Day 334- Katsushika Hokusai- Sketching From Life

It’s Day 334 and I really had a great time creating today’s piece.  I immediately wanted to do a painting of Mt. Fuji, which I did, but then I found paintings that the artist had done of demons and ghosts and was sad that I hadn’t found those first!  But alas, I am happy with how my piece turned out. 🙂 Join me in honoring Katsushika Hokusai today!

Self Portrait- Katsushika Hokusai

Self Portrait- Katsushika Hokusai

The waterfall of Amida behind the Kiso Road - Katsushika Hokusai

The waterfall of Amida behind the Kiso Road – Katsushika Hokusai

Katsushika Hokusai (葛飾 北斎, October 31, 1760 (exact date questionable) – May 10, 1849) was a Japanese artist, ukiyo-e painter and printmaker of the Edo period. He was influenced by such painters as Sesshu, and other styles of Chinese painting. Born in Edo (now Tokyo), Hokusai is best known as author of the woodblock print series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji (富嶽三十六景 Fugaku Sanjūroku-kei?, c. 1831) which includes the internationally recognized print, The Great Wave off Kanagawa, created during the 1820s.

Hokusai created the “Thirty-Six Views” both as a response to a domestic travel boom and as part of a personal obsession with Mount Fuji. It was this series, specifically The Great Wave print and Fuji in Clear Weather, that secured Hokusai’s fame both in Japan and overseas. As historian Richard Lane concludes, “Indeed, if there is one work that made Hokusai’s name, both in Japan and

Fuji, Mountains in clear Weather (Red Fuji) - Katsushika Hokusai

Fuji, Mountains in clear Weather (Red Fuji) – Katsushika Hokusai

abroad, it must be this monumental print-series…”. While Hokusai’s work prior to this series is certainly important, it was not until this series that he gained broad recognition.

Hokusai’s date of birth is not known for certain, but is often said to be the 23rd day of the 9th month of the 10th year of the Hōrekiera (in the old calendar, or october 30, 1760) to an artisan family, in the Katsushika district of Edo, Japan. His childhood name was Tokitarō.

The Dragon of Smoke Escaping from Mt Fuji- Hokusai

The Dragon of Smoke Escaping from Mt Fuji- Hokusai

It is believed his father was the mirror-maker Nakajima Ise, who produced mirrors for the shogun. His father never made Hokusai an heir, so it is possible that his mother was a concubine. Hokusai began painting around the age of six, possibly learning the art from his father, whose work on mirrors also included the painting of designs around the mirrors.

Hokusai was known by at least thirty names during his lifetime. Although the use of multiple names was a common practice of Japanese artists of the time, the numbers of names he used far exceeds that of any other major Japanese artist. Hokusai’s name changes are so frequent, and so often related to changes in his artistic production and style, that they are useful for breaking his life up into periods.

At the age of 12, he was sent by his father to work in a bookshop and lending library, a popular type of institution in Japanese cities, where reading books made from wood-cut

A colored version of the Big wave - Katsushika Hokusai

A colored version of the Big wave – Katsushika Hokusai

blocks was a popular entertainment of the middle and upper classes. At 14, he became an apprentice to a wood-carver, where he worked until the age of 18, whereupon he was accepted into the studio of Katsukawa Shunshō. Shunshō was an artist of ukiyo-e, a style of wood block prints and paintings that Hokusai would master, and head of the so-called Katsukawa school. Ukiyo-e, as practiced by artists like Shunshō, focused on images of the courtesans and Kabuki actors who were popular in Japan’s cities at the time.

After a year, Hokusai’s name changed for the first time, when he was dubbed Shunrō by his master. It was under this name that he published his first prints, a series of pictures of Kabuki actors published in 1779.

The Lantern Ghost, Iwa- Hokusai

The Lantern Ghost, Iwa- Hokusai

During the decade he worked in Shunshō’s studio, Hokusai was married to his first wife, about whom very little is known except that she died in the early 1790s. He married again in 1797, although this second wife also died after a short time. He fathered two sons and three daughters with these two wives, and his youngest daughter Sakae, also known as Ōi, eventually became an artist.

Upon the death of Shunshō in 1793, Hokusai began exploring other styles of art, including European styles he was exposed to through French and Dutch copper engravings he was able to acquire. He was soon expelled from the Katsukawa school by Shunkō, the chief disciple of Shunshō, possibly due to

The Phantom of Kohada Koheiji- Hokusai

The Phantom of Kohada Koheiji- Hokusai

studies at the rival Kanō school. This event was, in his own words, inspirational: “What really motivated the development of my artistic style was the embarrassment I suffered at Shunkō’s hands.”

Hokusai 1820. Erotic wood block print

Hokusai 1820. Erotic wood block print

Hokusai also changed the subjects of his works, moving away from the images of courtesans and actors that were the traditional subjects of ukiyo-e. Instead, his work became focused on landscapes and images of the daily life of Japanese people from a variety of social levels. This change of subject was a breakthrough in ukiyo-e and in Hokusai’s career. Fireworks at Ryōgoku Bridge (1790) dates from this period of Hokusai’s life.

From around the age of six, I had the habit of sketching from life. I became an artist, and from fifty on began producing works that won some reputation, but nothing I did before the age of seventy was worthy of attention. At seventy-three, I began to grasp

Kajikazawa in Kai Province - Katsushika Hokusai

Kajikazawa in Kai Province – Katsushika Hokusai

the structures of birds and beasts, insects and fish, and of the way plants grow. If I go on trying, I will surely understand them still better by the time I am eighty-six, so that by ninety I will have penetrated to their essential nature. At one hundred, I may well have a positively divine understanding of them, while at one hundred and thirty, forty, or more I will have reached the stage where every dot and every stroke I paint will be alive. May Heaven, that grants long life, give me the chance to prove that this is no lie.

Partial biography is from wikipedia.  His bio is extraordinarily large and very interesting!  Check it out.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 335…only 30 to go! Wow.

Best, Linda

View of Mount Fuji- Tribute to Katsushika Hokusai Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Metallic Paint on Canvas

View of Mount Fuji- Tribute to Katsushika Hokusai
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Metallic Paint on Canvas

Side-View View of Mount Fuji- Tribute to Katsushika Hokusai Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Metallic Paint on Canvas

Side-View
View of Mount Fuji- Tribute to Katsushika Hokusai
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Metallic Paint on Canvas

Close-Up 1 View of Mount Fuji- Tribute to Katsushika Hokusai Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Metallic Paint on Canvas

Close-Up 1
View of Mount Fuji- Tribute to Katsushika Hokusai
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Metallic Paint on Canvas

Close-Up 2 View of Mount Fuji- Tribute to Katsushika Hokusai Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Metallic Paint on Canvas

Close-Up 2
View of Mount Fuji- Tribute to Katsushika Hokusai
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Metallic Paint on Canvas

Close-Up 3 View of Mount Fuji- Tribute to Katsushika Hokusai Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Metallic Paint on Canvas

Close-Up 3
View of Mount Fuji- Tribute to Katsushika Hokusai
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Metallic Paint on Canvas

 

Day 333- Bridget Bate Tichenor- Spiritual Guides

It’s Day 333 and I really enjoyed creating today’s piece.  I was stumped at first at what I wanted to paint, but when the ideas started flowing, I had a great time.  I also wanted to keep it somewhat simple, but also really capture the artist’s essence so to speak. 🙂  Join me in honoring Bridget Bate Tichenor.

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor (born Bridget Pamela Arkwright Bate on November 22, 1917 – died on October 20, 1990), also known as Bridget Tichenor or B.B.T., was a Mexican surrealist painter of fantastic art in the school of magic realism and a fashion editor. Born in Paris and of British descent, she later embraced Mexico as her home.

The mesmerizing story of the Magic Realist painter Bridget Bate Tichenor has never been told.  It is a riveting revelation of an extraordinary female artist who impacted the 20th Century world of fashion, art, and society, with enormous contributions.  Revealed are the intimacies and secrets of an outwardly beautiful, exotic, bold, and courageous, yet painfully shy and reclusive woman, who lived in extraordinary times, yet was unknown to her peers, colleagues, and the world at large.

Bridget lived in an astonishing way, in many contrasting countries, and in many revolutionary platforms. Her personal code of excellence has yet to be recognized or acknowledged, outside small and eccentric art circles. Bridget adhered to rarefied and noble standards of human pride, integrity, respect, discipline, and compassion.

Bridget Bate Tichenor, Líderes (Leaders) Close Up

Bridget Bate Tichenor, Líderes (Leaders) Close Up

She honored these humane traits above all else in life.  Bridget’s impeccable values, in tandem with her determination and prioritization to execute her artistic vision, are the essence of her story, and substantiates her historical value.

Bridget inherited a peripatetic world from her self-absorbed, famous, and creatively gifted parents. It fueled deep insecurities, and was equally fed by fears of abandonment. Subsequently, in order to survive, she reinvented herself by necessity, and chose to mold herself into whatever she needed at any given time.

Bridget’s mother, Vera Bate Lombardi (Sarah Gertrude Baring Arkwright Fitzgeorge Bate Lombardi) was an indomitable combination of beauty and bravado with the highest connections. From 1925-1939, Vera became Co Co Chanel’s muse and Public Relations liaison to several European Royal Families.

BRIDGET BATE TICHENOR (1917-1990) Gusanos y caracoles

BRIDGET BATE TICHENOR (1917-1990) Gusanos y caracoles

Her demeanor and style influenced the ‘English Look’, the very foundation for the House of Chanel. Vera Bate Lombardi’s mother was Rosa Frederica Baring of the Baring Banking family, who had rescued the British Royal family during difficult economic times. Vera was allegedly an illegitimate descendent of George III, through her reputed father, HRH Prince Adolphus Cambridge, 1st Marquess of Cambridge Duke of Teck. She was presented socially as Fitzgeorge, as she was the unadopted daughter of her stepfather, the morganatic and bastard Colonel Fitzgeorge, son of Prince George, Duke of Cambridge and his mistress Sarah Louisa Fairbrother.

Chanel craved Vera’s immense popularity and privileged patrician heritage, however shrouded in controversial

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

royal illegitimacies. Chanel came from humble beginnings, and was decidedly uneducated. She looked to Vera as a ‘social advisor’, who would be responsible for her societal launch and business triumph. It was evident that Chanel’s personal identity had been tragically dehumanized and shamed as an orphan, and she systematically absorbed Vera’s exotic mannerisms, from gestures to stance, with Cambridge and Oxford intonations, in a scheming and arrogant self-reinvention of entitlement.

Lombardi was a flawless British Royal Fashion icon to Chanel, and Chanel shamelessly used her to establish her fashion-identity-template, which became the legendary Chanel brand. Years later, Vera, retaliated against Chanel’s ruthless jealousies and manipulations, and exposed her as a Nazi spy to her cousin Sir Winston Churchill in Spain circa 1944. This disclosure shattered Chanel’s reputation for many years.

La Caja de Cristal- Bridget Bate Tichenor

La Caja de Cristal- Bridget Bate Tichenor

Until now, Vera Bate Lombardi has been relatively obscured in Chanel’s literary and film biographies. Chanel cunningly perpetuated her adapted character identity, and concealed the truths of her business cornerstone. What had begun as flattery for Vera, terminated in disgust.

Bridget’s father, Frederick Blantford Bate, was born in Virginia but lived in England for over 20 years, working as a British representative for NBC during World War I. Bate was a Mechanical Officer in the US Army, who, in 1916, was instrumental in establishing The Field Service of American Ambulance in Paris. Bate was an intimate friend of Vera’s cousin, the Duke of Windsor. He was the first news correspondent to receive the story of the Duke’s abdication and marriage to Wallis Simpson, and contacted his associate, Alistair Cooke, in the UK to broadcast it.

The beautiful, noble, artistic, and rich are patently different, often misunderstood or condemned, yet granted societal privileges few receive. These very qualities that embodied Bridget’s unique style, influenced and were

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

copied by some of the greatest names of the 20th century such as her rivals Diana Vreeland and Frida Kahlo. She was loved and envied, but most importantly, awe-inspiring to Man Ray, Diego Rivera, Ernst Lubitsch, James Whale, Laurence Olivier, Anais Nin, Greta Garbo, and Joan Crawford.

Bridget had an amazing, yet tragic, multidimensional life, which included an arranged marriage, true love, romantic and professional rivalry, artistic achievement, mysticism, fantasy, perfectionism, and shattered dreams. All of which were played out in the most glamorous settings, with famous personalities and eccentric nobility that she orchestrated in a dramatic metaphysical theater of remarkable relationships.

She was difficult to get to know, guarded, and very secretive. She revealed certain things to socially survive, while withholding her poetically rich emotional and spiritual communications to focus through her dedicated relationship with her sacred and sovereign art. She had a genius gift of observation and execution in cryptic detail, both in her character and painting.

Bridget Bate TIchenor

Bridget Bate TIchenor

Her controversial royal illegitimate background overshadowed her profound artistry and her sense of self worth.  In her era and society, it was important to be of royal lineage. Her achievement in the art world was diminished by who she was as an illegitimate royal family member, her ravishing beauty, her refined intelligence, and her commanding personality. Her controversial background was more important and interesting to her friends, which graciously made her celebrated and received on one hand, yet made her hide how great an artist she was on the other and never acknowledged. This is why she was so shy about showing who she was as a superlative painter.

She compartmentalized her life. She was deathly afraid to remove her complex multiple masks and reveal not only her precious art, but also her deepest intimate feelings to others. She was validated only by those relationships that had a higher profile than she, so that she could retreat behind her provocatively mysterious and seductive persona to hide her acute vulnerability.

She was difficult to get to know, guarded, and very secretive.  She revealed certain things to socially survive, while withholding her poetically rich emotional and spiritual communications to focus through her dedicated

Bridget Bate Tichenor

Bridget Bate Tichenor

relationship with her sacred and sovereign art.

Bridget spiritually adopted me and I became her protégé in 1971. Among her many gifts, she benevolently trained me in painting and introduced me to ancient occult religions, which included many lost esoteric sciences of Egyptian, Tantrika, and Mesoamerican Magick and Alchemy. She fed my hunger to learn, and I became her consummate student in a world that had received a death rattle to classically trained artists.

Just before her death, I promised my dear friend and genius mentor Bridget that the world would know who she was. One of the legacies she gave to me were her life stories. I began to document Bridget’s life in 1990 shortly after her death, recording her extensive and detailed personal accounts that she imparted to me over the nineteen years of our relationship. The following biography is a small part of my promise that perpetuates the significance of her life.

-Zachary Selig-

Biography is from www.bridgetbatetichenor.com.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I really had a blast painting it.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 334.

Best,

Linda

Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Bienvenidos a mi Reencarnación- Tribute to Bridget Bate Tichenor
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 332- Georges Braque- Temporal Spaces

It’s Day 332 and I’ve been a little ahead of myself with painting because of the holidays.  I worked on this last night and finished up this morning.  I was very intimidated with today’s artist because of his painting style and I hope today’s piece helps me when I get to Duchamp!  Join me in honoring Georges Braque today. 🙂

Georges Braque

Georges Braque

Georges Braque 1882-1963

Violin and Candlestick- Georges Braque

Violin and Candlestick- Georges Braque

Georges Braque was at the forefront of the revolutionary art movement of Cubism. Braque’s work throughout his life focused on still lifes and means of viewing objects from various perspectives through color, line, and texture. While his collaboration with Pablo Picasso and their Cubist works are best known, Braque had a long painting career that continued beyond Cubism. Braque was also often dedicated to quiet periods in his studio rather than to being a personality in the art world.

Though Braque started out as a member of the Fauves, he began developing a Cubist style after meeting Pablo Picasso. While their paintings shared many similarities in palette, style and subject matter, Braque stated that unlike Picasso, his work was “devoid of iconological commentary,” and was concerned purely with pictorial space and composition.
Braque sought balance and harmony in his compositions, especially through papier colles, a pasted paper collage technique that Picasso and

Bottle of Run 1914- Georges Braque

Bottle of Run 1914- Georges Braque

Braque invented in 1912. Braque, however, took collage one-step further by gluing cut-up advertisements into his canvases. This foreshadowed modern art movements concerned with critiquing media, such as Pop art.

Braque stenciled letters onto paintings, blended pigments with sand, and copied wood grain and marble to achieve great levels of dimension in his paintings. His depictions of still lifes are so abstract that they border on becoming patterns that express an essence of the objects viewed rather than direct representations.
Georges Braque, Portugalczyk, 1911

Georges Braque, Portugalczyk, 1911

Childhood

Georges Braque was guided from a young age toward creative painting techniques. His father managed a decorative painting business and Braque’s interest in texture and tactility perhaps came from working with him as a decorator. In 1899, at age seventeen, Braque moved from Argenteuil into Paris, accompanied by friends Othon Friesz and Raoul Dufy.

Early Training

Braque’s earliest paintings were made in the Fauvist style. From 1902-1905, after giving up work as a decorator to pursue painting full-time he pursued Fauvist ideas and coordinated with Henri Matisse. He contributed his Fauvist colorful paintings to his first exhibition at the Salon des Independants in 1906. However, he was extremely affected by a visit to Pablo Picasso’s studio in 1907, to see Picasso’s breakthrough work – Les Demoiselles d’Avignon.

