Day 364- Karli Donna Young- Detach This Part

It’s Day 364 and I’m so happy and excited to do a tribute in honor of my very best friend who happens to be a great artist as well.  I’m so lucky to live with her and see her art everyday AND see her create her art.  Please join me in honoring Karli Donna Young today!

Karli Donna Young

Karli Donna Young

1921- Karli Donna Young

1921- Karli Donna Young

In the beginning there was Me, Carley Young, born and raised in a small town just outside of Vancouver, Canada. Growing up I loved horror movies, Stephen King novels, cartoons and making stuff out of other stuff (a gift from my mother, a crafty person in her own right).

I was an only child early on and spent lots of time pretending I lived inside of a John Bellairs book. I started painting in high school, but it didn’t really stick.

Me Me Me- Karli Donna Young

Me Me Me- Karli Donna Young

I couldn’t focus on just one thing. I tried sewing and knitting, photography and writing poetry. Again, nothing really stuck. I wanted to do too many things all at once. That’s still kinda true.

My mom says, lovingly, that I am like a lump of coal….there is a diamond in there somewhere, I just need to apply the appropriate pressure and time. I think she’s right.

Detach This Part- Karli Donna Young

Detach This Part- Karli Donna Young

I don’t want to be ONE thing. I want to be ALL the things. A painter, a quilter, a photographer and a ukulele superstar. I want to build furniture and sew dresses, paint signs and tap dance.

It’s hard to say why I make art, or why I make art the way that I do. I think I like to make things that are aesthetically pleasing to me or things that tap into

That Dream I had that One Time- Karli Donna Young

That Dream I had that One Time- Karli Donna Young

my own sense of nostalgia. I am in love with my childhood and all the magic that it holds for me.

I think that love comes through in all the things that I do, artistic or otherwise. I guess I just like to stand back once a project is complete, point and say “I MADE THAT”. I like the sense of accomplishment.

Drippy Painting- Karli Donna Young

Drippy Painting- Karli Donna Young

Oh, and I like to put glitter on everything.

I currently live on top of a big hill in El Cerrito, CA. where I ride bikes, make art, play ukulele and pretend I live inside a John Bellairs book.

~

Yay! I had so much fun doing today’s penultimate piece.  Glitter and great colors.  How lucky was I to be able to ask the artist herself throughout my creation any questions I had while creating my piece?  She also accompanied me to the art store to buy supplies this morning!  Including some oils for tomorrow’s Bob Ross tribute!  The FINAL painting!  I will see you then…on Day 365!  Woweeeee!

Best,

Linda

Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Side-View Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Side-View
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

 

Day 340- Ed “Big Daddy” Roth- “Get a bigger brush!”

It’s Day 340 and I am pretty stoked for today’s artist!  I loved drawing in his style as a kid and had so much fun with it today.  Please join me in honoring Ed “Big Daddy” Roth today!

Ed Roth

Ed Roth

Wild Child- Ed Roth

Wild Child- Ed Roth

Ed “Big Daddy” Roth (March 4, 1932 – April 4, 2001) was an artist, cartoonist, pinstriper and custom car designer and builder who created the hot-rod icon Rat Fink and other extreme characters. Roth was a key figure in Southern California’s Kustom Kulture and hot-rod movement of the late 1950s and 1960s.

Roth was born in Beverly Hills, California. He was the son of Marie (Bauer) and Henry Roth. He grew up in Bell, California, attending Bell High School, where his classes included auto shop and art.

Roth is best known for his grotesque caricatures — typified by Rat Fink — depicting imaginative, out-sized monstrosities driving representations of the hot rods that he and his contemporaries built. Roth began airbrushing and selling “Weirdo” t-shirts at car shows and in the pages of Car Craft magazine as early as July 1958. By the August 1959 issue of Car Craft “Weirdo shirts” had become a full blown craze with Roth at the forefront of the movement. The article featured Roth along with fellow Kustom Kulture pioneers Dean Jeffries and Pete Millar. Inspired by Roth and Barris Kustoms (whose shirts were airbrushed by Dean Jeffries),Detroit native Stanley Miller, a.k.a. “Stanley Mouse”, began advertising his own shirts in the pages of Car Craft in January 1961. The lesser known Rendina Studios of Detroit and Mad Mac of Cleveland also joined in on the monster “weirdo” shirt craze, but Roth was certainly the man who widely popularized the “Monsters in hot rods” art form.

In 1959 Roth created The Outlaw. This fiberglass Kustom hot rod was featured in the January 1960 issue of Car

Race?- Ed Roth

Race?- Ed Roth

Craft. The car was covered in Car Craft and Rod and Custom, and appeared at custom car and hot rod shows. Other hot rods include The Beatnik Bandit(1961), The twin Ford engined Mysterion (1963), The Orbitron (1964), and The Road Agent (1965) among others. In 1965, Roth’s surf buggy, the Surfite was featured in the film Beach Blanket Bingo starring Frankie Avalon and Annette Funicello, and also in Village of the Giants, featuring Beau Bridges and Tommy Kirk. One of Roth’s personal drivers was a tangerine orange 1955 Chevy 2-door post which he ran a Ford 406 cu. in. engine under the hood, he drove this car to his shop every day for years .

Cruisin Time- Ed Roth

Cruisin Time- Ed Roth

In 1962 the Revell model company began selling plastic models of Roth’s cars and from 1963 to 1965 Revell also manufactured plastic models of many of Roth’s monsters, including Rat Fink, Brother Rat Fink, Drag Nut, Mother’s Worry, Mr. Gasser and other weird creatures created by Roth. Revell continues to re-issue Roth’s Monsters and Kustom Car kits.

In 1963 The Hawk Model Company issued its line of “Weird-Oh’s” plastic models and Marx Toys issued Nutty Mads, both clearly inspired by Roth’s work. Both items were quite popular in the mid-sixties and remain sought after collector’s items to this day. Hawk Models continues to re-issue its “Weird-Oh’s” periodically.

Numerous artists were associated with Roth including artist David Mann, Rat Fink Comix artist R.K. Sloane, Steve Fiorilla who illustrated some of Roth’s catalogs, and most notably, Ed Newton who worked for Roth and

Chevy Nomads- Ed Roth

Chevy Nomads- Ed Roth

designed several of his cars and t-shirt designs beginning in 1964, and Kustom Kulture icon Robert Williams who began working for Roth in late 1965.

In the mid 1960s Roth began customizing motorcycles. Mainstream motorcycle magazines refused to run his articles and ads, so he started his own publication called Choppers, which featured articles on extending forks, custom sissy bars, etc. It was a small, black and white publication that ran from 1967 to 1970, and was the first magazine ever to exclusively feature custom motorcycles, or choppers. Roth also built the first known VW powered trike. Roth built many trikes for himself and others including Candy Wagon, California Cruiser, Secret Weapon, Rubber Ducky and The Great Speckled Bird.

In 1968 Mattel introduced Hot Wheels and Roth’s Beatnik Bandit was one of the first 16 die-cast toy cars produced by the company.

Cover Art- Ed Roth

Cover Art- Ed Roth

From 1970 to 1975 Roth worked for Brucker’s Movie World and their “Cars of the Stars” display. Brucker said that Roth was a very loyal guy and a very hard worker, even though he wasn’t making much money. Brucker said that when building something, Roth had a natural knack for seeing how things fit together — he would build something in a few days which would take other guys a couple of weeks. Although Roth was a laid-back, amiable guy, Brucker also remembers that Roth was a hell of a fighter and if anyone came through the museum causing trouble, Roth would put them in line. He was fearless. Roth’s Druid Princess was one of the many cars displayed there. Also during the 1970s, Roth worked for Knott’s Berry Farm as a sign painter and artist. He worked there for 10 years until about 1980.

In December 1977 Robert and Suzanne Williams along with Skip Barrett organized the first Rat Fink Reunion to celebrate the legacy of Roth. Rat Fink Reunions are still held to this day at the site of Roth’s final residence in Manti, Utah and near Los Angeles.

In 1993 a major exhibition was held at the Julie Rico Gallery in Santa Monica shortly after the Laguna Museum show “Kustom Kulture”. It was at this time that the low brow art movement began to take on steam. Featured in

Mustanger- Ed Roth

Mustanger- Ed Roth

the exhibition titled, “Rat Fink Meets Fred Flypogger Meets Cootchy Cooty” were Roth, Willams, and Mouse and their creations. The L.A. Times placed Roth’s Rat Fink on the cover of the Culture section December 20, 1993 with a full article about the entire exhibition.

A Roth custom car that was the subject of a number of articles in automotive enthusiast magazines (most notably, the Orbitron was featured in Car Craft magazine in 1965) but was feared lost in subsequent decades was discovered in Mexico in the summer of 2008. The Orbitron was built in 1964. The car, in dilapidated, inoperative condition, had been parked for some time in front of an adult bookstore in Ciudad Juárez. The owners of the shop were also the owners of the car. It was purchased and taken back to the United States by Michael Lightbourn, an American auto restorer who did business in Mexico. The Orbitron has been restored to its original condition by Beau Boeckmann.

Ed Roth

Ed Roth

Roth was active in counterculture art and hot-rodding his entire adult life. At the time of his death in 2001, he was working on a hot-rod project involving a compact car planned as a departure from the dominant tuner performance modification style.

Roth had his shop at 4616 Slauson Avenue in Maywood, California (about 8 miles southeast of downtown Los Angeles) that he started in early 1959. He ran an ad in Car Craft magazine that year announcing the new address of his shop.

For a period in the mid 1960s, Roth associated with various Outlaw motorcycle clubs who congregated at his shop as a lot of bikers were then living in Lynwood and Maywood. Musicians, police officers, FBI agents and various people involved in Hollywood would visit as well, providing an environment for one of Ed Roth’s most creative periods, and an important period in Kustom Kulture.

Roth incorporated the iron cross into his artwork (surfers had previously been using the iron cross as a symbol of youthful, carefree rebellion). Roth didn’t own a bike at the time so he bought a brand-new Harley-Davidson Sportster and then proceeded to paint its gas tank a flat black color. Roth painted white lettering on one side of the tank that said: “Love is Hate”; and on the reverse side: “Hate is Love”.

Roth had taken black and white photos of different bikers. He made posters, with titles like “Beautiful Buzzard”, or “Gray Cat” out of these photos, and sold them at car shows. Roth would periodically give these bikers small

Grim Reaper- Ed Roth

Grim Reaper- Ed Roth

amounts of money, but soon some of the bikers started to feel that Roth was “getting rich” off of them and they wanted a larger cut. Despite Roth’s agreement, rumors began to circulate that a certain club intended to attack Roth’s shop. The gang arrived at the shop with guns drawn, but Roth’s crew defended themselves. Roth challenged the head biker to a one-on-one fist fight to settle matters in the middle of the shop. Eventually Roth gained the upper hand and “just started to beat the living crap out of the guy”.

After this incident, Roth burnt his biker posters, leaving the lifestyle behind at the same time. Things started winding down at the shop in the late 1960s, and in 1970 the shop closed.

Ed Roth was married four times. His fourth wife, Ilene, lives in Manti, Utah, where Ed Roth spent the final years of his life. Roth joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1974. Roth shaved off his goatee and was heavily involved in social work through his church. His brother Gordon also became a Mormon.

Mighty Mustang- Ed Roth

Mighty Mustang- Ed Roth

At a 1999 lecture given at Brigham Young University’s Museum of Art, Roth shared some lessons he had learned in life: “expect criticism; if you can’t do it get help; you don’t need fancy tools or a fancy garage; and if you fulfill your duty Heavenly Father will bless you in what you do.”

Since his death, an annual “Big Daddy Roth” Open House has been held in Manti around the anniversary of his death. The museum that Ilene Roth created to honor her late husband includes displays of Ed’s art work and other memorabilia. Roth’s son Darryl has been working on collecting and displaying his father’s work.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my little portrait I did of myself in the Ed Roth style!  It brought back a lot of my childhood like scribbling drawings during class. 🙂  I will see you tomorrow on Day 341.

Best,

Linda

MUST PAINT!- Tribute to Ed Roth Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

MUST PAINT!- Tribute to Ed Roth
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View MUST PAINT!- Tribute to Ed Roth Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
MUST PAINT!- Tribute to Ed Roth
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 MUST PAINT!- Tribute to Ed Roth Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
MUST PAINT!- Tribute to Ed Roth
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 MUST PAINT!- Tribute to Ed Roth Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
MUST PAINT!- Tribute to Ed Roth
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 MUST PAINT!- Tribute to Ed Roth Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
MUST PAINT!- Tribute to Ed Roth
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 267- Yoshitomo Nara- “I Don’t Mind If You Forget Me”

It’s Day 267 and I had so much fun doing today’s tribute!  I also start my improv class tonight which I’m excited about. 🙂  Join me in honoring Yoshitomo Nara today.

Yoshitomo Nara

Yoshitomo Nara

Yoshitomo Nara

Yoshitomo Nara

Yoshitomo Nara (奈良 美智 Nara Yoshitomo, born 5 December 1959 in Hirosaki, Japan) is a Japanese artist. He lives and works in Tokyo, though his artwork has been exhibited worldwide. Nara has had nearly 40 solo exhibitions since 1984. He is represented in New York City by Pace Gallery, in Los Angeles by Blum & Poe and in London byStephen Friedman Gallery.

Nara received his B.F.A. (1985) and an M.F.A. (1987) from the Aichi Prefectural University of Fine Arts and Music. Between 1988 and 1993, Nara studied at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf, in Germany.

“Nara first came to the fore of the art world during Japan’s Pop art movement in the

I Am Alone- Yoshitomo Nara

I Am Alone- Yoshitomo Nara

1990s. The subject matter of his sculptures and paintings is deceptively simple: most works depict one seemingly innocuous subject (often pastel-hued children and animals drawn with confident, cartoonish lines) with little or no background. But these children, who appear at first to be cute and even vulnerable, sometimes brandish weapons like knives and saws. Their wide eyes often hold accusatory looks that could be sleepy-eyed irritation at being awoken from a nap—or that could be undiluted expressions of hate.”

Yoshitomo Nara

Yoshitomo Nara

Nara, however, does not see his weapon-wielding subjects as aggressors. “Look at them, they [the weapons] are so small, like toys. Do you think they could fight with those?” he says. “I don’t think so. Rather, I kind of see the children among other, bigger, bad people all around them, who are holding bigger knives…” Lauded by art critics, Nara’s bizarrely intriguing works have gained him a cult following around the world. In June, 2005, Nara’s artwork was featured in the album titled “Suspended Animation” by experimental band Fantômas. Other commercial products (including videos, books, magazines, catalogues and monographs) have been dedicated to Nara’s work. Recently, a two-volume catalogue raisonné of all his sculptures, paintings, and drawings was completed.

In 2010 the Asia Society showed Yoshitomo Nara: Nobody’s Fool the first major New

Yoshitomo Nara

Yoshitomo Nara

York exhibition of his work. Other major retrospectives include: “I Don’t Mind If You Forget Me”, which toured Japan between 2001 and 2002; and “Yoshitomo Nara: Nothing Ever Happens,” which traveled the United States from 2003 to 2005.

Aomori Ken Dog- Yoshitomo Nara

Aomori Ken Dog- Yoshitomo Nara

The manga and anime of his 1960s childhood are both clear influences on Nara’s stylized, large-eyed figures. Nara subverts these typically cute images, however, by infusing his works with horror-like imagery. This juxtaposition of human evil with the innocent child may be a reaction to Japan’s rigid social conventions.

The punk rock music of Nara’s youth has also influenced the artist’s work. Recalling

Yoshitomo Nara

Yoshitomo Nara

a similar – if more unsettling – image of rebellious, violent youth, Nara’s art embraces the punk ethos. That said, Nara has also cited traditions as varied as Renaissance painting, literature, illustration, ukiyo-e and graffiti as further inspiration.

Yoshitomo Nara

Yoshitomo Nara

But perhaps most significantly, Nara’s upbringing in post-World War II Japan profoundly affected his mindset and, subsequently, his artwork as well. He grew up in a time when Japan was experiencing an inundation of Western pop culture; comic books, Walt Disney animation, and Western rock music are just a few examples. Additionally, Nara was raised in the isolated countryside as a latchkey child of working-class parents, so he was often left alone with little to do but explore his young imagination. The fiercely independent subjects that populate so much of his artwork may be a reaction to Nara’s own largely independent childhood.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today!  It was obviously fun to do.  I love Nara’s art.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 268.

Best,

Linda

Ouch...My Brain Hurts- Tribute to Yoshitomo Nara Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Ouch…My Brain Hurts- Tribute to Yoshitomo Nara
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Ouch...My Brain Hurts- Tribute to Yoshitomo Nara Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Ouch…My Brain Hurts- Tribute to Yoshitomo Nara
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Ouch...My Brain Hurts- Tribute to Yoshitomo Nara Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Ouch…My Brain Hurts- Tribute to Yoshitomo Nara
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Ouch...My Brain Hurts- Tribute to Yoshitomo Nara Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Ouch…My Brain Hurts- Tribute to Yoshitomo Nara
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Ouch...My Brain Hurts- Tribute to Yoshitomo Nara Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Ouch…My Brain Hurts- Tribute to Yoshitomo Nara
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 231- John “Crash” Matos- Street Life

It’s Day 231 and I’m sure once you start scrolling you can understand why I am so excited about today’s artist.  I had a blast painting this today.  Join me in honoring John Matos a.k.a CRASH today.

John CRASH Matos

John CRASH Matos

John CRASH Matos

John CRASH Matos

Crash (b. John Matos, Bronx, New York, Oct. 11, 1961) is a graffiti artist. As early as 13, John Matos was spray painting New York City trains, the full image art as opposed to simpler tagging soon transferred to silk screened canvas. He was first noticed through his murals on subway cars and dilapidated buildings, he is now regarded as a pioneer of the Graffiti art movement.

His work is said to convey a “visual link between street life and established society”. In

John CRASH Matos

John CRASH Matos

1980, Crash curated the now iconic exhibition:”Graffiti Art Success for America” at Fashion MODA, launching the graffiti movement that has remained very active through today. By the 1980s Matos had exhibits across the United States and abroad. Galerie Yaki Kornblit was the first instrumental gallery in Amsterdam that help launch his career in Europe.

Mural- John CRASH Matos

Mural- John CRASH Matos

In 1981 Crash, along with 10 other artists were chosen by The Public Art Fund to design animated imagery for The Spectacolor Billboard in Times Square. He was given his first gallery showing by Sidney Janis at the Sidney Janis Gallery in 1983. Chase Manhattan, N.A., as well as CITIBANK, N.A., and other collections came calling. In 1984, Crash along with Keith Haring painted mural installations for the 5/5 Figuration Libre France/USA at the Musee d’art Moderne de la Villa de Paris.

In 1988 he sprayed Notes in the Wind measuring 178 x 178 centimetres to be exhibited and eventually to be owned by the Peter Stuyvesant Foundation in Zevenaar, Netherlands. In 1995, Crash was commissioned by British American Tobacco to create a commission for Lucky Strike brand cigarette, joining fellow artist Keith Haring, to create a special work for this company and their collection.

In 1996, Crash painted an Eric Clapton Signature Stratocaster and gave it to the artist as a gift. Clapton went on to use the specially designed

John CRASH Matos

John CRASH Matos

Stratocaster guitar by Crash

Stratocaster guitar by Crash

guitar through his 2001 tour and later appeared with another. In total Crash has created 5 guitars for Clapton, though only three of them have made public appearances. One of Clapton’s “Crashocasters” (nicknamed by Eric’s former guitar tech, Lee Dickson) auctioned for $321,100 (USD) by the name of “Crash-3” and was used extensively during the first Crossroads Guitar Festival in 2004.

Soon after Fender Musical Instruments commissioned the creation of 50 such graffiti designed guitars from Crash and named the line “Crashocasters.” Crash went on to also design a line of custom painted Telecasters with matching Fender amps. Other artists such as John Mayer have used the custom painted Crashocaster guitars.

John CRASH Matos

John CRASH Matos

In July 2006, the pieces titled “Aeroplane 1” (1983) and “A-U-T-O-matic”,(1985), along with other paintings from their permanent collection were displayed in the Brooklyn Museum of Art in a featured exhibit titled “Graffiti.” In 2009, Crash held his first exhibition of painted guitars and guitar related artwork in NYC.

In 2010, Crash held a 30 year retrospective at Fairfield University’s Walsh Gallery. Crash was asked by Sanrio to create a series of paintings to be shown at Art Basel, Miami Beach, FL, featuring Hello Kitty and other characters from Sanrio’s catalogue. Also, in 2010, Crash was commissioned to create a special limited edition luggage for TUMI, Inc. A painting was created and used for the design, which was released world wide in 2011. Same day releases were coordinated in Tokyo, Hong Kong, New York, Germany, Paris and London. Crash is one of the New York artist featured at MOCA, The David Geffen Building, Los Angeles’ “Art in the Streets”, April–August 2011. In 2011, Crash held his first print survey exhibition in Southport, Ct., at Southport Galleries.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I pulled out some of my old X-Men comics from high school and really wanted Archie to be in there as well. 🙂  I will see you tomorrow on Day 232!  Best, Linda

WHAK- Tribute to CRASH Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

WHAK- Tribute to CRASH
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View WHAK- Tribute to CRASH Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
WHAK- Tribute to CRASH
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 WHAK- Tribute to CRASH Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
WHAK- Tribute to CRASH
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 WHAK- Tribute to CRASH Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
WHAK- Tribute to CRASH
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 WHAK- Tribute to CRASH Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
WHAK- Tribute to CRASH
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas