Day 323- Barry McGee- Outside the Art World

It’s Day 323 and I worked on today’s piece a bit last night and this morning.  I spent most of my afternoon running errands and getting soaked in the rain.  Now I have to do stuff at home before heading out to improv class tonight.  I worked really hard on today’s piece and I am very happy with the result!  Join me in honoring Barry McGee today. 🙂

Barry McGee

Barry McGee

Barry McGee

Barry McGee

Barry McGee (born 1966 in San Francisco) is a painter and graffiti artist. He is also known by monikers such as Ray FongLydia FongBernon VernonP.KinRay VirgilTwist and further variations of Twist, such as TwisterTwistyTwisto and others.

McGee graduated from El Camino High School in South San Francisco, California. He later graduated from the San Francisco Art Institute in 1991 with a concentration in painting and printmaking.

McGee rose out of the Mission School art movement and graffiti boom in the San Francisco Bay Area during the early nineties. His

Barry McGee Installation SF MoMa.

Barry McGee Installation SF MoMa.

work draws heavily from a pessimistic view of the urban experience, which he describes as, “urban ills, overstimulations, frustrations, addictions & trying to maintain a level head under the constant bombardment of advertising”.

McGee’s paintings are very iconic, with central figures dominating abstracted backgrounds of drips, patterns and color fields. He has also painted portraits of street characters on their own empty bottles of liquor, painted flattened spray cans picked up at train yards and painted wrecked vehicles for art shows.

Barry McGee- Bottle

Barry McGee- Bottle

McGee has had numerous shows in many kinds of galleries and was also an artist in residence at inner-city McClymonds High School in Oakland, California in the early 1990s.

He was married to the artist Margaret Kilgallen, who died of cancer in 2001. The couple has a daughter named Asha.

The market value of his work rose considerably after 2001 as a result of his being included in the Venice Biennale and other major exhibitions. As a result, much of his San Francisco street art has been scavenged or stolen.

McGee was highly influential on the urban art scene that followed in his wake. He popularized use of paint drips in urban-influenced graphic design, as well as the gallery display technique of clustering paintings. These clustered compositions of pictures are based on similar installations he saw in Catholic churches whilst working in Brazil.

He also was an early participant in the practice of painting directly on gallery walls, imitating the intrusive

Barry McGee- Untitled

Barry McGee- Untitled

nature of graffiti. His use of chisel tip markers has heavily influenced sticker art and graffiti in general, which can be clearly seen in works produced by artists like sure, faust, and mecro.

McGee learned his later lowbrow style from Margaret Kilgallen, but was taught graffiti in 1989 by SR-1, mentor to both Barry McGee and artist “Dan Plasma”, and the founder of the THR graffiti crew, of which Barry was the second member.

Barry McGee

Barry McGee

McGee was involved in a controversy regarding the Adidas Y1 HUF, a shoe for which he provided the artwork. This gave rise to a protest campaign by some Asian-Americans who claimed that the picture on the shoe’s tongue depicts a racist stereotype. McGee responded to the controversy in a March 2006 press release. He stated that the drawing was a portrait of himself as an eight-year-old child. Barry McGee is half Chinese.

In 2004, as part of an exhibit, McGee spray-painted “Smash the State” on the walls of San Francisco Supervisor Matt Gonzalez’ City Hall office (City Hall is a registered national landmark).” Gonzalez told the press that he knew his office would be repainted for the next occupant.

Quotes-

  • “The more I learned about the art world, the more my interest in what was going on outside of it increased, I didn’t have any desire to bring graffiti inside the school’s walls or anything.”
  • “Compelling art to me is a name carved into a tree. Sometimes a rock soaring through a plate of glass can
    Barry McGee

    Barry McGee

    be the most beautiful, compelling work of art I have ever seen.”

  • “I’m not a sweet person. I’m OCD, ADD, but DFW and say thank you obsessively.”

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  The most challenging part was painting the geometric pattern as precise as I could.  I got some new fancy brushes and boy, do they make a difference!

I will see you tomorrow on Day 324!

Best,

Linda

My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
My Secret Friend- Tribute to Barry McGee
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 254- Linda Cleary- Forever Evolving

It’s Day 254 and it’s also my birthday!  I decided last minute that I would celebrate MYSELF today!  Is that wrong?  I’m not sure, but I don’t think so.  I was originally going to pay tribute to myself on the last day of this project but then thought…why not on my birthday?  And also why not do my biography in the third person?

Linda Cleary

Linda Cleary

Linda Cleary

Linda Cleary

Linda Cleary was born on September 11, 1978 in Seoul, Korea.  She is an American artist that lives in the Bay Area in California.  Her mother was Taiwanese and her father is Irish/Hungarian.  She grew up a military brat and lived in Korea and Japan for most of her life.  She has been an artist for as long as she can remember.  She once ruined the family microwave by attempting to melt crayons in it to make the world’s largest rainbow crayon.

She moved to San Francisco at the age of 19 to be closer to her mother and attend art school.  She studied

Blah Blah Blah- Linda Cleary

Blah Blah Blah- Linda Cleary

film and worked crazy hours as a front desk clerk at the Hilton Hotel.  She then lived in Seattle where she had her first two art shows and began playing and performing music as Scared Girl.

She now lives in El Cerrito, CA with her husband and two dogs.  If you are here then you know that she is doing a crazy painting a day project called Day of the Artist where she is paying tribute to an artist every day by painting a piece in their honor and hopefully capturing their style as well.  Follow the project on Facebook here.  She also makes monsters and sells them for a living.  You can visit her Ghoulie Girls shop here.

Her painting and art style has been evolving throughout the years and especially this particular year!  She likes to experiment with different materials from spackle to using sharpies.

I Can't Hear You I'm Too Busy Freaking Out- Linda Cleary

I Can’t Hear You I’m Too Busy Freaking Out- Linda Cleary

For a number of years she drew large scale pieces using black markers and pens to create cartoonish abstract surreal illustrations.  She now knows (after doing the Day of the Artist project) she was utilizing the automatism technique while creating these pieces.

Then she discovered acrylic paints!  It’s her favorite media, but she’s learning to appreciate all forms of media.  She’s actually overwhelmed with all the inspiration and ideas she gets everyday from art and sometimes feels like her brain is melting from too much inspiration.

Her art is continuing to evolve and transform.  Who knows where it’ll go next?  She

I Seem To Repeat Repeat Myself- Linda Cleary

I Seem To Repeat Repeat Myself- Linda Cleary

is hoping to have a huge artistic event after finishing the Day of the Artist project, where she can show all 365 paintings she did this year.  Maybe there will be a book…this is just a small biography because it would take much time to describe all the artistic endeavors she was involved with throughout her life.

Nude- Linda Cleary

Nude- Linda Cleary

I hope you enjoy my tribute to myself!  I decided to do a painting that I just “felt” like doing and I hope you like it.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 255 when I get back to honoring other artists!

Best,

Linda

 

Wires or Veins- Tribute to Linda Cleary (Myself!) Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Wires or Veins- Tribute to Linda Cleary (Myself!)
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Side-View Wires or Veins- Tribute to Linda Cleary (Myself!) Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Side-View
Wires or Veins- Tribute to Linda Cleary (Myself!)
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Wires or Veins- Tribute to Linda Cleary (Myself!) Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Wires or Veins- Tribute to Linda Cleary (Myself!)
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Wires or Veins- Tribute to Linda Cleary (Myself!) Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Wires or Veins- Tribute to Linda Cleary (Myself!)
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

 

 

 

Day Twenty-Three- Pacita Abad- Woman of Color

Today is Day Twenty-Three and I have to admit…my right eye has begun to twitch.  I haven’t had a facial twitch for quite awhile…but if any project is going to cause muscular twitches, it would be this one.

This particular painting has got to be the most colorful so far!  Well, at least the brightest.  Thanks to Pacita Abad…the wonderful artist I am honoring today.  She’s also the first Asian-American woman I’m featuring yet!  I’m pretty sure there are more to come. 🙂

Pacita Abad

Pacita Abad

An American Dream- Pacita Abad

An American Dream- Pacita Abad

Pacita Abad (1946-2004), internationally renowned, Philippine-American contemporary

painter, was born in Basco, Batanes, a small island in the northernmost part of the

Dancing Couple- Pacita Abad

Dancing Couple- Pacita Abad

Philippines. Her thirty-year painting career began when she traveled to the United States to study law in San Francisco. It was there that she decided to switch careers and dedicate her life to painting.

Since that time Pacita never stopped being a gypsy, and painted the globe while working on six different continents and traveling to more than 50 countries. During her career Pacita created over 4,500 artworks, and her paintings were exhibited in more than 200 museums and galleries around the world.  Short bio from her website.

Her early paintings were primarily figurative socio-political works of people and primitive masks. Another series was large scale paintings of underwater scenes, tropical flowers and animal wildlife. Pacita’s most extensive body of work, however, is her vibrant,

Pacita on the Alkaff Bridge in Singapore.  She painted it!

Pacita on the Alkaff Bridge in Singapore. She painted it!

colorful abstract work – many very large scale canvases, but also a number of small collages – on a range of materials from canvas and paper to bark cloth, metal, ceramics and glass. Abad created over 4,000 artworks. She painted a 55-meter long Alkaff Bridge in Singapore and covered it with 2,350 multicolored circles. During the last five years of her life, she lived and worked in a studio house on 28 Temenggong Road in Singapore, which currently houses the Visual Arts @ Temenggong.

Weeping Woman- Pacita Abad 1985

Weeping Woman- Pacita Abad 1985

Abad developed a technique of trapunto painting (named after a quilting technique), which entailed stitching and stuffing her painted canvases to give them a three-dimensional, sculptural effect. She then began incorporating into the surface of her paintings materials such as traditional cloth, mirrors, beads, shells, plastic buttons and other objects.

Fiesta- Pacita Abad

Fiesta- Pacita Abad

I decided to use red for the background.

I decided to use red for the background.

And finally here’s my completed piece…you can probably see why I am thinking that this is

White accents will look nice!

White accents will look nice!

probably my brightest piece yet.  I thought about doing something more abstract, but then saw a few pieces she did featuring more tribal art/masks.  I decided to look up actual Fillipino masks and honor her culture as well.  The rest of the painting is very stream of consciousness.  I wanted to just relax and see where the colors and brushes took me.  It was very meditative and I noticed the more colors and details I added, the happier I was.  I made my last dots and then I knew I was done.  I hope you enjoy looking at it as much as I enjoyed painting it.  Thank you Pacita Abad, for being such a lovely woman and sharing your art with me and fellow bloggers today.

xoxo, Linda

See you tomorrow…DAY 24!  Whew.

Let there be COLOR and more COLOR!

Let there be COLOR and more COLOR!

And finally, here’s my finished piece!  I can’t imagine if I was painting a huge canvas…it would be amazing…and of course, it would’ve taken me days and days.

Tree Man- Tribute to Pacita Abad Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Tree Man- Tribute to Pacita Abad
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Tree Man- Tribute to Pacita Abad Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Tree Man- Tribute to Pacita Abad
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Tree Man- Tribute to Pacita Abad Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Tree Man- Tribute to Pacita Abad
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Tree Man- Tribute to Pacita Abad Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Tree Man- Tribute to Pacita Abad
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas