Day 359- Paul Duhem- Locked Doors

It’s Day 359 and it’s Christmas Day!  Merry Christmas to you all.  I had a great time doing today’s piece and now I have to cook a bunch of food for my husband, brother and myself and try to have a nice relaxing day.  Please join me in honoring Paul Duhem today!  I wanted to honor his style, but also honor today’s holiday. 🙂

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem was born in Blandain, Belgium. He left school at 14 and worked as a farmhand for various agricultural concerns. During the Second World War he went to Germany, where he laid rails for the railways. Going to France at the end of the war, he was arrested for his collaboration with the Germans. But not being in full possession of all his faculties, he was transferred from prison to a psychiatric hospital before being employed as a labourer in farms in the region.

In 1977 he was admitted to a home where he did horticulture. Twelve years later, at the age of 70, Paul Duhem started to draw within the framework of a

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

workshop. He devoted himself to this activity, continuing until he died.

The human figure is a recurrent motif in his compositions. He drew the same face, which can be interpreted as a self-portrait, over and over again in an obsessive manner, declining it in series, introducing subtle variations in shape, rhythm and color.

Biography above is from Art Brut.com’s website.

Paul Duhem had been institutionalized for more than 40 years and was well into his seventies when he established a grueling quota for himself. He made up his mind that he wanted to produce six artworks a day, every day, for the remainder

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

of his life. Each morning after taking breakfast at a hospital for mental patients in southern Belgium, he brought out his crayons and jars of paint and crayons and, in the three or four hours before lunch, produced three new drawings. Then, in the hours between lunch time and dinner, he turned out three more works. Duhem’s subjects mostly took just two forms — a sad-eyed homme whom everybody understood to be Paul himself, and also the locked doors that he encountered everywhere in the mental institution.

Duhem was born in Blandain, a farming region. Because his parents were too poor to care for all their children, he was mostly

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

raised by grandparents. He attended school until his fourteenth year, and then left to work on a farm. Duhem was serving in the Belgium Army during World War II when, after being wounded and suffering shell shock, he was taken captive and held for two years in a German concentration camp.

Duhem finally resumed the life of a farmhand, but the war and prison years had taken a toll on his mentalstability. Diagnosed as schizophrenic, he was admitted to a mental institution in 1977. Because of his years as a farm worker, Duhem was given assignments as a gardener and groundskeeper at the institution.

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

In 1990, after beginning to show fragility of health, he was retired as a day worker. Soon after, he started producing colored drawings, at first turning out works with a variety of subjects, including birds, floral still-lifes and windmills, and then gradually limited his art to his own visage and the locked doors. He was 81 when he died in the summer of 1999.

Duhem’s work is widely admired art brut enthusiasts today, and is to be found

Paul Duhem

Paul Duhem

in nearly every significant museum collection of art brut in Europe. A large Paul Duhem museum show was presented in Brussels in 2001. The show then traveled to museums in France and The Netherlands.

Biography is from Dean Jensen Gallery’s website.
I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I had a great time painting it.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 360.  Then only 5 paintings left.  I can hardly believe it.
Best,
Linda
Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Santa- Tribute to Paul Duhem
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 193- Christian Dotremont- The Many Facets of Art

It’s Day 193 and I’m still busy busy.  Join me in celebrating Christian Dotremont today!  It was difficult to find an extensive biography on him so it’s a little cut and paste!  Enjoy.

Christian Dotremont

Christian Dotremont

Logogramme 2- Christian Dotremont

Logogramme 2- Christian Dotremont

Christian Dotremont, (12 December 1922 – 20 August 1979), was a Belgian painter and poet who was born in Tervuren, Belgium. He was a founding member of the Revolutionary Surrealist Group (1946) and he also founded Cobra together with Danish artist Asger Jorn. He later became well known for his painted poems (French: Peinture mots), which he called logograms.

He died of tuberculosis in Tervuren.

Above is from wikipedia.

Dotremont was influenced by late 1930s Belgian Surrealism. While in Paris during

Christian Dotremont

Christian Dotremont

World War II, he cofounded the group La Main à Plume, coedited its publication, and began his own textual experiments. He returned to Belgium after the war, and he helped keep Surrealism alive there in such publications asLe Ciel Bleu (“The Blue Sky”). With the establishment of COBRA, which is known chiefly as a visual arts phenomenon, Dotremont began a private quest for a pure, transcendent poetry.

Christian Dotremont

Christian Dotremont

This led to his invention of “logograms,” in which he sought to create a new “visual grammar,” a “poem-landscape.” Binary oppositions abound in his work: mystical-scientific, primal-futuristic, inner-outer, silent-sonic, intellectual-emotional. COBRA also furthered Dotremont’s friendship with the Danish painter Asger Jorn and cemented his links with Scandinavia. In 1951 Dotremont became ill with tuberculosis, the disease that eventually caused his death. While recovering from his first bout in Denmark, he wrote an autobiographical novel, La Pierre et l’oreiller (1955; “The Stone and the Pillow”). In such works as Digue(1959; “Dike”) and Moi, qui j’avais (1961; “I, Who I Had”) Dotremont continued his experiments with the systematic destabilization of language, which culminated in Logogrammes I & II (1964–65), Logbook(1974), and Traces (1980, posthumously published).

Above is from www.britannica.com.

Christian Dotremont‘s passion for words, images and art was forged early on, being born into a family deeply engaged with the editing and

Christian Dotremont

Christian Dotremont

publishing of art journals. His inquisitiveness and interest in creating works of art through words, eventually becomes the defining style of his entire career.

As a young poet in the early 1940’s, Dotremont becomes involved with the Surrealist movement, with the aim “to reveal the many facets of art”. With the surrealists, he discovers an artistic form, which does not allow itself to be controlled by common divisions between the arts, but rather encourages the freedom to experiment with words, images and concepts, inquisitively and vividly examining art as a concept.

Christian Dotremont

Christian Dotremont

Writing in images
In the work of Dotremont, words always play the most central part. Dotremont develops a style of writing or system of symbols called “logogrammes”, defined as something between images and words. The logogrammes appear as beautiful and ornate patterns, leading our thoughts to calligraphy or Arabic scripture. Dotremont painted these “pictures of words, and words of pictures” throughout his entire life. Often, he would accompany them with a short note beneath the image, which translated the logogramme into a readable text. Such notes were often brief, poetic and with a humoristic point.

Above is from www.galeriebirch.com.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I mainly used his “logogrammes” series as inspiration.

The universe is eternal.  The universe is not eternal. Arabic Translation

The universe is eternal. The universe is not eternal. Arabic Translation

I decided to use a Buddhist phrase from the Dhammapada, The universe is eternal.  The universe is not eternal.  I put it into an English to Arabic translator and then recreated it into a painting.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 194.  Best, Linda

Eternal Not Eternal- Tribute to Christian Dotremont Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Eternal Not Eternal- Tribute to Christian Dotremont
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Eternal Not Eternal- Tribute to Christian Dotremont Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Eternal Not Eternal- Tribute to Christian Dotremont
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Eternal Not Eternal- Tribute to Christian Dotremont Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Eternal Not Eternal- Tribute to Christian Dotremont
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Eternal Not Eternal- Tribute to Christian Dotremont Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Eternal Not Eternal- Tribute to Christian Dotremont
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Eternal Not Eternal- Tribute to Christian Dotremont Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Eternal Not Eternal- Tribute to Christian Dotremont
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 188- Henri Michaux- Phantomisms

It’s Day 188 and I’m super pooped.  I have another house guest arriving in two days so I’ve been trying to get ahead with this project!  Whew!  Join me in honoring Henri Michaux today.  I had a great time painting this piece today!  Below bio is from www.moma.org website.

Henri Michaux

Henri Michaux

About this artist

Henri Michaux

Henri Michaux

SOURCE: OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS

French draughtsman, painter and poet of Belgian birth. From 1911 to 1914 he studied at a Jesuit school in Brussels. In 1919 he started and then abandoned the study of medicine and the following year worked as a seaman. Returning to Brussels in 1921, he started writing in earnest in 1922, soon becoming known in literary circles. He went to Paris in 1924; here he was struck by the paintings of Klee, Max Ernst and de Chirico at a Surrealist exhibition. He started to paint in 1925 and until 1927 worked in a variety of media: India ink, watercolour and oils. The Alphabet series in ink, for example Alphabet (1925; Paris, Paulhan priv. col., see 1978 exh. cat., p. 10), was based on a series of personal ideograms, and in oils he painted the series of Blot works. From 1927 to 1937 he travelled extensively abroad, visiting South America, Turkey, China and India; this experience was a powerful influence on his later work.

On his return Michaux began to paint and draw regularly. From 1937 to 1939 he

Henri Michaux

Henri Michaux

produced a series of dreamlike gouaches on a black ground, which he called Phantomisms. They included such works as The Prince of the Night (1937; Paris,

Henri Michaux

Henri Michaux

Pompidou). In 1937 he had his first one-man show at the Librairie-Galerie de la Pléiade. After the publication of Entre centre et absence in 1936, with eight drawings, his Peintures was published in 1939 with seven poems and sixteen gouaches. During World War II, while continuing to write and paint, he published several other books with his own illustrations, such as Exorcismes (1943). He experimented with frottage from 1945 to 1947, and immediately after the accidental death of his wife in 1948 produced several hundred visionary ink and watercolour works.

In 1950 Michaux returned to his earlier use of ideograms in a series of India ink drawings, through which he became closely associated with

Henri Michaux

Henri Michaux

 Art informel. This resulted in the poem and 64 drawings that formed the album Mouvements (Paris, 1951). He continued this development with the MêléesFoules and Préhistoireseries of 1952 to 1953 and with the ink paintings of 1954 onwards, such as Painting in Indian Ink (1954; Paris, Pompidou). In 1955 he took French citizenship.

Henri Michaux

Henri Michaux

After experimenting with the drug mescaline, he produced a number of drawings and paintings from 1955 to 1962 executed as meticulous ‘all-over’ compositions, lacking any real centre, as in Mescalin Painting (1956; Paris, Pompidou). During the 1960s he continued to use India ink, watercolour and pastel; some works of this period suggest figurative elements, as in Untitled (India ink, 1960; New York, Guggenheim; for illustration see Art informel) or sepia and inkUntitled (1962; Paris, Pompidou). He introduced more colour into his work in 1967 by using acrylic, and he later mixed this with watercolour, as in Untitled (1970; see 1989 exh. cat., p. 62).

Throughout the 1970s Michaux’s style in his ink paintings, oils and acrylics remained spontaneous and abstract. The works of the late 1970s onwards were of a near figurative character.

From Grove Art Online

© 2009 Oxford University Press

I really enjoyed creating today’s piece.  I watered down black ink and did a more “watercolor” style this time.  I kept “movement” in mind while I painted this and made it more suggestive as to what exactly it was and still wanted it to have a abstract pattern effect.  I hope you enjoy it and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 189!  Best, Linda

Angels in Flight- Tribute to Henri Michaux Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Angels in Flight- Tribute to Henri Michaux
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Angels in Flight- Tribute to Henri Michaux Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Angels in Flight- Tribute to Henri Michaux
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Angels in Flight- Tribute to Henri Michaux Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Angels in Flight- Tribute to Henri Michaux
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Angels in Flight- Tribute to Henri Michaux Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Angels in Flight- Tribute to Henri Michaux
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Angels in Flight- Tribute to Henri Michaux Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Angels in Flight- Tribute to Henri Michaux
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas