Day 273- Corneille- Heaven on Earth

It’s Day 273 and I’m rushing around a bit today before I head out to some appointments.  Had tons of fun with today’s piece…so colorful and one of my favorite art movements.  I wanted to play with color today since I did charcoal yesterday.  Join me in honoring Corneille today. 🙂  His wikipedia bio was short so I decided to paste his obituary from the NYtimes.com on 9/6/2010.

Corneille

Corneille

Corneille 1973

Corneille 1973

The Dutch artist Corneille, who created lyrical, expressionist paintings bursting with color and who was one of the founders of the postwar European art movement known as Cobra, died on Sunday in Paris. He was 88 and lived in Paris.

His death was announced by the Cobra Museum of Modern Art in the Netherlands.

Corneille was best known for radicalizing the conservative Dutch art world in the early

Corneille

Corneille

1950s, making modern art not only acceptable, but embraceable as well. He placed familiar subjects — birds, cats, women and landscapes — in mythological and often childlike contexts, imbuing them with spontaneity and bright, sensual reds.

“I am a painter of joy,” Corneille remarked at a 2007 exhibition of his work at the Cobra Museum, said Katja Weitering, the artistic director of the museum, in Amstelveen, near Amsterdam.

“He was really an artist for all people,” she said. “He was open to the audience; he appeared in documentaries, on television, and frequently visited exhibitions. It’s safe to say we consider him one of the most important modern artists of the postwar.” In the Netherlands, she added, his fame and influence derived from the appeal of Cobra.

Corneille

Corneille

Born Guillaume Cornelis van Beverloo to Dutch parents on July 3, 1922, in Liège, Belgium, Corneille was influenced by Miró, Picasso and Paul Klee but claimed the most profound connection to van Gogh because of their shared passion for color, form and nature. He is to be buried in a plot near the grave of van Gogh in Auvers-sur-Oise, France, Ms. Weitering said.

Corneille founded Cobra in 1948 with five other artists, including his close friends Karel Appel and Constant Nieuwenhuys. The name was an acronym made up of the artists’ home cities — Copenhagen, Brussels and Amsterdam. The artists drew inspiration from surrealism, but believed that style promoted too much discussion and not enough action, Ms. Weitering said.

Instead, Corneille and his friends formed a united front in postwar Europe, urging

Corneille

Corneille

a break from tradition and toward freedom and vitality. In an intense three years, Cobra produced two major international exhibitions and published 10 issues of a magazine for which Corneille wrote poetry. Cobra disbanded in 1951, saying it had achieved its goals, and the artists returned to their individual careers.

Corneille

Corneille

Corneille began his artistic life in 1940, studying at the Academy of Fine Arts in Amsterdam. Though he made his home base in Paris in the early 1950s, he traveled extensively in Africa, Cuba, Brazil, and Mexico. In Africa he became fascinated by the colors, smells and cultures, Ms. Weitering said, collecting brightly painted objects like the masks he later used as themes. He also spent time in Italy, Israel and San Francisco, expanding his repertory to include etching, ceramics and printmaking.

Beyond the Netherlands, Corneille’s work is in the collections of several American museums, including the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.

He is survived by his wife, Natacha, and their son, Dimitri.

Corneille

Corneille

Ms. Weitering said she recalled a television interview Corneille did several years ago in the Netherlands, in which he talked about his natural optimism.

She said: “I remember Corneille saying, ‘There are people who believe in heaven after they die. I believe in heaven on earth.’ ”

~

I hope you enjoy my piece today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 274!

Best,

Linda

Brand New Day- Tribute to Corneille  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Brand New Day- Tribute to Corneille
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Brand New Day- Tribute to Corneille  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Brand New Day- Tribute to Corneille
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Brand New Day- Tribute to Corneille  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Brand New Day- Tribute to Corneille
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Brand New Day- Tribute to Corneille  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Brand New Day- Tribute to Corneille
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Brand New Day- Tribute to Corneille  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Brand New Day- Tribute to Corneille
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 272- Douglas A. Kinsey- Zen-Like Economy

It’s Day 272 and I really wanted to work with charcoal before the year was over!  I found today’s artist randomly and fell in love with his artwork and philosophy. 🙂  Join me in honoring Douglas A. Kinsey today.

Douglas A. Kinsey

Douglas A. Kinsey

As If Things Were Less Spoken Of 5- Douglas A. Kinsey

As If Things Were Less Spoken Of 5- Douglas A. Kinsey

Doug Kinsey (b. 1956) has been prolific as a painter for over thirty years. His first solo-exhibit was held at Mount St. Vincent University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada in 1972. As a young man Kinsey had the good fortune to work and study under two of Canada’s more notable color-field minimalists Jean Goguen and Guido Molinari while attending what is now known as Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Over a 7 year period Paul Reed of the Washington D.C. Colorists mentored Kinsey. Kinsey is a graduate of The Otis College of Art and Design, Los Angeles, CA.

Doug approaches the development of his imagery with an expressed Zen-like economy. The

Coal Mine 17- Douglas A. Kinsey

Coal Mine 17- Douglas A. Kinsey

strong subtle spiritual component remains as the most compelling attitude seen in his work. This abiding stillness expressed in the dark blue forms can at times produce a roaring sense of complete mystical silence. During this experience the viewer is asked to join and participate in the deeper mysteries which can occur during profound moments of inner-contemplation.

By allowing the physical landscape aspects of his Ohio River Valley home to influence his primary shapes and forms a strong organic quality is defined.

The Borderline Revisited 5- Douglas A. Kinsey

The Borderline Revisited 5- Douglas A. Kinsey

Intrinsically haptic by nature, Doug’s work articulates the combining of the intellect with the spiritual truths to be found in nature.

A native of California, Kinsey has resided in Pittsburgh, PA for almost ten years. He received his Masters degree in theology from Trinity Episcopal School for Ministry and currently teaches art to severely “at risk” children at The Holy Family Institute for Learning in Pittsburgh, PA.

Kinsey has exhibited widely in the US and abroad. Most notably are exhibitions at The Carnegie Museum of Art in 2001 which was curated by David Carrier, critic for Artforum and Art in America, In 2003 he received notice from Thomas Sokolowski, Director of The Andy Warhol Museum when he was awarded Best in Show at The Hoyt Institute of Art.

Kinsey has been included in exhibitions at the State Museum of Pennsylvania for an unprecedented two years in a row 2003-2004.

Also in 2004 his work was included in Westmoreland Museum of American Art Biennial, The Andy Warhol Museum of Art, and Gallery Ginza Himawari, Tokyo, Japan.

Two large canvases were selected for The Butler Institute of American Art 70th Summer Annual. 2006 (Youngstown, Ohio). The curator

Waking Into The Desert Dream 39- Douglas A. Kinsey

Waking Into The Desert Dream 39- Douglas A. Kinsey

was noted painter and art critic for NEWSWEEK Magazine, Peter Plagens. “Interval Series, exodus” received an Honorable Mention award.

Kinsey’s work is often described as maintaining the coolness of Rothko while expressing the strength of Kline.

When looking at my work the viewer should consider them as configurations of spiritual geography. In this manner I refer them as “Interior/Exterior Landscapes”. The primary blue shape will refer to geological forms found in geographical landscape. As such they mark unspoken borders much like a rock cairn would. This marking indicates a place of spiritual solace and point of reflection. My intention is to explore the subconscious symbols of an ‘interior’ spiritual reality when consecrated by the borders of ‘external’ physical reality.’

All artwork and biography is from www.absolutearts.com.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today.  It was so fun to work with charcoal again.  I haven’t really worked with it since art school!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 273.

Best,

Linda

The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey Linda Cleary 2014 Charcoal on Canvas

The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey
Linda Cleary 2014
Charcoal on Canvas

Side-View The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey Linda Cleary 2014 Charcoal on Canvas

Side-View
The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey
Linda Cleary 2014
Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 1 The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey Linda Cleary 2014 Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 1
The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey
Linda Cleary 2014
Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 2 The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey Linda Cleary 2014 Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 2
The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey
Linda Cleary 2014
Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 3 The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey Linda Cleary 2014 Charcoal on Canvas

Close-Up 3
The Way Out- Tribute to Douglas A. Kinsey
Linda Cleary 2014
Charcoal on Canvas

 

 

 

Day 271- Pamela Munger- Individualistic Responses

It’s Day 271 and I am a little pooped after my improv show last night.  It went so well!  Now back to painting!  Join me in honoring Pamela Munger today. 🙂  Had a wonderful time painting my tribute today.

Pamela Munger

Pamela Munger

TRACE ELEMENTS- Pamela Munger

TRACE ELEMENTS- Pamela Munger

What draws me to painting is the combination of creativity, solitude and limitless possibilities.  I’m all about experimentation with paint, surfaces and subject matter but I like to keep it simple and innocent, avoiding detail and not giving away the whole story. I lean towards  the abstract because that’s where I can truly be creative and people can develop their own interpretation based on what they see, but I also do the occasional painterly landscape or still life. I’ve noticed that’s one of the trickiest things about painting….trying to focus on what to paint since I want to paint everything!

I’ve been fortunate to work with several popular interior designers over the years and enjoy taking on the occasional commission. Recently, I’ve been featured on popular websites such as One Kings Lane, Joy and Revelry, and Fifty Artists.

My career as an artist started when I was teaching English and was looking for something to do creatively. I was given some art supplies one Xmas, painted my first painting and that was it. I was hooked. What started as a keen hobby grew to be a part time income and now I work full time as an artist.

I’m from southern California, and currently reside in rural western Colorado where my husband and I have a farm where we grow hops

Green and Yellow Fields- Pamela Munger

Green and Yellow Fields- Pamela Munger

for the Colorado microbreweries. The big open sky and land are a constant inspiration for my art.

About the artist and some paintings are from her website.

Artist Interview: Pamela Munger

Interview below is from The Gallivanting Girl Blog.  According to above info, she is now a full time artist.  Nice!

1. Were you always an art kid, or did you stumble upon it later in life?

I wasn’t an artsy kid at all, unless coloring in coloring books count. I thought one had to be gifted in art in order to do art. I don’t come from an artsy family– my father was an engineer and my mother was a homemaker and the art we had in our home was strictly traditional prints and one original painting of a barn that I believe was bought at a furniture store.
What happened was, about 10 years ago I started feeling crafty and creative and was looking for some outlet….I dabbled in writing, learned some tunes on the guitar, but nothing really took. Then, 6 years ago, my husband bought me a paint set from a hobby store for xmas and I painted my first painting and that’s all it took for me to become completely obsessed with painting.
Snow Bound- Pamela Munger

Snow Bound- Pamela Munger

2. What style of art is your favorite and why?

I love semi-abstract pieces. Because there’s a hint of what it is representing but the artist has taken liberty and creativity and produced the image with something more to say.
3. What do you use for inspiration, or how do you generate ideas?

Other artists are always an inspiration of course and the internet is so fabulous for looking at great art. I’m sort of all over the place with my paintings because I’m always thinking of different things I can do, plus I get bored easily and can’t stand to do the same thing over and over again. I get ideas from photos I take and images I see, and colors and light and texture. Many of my paintings start off as one thing and then morph into something completely different than I intended. I’m very loose when I paint and am attracted to the idea that I’m not completely sure what I will produce. It makes for a more exciting and fun process.

4. Walk us through your creative process from idea to finished project.

I’m a fast painter so most of my time is spent deciding what to paint. ( I love how painting tells you who you are as a person) It really depends on my mood. I might want to paint in oils one day and do some abstract landscapes, so I’ll look at some photos I have and choose

White Cloud- Pamela Munger

White Cloud- Pamela Munger

some colors and start mixing with a palette knife. I’ve got music playing, maybe some blues, I’ll take a canvas and cover it in an acrylic color, wait a few minutes for it to dry, then I’ll start laying on the oil paint. I decide as I go. If I don’t like what I see, I scrape it off and start over. (I love how painting takes a certain amount of bravery)

5. What is a typical day in your life?

Right now, I work full time as a case manager for children with disabilities. The weekends are the only time I have for painting. Maybe that will change some day. We have a farm where we grow hops for the craft brew industry and when that is successful enough, I’ll quit my job and have more time for painting. Yeah, right!

6. What do you think draws you to other people’s work?

That’s a tough question. If you saw the art in my house you’d think, huh…wonder why she bought that? There are just too many reasons to say why I’m drawn to a work. That’s the great thing about art….it produces an individualistic response.

West Abstract Landscape- Pamela Munger

West Abstract Landscape- Pamela Munger

7. What are your interests/hobbies?

Ah, any easy question! Other than painting. my second love is reading great literature. I was a lit major and taught English for several years. I also ski and cook and hike and obsess about my hair and chew gum alot.
8. Is this your full time job, or do you have a job out-of-studio?

I wish painting was my full time job! See above.

9. What is your favorite piece you’ve ever made and why?

Hmmm…..usually it’s my latest piece. Right now I’m working on a commission for my boss….a Hawaiian landscape. I pretty much love it and may take it for myself. Ssssh, don’t tell.

10. What advice would you give to an artist just starting out in the business world?

The business world of art? Sell online.
11. Describe your work space.
My work space is in our home office which I share with hubs. I have a small corner which I try to keep contained and often don’t. There is usually a smudge of paint on our business papers and on the computer mouse. Painting is a little messy and I’m not a clean freak. I paint on an easel and have a table and supply cabinet and my paintings are all over the house, in various stages, some completed and drying, some I plan to paint over, and some for sale on my etsy site. 

12. Did you face any setbacks on your path to being an artist?

Nothing really to make note of. You do have to overcome your fear of people not caring for your art. You can’t take it personally, everyone

Shaded was her Dream- Pamela Munger

Shaded was her Dream- Pamela Munger

has different tastes and are on their own artistic journey.

13. What milestones, goals, or achievements are you striving for right now? 
 
To increase my presence on the web and sell double what I sold in 2011. To get hubs to make enough money with the hop farm so we can build a new home with a separate studio for me 🙂 If everyone would just please start drinking more craft brew, thank you. Cheers! Thanks Julia for this opportunity!!
~
I really enjoyed doing my tribute today.  I randomly found Pamela’s paintings online and loved her style.  I hope I was able to capture her essence in my piece. 🙂  She has an etsy site if you are interested in purchasing one of her paintings!  One of her pieces was featured on Mad Men!
Blue Cascade (Featured on Mad Men Season 7)- Pamela Munger

Blue Cascade (Featured on Mad Men Season 7)- Pamela Munger

I will see you tomorrow on Day 272.
Best,
Linda
Lonely Tree- Tribute to Pamela Munger Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Lonely Tree- Tribute to Pamela Munger
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Lonely Tree- Tribute to Pamela Munger Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Lonely Tree- Tribute to Pamela Munger
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Lonely Tree- Tribute to Pamela Munger Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Lonely Tree- Tribute to Pamela Munger
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Lonely Tree- Tribute to Pamela Munger Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Lonely Tree- Tribute to Pamela Munger
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Lonely Tree- Tribute to Pamela Munger Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Lonely Tree- Tribute to Pamela Munger
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 270- Makoto Fujimura- Beauty Revealed

It’s Day 270 and I have an improv show this evening!  Pretty excited and nervous…but painting definitely helped distract my mind a bit today.  I found this artist and was going to wait to do a tribute until I bought actual gold leaf…then I got too excited to try it and did it with metallic paint.  I hope I was able to capture the essence of his artwork.  Join me in honoring Makoto Fujimura today.  He is so wonderful!

Makoto Fujimura

Makoto Fujimura

Tree Grace- Makoto Fujimura

Tree Grace- Makoto Fujimura

Makoto Fujimura (born in 1960 in Boston, USA) is a 21st-century contemporary artist. He graduated with a B.A. from Bucknell University, then studied in a traditional Japanesepainting doctorate program for several years at Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music with several notable artists such as Takashi Murakami and Hiroshi Senju.

He was the first non-native to participate in the Japanese Painting Doctorate

Splendor for Kayama- Makoto Fujimura

Splendor for Kayama- Makoto Fujimura

Program, which dates back to 15th century. His bicultural arts education led his style towards a fusion between fine art and abstract expressionism, together with the traditional Japanese art of Nihonga.

Fujimura founded the International Arts Movement in 1991 and currently acts as Creative Director. He has co-hosted several major conferences for the International Arts Movement, most recently “Inhabit.”

Makoto Fujimura Soliloquies: Joy

Makoto Fujimura
Soliloquies: Joy

He is represented by Dillon Gallery in New York City and Tokyo; as well as by White Stone Gallery in Philadelphia. His work can be seen at the National Modern Museum of Art in Tokyo, the Saint Louis Museum, the Cincinnati Museum, and the CNN building in Hong Kong. He was appointed by President Bush to the National Council on the Arts in 2003. At the completion of his term in 2009, then Chair Dana Gioia awarded him the Chairman’s Medal for his service and contribution to arts advocacy in the United States.

His work includes “The Splendor of the Medium”, “Water Flames,” and “Charis,” a collection

Golden Summer- Makoto Fujimura

Golden Summer- Makoto Fujimura

of paintings using stone-ground minerals including gold, platinum, azurite,malachite and cinnabar. He has collaborated with percussionist/composer Susie Ibarra on multiple occasions, and his live painting was recorded by Plywood Pictures in “Live in New York: Susie Ibarra + Makoto Fujimura.” (2009)

In November 2009, Fujimura’s works were coupled with works of Georges Rouault at Dillon Gallery. Fujimura created several new works in homage to the 20th century master, the catalyst of the “Sacred Arts Movement” in Paris that influenced Picasso, Matisse and other modernist artists. Fujimura wrote an essay for the show that was included in a short book that was produced to accompany the show called “Soliloquies” (Square Halo Books, 2009) ISBN 978-0-9785097-2-9.

Crossway Publishing commissioned Fujimura in 2009 for The Four Holy Gospels project to commemorate the 400th Anniversary of the publishing of the King James Bible. It was the first time that a single artist has been commissioned to illuminate the four Gospels in nearly five hundred years. The Gospels were on exhibition at the Museum Of Biblical Art in Manhattan until October 2011, and are on display in Takashimaya, Nihonbashi, Tokyo, until Dec 27th. The Four Holy Gospels comprise of five major frontispieces, 89 chapter heading letters and over 140 pages of hand illumined pages, all done in traditional Nihonga.

Golden Pines- Makoto Fujimura

Golden Pines- Makoto Fujimura

A popular speaker, he has lectured at Bucknell University, Philadelphia Biblical University, Gordon College, Grove City College, The King’s College (New York), Princeton University, Yale University, Baylor University, Belmont University, Duke University, Belhaven University and various arts conferences. He is also an author of several books including “River Grace” (Poiema Press, 2008), and “Refractions: A Journey of Faith, Art and Culture” (NavPress, 2009). His essays have appeared in IMAGE Journal, American Arts Quarterly, and World magazine. His essay “The Fallen Towers and the Art of Tea” was selected for IMAGE Journal’s “Bearing the Image: Twenty Years of IMAGE” anthology. He is featured twice in the book “Objects of Grace: Conversations on Creativity and Faith” (Square Halo Books, 2004) ISBN 978-0-9658798-3-5 and contributed an essay and artwork to “It Was Good: Making Art to the Glory of God” (Square Halo Books, 2007) ISBN 978-0-9785097-1-2. In 2010 Fujimura made his on-screen debut with commentary in the award winning documentary, The Human Experience.

Biography is from wikipedia.

Visit his website here.

I hope you enjoy my piece for today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 271@

Best,
Linda

Golden Skies- Tribute to Makoto Fujimura Linda Cleary Acrylic on Canvas

Golden Skies- Tribute to Makoto Fujimura
Linda Cleary
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Golden Skies- Tribute to Makoto Fujimura Linda Cleary Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Golden Skies- Tribute to Makoto Fujimura
Linda Cleary
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Golden Skies- Tribute to Makoto Fujimura Linda Cleary Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Golden Skies- Tribute to Makoto Fujimura
Linda Cleary
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Golden Skies- Tribute to Makoto Fujimura Linda Cleary Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Golden Skies- Tribute to Makoto Fujimura
Linda Cleary
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Golden Skies- Tribute to Makoto Fujimura Linda Cleary Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Golden Skies- Tribute to Makoto Fujimura
Linda Cleary
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 269- Josef Mikl- New Discoveries

It’s Day 269 and my busy week is wrapping up…I had a very nice time painting today’s piece.  I feel like I haven’t done an abstract piece quite like this one in a while.  There’s something very freeing about these kind of paintings.  Join me in honoring Josef Mikl today!

Josef Mikl

Josef Mikl

The dog Kopejkin (Gogol), 2000, oil on canvas, 200x200 cm- Josef Mikl

The dog Kopejkin (Gogol), 2000, oil on canvas, 200×200 cm- Josef Mikl

Josef Mikl (August 8, 1929 – March 29, 2008) was an Austrian abstract painter of the Informal style.

Born in Vienna, he received his first training at the Graphische Lehr- und Versuchsanstalt, studying at the prominent Viennese academy from 1949 to 1956 under Josef Dobrovský. Collaborating with Friedensreich Hundertwasser at the Vienna Art Club, Mikl later was a member of the Galerie St. Stephan group. In 1968 Mikl, well known in Austria, represented his home country at the 34th Biennale in Venice.

Classified as an Informal and Modernist artist, Mikl himself despised his artwork being placed under a specific label, calling it “an insult” in an undated interview. He worked in oil, pastels and water colors, as well as sculptures and drawings that either stood alone or served as illustrations in a book or decorations in a church. Mikl is best known for renovating the Redoutensaal in Vienna’s Imperial Palace after it was destroyed in a 1992 fire. The hall once served as a venue for the first performance of Ludwig van Beethoven’s 8th Symphony as well as a summit between U.S. President John F. Kennedy and Soviet leader Nikita S. Krushchev and was reopened in 1997 with vibrant reds and yellows depicting notable themes and figures of Austrian literature, all of Mikl’s design.

Josef Mikl died of cancer on March 29, 2008. His funeral was held on April 3 though his death was not announced until the next day, in

Josef Mikl

Josef Mikl

accordance with Mikl’s wishes.  Survivors include his wife, Brigitte Bruckner, and their 20-year-old daughter Anna Mikl.

Biography above is from wikipedia.

Below is from his obituary in The Guardian.

The painter Josef Mikl, who has died from cancer at the age of 78, was one of the most distinguished abstract artists of his generation. Though relatively little known in Britain, in his native Austria he received many honours, including a commission to decorate the state room known as the Redoutensaal, in Vienna’s Hofburg Palace, after its destruction by fire in 1992.

Josef Mikl

Josef Mikl

As well as its impressive size and vibrant fields of colour, the hall’s painted ceiling includes 34 verses by the early 20th-century author Karl Kraus, handwritten by Mikl on such a small scale that they are invisible to the spectator below. Public art and personal expression have rarely been so deftly combined.

Mikl was born in Vienna, where he started his training at the end of the second world war. After three years at the Graphische Lehr- und Versuchsanstalt (Vienna Training and Research Institute of Graphic Arts), in 1949 he began studying under Josef Dobrowsky, who had recently been appointed to the Academy of Fine Arts, the institution in which Mikl was himself to become a professor 20 years later. Dobrowsky’s vivid landscapes and genre paintings had a significant effect after the cultural sterility of the Nazi era. However, together with his fellow academy student Friedensreich Hundertwasser, Mikl helped to open Austria to more radical foreign influences, especially the expressive abstraction of French art informal.

Even more important was Mikl’s relationship with Markus Prachensky, Arnulf Rainer and Wolfgang Hollegha. In 1956 these abstract painters joined the circle around the extraordinary Monsignor Otto Mauer, a liberal Catholic intellectual who set up a gallery, next to St Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna, at which Mikl frequently exhibited in the late 1950s and 60s.

His rising reputation led to some monumental commissions, for example to design a stained-glass window in 1959 for the Peace Church

Josef Mikl

Josef Mikl

in Hiroshima. During this period he was also invited to prestigious international shows, representing Austria at the 34th Venice Biennale in 1968, and twice participating in the documenta exhibition in Kassel.

Mikl’s output was certainly varied, ranging from oils, pastels and watercolours to sculpture and book illustrations. The clearly defined, almost mechanistic forms of his youth gave way to more lyrical images in which the human figure was often hinted at through sensuous washes of colour.

The influence from action painting can hardly be denied: like other artists, most famously Jackson Pollock, Mikl sometimes laid his canvases on the floor in order to work. The scale of his projects also increased, as in his 300-square-metres decoration for a chapel at the St Virgil educational centre in Salzburg in 1975-76. However, he was still capable of producing small, subtle pieces: lithographs and other prints, for example, filled with delicate shifts of tone and linear patterns.

Josef Mikl

Josef Mikl

Moreover, Mikl was keen to distance himself from abstract expressionism’s more extravagant aesthetic and intellectual claims. Above all, he did not wish to be seen as representing contemporary anguish or any other spirit of his age. He dismissed the concept of zeitgeist as “decorative”: as he put it, “it works with the masses as the most powerful force, with sentimentality, foolish content, false form, bad technique, the pseudo-philosophy of the art trade. The word zeitgeist is an insult.” Mikl saw himself rather as the Thomas Edison of painting, continually making new discoveries, regardless of the preconceptions of the day. This intellectual dynamism is most clearly reflected in the Redoutensaal canvases, which were completed in 1997. While the ceiling and some of the wall paintings are responses to modern works by Kraus and Elias Canetti, other images in the room refer to the 19th-century dramatists Johann Nestroy and Ferdinand Raimund.

Nestroy’s sharp satire, often using comic songs and wordplay, could be expressed only obliquely through abstract art, and yet the contrast with the reconstructed room’s pompous architecture is highly effective. It is hard to imagine a more fitting adornment to a chamber that hosts such magnificent functions as the council of EU ministers and the Viennese coffee-makers’ ball.

Mikl himself was given numerous awards, from the Austrian Decoration for Science and Art (1990) to the City of Vienna’s Ring of Honour (2004). He is survived by his wife, the artist Brigitte Bruckner, who was over 30 years his junior, and his daughter Anna. The news of his death was not made public, according to his wishes, until shortly after his funeral.

· Josef Mikl, artist, born August 8 1929; died March 29 2008

I hope you enjoy my piece for today!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 270!

Best,

Linda

Rot und Blau Tanzen- Tribute to Josef Mikl Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Rot und Blau Tanzen- Tribute to Josef Mikl
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Rot und Blau Tanzen- Tribute to Josef Mikl Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Rot und Blau Tanzen- Tribute to Josef Mikl
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Rot und Blau Tanzen- Tribute to Josef Mikl Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Rot und Blau Tanzen- Tribute to Josef Mikl
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Rot und Blau Tanzen- Tribute to Josef Mikl Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Rot und Blau Tanzen- Tribute to Josef Mikl
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Rot und Blau Tanzen- Tribute to Josef Mikl Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Rot und Blau Tanzen- Tribute to Josef Mikl
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 268- Giorgio Griffa- Constant and Never Finished

It’s Day 268 and I’m still trudging through this hectic week.  I just got back from my friend Skye’s book release reading in San Francisco.  My husband also read there.  It was lovely.  I did have time to do painting this morning so join me in honoring Giorgio Griffa today.

Giorgio Griffa

Giorgio Griffa

Giorgio Griffa

Giorgio Griffa

Giorgio Griffa (born in Turin, March 29, 1936) is an Italian abstract painter living and working in Turin.

Giorgio Griffa never received a formal art education. He began painting as a child, taking lessons from local painters at the Circolo degli Artisti in Turin.
After completing a degree in law in 1958, Griffa became a practicing lawyer.
In the sixties, Griffa began working as an assistant to the Italian painter Filippo Scroppo, a member of the MAC (Art Concreta) movement and a teacher at the Accademia Albertina in Turin.

In 1968, Giorgio Griffa abandoned figurative painting in favor of a format of

Caduta Azzurra- Giorgio Griffa

Caduta Azzurra- Giorgio Griffa

abstract painting that still characterizes his work to this day. Painting with acrylic on raw un-stretched canvas, burlap and linen, Griffa’s works are nailed directly to the wall along their top edge. When not exhibited, the works are folded and stacked, resulting creases that create an underlying grid for his compositions. In keeping with his idea that painting is “constant and never finished”, many of his works display a deliberate end-point that has been described as stopping a thought mid-sentence.

Giorgio Griffa Quasi dipinto, 1968 Acrylic on canvas

Giorgio Griffa
Quasi dipinto, 1968
Acrylic on canvas

Despite early associations with movements such as Arte Povera and Minimalism, Giorgio Griffa’s work was not exhibited in the United States for 40 years after his first solo exhibition in New York at Ileana Sonnabend’s gallery. In 2012, Giorgio Griffa had a solo exhibition, Fragments 1968 – 2012 at Casey Kaplan gallery in New York, leading him to be named one of the “10 thrilling rediscoveries from 2012.”  His exhibition was interrupted by Hurricane Sandy and later reopened in 2013. In her review of the exhibition, Roberta Smith wrote “His art deserves a place in the global history of abstraction.”

Giorgio Griffa exhibited at Sonnabend gallery in New York in 1970 and participated in

Giorgio Griffa

Giorgio Griffa

important international exhibitions such as Prospekt, Düsseldorf (1969 and 1974) and the Venice Biennale (1978 and 1980). Other important early exhibitions include Processes of Visualized Thought: Young Italian Avant-garde, Kunstmuseum Luzern(1970) and A Painting Exhibition of Painters who Place Painting in Question, curated by Michel Claura, Stadtische Museum, Monchengladbach (1973).

Giorgio Griffa

Giorgio Griffa

Recent solo presentations of Giorgio Griffa’s works include Golden Ratio, Mies van der Rohe Haus, Berlin (2013) Fragments 1968 – 2012, Casey Kaplan, New York (2013), MACRO, Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, Rome (2011), Neuer Kunstverein, Aschaffenburg (2005) and Uno and Due, Galleria Civica d’Art Moderna e Contemporanea, Turin (2002).

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today.  I was going to wait until I purchased un-stretched burlap or linen, but decided to emulate it on a regular canvas.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 269!

Best, Linda

Frammenti Colorati- Tribute to Giorgio Griffa Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Frammenti Colorati- Tribute to Giorgio Griffa
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Frammenti Colorati- Tribute to Giorgio Griffa Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Frammenti Colorati- Tribute to Giorgio Griffa
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Frammenti Colorati- Tribute to Giorgio Griffa Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Frammenti Colorati- Tribute to Giorgio Griffa
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Frammenti Colorati- Tribute to Giorgio Griffa Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Frammenti Colorati- Tribute to Giorgio Griffa
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Frammenti Colorati- Tribute to Giorgio Griffa Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Frammenti Colorati- Tribute to Giorgio Griffa
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 267- Yoshitomo Nara- “I Don’t Mind If You Forget Me”

It’s Day 267 and I had so much fun doing today’s tribute!  I also start my improv class tonight which I’m excited about. 🙂  Join me in honoring Yoshitomo Nara today.

Yoshitomo Nara

Yoshitomo Nara

Yoshitomo Nara

Yoshitomo Nara

Yoshitomo Nara (奈良 美智 Nara Yoshitomo, born 5 December 1959 in Hirosaki, Japan) is a Japanese artist. He lives and works in Tokyo, though his artwork has been exhibited worldwide. Nara has had nearly 40 solo exhibitions since 1984. He is represented in New York City by Pace Gallery, in Los Angeles by Blum & Poe and in London byStephen Friedman Gallery.

Nara received his B.F.A. (1985) and an M.F.A. (1987) from the Aichi Prefectural University of Fine Arts and Music. Between 1988 and 1993, Nara studied at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf, in Germany.

“Nara first came to the fore of the art world during Japan’s Pop art movement in the

I Am Alone- Yoshitomo Nara

I Am Alone- Yoshitomo Nara

1990s. The subject matter of his sculptures and paintings is deceptively simple: most works depict one seemingly innocuous subject (often pastel-hued children and animals drawn with confident, cartoonish lines) with little or no background. But these children, who appear at first to be cute and even vulnerable, sometimes brandish weapons like knives and saws. Their wide eyes often hold accusatory looks that could be sleepy-eyed irritation at being awoken from a nap—or that could be undiluted expressions of hate.”

Yoshitomo Nara

Yoshitomo Nara

Nara, however, does not see his weapon-wielding subjects as aggressors. “Look at them, they [the weapons] are so small, like toys. Do you think they could fight with those?” he says. “I don’t think so. Rather, I kind of see the children among other, bigger, bad people all around them, who are holding bigger knives…” Lauded by art critics, Nara’s bizarrely intriguing works have gained him a cult following around the world. In June, 2005, Nara’s artwork was featured in the album titled “Suspended Animation” by experimental band Fantômas. Other commercial products (including videos, books, magazines, catalogues and monographs) have been dedicated to Nara’s work. Recently, a two-volume catalogue raisonné of all his sculptures, paintings, and drawings was completed.

In 2010 the Asia Society showed Yoshitomo Nara: Nobody’s Fool the first major New

Yoshitomo Nara

Yoshitomo Nara

York exhibition of his work. Other major retrospectives include: “I Don’t Mind If You Forget Me”, which toured Japan between 2001 and 2002; and “Yoshitomo Nara: Nothing Ever Happens,” which traveled the United States from 2003 to 2005.

Aomori Ken Dog- Yoshitomo Nara

Aomori Ken Dog- Yoshitomo Nara

The manga and anime of his 1960s childhood are both clear influences on Nara’s stylized, large-eyed figures. Nara subverts these typically cute images, however, by infusing his works with horror-like imagery. This juxtaposition of human evil with the innocent child may be a reaction to Japan’s rigid social conventions.

The punk rock music of Nara’s youth has also influenced the artist’s work. Recalling

Yoshitomo Nara

Yoshitomo Nara

a similar – if more unsettling – image of rebellious, violent youth, Nara’s art embraces the punk ethos. That said, Nara has also cited traditions as varied as Renaissance painting, literature, illustration, ukiyo-e and graffiti as further inspiration.

Yoshitomo Nara

Yoshitomo Nara

But perhaps most significantly, Nara’s upbringing in post-World War II Japan profoundly affected his mindset and, subsequently, his artwork as well. He grew up in a time when Japan was experiencing an inundation of Western pop culture; comic books, Walt Disney animation, and Western rock music are just a few examples. Additionally, Nara was raised in the isolated countryside as a latchkey child of working-class parents, so he was often left alone with little to do but explore his young imagination. The fiercely independent subjects that populate so much of his artwork may be a reaction to Nara’s own largely independent childhood.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my tribute today!  It was obviously fun to do.  I love Nara’s art.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 268.

Best,

Linda

Ouch...My Brain Hurts- Tribute to Yoshitomo Nara Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Ouch…My Brain Hurts- Tribute to Yoshitomo Nara
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Ouch...My Brain Hurts- Tribute to Yoshitomo Nara Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Ouch…My Brain Hurts- Tribute to Yoshitomo Nara
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Ouch...My Brain Hurts- Tribute to Yoshitomo Nara Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Ouch…My Brain Hurts- Tribute to Yoshitomo Nara
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Ouch...My Brain Hurts- Tribute to Yoshitomo Nara Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Ouch…My Brain Hurts- Tribute to Yoshitomo Nara
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Ouch...My Brain Hurts- Tribute to Yoshitomo Nara Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Ouch…My Brain Hurts- Tribute to Yoshitomo Nara
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 266- Thomas Downing- Spots

It’s Day 266 and I’m having a pretty busy week.  I almost forgot to post this blog today!  My mind has definitely felt a bit scattered and I’ve been practicing various British dialects for a show I’m doing on Saturday. 🙂  Join me in honoring Thomas Downing today.  I loved doing today’s painting.

Thomas Downing

Thomas Downing

Red - Thomas Downing.  Completion Date: 1966

Red – Thomas Downing. Completion Date: 1966

Thomas Downing (1928–1985) was an American painter, associated with the Washington Color Field Movement.

Thomas Downing was born in Suffolk, Virginia. He studied at Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, Virginia, where he received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1948. He then studied at the Pratt Institute, a well-known art school in Brooklyn, New York, until 1950. That year he received a grant from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, enabling him to travel to Europe, where he studied briefly at the Académie Julian in Paris.

In 1951 he returned to the United States, and after serving in the U.S. Army, settled

Thomas Downing

Thomas Downing

in Washington, D.C., where he began to teach, in 1953. The following summer, he enrolled in a summer institute at Catholic University, studying under Kenneth Noland. He became a friend of Noland, who became a significant influence on Downing’s art and who was one of the founders of the Washington Color Field Movement.

Thomas Downing

Thomas Downing

In the late 1950s, Downing shared a studio with Howard Mehring, another artist of the Washington Color School and Color Field painting. In 1964 Clement Greenberg included Noland, Mehring, Downing and others in his traveling museum exhibition called Post-painterly Abstraction.

From 1965 to 1968, Downing taught at the Corcoran College of Art and Design in Washington, D.C. There he taught several people who in their turn became artists influenced by Downing’s ideas, including Sam Gilliam.

His paintings to a large extent consisted of circles arranged in precise patterns on the canvas, with colors

Untitled 1962- Thomas Downing

Untitled 1962- Thomas Downing

often chosen according to ideas of symmetry. Downing’s Spot Paintings are his best known works.

In the last ten years of his life, Downing lived in Provincetown, Massachusetts. He died in October 1985 in Provincetown, Massachusetts at the age of 57. In its obituary theWashington Times characterized his death as mysterious. The newspaper was referring to the then recent demise of Washington Color Field artist Gene Davis (1920–1985) and to the earlier death of Howard Mehring (1931–1978), as well.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I had a good and relaxing time painting it.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 266.

Best,

Linda

Descent- Tribute to Thomas Downing Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Descent- Tribute to Thomas Downing
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Descent- Tribute to Thomas Downing Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Descent- Tribute to Thomas Downing
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Descent- Tribute to Thomas Downing Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Descent- Tribute to Thomas Downing
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Descent- Tribute to Thomas Downing Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Descent- Tribute to Thomas Downing
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Descent- Tribute to Thomas Downing Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Descent- Tribute to Thomas Downing
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 265- Gary John- Always a Street Artist

It’s Day 265…only 100 left to go!  Wow…Join me in honoring Gary John today.  I found this artist and fell in love with his story and artwork!  I hope you will too.  Below is an article about him from the Santa Monica Mirror that I liked .

From Santa Monica Mirror- Artist Gary John (center) has gone from living on the streets of Venice to becoming an emerging artist in the past eight months thanks to gallery owners Bruce (left) and Scot Lurie.

From Santa Monica Mirror- Artist Gary John (center) has gone from living on the streets of Venice to becoming an emerging artist in the past eight months thanks to gallery owners Bruce (left) and Scot Lurie.

Four Chairs- Gary John

Four Chairs- Gary John

Painting A New Life After Living On The Streets

POSTED NOV. 28, 2013, 8:59 AM JYNARRA BRINSON / MIRROR CONTRIBUTOR

Eight months ago, homeless street artist Gary John was up to his usual one day – painting for

Big Boy Act- Gary John

Big Boy Act- Gary John

nearly 10 hours non-stop on the Venice boardwalk – when something told him to put his brush down, pack his things, and check out Culver City’s art gallery loop.

“I never stop painting,” John says. “I don’t break my routine and more than that, I hem and haw for everything.”

But on that day, John listened to what he describes as nothing more than “divine intervention.”

During this journey to Culver City, he walked into the Bruce Lurie Gallery near the corner of La Cienega and Washington boulevards.

Gary John

Gary John

Perhaps it was the dried-up paint on John that tipped gallery owner Bruce Lurie off, or maybe the same “something” that spoke to John hours earlier, whatever it was compelled Lurie to address him, knowingly, when he said, “Hi artist.”

The salutation did not strike John as particularly significant. He walked about the gallery before heading toward the exit when he heard a voice behind him.

“What kind of art do you do?” John recalls being asked.

He told Lurie about his art – his abstract pop culture images on cardboard, newspaper,

Gary John

Gary John

canvas, and just about any low-cost material he could get his hands on.

For years John met several people, celebrities included, who filled his ears and heart with colorful hopes. They promised to help him find representation and to get his work on t-shirts, skateboards, and other commercial exposure – which never happened.

Hoax Man- Gary John

Hoax Man- Gary John

When Lurie expressed curiosity and asked him to bring his work in, John assumed the usual would transpire: He’d bring his things in, lay them out, be told his work wasn’t actually what they were looking for and sent on his way, with good wishes, of course.

However, this time was different. The decision was unanimous. All three Lurie brothers – Bruce, Evan, and Scot, all gallery owners themselves, happened to be in town that day – decided John was precisely who they were looking for.

“They said come back tomorrow and we’ll do some paperwork,” John says. “I think he took

Modern Art- Gary John

Modern Art- Gary John

everything I had. It was like a dream. They were telling me my stuff is fantastic, we’re going to promote you, not only that, represent you and take you all over the country and it was too much.”

Overwhelmed nearly to hysteria, John asked them to stop talking, said it was too much for one day and left. He walked halfway down the block, found a front porch and sat. He recalls bawling like a baby but more like someone whose wildest dreams had just come true.

Gary John

Gary John

Nearly a decade ago, John visited Los Angeles to seek a brighter backdrop than the grey and rain from his native Seattle. At the insistence of his friend Dan Corley, he said he visited LA for what he intended to be a two-week trial.

“I owe everything to Dan Corley,” John says. “He encouraged me when I wanted to give up. If it weren’t for him I would not be where I am today. No one could ask for a better friend.”

When he arrived, he says, he knew LA would be his new home. The sole earnings from his art sales on the boardwalk sustained him to a minor degree. John struggled with homelessness, finding himself in and out of motels and living on the streets of Venice.

“I was able to pull myself in and out,” John says. “After 10 years of gutting it out on

Queen in a Balloon- Gary John

Queen in a Balloon- Gary John

Venice Beach, I had all but given up. Things really improved when Bruce took me on.”

Today, John lives in an apartment in Culver City.

His art is reminiscent of Haring and Basquiat, and it’s with comparable abandon that vivid hues take shape (or not) on his canvas.

John says he’ll never forget the first time he saw his paintings on the wall.

“It was beautiful,” he says from under a dark green baseball cap and sunglasses, his hands tucked deep into his pockets. “Here were my paintings on this beautiful wall and Bruce came up to me and said, you’re where you belong – he said that to me.”

John himself won’t be at Art Basel Miami Beach 2013 next month, but his art will. The highly selective annual international show attracted 50,000 international visitors last year. Artists, collectors, gallerists, curators, art enthusiasts, and the like descend on Miami Beach for four days to celebrate work from masters of Modern and contemporary art as well as pieces by emerging stars.

Paris Shoe- Gary John

Paris Shoe- Gary John

Art Basel is not John’s first show appearance, but it is the most high profile. His acceptance to the show is something not many established artists can’t boast. Past show appearances include the Affordable Art Fair in New York, Houston Art Fair, as well as shows in the Hamptons and Palm Springs.

Bruce Lurie says he always sells out John’s artwork each show.

“His art is something that reminds us of the purity of our childhood,” Lurie says. “The iconic images, drawn spontaneously yet perfectly have a deeper psychological meaning, and connect today with yesteryears. You might initially think the images are innocent, but they can be provocative and erotic – the fine art collector is attracted to those.”

In the past few weeks John’s work appeared in an auction hosted by The Skirball Museum; Children’s Hospital Los Angeles recently purchased a few of his works; and a curator from the Gothenburg Museum of Art in Sweden expressed interest in showing his work.

John wants his story to serve as encouragement for artists who remain steadfast as well as for those who struggle with persevering through the odds.

“If you hang in there long enough, you keep pushing, your dreams can come true. I never believed it because I went through so many hardships,” John says.

Even though his art is receiving attention he never thought possible, John still paints and sells 8×10 inch pieces along the Venice boardwalk.

“People say you have success now, why are you still on Venice beach,” John says. “I always tell them – because I was a street artist, I am a street artist and I’ll always be a street artist.”

Visit Gary John’s website at streetartgaryjohn.com. Alternatively, you can find him in person most days along the Venice boardwalk across from Figtree’s Café.

Above is article from the Santa Monica Mirror website.

Isn’t his story lovely?  I love it.  I really enjoyed painting this piece today and I hope you like it!  Only a hundred paintings to go for this project!  I can’t believe it.  Well, I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 266.

Best,
Linda

Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View
Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Love is Love- Tribute to Gary John
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Day 264- Martin Barré- Designating Space

It’s Day 264 and I’m about to rush out and do some improv in a meadow today!  I had to get my painting done early.  I planned it out and it is an example of something that didn’t quite turn out how it did in my mind.  I had this specific image of what I wanted to create and it didn’t happen…BUT, I do like what did happen.  Definitely the epitome of improvisation happening.  Join me in honoring Martin Barré today.  This piece was inspired by his art, but I’m not sure if I exactly captured his style…since the result was kind of an accident! 🙂

Martin Barré

Martin Barré

Martin Barré

Martin Barré

Martin Barré

b. 1924, Nantes, France; d. 1993, Paris

Martin Barré was born Michel Barré on September 22, 1924, in Nantes, France. He trained at the École des beaux-arts, Nantes, first in architecture and then in painting, before moving to Paris in 1948. In 1955 he exhibited his first abstract paintings at the Galerie La Roue. However, it was not until around 1958 or 1959, after he had traveled to the Netherlands, where he saw the work of Russian artist Kazimir Malevich, that his art attained the expressive rigor that became its hallmark.

Barré designated space in his paintings by the distinct relationship between figure and

Martin Barré

Martin Barré

ground, using forms that are spare and reduced, thus leaving much of the surface of the canvas open. In an effort to avoid expressionistic gestures, he applied paint with a palette knife instead of a brush. In 1960, Barré exchanged the knife for the paint tube, mixing its contents himself and then squeezing the paint directly onto the canvas. In 1963 he turned to spray paint, a medium with properties he had come to appreciate when looking at graffiti in the Parisian metro.

Martin Barré

Martin Barré

Having found a matte black he liked, he used this method until 1967 and made paintings that either consist of white surfaces marked by subtle traces of spray paint in a corner, or are striped. In 1967 Barré decided to use stencils, and cut out the shape of an arrow from a large sheet of paper, for mark making that was controlled rather than intuitive. Then for five years Barré stopped painting altogether and concentrated on conceptual work, such as a group of photographs shown at Galerie Daniel Templon in 1968 that presented details of the Parisian gallery’s empty interior.

When he returned to painting in the early 1970s, Barré began using acrylics and a

Martin Barré

Martin Barré

brush, and adopted a slightly more expressive style. Perpetually restless and seeking new ways to challenge accepted modes of abstraction, Barré soon moved on, eventually making a series of paintings in which geometric shapes in bright hues abut the edge of the canvas, usually painted a soft pink, and creating an ambiguous delineation between figure and ground.

Martin Barré

Martin Barré

Barré showed regularly at Galerie Daniel Templon and had solo shows at a number of international museums, including the Museu de arte moderna, Rio de Janeiro (1965). He was featured in group shows at the Carnegie International, Pittsburgh (1961); Venice Biennale (1964, 1978); and Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris (1992).

Interest in Barré’s work has grown since his death; his work was the subject of two solo shows at Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York (2008, 2011), and was featured in La peinture après l’abstraction, 1955–1975: Martin Barré, Jean Degottex, Raymond Hains, Simon Hanta, Jacques Villeglé(Painting after abstraction, 1955–1975) at the Musée d’art moderne de la martin_barre_67-z-7_d5690568hVille de Paris (1999). Barré died on July 10, 1993, in Paris.

Biography is from Guggenheim Museum’s website.

I hope you enjoy my tribute piece today and I will see you tomorrow on Day 265!  ONLY 100 more paintings to go starting tomorrow.  I’m feeling a little sad about this, but also a little relief.  Now I just need to create newer, yet shorter challenges for next year. 🙂

Best,

Linda

Space and form- Tribute to Martin Barré Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Spraypaint on Canvas

Space and form- Tribute to Martin Barré
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Spraypaint on Canvas

Side-View Space and form- Tribute to Martin Barré Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Spraypaint on Canvas

Side-View
Space and form- Tribute to Martin Barré
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Spraypaint on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Space and form- Tribute to Martin Barré Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Spraypaint on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Space and form- Tribute to Martin Barré
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Spraypaint on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Space and form- Tribute to Martin Barré Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Spraypaint on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Space and form- Tribute to Martin Barré
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Spraypaint on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Space and form- Tribute to Martin Barré Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Spraypaint on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Space and form- Tribute to Martin Barré
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Spraypaint on Canvas