After this encounter, the two artists forged an intimate friendship and artistic camaraderie. “We would get

Baluster and Skull- Georges Braque

Baluster and Skull- Georges Braque

together every single day,” Braque said, “to discuss and assay the ideas that were forming, as well as to compare our respective works”. The drastic change in Braque’s painting style can be directly attributed to Picasso. Once he understood Picasso’s goals, Braque aimed to strengthen “the constructive elements in his works while foregoing the expressive excesses of Fauvism”. His landscape paintings in which scenes were distilled into basic shapes and colors inspired French art critic, Louis Vauxcelles, to coin the term Cubism by describing Braque’s work as “bizarreries cubiques.”

Braque and Picasso worked in synchronicity until Braque’s return from war in 1914. When Picasso began to paint figuratively, Braque felt his friend had betrayed their Cubist systems and rules, and continued on his own. However, he continued to remain influenced by Picasso’s work, especially in regards to papier colles, a collage technique pioneered by both artists using only pasted paper. His collages featured geometric shapes interrupted by musical instruments, grapes, or furniture. These were so three-dimensional that they are considered important in the development of Cubist sculpture. By 1918, Braque felt he had sufficiently explored papier colles, and returned to still life painting.

Musical Instruments 1908- Georges Braque

Musical Instruments 1908- Georges Braque

Viewers noted a more limited palette at Braque’s first post-war solo show in 1919. Yet he steadfastly adhered to Cubist rules about depicting objects from multi-faceted perspectives in geometrically patterned ways. In this, he continued as a true Analytical Cubist longer than did Picasso, whose style, subject matter and palettes changed continuously. Braque was most interested in showing how objects look when viewed over time in different temporal spaces and pictorial planes. As a result of his dedication to depicting space in various ways, he naturally gravitated towards designing sets and costumes for theater and ballet performances, doing this throughout the 1920s.

In 1929, Braque took up landscape painting once again, using new, bright colors influenced by Picasso and Matisse. Then in the 1930s, Braque began to portray Greek heroes and deities, though he claimed the subjects were stripped of their symbolism and ought to be viewed through a purely formal lens.

He called these works exercises in calligraphy, possibly because they were not strictly about figures but more about sheer line and shape. In the latter half of the 1930s, Braque embarked on painting his Vanitas series, through which he existentially considered death and suffering. Growing increasingly obsessed with the

Still Life with Clarinet 1927- Georges Braque

Still Life with Clarinet 1927- Georges Braque

physicality of his paintings, he explored the ways in which brushstrokes and paint qualities could enhance his subject matter.

The objects used in his still lifes were highly personal to Braque, however, he did not reveal these meanings. Skulls, for example, were objects he painted repeatedly at the onset of World War II. In 1944, when World War II ended, Braque began to embrace lighter subjects like flowers, billiard tables, and garden chairs.

His final series of eight canvases made from 1948-1955, each titled Atelier, or Studio, depicted imagery that represented the artist’s inner thoughts on each object rather than clues to the outside world. At the very end of his life, Braque painted birds repeatedly, as the perfect symbol of his obsession with space and movement.

Woman with a Guitar 1913- Georges Braque

Woman with a Guitar 1913- Georges Braque

Braque is remembered as a progenitor of Cubism, who was both rational and sensuous in his still life paintings. He was a classic painter in this sense, and has influenced the likes of Jim Dine andWayne Thiebaud, who focused on still life painting. Braque is also a celebrated colorist, and can be traced through contemporary art to those painters who work with color in similar ways. Perhaps Braque is most remembered for his use of collage, as many contemporary artists, from sculptors like Jessica Stockholder to painters like Mark Bradford, apply paper to their works as a means to comment on society and its products.

“To work from nature is to improvise.”

“One must not imitate what one wants to create.”

“One must beware of an all-purpose formula that will serve to interpret the other arts as well as reality, and that instead of creating will only produce a style, or rather a stylization.”

Biography is from www.artstory.org.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  It was a very educational experience and interesting as well!  I wish I had more time to work on it.  It’s not perfect, but I think I did well.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 333.

Best,

Linda

Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Side-View Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Side-View
Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Woman at a Piano- Tribute to Georges Braque
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Ink on Canvas

Day 331- Grandma Moses- Life, A Good Day’s Work

It’s Day 331…and it’s Thanksgiving!  I thought today’s artist was perfect to pay tribute to on a holiday!  Please join me in honoring Grandma Moses today.  If only we all can find fame (for the first time or again) at the age of 80 and live til the age of 101!  I give thanks to her for pursuing such creativity later in life.

Grandma Moses

Grandma Moses

Anna Mary Robertson Moses (September 7, 1860 – December 13, 1961), better known by her nickname of “Grandma Moses,”was a renowned American folk artist. Having begun painting in earnest at the age of 78, she is often cited as an example of an individual successfully beginning a career in the arts at an advanced age. Her works have been shown and sold in the United States and abroad and have been marketed on greeting cards and other merchandise. Moses’ paintings are among the collections of many museums. The Sugaring Off was sold for US$1.2 million in 2006.

The Burning of Troy- Grandma Moses

The Burning of Troy- Grandma Moses

Moses has appeared on magazine covers, television, and in a documentary of her life. She wrote an autobiography of her life, won numerous awards and was awarded two honorary doctoral degrees.

The New York Times said of her: “The simple realism, nostalgic atmosphere and luminous color with which Grandma Moses portrayed homely farm life and rural countryside won her a wide following. She was able to capture the excitement of winter’s first snow, Thanksgiving preparations and the new, young green of oncoming spring… In person, Grandma Moses charmed wherever she went. A tiny, lively woman with mischievous gray eyes and a quick wit, she could be sharp-tongued with a sycophant and stern with an errant grandchild. ”

Starting at 12 years of age and for a total of 15 years, she was a live-in housekeeper. One of the families that she

Grandma Moses - Christmas at Home

Grandma Moses – Christmas at Home

worked for, who noticed her appreciation for their prints made by Currier and Ives, supplied her with art materials to create drawings. Moses and her husband began their married life in Virginia, where they worked on farms. In 1905 they returned to Northeastern United States and settled in Eagle Bridge, New York. The couple had five children who survived infancy. Her interest in art was expressed throughout her life, including embroidery of pictures with yarn, until arthritis made this pursuit too painful.

Born in Greenwich on September 7, 1860, Anna Mary Robertson was the third of Margaret Shanahan Robertson and Russell King Robertson’s ten children. She was raised with four sisters and five

GRANDMA MOSES The Old Checkered House in Cambridge Valley

GRANDMA MOSES The Old Checkered House in Cambridge Valley

brothers. Her father ran a flax mill and was a farmer. Moses attended a one-room school for a short period of time as a child. That school is now the Bennington Museum in Vermont which has the largest collection of her works in the United States. Moses first painted as a child, using lemon and grape juice to make colors for her “lambscapes”. Other natural materials that she used to create works of art included ground ochre, grass, flour paste, slack lime and sawdust.

She left home and began to work for a wealthy neighboring family at 12 years of age, performing chores on their farm. She continued to keep house, cook and sew for wealthy families for 15 years. One of the families that she worked for, the Whitesides, noticed her interest in their Currier and Ives prints and purchased chalk and wax crayons so that she could create her own artwork.

She was 27 when she worked on the same farm as Thomas Salmon, a “hired man”. They married and established themselves nearStaunton, Virginia where they spent nearly two decades, living and working in turn

Moving Day on the Farm- Grandma Moses

Moving Day on the Farm- Grandma Moses

on four separate local farms. To supplement the family income, Moses made potato chips and churned butter from the milk of a cow that she purchased with her savings. Later, the couple bought a farm.

Moses and her husband had five of ten children born to them survive infancy. Although she loved living in the Shenandoah Valley, in 1905 Anna and Robert moved to a farm in Eagle Bridge, New York at her husband’s urging. Thomas Moses died in 1927 of a heart attack, after which her son Forrest helped her operate the farm. She retired and moved to a daughter’s home in 1936. Anna Mary was known as either “Mother Moses” or “Grandma Moses,” and although she first exhibited as “Mrs. Moses,” the press dubbed her “Grandma Moses,” and the nickname stuck.

Grandma Moses

Grandma Moses

As a young wife and mother, Moses had been creative in her home by, for example, using housepaint to decorate a fireboard in 1918. Moses made embroidered pictures of yarn for friends and family beginning in 1932.  She also created beautiful quilted objects, a form of “hobby art” as defined by Lucy R. Lippard.

Moses had developed arthritis by the age of 76, which made embroidery painful. It was suggested to her by Celestia, her sister, that painting would be easier for her, which spurred Moses’s painting career in her late 70s.

Moses painted scenes of rural life from earlier days, which she called “old-timey” New England landscapes. Moses said that she would “get an inspiration and start painting; then I’ll forget everything, everything except how things used to be and how to paint it so people will know how we used to live.” She omitted features of modern life, like tractors and telephone poles, from her works of art.

Her early style is less individual and more realistic or primitive, despite her lack of knowledge of, or perhaps rejection of, basic perspective. Initially she created simple compositions or copied existing images. As her career advanced she created complicated, panoramic compositions of rural life.

She was a prolific painter, generating over 1,500 canvasses in three decades. Initially Moses charged $3 to $5

Grandma Moses

Grandma Moses

for a painting, depending upon its size, and as her fame increased her works were sold for $8,000 to $10,000. Her winter paintings are reminiscent of some such of the known winter paintings of Pieter Bruegel the Elder, although she had never seen his work. A German fan of her work said, “There emanates from her paintings a light-hearted optimism; the world she shows us is beautiful and it is good. You feel at home in all these pictures, and you know their meaning. The unrest and the neurotic insecurity of the present day make us inclined to enjoy the simple and affirmative outlook of Grandma Moses.”

During a visit to Hoosick Falls in 1938, Louis J. Caldor, who collected art and worked as an engineer in the state of New York, discovered paintings made by Moses in the window of a drug store. He bought their supply and ten more from her Eagle Bridge house for $3 or $5 each. The next year, three Grandma Moses paintings were included in New York’s Museum of Modern Art exhibition entitled “Contemporary Unknown American Painters”. Her first solo exhibition, “What a Farm Wife Painted,” opened in the same city in October 1940 at Otto Kallir’s Galerie St. Etienne. A meet-and-greet with the artist

Grandma Moses

Grandma Moses

and an exhibition of 50 paintings at Gimbel’s Department Store was held next on November 15. Her art displays included samples of her baked goods and preserves that won Moses prizes at the county fair. Her third solo show in as many months, was held at the Whyte Gallery, Washington, D.C. In 1944 she began to be represented by the American British Art Center and the Galerie St. Etienne, which increased her sales. Her paintings were exhibited throughout Europe and the United States over the next 20 years. Otto Kallir established the Grandma Moses Properties, Inc. for her.

Grandma Moses’s paintings were used to publicize American holidays, including Thanksgiving, Christmas and Mother’s Day. During the 1950s, Grandma Moses’s exhibitions broke attendance records around the world. Art historian Judith Stein noted: “A cultural icon, the spry, productive nonagenarian was continually cited as an inspiration for housewives, widows and retirees.” Her paintings were reproduced on Hallmark greeting cards, tiles, fabrics, and ceramics. They were also used to market products, like coffee, lipstick, cigarettes, and cameras.

n 1950, the National Press Club cited her as one of the five most newsworthy women and the National Association of House Dress Manufacturers honored her as their 1951 Woman of the Year. At age 88, Mademoiselle magazine named Grandma Moses a “Young Woman of the Year.” She was awarded two honorary

So Long Till Next Year- Grandma Moses

So Long Till Next Year- Grandma Moses

doctoral degrees. The first was bestowed in 1949 from Russell Sage College and the second two years later from the Moore College of Art and Design.

President Harry S. Truman presented her with the Women’s National Press Club trophy Award for outstanding accomplishment in art in 1949. Jerome Hill directed the 1950 documentary of her life, which was nominated for an Academy Award. In 1952, she published My Life’s History, her autobiography. In it she said “I look back on my life like a good day’s work, it was done and I feel satisfied with it. I was happy and contented, I knew nothing better and made the best out of what life offered. And life is what we make it, always has been, always will be.” In 1955, she appeared as a guest on See It Now, a television program hosted by Edward R. Murrow.

Grandma Moses

Grandma Moses

She was a Society of Mayflower Descendants and Daughters of the American Revolution member. Her 100th birthday was named by New York Governor Nelson Rockefelleras “Grandma Moses Day”. LIFE magazine celebrated her birthday by featuring her on its September 19, 1960 cover. The children’s book “Grandma Moses Story Book” was published in 1961.

Grandma Moses died on December 13, 1961 at 101 years of age in Hoosick Falls, New York at the Health Center. She is buried there at the Maple Grove Cemetery. President John F. Kennedy memorialized her: “The death of Grandma Moses removed a beloved figure from American life. The directness and vividness of her paintings restored a primitive freshness to our perception of the American scene. Both her work and her life helped our nation renew its pioneer heritage and recall its roots in the countryside and on the frontier. All Americans mourn her loss.” After her death, her work was exhibited in several large traveling exhibitions in the United States and abroad.

Biography is from wikipedia.

Painting’s not important. The important thing is keeping busy.

Grandma Moses
Keep in mind that she lived to 101!  Keep busy folks! 😉

I hope you enjoy my piece for today!  I was going to add more figures, but kind of liked the solitude after painting the little girl ice skating. 🙂  I had a nice time doing today’s tribute.  I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 332!  Hope everyone is getting stuffed with food today!  And I am grateful to all these artists that inspire me and continue to inspire me!  I am thankful for art in general for always being there for me in all ways possible.  Aren’t we lucky to live in a world so full of creativity?

Best,

Linda

Next Year's Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Next Year’s Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Next Year's Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Next Year’s Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Next Year's Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Next Year’s Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Next Year's Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

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Next Year’s Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses
Linda Cleary 2014
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Close-Up 3 Next Year's Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Next Year’s Around the Corner- Tribute to Grandma Moses
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 330- Roy Lichtenstein- Forming Art

It’s Day 330 and I was excited about today’s artist.  Join me in honoring Roy Lichtenstein today!

Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein

IllustratorPainter (1923–1997)

Little Big Painting- Roy Lichtenstein

Little Big Painting- Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein was an American pop artist best known for his boldly-colored parodies of comic strips and advertisements.

American artist Roy Lichtenstein was born in New York City on October 27, 1923, and grew up on Manhattan’s Upper West Side.

In the 1960s, Lichtenstein became a leading figure of the new Pop Art movement. Inspired by advertisements and comic strips,

Girl In Mirror- Roy Lichtenstein

Girl In Mirror- Roy Lichtenstein

Lichtenstein’s bright, graphic works parodied American popular culture and the art world itself. He died in New York City on September 29, 1997.

Early Years

Roy Fox Lichtenstein was born on October 27, 1923, in New York City, the son of Milton Lichtenstein, a successful real estate developer, and Beatrice Werner Lichtenstein. As a boy growing up on Manhattan’s Upper West Side, Lichtenstein had a passion for both science and comic books. In his teens, he became interested in art. He took watercolor classes at Parsons School of Design in 1937, and he took classes at the Art Students League in 1940, studying with American realist painter Reginald Marsh.

Still Life with Cow Skull- Roy Lichtenstein

Still Life with Cow Skull- Roy Lichtenstein

Following his graduation from the Franklin School for Boys in Manhattan in 1940, Lichtenstein attended The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. His college studies were interrupted in 1943, when he was drafted and sent to Europe for World War II.

After his wartime service, Lichtenstein returned to Ohio State in 1946 to finish his undergraduate degree and master’s degree—both in fine arts. He briefly taught at Ohio State before moving to Cleveland and working as a window-display designer for a department store, an industrial designer and a commercial-art instructor.

Commercial Success and Pop Art

In the late 1940s, Lichtenstein exhibited his art in galleries nationwide, including in Cleveland and New York City. In the 1950s, he often took his artistic subjects from mythology and from American history and folklore, and he painted those subjects in styles that paid homage to earlier art, from the 18th century through modernism.

Lichtenstein began experimenting with different subjects and methods in the early 1960s, while he was teaching at Rutgers University. His newer work was both a commentary on American popular culture and a reaction to the recent success of Abstract Expressionist painting by artists like Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning.

Girl with Tear I- Roy Lichtenstein

Girl with Tear I- Roy Lichtenstein

Instead of painting abstract, often subject-less canvases as Pollock and others had had done, Lichtenstein took his imagery directly from comic books and advertising. Rather than emphasize his painting process and his own inner, emotional life in his art, he mimicked his borrowed sources right down to an impersonal-looking stencil process that imitated the mechanical printing used for commercial art.

Lichtenstein’s best-known work from this period is “Whaam!,” which he painted in 1963, using a comic book panel from a 1962 issue of DC Comics’All-American Men of War as his inspiration. Other works of the 1960s featured cartoon characters like Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck and advertisements for food and household products. He created a large-scale mural of a laughing young woman (adapted from an image in a comic book) for the New York State Pavilion of the 1964 World’s Fair in New York City.

Melody- Roy Lichtenstein

Melody- Roy Lichtenstein

Lichtenstein became known for his deadpan humor and his slyly subversive way of building a signature body of work from mass-reproduced images. By the mid-1960s, he was nationally known and recognized as a leader in the Pop Art movement that also included Andy Warhol, James Rosenquist and Claes Oldenburg. His art became increasingly popular with both collectors and influential art dealers like Leo Castelli, who showed Lichtenstein’s work at his gallery for 30 years. Like much Pop Art, it provoked debate over ideas of originality, consumerism and the fine line between fine art and entertainment.

Later Career

By the late 1960s, Lichtenstein had stopped using comic book sources. In the 1970s his focus turned to creating paintings that referred to the art of early 20th century masters like Picasso, Henri Matisse, Fernand Léger and Salvador Dalí.

In the 1980s and ’90s, he also painted representations of modern house interiors, brushstrokes and mirror

Drowning Girl- Roy Lichtenstein

Drowning Girl- Roy Lichtenstein

reflections, all in his trademark, cartoon-like style. He also began working in sculpture.

In the 1980s, Lichtenstein received several major large-scale commissions, including a 25-foot-high sculpture titled “Brushstrokes in Flight” for the Port Columbus International Airport in Columbus, Ohio and a five-story-tall mural for the lobby of the Equitable Tower in New York.

Lichtenstein was committed to his art until the end of his life, often spending at least 10 hours a day in his studio. His work was acquired by major museum collections around the world, and he received numerous honorary degrees and awards, including the National Medal of Arts in 1995.

Personal Life and Death

Roy Lichtenstein. Portræt / Portrait, 1977

Roy Lichtenstein. Portræt / Portrait, 1977

Lichtenstein married twice. He and his first wife, Isabel, whom he married in 1949 and divorced in 1967, had two sons, David and Mitchell. He married Dorothy Herzka in 1968.

Lichtenstein died of complications from pneumonia on September 29, 1997, at the New York University Medical Center in Manhattan.

Biography is from www.biography.com.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today.  I’m trying to get a little ahead so that I can relax tomorrow on Thanksgiving.  I hope you all have a great holiday and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 331!

Best,

Linda

Regret- Tribute to Roy Lichtenstein Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Regret- Tribute to Roy Lichtenstein
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Regret- Tribute to Roy Lichtenstein Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Regret- Tribute to Roy Lichtenstein
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Regret- Tribute to Roy Lichtenstein Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Regret- Tribute to Roy Lichtenstein
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Regret- Tribute to Roy Lichtenstein Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Regret- Tribute to Roy Lichtenstein
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Regret- Tribute to Roy Lichtenstein Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Regret- Tribute to Roy Lichtenstein
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 329- Doze Green- Infinite Perspectives

It’s Day 329 and I had a fun time with today’s piece.  Please join me in honoring Doze Green today.  I love his style.

Doze Green

Doze Green

Doze Green

Doze Green

Doze Green translates complex metaphysical concepts through his paintings, such as the possible manipulation of energy and matter to create a timeless space. He explores meditations on matter and anti-matter, layers of consciousness, and different possibilities based on cosmology.

Through stream-of-consciousness painting, Doze Green creates fractured imagery to convey infinite possibilities. His intention is to reveal works with an ever-changing narrative. Multi-dimensional planes and illusion of time are presented through fragmented, incomplete figures.

He believes by depicting beings that are not fully materialized, these beings are not of this realm. He presents

DOZE-GREEN-Luminosity-preview-14

DOZE-GREEN-Luminosity-preview-14

possibilities of immortality through paintings where narratives are interminable. His collection of paintings is an extension of this metaphysical concept.

Cubist influences include ascending and descending planes and repetitive, overlapping, and concentric lines in an otherwise undefined landscape. For Doze Green, this energy and motion of created forms exist in a visual meeting place of ideas.

Doze Green

Doze Green

Influenced by Edo period paintings, Doze Green mixes black gesso with Sumi ink and applies “creatively chaotic, and intuitive brushstrokes,” in a calligraphy-inspired and graffiti aesthetic. Doze Green translates these primitive markings as “biological entities, a swarm of arrows coming in from infinite perspective.”

Doze Green is also known for his live painting performances. Doze Green’s work is in many public and private collections throughout the United States, Japan, Europe, and Australia. His works have been published in

Detail of painting- Doze Green

Detail of painting- Doze Green

BlackBook, Anthem, Juxtapoz, Tokion, and­­ Vibe and reviewed on CNN.

Biography above is from www.dozegreen.com.

Below blurb is from http://www.artsy.com.

In the 1970s, Doze Green was a Hip-Hop pioneer. A member of the legendary Rock Steady Crew—the group that pioneered breakdancing (also known as B-Boying)—the subway-tagging graffiti artist often participated in breakdance performances at SoHo and Lower East Side galleries.

Doze Green

Doze Green

Moving from walls to canvas, Green’s recent paintings, influenced by the art of the Edo Period in Japan and created with gesso and sumi ink, incorporate his signature style of figurative abstraction and use of letterforms while at the same time posing metaphysical questions about the nature of narrative, the physics of time, and the possibility of immortality. He calls them “biological entities, a swarm of arrows coming in from infinite perspective.”

~

I hope you enjoy my tribute today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 330!  35 to go…I almost can’t believe it.  I’m

Doze Green

Doze Green

happy, proud and sad all at the same time.

Best,

Linda

Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green Linda Cleary 2014 Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green
Linda Cleary 2014
Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green Linda Cleary 2014 Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green
Linda Cleary 2014
Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green Linda Cleary 2014 Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green
Linda Cleary 2014
Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green Linda Cleary 2014 Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green
Linda Cleary 2014
Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green Linda Cleary 2014 Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Eye Contact- Tribute to Doze Green
Linda Cleary 2014
Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Day 328- Gustav Klimt- No Self-Portraits

It’s Day 328 and another intimidating artist.  But for some reason, which I think it was concept, I think I nailed it today.  I had a clear concept of what I wanted to accomplish and I had a wonderful time creating today’s piece.  Join me in honoring Gustav Klimt today.

Gustav Klimt

Gustav Klimt

Hope II- Gustav Klimt

Hope II- Gustav Klimt

Gustav Klimt was born in Vienna, in 1862, into a lower middle-class family of Moravian origin. His father, Ernst Klimt, worked as an engraver and goldsmith, earning very little, and the artist’s childhood was spent in relative poverty. The painter would have to support his family financially throughout his life.

In 1876, Klimt was awarded a scholarship to the Vienna School of Arts and Crafts (Kunstgewerbeschule), where he studied until 1883, and received training as an architectural painter. He revered the foremost history painter of the time, Hans Makart.

Klimt readily accepted the principles of a conservative training; his early work may be classified as academic. In 1877 his brother Ernst,

The Kiss- Gustav Klimt

The Kiss- Gustav Klimt

who, like his father, would become an engraver, also enrolled in the school. The two brothers and their friend Franz Matsch began working together; by 1880 they had received numerous commissions as a team they called the “Company of Artists”, and helped their teacher in painting murals in the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna.

After finishing his studies, Klimt opened a studio together with Matsch and Ernst Klimt. The trio specialized in interior decoration, particularly theaters. Already by the 1880s, they were renowned for their skill and decorated theaters throughout the Austro-Hungarian Empire, and much of their work can still be seen there. In 1885, they were commissioned to decorate the Empress Elizabeth’s country retreat, the Villa Hermes near Vienna (Midsummer Night’s Dream). In 1886, the painters were asked to decorate the Viennese Burgtheater, effectively recognizing them as the foremost of decorators of Austria. Works that Klimt painted for this project include the Cart of Thespis, the Altars of Dionysosand Apollo and the Theater at Taormina, as well as scenes from the Shakespearean Globe Theater.

Adele Bloch-Bauer I, which sold for a record $135 million in 2006, Neue Galerie, New York- Gustav Klimt

Adele Bloch-Bauer I, which sold for a record $135 million in 2006, Neue Galerie, New York- Gustav Klimt

At the completion of the work in 1888, the painters were awarded the Golden Service Cross (Verdienstkreuz), and Klimt was commissioned to paint the Auditorium of the Old Burgtheater, the work that would bring him to the height of his fame. This painting, with its almost photographic accuracy is considered one of the greatest achievements in Naturalist painting. As a result, Klimt was awarded the Emperor’s Prize and became a fashionable portraitist, as well as the leading artist of his day. Paradoxically, it was at this point, with a fabulous career as a classicist painter unfolding before him, that Klimt began turning towards the radical new styles of the Art Noveau.

In the coming few years, the artistic trio fell apart. Franz Matsch wanted to branch out into portrait painting, which he did with some success. Meanwhile, Gustav Klimt’s changing style made it impossible for them to work together on any project. Furthermore, Ernst Klimt died in 1892, shortly after the death of their father.

Struck by this double tragedy, Gustav retreated from public life, focusing on experimentation and the study of

Hygeia- Gustav Klimt

Hygeia- Gustav Klimt

contemporary styles of art, as well as historical styles that were overlooked within the establishment, such as Japanese, Chinese, Ancient Egyptian and Mycenaean art. In 1893, he began work on his last public commission: the paintings Philosophy, Medicine and Jurisprudence, for the University of Vienna. The three would only be completed in the early 1900s, and they would be criticized severely for their radical style and what was, according to the mores of the time, lewdness. Unfortunately, the paintings were destroyed during the Second World War and only black-and-white reproductions of them remain.

The painter was not alone in his opposition to the Austrian artistic establishment of the time. In 1897, he, together with forty other notable Viennese artists, resigned from the Academy of Arts and founded the “Union of Austrian Painters”, more commonly known as the Secession. Klimt was immediately elected president. While the Union had no clearly defined goals or support for particular styles, it was against the classicist establishment, which it found to be oppressive.

The Three Ages of Woman- Gustav Klimt

The Three Ages of Woman- Gustav Klimt

In 1902, Klimt finished the Beethoven Frieze for the 14th Vienna Secessionist exhibition, which was intended to be a celebration of the composer and featured a monumental, polychromed sculpture by Max Klinger. Meant for the exhibition only, the frieze was painted directly on the walls with light materials. After the exhibition the painting was preserved, although it did not go on display until 1986.

During this period Klimt did not confine himself to public commissions. Beginning in the late 1890s he took annual summer holidays with the Flöge family on the shores of Attersee and painted many of his landscapes there. Klimt was largely interested in painting figures; these works constitute the only genre aside from figure-painting which seriously interested Klimt. Klimt’s Attersee paintings are of a number and quality so as to merit a separate appreciation. Formally, the landscapes are characterized by the same refinement of design and emphatic patterning as the figural pieces. Deep space in the Attersee works is so efficiently flattened to a single plane, it is believed that Klimt painted them while looking through a telescope.

Klimt’s ‘Golden Phase’ was marked by positive critical reaction and success. Many of his paintings from this period used gold leaf; the prominent use of gold can first be traced back to Pallas Athene, (1898) andJudith I (1901), although the works most popularly associated with this period are the Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I (1907) and The Kiss (1907-1908). Klimt travelled little but trips to Venice and Ravenna, both famous for their

The Tree of Life- Gustav Klimt

The Tree of Life- Gustav Klimt

beautiful mosaics, most likely inspired his gold technique and his Byzantine imagery. In 1904, he collaborated with other artists on the lavish Palais Stoclet, the home of a wealthy Belgian industrialist, which was one of the grandest monuments of the Art Nouveau age. Klimt’s contributions to the dining room, including both Fulfillment and Expectation, were some of his finest decorative work, and as he publicly stated, “probably the ultimate stage of my development of ornament.” Between 1907 and 1909, Klimt painted five canvases of society women wrapped in fur. His apparent love of costume is expressed in the many photographs of Flöge modeling clothing he designed.

Water Snakes II- Gustav Klimt

Water Snakes II- Gustav Klimt

As he worked and relaxed in his home, Klimt normally wore sandals and a long robe with no undergarments. His simple life was somewhat cloistered, devoted to his art and family and little else except the Secessionist Movement, and he avoided café society and other artists socially. Klimt’s fame usually brought patrons to his door, and he could afford to be highly selective. His painting method was very deliberate and painstaking at times and he required lengthy sittings by his subjects. Though very active sexually, he kept his affairs discreet and he avoided personal scandal.

By 1910, Klimt had moved past his Golden Style. One of his last pictures in that style was Death and Life (1908-1910). In 1911, the painting was shown at the International Exhibition in Rome, where it won first place. However, the artist was dissatisfied with the work, and in 1912, he changed the background from gold to blue.

In 1915 his mother Anna died. Klimt died three years later in Vienna on February 6, 1918, having suffered a

Gustav Klimt

Gustav Klimt

stroke and pneumonia. He was buried at the Hietzing Cemetery in Vienna. Numerous paintings were left unfinished.

Klimt’s paintings have brought some of the highest prices recorded for individual works of art. In 2006, the 1907 portrait, Adele Bloch-Bauer I, was purchased for the Neue Galerie in New York by Ronald Lauder for a reported US $135 million, surpassing Picasso’s 1905 Boy With a Pipe (sold May 5, 2004 for $104 million), as the highest reported price ever paid for a painting.

Klimt’s work is often distinguished by elegant gold or coloured decoration, spirals and swirls, and phallic shapes used to conceal the more erotic positions of the drawings upon which many of his paintings are based. This can be seen in Judith I (1901), and in The Kiss (1907-1908), and especially in Danaë (1907). One of the most common themes Klimt used was that of the dominant woman, the femme fatale.

Gustav Klimt

Gustav Klimt

Art historians note an eclectic range of influences contributing to Klimt’s distinct style, including Egyptian, Minoan, Classical Greek, and Byzantine inspirations. Klimt was also inspired by the engravings of Albrecht Dürer, late medieval European painting, and Japanese Rimpa school. His mature works are characterized by a rejection of earlier naturalistic styles, and make use of symbols or symbolic elements to convey psychological ideas and emphasize the “freedom” of art from traditional culture.

Biography is from www.gustav-klimt.com.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today.  I had such a great time honoring this great artist.  Join me tomorrow on Day 329!

Best,

Linda

The Nap- Tribute to Gustav Klimt Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Metallic Paint of Canvas

The Nap- Tribute to Gustav Klimt
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Metallic Paint of Canvas

Side-View The Nap- Tribute to Gustav Klimt Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Metallic Paint of Canvas

Side-View
The Nap- Tribute to Gustav Klimt
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Metallic Paint of Canvas

Close-Up 1 The Nap- Tribute to Gustav Klimt Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Metallic Paint of Canvas

Close-Up 1
The Nap- Tribute to Gustav Klimt
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Metallic Paint of Canvas

Close-Up 2 The Nap- Tribute to Gustav Klimt Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Metallic Paint of Canvas

Close-Up 2
The Nap- Tribute to Gustav Klimt
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Metallic Paint of Canvas

Close-Up 3 The Nap- Tribute to Gustav Klimt Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic & Metallic Paint of Canvas

Close-Up 3
The Nap- Tribute to Gustav Klimt
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic & Metallic Paint of Canvas

Day 327- M.C. Escher- Absurdly Impossible

It’s Day 327 and I got nervous last night when I saw today’s artist.  Well, most of the artists coming up are quite intimidating!  I really wanted to honor his style, but also have fun with it.  Join me in honoring M.C. Escher today!

M.C. Escher

M.C. Escher

M.C. Escher Co. B.V.  Baarn, The Netherlands

M.C. Escher Co. B.V.
Baarn, The Netherlands

Maurits Cornelis Escher  17 June 1898 – 27 March 1972), usually referred to as M. C. Escher, was a Dutch graphic artist. He is known for his often mathematically inspired woodcuts, lithographs, and mezzotints. These feature impossible constructions, explorations of infinity, architecture, and tessellations.

Maurits Cornelis was born in Leeuwarden, Friesland, in a house that forms part of the Princessehof Ceramics Museum today. He was the youngest son of civil engineer George Arnold Escher and his second wife, Sara Gleichman. In 1903, the family moved to Arnhem, where he attended primary school and secondary school until 1918.

He was a sickly child, and was placed in a special school at the age of seven and failed the second grade. Although he excelled at drawing, his grades were generally poor. He also took carpentry and piano lessons until he was thirteen years old.

In 1919, Escher attended the Haarlem School of Architecture and Decorative Arts in

Bond of Union- M.C. Escher

Bond of Union- M.C. Escher

Haarlem. He briefly studied architecture, but he failed a number of subjects (partly due to a persistent skin infection) and switched to decorative arts. He studied under Samuel Jessurun de Mesquita, with whom he remained friends for years. In 1922, Escher left the school after having gained experience in drawing and making woodcuts.

Cycle- M.C. Escher

Cycle- M.C. Escher

In 1922, an important year of his life, Escher traveled through Italy (Florence, San Gimignano, Volterra, Siena, Ravello) and Spain (Madrid, Toledo, Granada). He was impressed by the Italian countryside and by the Alhambra, a fourteenth-century Moorish castle in Granada. The intricate decorative designs at Alhambra, which were based on geometrical symmetries featuring interlocking repetitive patterns sculpted into the stone walls and ceilings, were a powerful influence on Escher’s works. He returned to Italy regularly in the following years.

In Italy, Escher met Jetta Umiker, whom he married in 1924. The couple settled in Rome where their first son, Giorgio (George) Arnaldo Escher, named after his grandfather, was born. Escher and Jetta later had two more sons: Arthur and Jan.

In 1935, the political climate in Italy (under Mussolini) became unacceptable to Escher. He had no interest in politics, finding it impossible to involve himself with any ideals other than the expressions of

Sky Water- M.C. Escher

Sky Water- M.C. Escher

his own concepts through his own particular medium, but he was averse to fanaticism and hypocrisy. When his eldest son, George, was forced at the age of nine to wear a Ballila uniform in school, the family left Italy and moved to Château-d’Œx, Switzerland, where they remained for two years.

Escher, who had been very fond of and inspired by the landscapes in Italy, was decidedly unhappy in Switzerland. In 1937, the family moved again, to Uccle, a suburb of Brussels, Belgium. World War II forced them to move in January 1941, this time to Baarn, Netherlands, where Escher lived until 1970. Most of Escher’s better-known works date from this period. The sometimes cloudy, cold and wet weather of the Netherlands allowed him to focus intently on his work. For a time after undergoing surgery, 1962 was the only period in which Escher did not work on new pieces.

Eye- M.C. Escher

Eye- M.C. Escher

Escher moved to the Rosa Spier Huis in Laren in 1970, an artists’ retirement home in which he had his own studio. He died at the home on 27 March 1972, aged 73.

In his early years, Escher sketched landscapes and nature. He also sketched insects, which appeared frequently in his later work. His first artistic work, completed in 1922, featured eight human heads divided in different planes. Later around 1924, he lost interest in “regular division” of planes, and turned to sketching landscapes in Italy with irregular perspectives that are impossible in natural form.

Escher’s first print of an impossible reality was Still Life and Street, 1937. His artistic expression was created from images in his mind, rather than directly from observations and travels to other countries. Well known examples of his work include Drawing Hands, a work in which two hands are shown, each drawing the other; Sky and Water, in which light plays on shadow to morph the water background behind fish figures into bird figures on a sky background; and Ascending and Descending, in which lines of people ascend and descend stairs in an infinite loop, on a construction which is impossible to build and possible to draw only by taking advantage of quirks of perception and perspective.

He worked primarily in the media of lithographs and woodcuts, though the few mezzotints he made are considered to be masterpieces of

Hand with Reflecting Sphere- M.C. Escher

Hand with Reflecting Sphere- M.C. Escher

the technique. In his graphic art, he portrayed mathematical relationships among shapes, figures and space. Additionally, he explored interlocking figures using black and white to enhance different dimensions. Integrated into his prints were mirror images of cones, spheres, cubes, rings and spirals. Escher was left-handed.

Although Escher did not have mathematical training—his understanding of mathematics was largely visual and intuitive—Escher’s work had a strong mathematical component, and more than a few of the worlds which he drew were built around impossible objects such as the Necker cube and the Penrose triangle. Many of Escher’s works employed repeated tilings called tessellations. Escher’s artwork is especially well liked by mathematicians and scientists, who enjoy his use of polyhedra and geometric distortions. For example, in Gravity, multicolored turtles poke their heads out of a stellated dodecahedron.

Relativity- M.C. Escher

Relativity- M.C. Escher

The mathematical influence in his work emerged around 1936, when he journeyed to the Mediterranean with the Adria Shipping Company. He became interested in order and symmetry. Escher described his journey through the Mediterranean as “the richest source of inspiration I have ever tapped.”

After his journey to the Alhambra, Escher tried to improve upon the art works of the Moors using geometric grids as the basis for his sketches, which he then overlaid with additional designs, mainly animals such as birds and lions.

His first study of mathematics, which later led to its incorporation into his art works, began with George Pólya’s academic paper on plane symmetry groups sent to him by his brother Berend. This paper inspired him to learn the concept of the 17 wallpaper groups(plane symmetry groups). Using this mathematical concept, Escher created periodic tilings with 43 colored drawings of different types of symmetry. From this point on he developed a mathematical approach to expressions of symmetry in his art works. Starting in 1937, he created woodcuts using the concept of the 17 plane symmetry groups.

In 1941, Escher summarized his findings in a sketchbook, which he labeled Regelmatige vlakverdeling in asymmetrische congruente

3 Spheres II- M.C. Escher

3 Spheres II- M.C. Escher

veelhoeken (“Regular division of the plane with asymmetric congruent polygons”). His intention in writing this was to aid himself in integrating mathematics into art. Escher is considered a research mathematician of his time because of his documentation with this paper, in which he studied color based division, and developed a system of categorizing combinations of shape, color and symmetrical properties.

Around 1956, Escher explored the concept of representing infinity on a two-dimensional plane. Discussions with Canadian mathematician H.S.M. Coxeter inspired Escher’s interest in hyperbolic tessellations, which are regular tilings of the hyperbolic plane. Escher’s wood engravings Circle Limit I–IV demonstrate this concept. In 1959, Coxeter published his finding that these works were extraordinarily accurate: “Escher got it absolutely right to the millimeter.”

Belvedere- M.C. Escher

Belvedere- M.C. Escher

Escher was awarded the Knighthood of the Order of Orange Nassau in 1955. Subsequently he regularly designed art for dignitaries around the world.

In 1958, he published a book entitled Regular Division of the Plane, with reproductions of a series of woodcuts based on tessellations of the plane, in which he described the systematic buildup of mathematical designs in his artworks. He emphasized, “Mathematicians have opened the gate leading to an extensive domain.”

Overall, his early love of Roman and Italian landscapes and of nature led to his interest in the concept of regular division of a plane, which he applied in over 150 colored works. Other mathematical principles evidenced in his works include the superposition of a hyperbolic plane on a fixed 2-dimensional plane, and the incorporation of three-dimensional objects such as spheres, columns and cubes into his works. For example, in a print called “Reptiles”, he combined two and three-dimensional images. In one of his papers, Escher emphasized the importance of dimensionality and described himself as “irritated” by flat shapes: “I make them come out of the plane.”

Escher also studied topology. He learned additional concepts in mathematics from the British mathematician Roger Penrose. From this knowledge he created Waterfall and Up and Down, featuring irregular perspectives similar to the concept of the Möbius strip.

Escher printed Metamorphosis I in 1937, which was a beginning part of a series of designs that told a story through the use of pictures. These works demonstrated a culmination of Escher’s skills to incorporate mathematics into art. In Metamorphosis I, he transformed convex polygonsinto regular patterns in a plane to form a human motif. This effect symbolizes his change of interest from landscape and nature to regular division of a plane.

His piece Metamorphosis III is wide enough to cover all the walls in a room, and then loop back onto itself.

After 1953, Escher became a lecturer at many organizations. A planned series of lectures in North America in 1962 was cancelled due to an

Drawing Hands- M.C. Escher

Drawing Hands- M.C. Escher

illness, but the illustrations and text for the lectures, written out in full by Escher, were later published as part of the book Escher on Escher. In July 1969 he finished his last work, a woodcut called Snakes, in which snakes wind through a pattern of linked rings which fade to infinity toward both the center and the edge of a circle.

The special way of thinking and the rich graphic work of M.C. Escher has had a continuous influence in science and art, as well as being referenced in popular culture. Ownership of the Escher intellectual property and of his unique art works have been separated from each other.

In 1969, Escher’s business advisor, Jan W. Vermeulen, author of a biography in Dutch on the artist, established the M.C. Escher Stichting (M.C. Escher Foundation), and transferred into this entity virtually all of Escher’s unique work as well as hundreds of his original prints. These works were lent by the Foundation to the Hague Museum. Upon Escher’s death, his three sons dissolved the Foundation, and they became partners in the ownership of the art works. In 1980, this holding was sold to an American art dealer and the Hague Museum. The Museum obtained all of the documentation and the smaller portion of the art works.

The copyrights remained the possession of the three sons – who later sold them to Cordon Art, a Dutch company. Control of the copyrights was subsequently transferred to The M.C. Escher Company B.V. of Baarn, Netherlands, which licenses use of the copyrights on all of Escher’s art and on his spoken and written text.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my M.C. Escher tribute today.  My arm has been hurting the past couple weeks…probably due to painting, drawing and also the change in weather.  I really need to rest it once this project is over AND get some acupuncture done!  Whew.  It was a challenging piece and I kept changing my mind about the background.  I finally decided on what to do because of the pain…ha.

I will see you tomorrow on Day 328.  Best, Linda

Q-Bert- Tribute to M.C. Escher Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Graphite on Canvas

Q-Bert- Tribute to M.C. Escher
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Graphite on Canvas

Side-View Q-Bert- Tribute to M.C. Escher Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Graphite on Canvas

Side-View
Q-Bert- Tribute to M.C. Escher
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Graphite on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Q-Bert- Tribute to M.C. Escher Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Graphite on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Q-Bert- Tribute to M.C. Escher
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Graphite on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Q-Bert- Tribute to M.C. Escher Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Graphite on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Q-Bert- Tribute to M.C. Escher
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Graphite on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Q-Bert- Tribute to M.C. Escher Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Graphite on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Q-Bert- Tribute to M.C. Escher
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Graphite on Canvas

Day 326- KAWS- Infusion

It’s Day 326 and I’m pooped…had a show last night and then heading out to rehearsal in a little while.  Please join me in honoring KAWS A.K.A. Brian Donnelly today.

KAWS Brian Donnelly

KAWS Brian Donnelly

kaws

kaws

Brian Donnelly (born 1974), professionally known as KAWS, is a New York-based artist and designer of limited edition toys and clothing. He currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

KAWS was born Brian Donnelly in Jersey City, New Jersey. He graduated from the School of Visual Arts in New York with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in illustration in 1996. After graduation, KAWS briefly worked for Disney as a freelance animator painting backgrounds. He also contributed to the animated series 101 DalmatiansDaria and Doug.

He began his career as a graffiti artist growing up in Jersey City, New Jersey. Later moving to New York City in the 1990s, KAWS started subverting imagery on billboards, bus shelters and kaws aldrich invite-thumb-523x358phone booth advertisements. These reworked advertisements were at first left alone, lasting for up to several months, but as KAWS’ popularity skyrocketed, the ads became increasingly sought after. In addition to New York, KAWS has done work in Paris, London, Berlin and Tokyo.

In the late 90s, KAWS began to design and produce limited edition vinyl toys, “an instant hit with the global art toy-collecting community,” especially in Japan, where this genre is well respected and widespread. More toys and later clothing were made for Original Fake, a recent collaborative store with Medicom Toy, in the Aoyama district of Tokyo where an original limited edition product is released each week.

KAWS- The Nature of Need Exhibition

KAWS- The Nature of Need Exhibition

KAWS has also participated in other commercial collaborations with Nigo for A Bathing Ape, Jun “Jonio” Takahashi for Undercover, Michael “Mic” Neumann for Kung Faux, snowboard projects with Burton, and sneakers with Nike and Vans. His most recent collaboration was with Comme des Garçons. As of August 2010, it is reported that Kaws has designed a limited edition bottle for Dos Equis, a Mexican beer brand. The bottle was released in Mexico in early September 2010.

KAWS’ acrylic paintings and sculpture have many repeating images, all meant to be universally understood, surpassing languages and cultures. One of KAWS’ early series, Package Paintings, was made in 2000. This series, entitled The Kimpsons,subverted the famous American cartoon, The Simpsons.

KAWS explains that he “found it weird how infused a cartoon could become in people’s lives; the impact it could have, compared to regular politics.” In addition,

kaws toys

kaws toys

KAWS has reworked other familiar icons such as Mickey Mouse, the Michelin Man, the Smurfs, and SpongeBob SquarePants.

Recent solo exhibitions include Original Fake at the Bape Gallery in Tokyo (2003) where his sculpture “Wonderful World” sold for $400,000. KAWS has been periodically showing both paintings and products at Colette in Paris since 1999. His work is included in the traveling exhibition Beautiful Losers, which started at the Cincinnati Contemporary Art Center and will be traveling through 2009 throughout the US and Europe, including his largest museum show to date, which will be held at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, Georgia.

kaws installation

kaws installation

KAWS’s “Companion,” a grayscale figure based on Mickey Mouse with his face obscured by both hands, was adapted into a balloon for the 2012 Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade as part of the parade’s “Blue Sky Gallery” feature.

For the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards KAWS’s company redesigned the iconic moonman statue.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today for KAWS.  I love his work and it makes me want to design toys!  I also enjoyed fusing my favorite cartoon character Spongebob and his artwork today. 🙂  I will see you tomorrow on Day 327!

Best,

Linda

Oh My- Tribute to KAWS Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Oh My- Tribute to KAWS
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Oh My- Tribute to KAWS Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Oh My- Tribute to KAWS
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Oh My- Tribute to KAWS Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Oh My- Tribute to KAWS
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Oh My- Tribute to KAWS Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Oh My- Tribute to KAWS
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Oh My- Tribute to KAWS Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Oh My- Tribute to KAWS
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 325- Gertrude Abercrombie- Simple and Strange

It’s Day 325 and I’m finishing up stuff today because I have another improv show tonight…I’m trying to stay rested and not overexert myself these past couple weeks.  I had a great time painting today’s piece so join me in honoring Gertrude Abercrombie today!

Gertrude Abercrombie

Gertrude Abercrombie

Self Portrait of My Sister- Gertrude Abercrombie

Self Portrait of My Sister- Gertrude Abercrombie

Gertrude Abercrombie (February 17, 1909 – July 3, 1977) was an American painter based in Chicago. Called “the queen of the bohemian artists”, Abercrombie was involved in the Chicago jazz scene and was friends with musicians such as Dizzy Gillespie,Charlie Parker, and Sarah Vaughan, whose music inspired her own creative work.

Abercrombie was born on February 17, 1909, in Austin, Texas. Her parents, Tom and Lula Janes Abercrombie, were traveling opera singers who happened to be in Austin on the day of

"Between Two Camps" by Gertrude Abercrombie (1948)

“Between Two Camps” by Gertrude Abercrombie (1948)

Gertrude’s birth. The family lived in Berlin in 1913 to further her mother’s career, but the beginning of World War I caused the family to move back to the United States. Upon their return the family lived in Aledo, Illinois before settling in Hyde Park, Chicago in 1916. She was raised in a strict Christian Scientistenvironment at home.

She earned a degree in Romance Language from the University of Illinois in 1929. After studying figure drawing briefly at the Art Institute of Chicago, she took a year-long course in commercial art at the American Academy of Art in Chicago, leading to her first job drawing gloves for Mesirow Department Store advertisements. She also worked briefly as an artist for Sears. In the mid-1930s she moved out of her family’s home and became active in the regional art scene.

Gertrude Abercrombie, Split Personality (1954)

Gertrude Abercrombie, Split Personality (1954)

In 1940 she married lawyer Robert Livingston, and in 1942 gave birth to their daughter Dinah. In 1948 the couple divorced. That same year she married music critic Frank Sandiford, with Dizzy Gillespie performing at the wedding. The couple were active in the bohemian lifestyle and jazz scene of Chicago hence their connection with Gillespie. They met musicians through Sandiford and through Abercrombie’s own skills as an improvisational pianist. The couple would divorce in 1964.

Within Abercrombie’s avant garde social circle she was the inspiration for the song

Gertrude Abercrombie

Gertrude Abercrombie

“Gertrude’s Bounce” by Richie Powell, who claimed that she walked “just like the way the rhythm sounds in the Introduction”, and she appeared as herself in James Purdy’s Gertrude of Stony Island Avenue and as a fictional character in Purdy’s Malcolm, Eustace Chisholm.

Gertrude Abercrombie

Gertrude Abercrombie

By the late 1950s her health declined due to financial trouble, alcoholism, and arthritis, and she became reclusive. After 1959 her paintings diminished in number as well as scale. She required a wheelchair and was eventually bedridden. In the final year of her life, a major retrospective of her work was held at the Hyde Park Art Center. She died in Chicago July 3, 1977. Her will established the Gertrude Abercrombie Trust which distributed her work and the work of other artists she owned to cultural institutions throughout the Midwest.

While studying at the Institute she began working at a department store drawing gloves for advertisements and in 1932 she began to focus strictly on her art. The following summer she made her first sale at an outdoor art fair in Chicago and received an honorable mention in the newspaper for the event. From 1934-1940 she served as a painter for the Works Progress Administration and in 1934 year the Chicago Society of Artists held a solo show of her work. During the 1930s and 1940s she also began creating woodcuts.

Themes

She painted many variations of her favored subjects: sparsely furnished interiors, barren landscapes, self-portraits, and still-lifes. Many

Gertrude Abercrombie

Gertrude Abercrombie

compositions feature a lone woman in a flowing gown, often depicted with attributes of sorcery: an owl, a black cat, a crystal ball, or a broomstick. These works were often self-portraits, as she stated in an interview with Studs Terkel shortly before her death: “it is always myself that I paint”. Tall and sharp-featured, she considered herself ugly; in life she sometimes wore a pointed velvet hat to accentuate her witch-like appearance, “enjoy[ing] the power this artifice gave her over others who would fear or recoil from her”. The 1940s and ’50s are described as her most prolific and productive period; a time when she no longer painted many portraits, but retained the themes mentioned above.

Abercrombie’s mature works are painted in a precise, controlled style. She took little interest in other artists’ work, although she admired Magritte.  Largely self-taught, she did not regard her lack of extensive formal training as a hindrance. She said of her work:

I am not interested in complicated things nor in the commonplace. I like and like to paint simple things that are a little strange. My work comes directly from my inner consciousness and it must come easily. It is a process of selection and reduction.

Gertrude Abercrombie

Gertrude Abercrombie

Her work evolved into incorporating her love for jazz music, inspired by parties and jam sessions she hosted in her Hyde Park home. Musicians such as Sonny Rollins, Max Roach, Jackie Cain and the Modern Jazz Quartet were considered friends. Dizzy Gillespie described her “the first bop artist. Bop in the sense that she has taken the essence of our music and transported it to another art form”.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I really enjoyed coming up with a theme and concept of today’s piece.  It was definitely something different compared to the other pieces I’ve created.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 326!

Best,

Linda

 

Spirit Friend- Tribute to Gertrude Abercrombie Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Spirit Friend- Tribute to Gertrude Abercrombie
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Spirit Friend- Tribute to Gertrude Abercrombie Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Spirit Friend- Tribute to Gertrude Abercrombie
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Spirit Friend- Tribute to Gertrude Abercrombie Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Spirit Friend- Tribute to Gertrude Abercrombie
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Spirit Friend- Tribute to Gertrude Abercrombie Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Spirit Friend- Tribute to Gertrude Abercrombie
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Spirit Friend- Tribute to Gertrude Abercrombie Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Spirit Friend- Tribute to Gertrude Abercrombie
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas