Day 364- Karli Donna Young- Detach This Part

It’s Day 364 and I’m so happy and excited to do a tribute in honor of my very best friend who happens to be a great artist as well.  I’m so lucky to live with her and see her art everyday AND see her create her art.  Please join me in honoring Karli Donna Young today!

Karli Donna Young

Karli Donna Young

1921- Karli Donna Young

1921- Karli Donna Young

In the beginning there was Me, Carley Young, born and raised in a small town just outside of Vancouver, Canada. Growing up I loved horror movies, Stephen King novels, cartoons and making stuff out of other stuff (a gift from my mother, a crafty person in her own right).

I was an only child early on and spent lots of time pretending I lived inside of a John Bellairs book. I started painting in high school, but it didn’t really stick.

Me Me Me- Karli Donna Young

Me Me Me- Karli Donna Young

I couldn’t focus on just one thing. I tried sewing and knitting, photography and writing poetry. Again, nothing really stuck. I wanted to do too many things all at once. That’s still kinda true.

My mom says, lovingly, that I am like a lump of coal….there is a diamond in there somewhere, I just need to apply the appropriate pressure and time. I think she’s right.

Detach This Part- Karli Donna Young

Detach This Part- Karli Donna Young

I don’t want to be ONE thing. I want to be ALL the things. A painter, a quilter, a photographer and a ukulele superstar. I want to build furniture and sew dresses, paint signs and tap dance.

It’s hard to say why I make art, or why I make art the way that I do. I think I like to make things that are aesthetically pleasing to me or things that tap into

That Dream I had that One Time- Karli Donna Young

That Dream I had that One Time- Karli Donna Young

my own sense of nostalgia. I am in love with my childhood and all the magic that it holds for me.

I think that love comes through in all the things that I do, artistic or otherwise. I guess I just like to stand back once a project is complete, point and say “I MADE THAT”. I like the sense of accomplishment.

Drippy Painting- Karli Donna Young

Drippy Painting- Karli Donna Young

Oh, and I like to put glitter on everything.

I currently live on top of a big hill in El Cerrito, CA. where I ride bikes, make art, play ukulele and pretend I live inside a John Bellairs book.

~

Yay! I had so much fun doing today’s penultimate piece.  Glitter and great colors.  How lucky was I to be able to ask the artist herself throughout my creation any questions I had while creating my piece?  She also accompanied me to the art store to buy supplies this morning!  Including some oils for tomorrow’s Bob Ross tribute!  The FINAL painting!  I will see you then…on Day 365!  Woweeeee!

Best,

Linda

Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Side-View Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Side-View
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Follow Me...- Tribute to Karli Donna Young Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Follow Me…- Tribute to Karli Donna Young
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Ink, Glitter on Canvas

 

Day 341- Len Jessome- Need To Create

It’s Day 341 and I really had a great time with today’s painting.  I love the style and somewhat therapeutic effect it had on me.  Please join me in honoring Len Jessome today.  I couldn’t find a photo of him online so I decided to use a self portrait.

Autoportrait- Len Jessome

Autoportrait- Len Jessome

Jesus wouldn't like it - Len Jessome

Jesus wouldn’t like it – Len Jessome

Canadian artist , Leonardo Jessome was born in 1963 in Hamilton, where he lives and works. He left his career in 2000 to devote himself full time to his artistic activity.  Its very singular work is already present in many private collections in North America and Europe.

His work is based on the human condition and man’s place in contemporary society . He painted portraits of rare intensity in a unique graphical style .

His inner demons led him naturally to the raging street art but it’s

Almost Happy- Len Jessome

Almost Happy- Len Jessome

not the bomb attack that the artist but his canvases with brushes in a raw style , powerful and free.

Biography is from Galerie Sylvie’s site.

i have a manic need to create—my work is based on the temporality and fragility of life and all the experiences life may encompass. i use whatever medium is available to express an idea. sometimes i use house paint, industrial rust paint and / or mix these with artists paints, each has a unique property and express ideas differently.
 
I Love You- Len Jessome

I Love You- Len Jessome

flowing industrial paint achieves different results than artists oil. as in life not everything mixes as perfectly as one might hope, exceptions are made to the exclusion of others. as a result my work may patina and change over time.

It is the capturing of the idea that is key. the patina records the passage of

Darkness I Wish I Was Yours- Len Jessome

Darkness I Wish I Was Yours- Len Jessome

time. the style of my work changes often, expanding my awareness and perceptions.

i like that my paintings live in many parts of the world. snippets of my thoughts and feelings scattered around this earth that will remain when i am no longer here.
Len Jessome

Len Jessome

Above is from Len Jessome’s blog.

I hope you enjoy my piece for today!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 342!
Best,
Linda
Always Lurking...-Tribute to Len Jessome Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Always Lurking…-Tribute to Len Jessome
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Always Lurking...-Tribute to Len Jessome Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Always Lurking…-Tribute to Len Jessome
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Always Lurking...-Tribute to Len Jessome Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Always Lurking…-Tribute to Len Jessome
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Always Lurking...-Tribute to Len Jessome Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Always Lurking…-Tribute to Len Jessome
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Always Lurking...-Tribute to Len Jessome Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Always Lurking…-Tribute to Len Jessome
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 292- Philip Guston- We Work Until We Vanish

It’s Day 292 and I had a great time with today’s piece.  Join me in honoring Philip Guston today!

Philip Guston

Philip Guston

Philip Guston

Philip Guston

Philip Guston, born Phillip Goldstein (June 27, 1913 – June 7, 1980), was a painter and printmaker in the New York School, which included many of the abstract expressionists, such as Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning. In the late 1960s Guston helped to lead a transition from abstract expressionism to neo-expressionism in painting, abandoning the so-called “pure abstraction” of abstract expressionism in favor of more cartoonish renderings of various personal symbols and objects.

Phillip Guston was born in 1913 in Montreal, Canada, Guston moved with his family to Los Angeles as a child. Guston’s Ukrainian Jewish parents escaped persecution when they moved from Odessa, Ukraine. Guston and his family were aware of the regular Klan activities against Jews, blacks and others which took place across California during Guston’s childhood. When Guston was 10 or 11, his father hanged himself in the shed, and the young Guston found the body. Guston began painting at the age of 14, and in 1927 he enrolled in the Los Angeles Manual Arts High School, where both he andJackson Pollock studied under Frederick John de St. Vrain Schwankovsky and were introduced to modern European art, oriental philosophy, theosophy and mystic literature.

Guston’s early work was figurative and representational. His mother supported his artistic inclinations, and he often made drawings in a

Philip Guston, Painter's Forms II

Philip Guston, Painter’s Forms II

small closet, lit by a hanging bulb. Apart from his high school education and a one-year scholarship at the Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles, Guston remained a largely self-taught artist. During high school, Guston and Jackson Pollock published a paper opposing the high school’s emphasis on sports over art. Their criticism led to both being expelled, but Pollock returned and graduated. At Otis on scholarship, Guston felt unfulfilled by the academic approach which limited him to drawing from plaster casts instead of the live model. Before dropping out of Otis, Guston spent a night in the studio making drawings of these figurative plasters scattered all over the studio floor.

As an 18-year-old, politically aware painter, Guston made an indoor mural in L.A. – for the John Reed Club -, depicting the Scottsboro Boys. This mural was defaced by local police officers, which had an impact on Guston’s political and social outlook.

In 1934, Guston, as Philip Goldstein, along with Reuben Kadish, joined the poet and friend Jules Langsner in a trip to Mexico where they were given a 1,000-square-foot (93 m2) wall in the former summer palace of the Emperor Maximilian in the state capital of Morelia, where they produced the impressive The Struggle Against Terror, an antifascist mural clearly influenced by the work of Siqueiros. A two-page review in Time magazine quoted Siqueiros describing them as ‘the most promising painters in either the US or Mexico’. While in Mexico he also met and spent time with Frida Kahlo and her husband Diego Rivera.

Painter's Head- Philip Guston

Painter’s Head- Philip Guston

In 1934-35, Guston and Kadish completed another mural at City of Hope, at the time a tuberculosis hospital located in Duarte, California, that remains to this day. In September 1935 he moved to New York where he worked as an artist in the WPA program. In 1937 he married an artist and poet he first met at Otis, Musa McKim.They collaborated on several WPA murals. During this period his work included strong references to Renaissance painters such as Paolo Uccello, Masaccio, Piero della Francesca, and Giotto. He was also influenced by American Regionalists and Mexican mural painters.

A powerful and enduring influence, whom Guston was to acknowledge throughout his career, was Italian painter Giorgio de Chirico. Musa Mayer, Guston’s daughter, recalled in her book Night Studio: A memoir of Philip Guston how the artist kept a De Chirico monograph in his studio, to which he would often refer.

Guston’s first foray into teaching was as an artist-in-residence at the School of Art and Art History at the State University of Iowa (today the University of Iowa) from 1941 to 1945. There he completed a mural for the Social Security Building in Washington, D.C., turned to easel painting, and had his first solo exhibition in 1944. After this he was artist-in-residence at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri until 1947. He continued to teach at New York University and at the Pratt Institute. From 1973 to 1978 he conducted a once-monthly graduate seminar at Boston University. Guston’s students include two graduates of the State University of Iowa, paintersStephen Greene (1917–1999) and Fridtjof Schroder (1917–1990) and Ken Kerslake (1930–2007), who attended Pratt Institute. Those who attended his graduate seminars at Boston University include painter Gary Komarin (1951-) and new media artist Christina McPhee (1954-).

In the 1950s, Guston achieved success and renown as a first-generation Abstract Expressionist. During this period his paintings often

Painting, Smoking, Eating - Philip Guston

Painting, Smoking, Eating – Philip Guston

consisted of blocks and masses of gestural strokes and marks of color floating within the picture plane. These works, with marks often grouped toward the center of the compositions, recall the “plus and minus” compositions by Piet Mondrian or the late Nymphea canvases by Monet. Guston used a relatively limited palette favoring whites, blacks, greys and reds in these works. This palette remains evident in his later work.

In 1967, Guston moved to Woodstock. He was increasingly frustrated with abstraction and began painting representationally again, but in a rather personal, cartoonish manner. The first exhibition of these new figurative paintings was held in 1970 at the Marlborough Gallery in New York. It received scathing reviews from most of the art establishment (notably from the New York Times art critic Hilton Kramer who, in an article entitled “A Mandarin pretending to be a Stumblebum” ridiculed Guston’s new style). One of the few who instantly understood the importance of those paintings was the painter Willem de Kooning who, at the time, said to Guston that they were “about freedom” (cited in Musa Mayer’s biography of her father, Night Studio).

The Studio- Philip Guston

The Studio- Philip Guston

As a result of the poor reception of his new figurative paintings, Guston isolated himself even more in Woodstock, far from the art world which had so utterly misunderstood his art (see the initial reaction of Robert Hughes, critic for Time Magazine, who later was to change his views, in a scathing review entitled “Ku Klux Komix”, and Hilton Kramer’s NY Times review). His contract with the Marlborough gallery was not renewed and, after a short period without any dealer, he joined the recently opened David McKee Gallery (he had known McKee at Marlborough) to which he remained faithful until the end of his life.

In 1960, at the peak of his activity as an abstractionist, Guston said: “There is something ridiculous and miserly in the myth we inherit from abstract art. That painting is autonomous, pure and for itself, therefore we habitually analyze its ingredients and define its limits. But painting is ‘impure’. It is the adjustment of ‘impurities’ which forces its continuity. We are image-makers and image-ridden.” From 1968 onwards he made these words his motto. In this body of work he created a lexicon of images such asKlansmen, lightbulbs, shoes, cigarettes, and clocks. In late 2009, the McKee gallery in NYC, Guston’s historic dealer, mounted a show revealing that lexicon in 49 small oils on panel painted between 1969 and 1972 that had never been publicly displayed as a whole. Guston is best known for these late existential and lugubrious paintings, which at the time of his death had reached a wide audience, and found great popular acceptance. In 1980 he was elected into the National Academy of Design as an Associate Academician. Guston died in 1980 in Woodstock, New York.

Guston’s works are now held and exhibited in major museums worldwide, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of

Couple in Bed- Philip Guston

Couple in Bed- Philip Guston

Modern Art, the Art Institute of Chicago and the Tate Modern. In May, 2013, the sale of his 1958 abstract expressionist painting To Fellini, for $25.8 million, set the auction record for a Guston work.

We are image-makers and image-ridden… We work until we vanish. (Philip Guston)

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I thought I’d paint a self portrait of myself…painting a painting in my own style. 🙂  I really had fun with this one.

I will see you tomorrow on Day 293!

Best,

Linda

Self Portrait in Studio- Philip Guston Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Self Portrait in Studio- Philip Guston
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Self Portrait in Studio- Philip Guston Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Self Portrait in Studio- Philip Guston
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Self Portrait in Studio- Philip Guston Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Self Portrait in Studio- Philip Guston
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Self Portrait in Studio- Philip Guston Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Self Portrait in Studio- Philip Guston
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Self Portrait in Studio- Philip Guston Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Self Portrait in Studio- Philip Guston
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 272- Douglas A. Kinsey- Zen-Like Economy

It’s Day 272 and I really wanted to work with charcoal before the year was over!  I found today’s artist randomly and fell in love with his artwork and philosophy. 🙂  Join me in honoring Douglas A. Kinsey today.

Douglas A. Kinsey

Douglas A. Kinsey

As If Things Were Less Spoken Of 5- Douglas A. Kinsey

As If Things Were Less Spoken Of 5- Douglas A. Kinsey

Doug Kinsey (b. 1956) has been prolific as a painter for over thirty years. His first solo-exhibit was held at Mount St. Vincent University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada in 1972. As a young man Kinsey had the good fortune to work and study under two of Canada’s more notable color-field minimalists Jean Goguen and Guido Molinari while attending what is now known as Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Over a 7 year period Paul Reed of the Washington D.C. Colorists mentored Kinsey. Kinsey is a graduate of The Otis College of Art and Design, Los Angeles, CA.

Doug approaches the development of his imagery with an expressed Zen-like economy. The

Coal Mine 17- Douglas A. Kinsey

Coal Mine 17- Douglas A. Kinsey

strong subtle spiritual component remains as the most compelling attitude seen in his work. This abiding stillness expressed in the dark blue forms can at times produce a roaring sense of complete mystical silence. During this experience the viewer is asked to join and participate in the deeper mysteries which can occur during profound moments of inner-contemplation.

By allowing the physical landscape aspects of his Ohio River Valley home to influence his primary shapes and forms a strong organic quality is defined.

The Borderline Revisited 5- Douglas A. Kinsey

The Borderline Revisited 5- Douglas A. Kinsey

Intrinsically haptic by nature, Doug’s work articulates the combining of the intellect with the spiritual truths to be found in nature.

A native of California, Kinsey has resided in Pittsburgh, PA for almost ten years. He received his Masters degree in theology from Trinity Episcopal School for Ministry and currently teaches art to severely “at risk” children at The Holy Family Institute for Learning in Pittsburgh, PA.

Kinsey has exhibited widely in the US and abroad. Most notably are exhibitions at The Carnegie Museum of Art in 2001 which was curated by David Carrier, critic for Artforum and Art in America, In 2003 he received notice from Thomas Sokolowski, Director of The Andy Warhol Museum when he was awarded Best in Show at The Hoyt Institute of Art.

Kinsey has been included in exhibitions at the State Museum of Pennsylvania for an unprecedented two years in a row 2003-2004.

Also in 2004 his work was included in Westmoreland Museum of American Art Biennial, The Andy Warhol Museum of Art, and Gallery Ginza Himawari, Tokyo, Japan.

Two large canvases were selected for The Butler Institute of American Art 70th Summer Annual. 2006 (Youngstown, Ohio). The curator

Waking Into The Desert Dream 39- Douglas A. Kinsey

Waking Into The Desert Dream 39- Douglas A. Kinsey

was noted painter and art critic for NEWSWEEK Magazine, Peter Plagens. “Interval Series, exodus” received an Honorable Mention award.

Kinsey’s work is often described as maintaining the coolness of Rothko while expressing the strength of Kline.

When looking at my work the viewer should consider them as configurations of spiritual geography. In this manner I refer them as “Interior/Exterior Landscapes”. The primary blue shape will refer to geological forms found in geographical landscape. As such they mark unspoken borders much like a rock cairn would. This marking indicates a place of spiritual solace and point of reflection. My intention is to explore the subconscious symbols of an ‘interior’ spiritual reality when consecrated by the borders of ‘external’ physical reality.’

All artwork and biography is from www.absolutearts.com.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today.  It was so fun to work with charcoal again.  I haven’t really worked with it since art school!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 273.

Best,

Linda

The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey Linda Cleary 2014 Charcoal on Canvas

The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey
Linda Cleary 2014
Charcoal on Canvas

Side-View The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey Linda Cleary 2014 Charcoal on Canvas

Side-View
The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey
Linda Cleary 2014
Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 1 The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey Linda Cleary 2014 Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 1
The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey
Linda Cleary 2014
Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 2 The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey Linda Cleary 2014 Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 2
The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey
Linda Cleary 2014
Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 3 The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey Linda Cleary 2014 Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 3
The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey
Linda Cleary 2014
Charcoal on Canvas

 

 

 

Day 138- Jack Bush- No Rules

It’s Day 138 and I’m trying to get my painting and chores done so that I can work on writing my new book.  There is a part of me that wishes I would just work on my books in progress, but I’m inspired by my new story and actually have a place that I’m submitting it to.  The other books are hard work and I don’t have any place specific I’m working on sending it into.  I did enjoy painting today so join me in celebrating Jack Bush today!

Jack Bush

Jack Bush

Jack Bush

Jack Bush

Jack Bush (20 March 1909 – 24 January 1977) (variant name John Hamilton Bush) was a Canadian abstract painter. His paintings are associated with the Color Field movement and Post-painterly Abstraction.

Bush was born in Toronto, Ontario, in 1909. As a young man, he studied with Adam

Jack Bush

Jack Bush

Sheriff Scott and Edmond Dyonnet in Montreal, Quebec.

In his early stages, Bush was influenced by the work of Charles Comfort and the Group of Seven. During the 1930s, he ran a commercial art business and, by night, furthered his studies at the Ontario College of Art. Bush, like other Canadian artists of the time, was sheltered from major European influences. After seeing the work of the American Abstract Expressionists in New York City, Bush’s canvases changed dramatically.

Jack Bush

Jack Bush

Bush developed his work and approach to abstraction through the 1950s. He was a member of Painters Eleven, the group founded byWilliam Ronald in 1953 to promote abstract painting in Canada, and was soon encouraged in his art by the American art critic Clement Greenberg. Critical at first, Greenberg became a mentor to Bush and encouraged him to refine his palette, technique, and approach.

As a result of Greenberg’s guidance, Bush became closely tied to Color Field Painting. Bush became friends

Arabesque 1975- Jack Bush

Arabesque 1975- Jack Bush

with artists associated with color-field like Jules Olitski, Kenneth Noland and also Anthony Caro. As Painters Eleven disbanded in 1960, Bush moved on, and in the end became one of the more successful artists to come from this group.

Leap on Blue 1976- Jack Bush

Leap on Blue 1976- Jack Bush

Jack Bush represented Canada at the 1967 São Paulo Art Biennial, and in 1976 the Art Gallery of Ontario toured a large retrospective of his work. He died in Toronto 24 January 1977. His son Terry was an award winning jingle writer, best known for singing “Maybe Tomorrow”, the theme for the The Littlest Hobo.

Biography is from wikipedia.

There are no rules. (Jack Bush)

I hope you enjoy my piece today and I will see you tomorrow on Day 139!  Best, Linda

Color Slide- Tribute to Jack Bush Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Color Slide- Tribute to Jack Bush
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Color Slide- Tribute to Jack Bush Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Color Slide- Tribute to Jack Bush
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Color Slide- Tribute to Jack Bush Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Color Slide- Tribute to Jack Bush
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Color Slide- Tribute to Jack Bush Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Color Slide- Tribute to Jack Bush
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Color Slide- Tribute to Jack Bush Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Color Slide- Tribute to Jack Bush
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas