piece in a while so I did one today.  Join me in honoring Italo Valenti today.  I had to translate his biography from Italian.

Italo Valenti

Italo Valenti

Italo Valenti Archétypes, 1971 38 1/2 in. x 39 1/4in. Painted paper on pavatex - See more at: http://www.bechtler.org/collection#sthash.CVAeIPcI.dpuf

Italo Valenti
Archétypes, 1971
38 1/2 in. x 39 1/4in. Painted paper on pavatex
– See more at: http://www.bechtler.org/collection#sthash.CVAeIPcI.dpuf

Italo Valenti (Milan, April 29, 1912 – Ascona, September 6, 1995) was an Italian painter.

“And it’s probably indulge in this aimless, in these pauses of silence, which one has

Italo Valenti

Italo Valenti

the feeling of being closer to themselves, that is, more spontaneous. In living in this world of the unusual, where things often live concealed or lost outside and inside of us, is perhaps the natural phenomenon of forgetting, working almost automatically.”
(Italo Valenti)

He was born in Milan April 29, 1912, the son of wealthy merchants. His was a happy childhood, even in the absence of parents, passed in the house Milan welcomed by the fairy tales of his grandmother who will be a constant source of inspiration for his art. At seven he moved to Vicenza; in the Venetian city attended the School of Arts and Crafts and began working at a goldsmith.

Italo Valenti

Italo Valenti

It was the theosophist Free Augenti to him to discover that all the arts are in connection with each other. He held his first solo exhibition in Valdagno in 1932 he enrolled at the Academy of Venice and then at the Academy of Brera where he studied with Aldo Carpi and Eve Tea. At this date also the first trip to Paris and Belgium to the discovery of Cézanne, and painting impressionist and post-impressionist.

In 1937 he entered the Corrente movement with Sassu, Luciano Anceschi, Guttuso, Fontana, Birolli, Cassinari, Raffaele De Grada, Treccani, Benjamin Joppa, Salvatore Quasimodo, Migneco, Morlotti, Vittorio Sereni and others, which referred to civil

Valenti Italo Collage

Valenti Italo Collage

and social expressionist art to overcome the provincialism and the rhetoric of Italian art. The participation of Valenti activity of the group was intense: the distinctive feature of his figurative painting was to be found in the sleepy and dreamy lyricism that made mention of “primitivism fantastic,” already stretched to the stylization of the figure that will land as a result of abstract forms.

"Eurydike"- Italo Valenti

“Eurydike”- Italo Valenti

In 1938 he began his teaching career at the School of nude di Brera, where he taught until 1952, when he moved permanently to Switzerland, Locarno. Here he came in contact with the group of artists that were present at that time in Ascona (Jean Arp, Ben Nicholson, Remo Rossi and Julius Bissier) and this led to a gradual rethinking of his painting: the narrative dimension, more properly figurative, was progressively less as he said more research on the effects of color and space that led him to a phase of “lyrical abstraction informal.”

The themes of the dream “primitivism fantastic” were still present: the magicians, the series of cerfs ruffles, the moons, the theaters, the stations of vessels; but the style was completely different:

Italo Valenti

Italo Valenti

the composition was shattered into triangles, trapezoids, rhombuses, primordial symbols and enigmatic with their own “thoughtful lightness.”

It is among the painters that the entrepreneur Giuseppe Verzocchi contacted for its collection of works on the theme of the work: between 1949 and 1950, Valenti realized locomotives (1949-1950), under which, together with the self, is now preserved Collection Verzocchi, at the Pinacoteca Civica of Forlì.

His painting is more pure, clean, composed of a few elements that float in an abstract vacuum. So are created abstract collages of the last artistic production, in which the boyish, the fantastic, dreamlike find their final equilibrium with the symbolic, the enigmatic abstraction, in a vital synthesis and final. In 1985 he was hit by stroke which deprives him of speech and the use of his right arm. For this reasons, the collages that follow belong to what he calls the “era of the left hand.” He died September 6, 1995 in Ascona.

Biography is from Italian wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 279.

Best,

Linda

Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View
Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Forme- Tribute to Italo Valenti
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

DAY ONE-HUNDRED!- Raoul Hausmann- New Visions

It’s Day 100 and I’m scrambling around to get stuff done!  Join me in celebrating my 100th painting and today’s artist…Raoul Hausmann!  I love this guy…

Raoul Hausmann

Raoul Hausmann

Raoul Hausmann

Raoul Hausmann

Raoul Hausmann (July 12, 1886 – February 1, 1971) was an Austrian artist and writer. One of the key figures in Berlin Dada, his experimental photographic collages, sound poetry and institutional critiques would have a profound influence on the European Avant-Garde in the aftermath of World War I.

Raoul Hausmann was born in Vienna but moved to Berlin with his parents at the age of 14, in 1901. His earliest art training was from his father, a professional conservator and painter. He met Johannes Baader, an eccentric architect and another future member of Dada, in 1905. At around the same time he met Elfride Schaeffer, a violinist, whom he married in 1908, a year after the birth of their daughter, Vera. That same year Hausmann enrolled at a private Art School in Berlin, where he remained until 1911.

After seeing Expressionist paintings in Herwarth Walden’s gallery Der Sturm in 1912,

Raoul Hausmann

Raoul Hausmann

Hausmann started to produce Expressionist prints in Erich Heckel’s studio, and became a staff writer for Walden’s magazine, also called Der Sturm, which provided a platform for his earliest polemical writings against the art establishment. In keeping with his Expressionist colleagues, he initially welcomed the war, believing it to be a necessary cleansing of a calcified society, although being an Austrian citizen living in Germany he was spared the draft.

Hausmann met Hannah Höch in 1915, and embarked upon an extramarital affair that produced an ‘artistically productive but turbulent bond’ that would last until 1922. In 1916 Hausmann met two more people who would become important influences on his subsequent career; the psychoanalyst Otto Gross who believed psychoanalysis to be the preparation for revolution, and the anarchist writer Franz Jung. By now his artistic circle had come to include the writer Salomo Friedlaender, Hans Richter, Emmy Hennings and members of Die Aktion magazine, which, along with Der Sturm and the anarchist paper Die Freie Straße published numerous articles by him in this period.

‘The notion of destruction as an act of creation was the point of departure for Hausmann’s Dadasophy, his theoretical contribution to Berlin Dada.’

Raoul Hausmann

Raoul Hausmann

When Richard Huelsenbeck, a 24 year old medical student who was a close friend of Hugo Ball and one of the founders of Zurich Dada, returned to Berlin in 1917, Hausmann was one of a group of young disaffected artists that began to form the nucleus of Berlin Dada around him. Huelsenbeck delivered his “First Dada Speech in Germany”, January 22, 1918 at the fashionable art dealer IB Neumann’s gallery, Kurfurstendamm Berlin. Over the course of the next few weeks, Hausmann, Huelsenbeck,George Grosz, John Heartfield, Jung, Höch, Walter Mehring and Baader started the Club Dada. The first event staged was an evening of poetry performances and lectures against the backdrop of a retrospective of paintings by the establishment artist Lovis Corinth at the Berlin Sezession, April 12, 1918. Amongst the contributors, Huelsenbeck recited the Dada Manifesto, Grosz danced a “Sincopation” homaging Jazz, whilst Hausmann ended the evening by shouting his manifesto The New Material In Painting at the by-now near riotous audience;

“The threat of violence hung in the air. One envisioned Corinth’s pictures torn

Raoul Hausmann

Raoul Hausmann

to shreds with chair legs. But in the end it didn’t come to that. As Raoul Hausmann shouted his programmatic plans for dadaist painting into the noise of the crowd, the manager of the sezession gallery turned the lights out on him.”

Raoul Hausmann

Raoul Hausmann

The call for new materials in painting bore fruit later the same year when Hausmann and Höch holidayed on the Baltic Sea. The guest room they were staying in had a generic portrait of soldiers, onto which the patron had glued photographic portrait heads of his son five times.

“It was like a thunderbolt: one could – I saw it instantaneously – make pictures, assembled entirely from cut-up photographs. Back in Berlin that september, I began to realize this new vision, and I made use of photographs from the press and the cinema.” Hausmann, 1958

The photomontage became the technique most associated with Berlin Dada, used extensively by Hausmann, Höch, Heartfield, Baader and Grosz, and would prove a crucial influence on Kurt Schwitters, El Lissitsky and Russian Constructivism. It should also be pointed out that Grosz, Heartfield and Baader all laid claim to having invented the technique in later memoirs, although no works have surfaced to justify these claims.

At the same time, Hausmann started to experiment with sound poems he called “phonemes” and “poster poems”, originally created by the

Raoul Hausmann

Raoul Hausmann

chance lining up of letters by a printer without Hausmann’s direct intervention. Later poems used words which were reversed, chopped up and strung out, then either typed out using a full range of typographical strategies, or performed with boisterous exuberance. Schwitters’ Ursonate was directly influenced by a performance of one of Hausmann’s poems, “fmsbwtazdu”, at an event in Prague in 1921.

He died on February 1, 1971, in Limoges.

Partial biography from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my painting/collage/photomontage tribute today.  I did because it’s piece 100 and dedicated to that!

I will see you tomorrow on Day 101!  Best, Linda

Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on canvas

Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on canvas

Side-View Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on canvas

Side-View
Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on canvas

Close-Up 1 Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on canvas

Close-Up 1
Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on canvas

Close-Up 2 Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on canvas

Close-Up 2
Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on canvas

Close-Up 3 Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on canvas

Close-Up 3
Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on canvas

Close-Up 4 Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on canvas

Close-Up 4
Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on canvas

Close-Up 5 Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on canvas

Close-Up 5
Day 100- Tribute to Raoul Hausmann
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on canvas