January Artist Wrap-Up!

Here are all 31 paintings I did through the month of January!  I’m also putting *notes on which paintings are reserved so far for purchase and for who.  If I don’t have yours and you’ve asked for it then please let me know!  Also, if I’ve put your name there and you’ve changed your mind let me know.  No hard feelings! 🙂

Thank you all for supporting me this month!  I’m still trying to figure out if I want to have a huge art show at the end of this year or open up an online shop to sell these.  The image of all of these on the walls of an art gallery makes me pretty excited.  People are also recommending I try to contact a publisher to do a coffee table book.  Wouldn’t that be fun?  Please let me know if you are interested in purchasing one of these.  I think I’ll be selling them at around $50…maybe a smidgen more or less depending on the painting.  Now onto February!

Bestest, Linda P. Cleary

January 1, 2014- Larry Poons

Truth Bleeds Through- Tribute to Larry Poons- Linda Cleary 2014

Truth Bleeds Through- Tribute to Larry Poons- Linda Cleary 2014

January 2, 2014- Wassily Kandinsky (*Susan Boylan-Griffin)

Composition I- Linda Cleary 2014 (Tribute to Wassily Kandinsky)

Composition I- Linda Cleary 2014 (Tribute to Wassily Kandinsky)

January 3, 2014- John McLaughlin

Untitled 1- Linda Cleary 2014- Tribute to John McLaughlin- Acrylic

Untitled 1- Linda Cleary 2014- Tribute to John McLaughlin- Acrylic

January 4, 2014- Margaret Keene (Not for Sale…quite yet.)

Taco and Mama- Linda Cleary 2014- Tribute to Margaret Keane Acrylic on Canvas

Taco and Mama- Linda Cleary 2014- Tribute to Margaret Keane
Acrylic on Canvas

January 5, 2014- Madge Gill

Girl Smoking- Tribute to Madge Gill- Linda Cleary 2014- Pen & Ink on canvas

Girl Smoking- Tribute to Madge Gill- Linda Cleary 2014- Pen & Ink on canvas

January 6, 2014- Francis Bacon

Study for a Woman Screaming- Tribute to Francis Bacon- Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Study for a Woman Screaming- Tribute to Francis Bacon- Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

January 7, 2014- Seraphine Louis (*Melodi Ross)

Flowering Tree- Tribute to Seraphine Louis- Linda Cleary 2014- Acrylic on canvas

Flowering Tree- Tribute to Seraphine Louis- Linda Cleary 2014- Acrylic on canvas

January 8, 2014- Johannes Itten

Kreise Und Quadrate- Tribute to Johannes Itten- Linda Cleary 2014- Acrylic on canvas

Kreise Und Quadrate- Tribute to Johannes Itten-
Linda Cleary 2014- Acrylic on canvas

January 9, 2014- Ray Parker

I Like that I Like this- Tribute to Ray Parker- Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

I Like that I Like this- Tribute to Ray Parker- Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

January 10, 2014- Edd Cartier

Visitor from Zorkon- Tribute to Edd Cartier- Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas (Lighting is a little off since I took this indoors after the sun set.)

Visitor from Zorkon- Tribute to Edd Cartier- Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas
(Lighting is a little off since I took this indoors after the sun set.)

January 11, 2014- Egon Schiele

Girl in striped stockings- Tribute to Egon Schiele- Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Girl in striped stockings- Tribute to Egon Schiele- Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

January 12, 2014- Joan Miro (Not for Sale…yet!)

Pájaros en Vuelo (Birds in Flight)- Tribute to Joan Miro Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Pájaros en Vuelo (Birds in Flight)- Tribute to Joan Miro
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

January 13, 2014- Ray Johnson

Not Nothing- Tribute to Ray Johnson Linda Cleary 2014 Pen & Ink / Acrylic on canvas

Not Nothing- Tribute to Ray Johnson
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen & Ink / Acrylic on canvas

January 14, 2014- Alphonse Mucha (*Susanna Skelley)

Springtime- Tribute to Alphonse Mucha Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Springtime- Tribute to Alphonse Mucha
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

January 15, 2014- Yayoi Kusama (*Reserved for Cory Holster)

"My mind was wandering at dinner"- Tribute to Yayoi Kusama Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

“My mind was wandering at dinner”- Tribute to Yayoi Kusama
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

January 16, 2014- Jackson Pollock

Number 16- Tribute to Jackson Pollock Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Latex on canvas

Number 16- Tribute to Jackson Pollock
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Latex on canvas

January 17, 2014- George Widener (*Reserved for Thor Klippert)

Escape Your Fate-  Tribute to George Widener Linda Cleary 2014 Pen & Ink, Acrylic on paper and canvas

Escape Your Fate-
Tribute to George Widener
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen & Ink, Acrylic on paper and canvas

January 18, 2014- Tom Wesselmann (*Reserved for Spencer Tomimatsu)

Woman Smoking Study- Tribute to Tom Wesselmann Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Woman Smoking Study- Tribute to Tom Wesselmann
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

January 19, 2014- Camille Bombois

Le Clown Heureux- Tribute to Camille Bombois Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Le Clown Heureux-
Tribute to Camille Bombois
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

January 20, 2014- Nadir Afonso

Através do Portal (Through the Portal)- Tribute to Nadir Afonso Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Através do Portal (Through the Portal)- Tribute to Nadir Afonso
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

January 21, 2014- Marlene Dumas

Fat Baby- Tribute to Marlene Dumas Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Fat Baby- Tribute to Marlene Dumas
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

January 22, 2014- Brad Greenwood (Not for sale…yet!)

Lupo Lupo- Tribute to Brad Greenwood Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/pencil on wood panel

Lupo Lupo- Tribute to Brad Greenwood
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/pencil on wood panel

January 23, 2014- Pacita Abad

Tree Man- Tribute to Pacita Abad Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Tree Man- Tribute to Pacita Abad
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

January 24, 2014- Horace Pippin

Man on Bench Smoking- Tribute to Horace Pippin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Man on Bench Smoking- Tribute to Horace Pippin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

January 25, 2014- H.R. Giger (*Reserved for Joey Raven)

A.L.I.E.N.- Tribute to H.R. Giger Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

A.L.I.E.N.- Tribute to H.R. Giger
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

January 26, 2014- William Baziotes

The Second Moon- Tribute to William Baziotes Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

The Second Moon- Tribute to William Baziotes
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

January 27, 2014- Jean Crotti

La Réflexion- Tribute to Jean Crotti Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

La Réflexion- Tribute to Jean Crotti
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

January 28, 2014- Hannah Hoch

It's for you- Tribute to Hannah Hoch Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Paper/glue on canvas

It’s for you- Tribute to Hannah Hoch
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Paper/glue on canvas

January 29, 2014- Arshile Gorky

The Man You See is in your Mind- Tribute to Arshile Gorky Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

The Man You See is in your Mind- Tribute to Arshile Gorky
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

January 30, 2014- Joy Garnett

The Roof is on Fire- Tribute to Joy Garnett Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylics on canvas

The Roof is on Fire- Tribute to Joy Garnett
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylics on canvas

January 31, 2014- Paul Klee (*Monica Johansen-Benway)

Churches, Sun and Moon- Tribute to Paul Klee Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Churches, Sun and Moon- Tribute to Paul Klee
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

Day Thirty-One- Paul Klee- “One eye sees, the other feels”

Day Thirty-One and wow, today was the worst.  I was super grumpy while painting.  I’m going to be completely honest with you.  My original artist was Van Gogh…I started TWO paintings and ended up scrapping them.  Double ugh.  Then I decided to switch artists after trying my hardest to stick with Vincent.  Today I present to you…Paul Klee!

Paul Klee 1911

Paul Klee 1911

Castle & Sun- Paul Klee 1928

Castle & Sun- Paul Klee 1928

Paul Klee (18 December 1879 – 29 June 1940) was a painter born in Münchenbuchsee, Switzerland, and is considered to be a German-Swiss. His highly individual style was influenced by movements in art that included expressionism, cubism, andsurrealism. He was also a student of orientalism. Klee was a natural draftsman who experimented with and eventually got deep into color theory, writing about it extensively; his lectures Writings on Form and Design Theory (Schriften zur Form und Gestaltungslehre), published in English as the Paul Klee Notebooks, are held to be as important for modern art as Leonardo da Vinci’s A Treatise on Painting for the Renaissance.  He and his colleague, the Russian painter Wassily Kandinsky, both taught at the German Bauhaus school of art, design and architecture. His works reflect his dry humour and his sometimes childlike perspective, his personal moods and beliefs, and also his musicality.

First of all, the art of living; then as my ideal profession, poetry and philosophy, and as my real profession, plastic arts;

Insula Dulcamara- Paul Klee

Insula Dulcamara- Paul Klee

in the last resort, for lack of income, illustrations.

—Paul Klee.

Paul Klee was born as the second child of the German music teacher Hans Wilhelm Klee (1849–1940) and the Swiss singer Ida Marie Klee, née Frick (1855–1921). His sister Mathilde (died 6 December 1953) was born on 28 January 1876 in Walzenhausen. Their father came from Tann and studied at the Stuttgart Conservatory singing, piano, organ and violin, meeting there his future wife Ida Frick. Hans Wilhelm Klee was active as a music

Red Balloon- Paul Klee

Red Balloon- Paul Klee

teacher at the Bern State Seminary in Hofwil near Bern until 1931. Klee was able to develop his music skills as his parents encouraged and inspired him until his death.  In 1880, his family moved to Bern, where they moved 17 years later after numerous changes of residence into a house at the Kirchenfeld district.  From 1886 to 1890, Klee visited primary school and received, at the age of 7, violin classes at the Municipal Music School. He was so talented on violin that, aged 11, he received an invitation to play as an extraordinary member of the Bern Music Association.

In his early years, following his parents’ wishes, he focused on becoming a

Strong Dream- Paul Klee 1929

Strong Dream- Paul Klee 1929

musician; but he decided on the visual arts during his teen years, partly out of rebellion and partly because of a belief that modern music lacked meaning for him. He stated, “I didn’t find the idea of going in for music creatively particularly attractive in view of the decline in the history of musical achievement.” As a musician, he played and felt emotionally bound to traditional works of the eighteenth and nineteenth century, but as an artist he craved the freedom to explore radical ideas and styles.  At sixteen, Klee’s landscape drawings already show considerable skill.

Fire in the Evening- Paul Klee

Fire in the Evening- Paul Klee

Around 1897, he started his diary, which he kept until 1918, and which has provided scholars with valuable insight into his life and thinking.  During his school years, he avidly drew in his school books, in particular drawing caricatures, and already demonstrating skill with line and volume.  He barely passed his final exams at the “Gymnasium” of Bern, where he qualified in the Humanities. With his characteristic dry wit, he wrote, “After all, it’s rather difficult to achieve the exact minimum, and it involves risks.”  On his own time, in addition to his deep interests in music and art, Klee was a great reader of literature, and later a writer on art theory and aesthetics.

With his parents’ reluctant permission, in 1898 he began studying art at the

Rose Garden- Paul Klee

Rose Garden- Paul Klee

Academy of Fine Arts in Munich with Heinrich Knirr and Franz von Stuck. He excelled at drawing but seemed to lack any natural color sense. He later recalled, “During the third winter I even realized that I probably would never learn to paint.”  During these times of youthful adventure, Klee spent much time in pubs and had affairs with lower class women and artists’ models. He had an illegitimate son in 1900 who died several weeks after birth.

klee.dream-city

Destroyed Place 1920- Paul Klee

Destroyed Place 1920- Paul Klee

After receiving his Fine Arts degree, Klee went to Italy from October 1901 to May 1902 with friend Hermann Haller. They stayed in Rome, Florence, and Naples, and studied the master painters of past centuries.  He exclaimed, “The Forum and the Vatican have spoken to me. Humanism wants to suffocate me.” He responded to the colors of Italy, but sadly noted, “that a long struggle lies in store for me in this field of color.” For Klee, color represented the optimism and nobility in art, and a hope for relief from the pessimistic nature he expressed in his black-and-white grotesques and satires. Returning to Bern, he lived with his parents for several years, and took occasional art classes. By 1905, he was developing some experimental techniques, including drawing with a needle on a blackened pane of glass, resulting in fifty-seven works including his Portrait of My Father (1906).  In the years 1903-5 he also completed a cycle of eleven zinc-plate etchings called Inventions, his first exhibited works, in which he illustrated several grotesque characters.  He commented, “though I’m fairly satisfied with my etchings I can’t go on like this. I’m not a specialist.” Klee was still dividing his time with music, playing the violin in an orchestra and writing concert and theater reviews.

Klee has been variously associated with Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, Surrealism,

Full Moon- Paul Klee

Full Moon- Paul Klee

and Abstraction, but his pictures are difficult to classify. He generally worked in isolation from his peers, and interpreted new art trends in his own way. He was inventive in his methods and technique. Klee worked in many different media—oil paint, watercolor, ink, pastel, etching, and others. He often combined them into one work. He used canvas, burlap, muslin, linen, gauze, cardboard, metal foils, fabric, wallpaper, and newsprint.  Klee employed spray paint, knife application, stamping, glazing, and impasto, and mixed media such as oil with watercolor, water color with pen and India ink, and oil with tempera.

Dream City- Paul Klee

Dream City- Paul Klee

He was a natural draftsman, and through long experimentation developed a mastery of color and tonality. Many of his works combine these skills. He uses a great variety of color palettes from nearly monochromatic to highly polychromatic. His works often have a fragile childlike quality to them and are usually on a small scale. He often used geometric forms as well as letters, numbers, and arrows, and combined them with figures of animals and people. Some works were completely abstract. Many of his works and their titles reflect his dry humor and varying moods; some express political convictions. They frequently allude to poetry, music and dreams and sometimes include words or musical notation. The later works are distinguished by spidery hieroglyph-like symbols.Rainer Maria Rilke wrote about Klee in 1921, “Even if you hadn’t told me he plays the violin, I would have guessed that on many occasions his drawings were transcriptions of music.”

Pamela Kort observed: “Klee’s 1933 drawings present their beholder with an unparalleled

Paul Klee painting - Ad Marginem 1930

Paul Klee painting – Ad Marginem 1930

opportunity to glimpse a central aspect of his aesthetics that has remained largely unappreciated: his lifelong concern with the possibilities of parody and wit. Herein lies their real significance, particularly for an audience unaware that Klee’s art has political dimensions.”

Among the few plastic works are hand puppets made between 1916 and 1925, for his son Felix. The artist neither counts them as a component of his oeuvre, nor does he list them in his catalogue raisonné. Thirty of the preserved puppets are stored at the Paul Klee Centre, Bern.

Read more of his biography at wikipedia.

I felt a little better switching artists, but to be brutally honest I just did not want to paint at

Grumpy painting!

Grumpy painting!

all today.  This is a first and I’m sure it won’t be the last.  Hopefully my tribute isn’t absolutely awful, because this artist is great.  He paints in so many different ways that it was challenging to pick a specific style to emulate.  I decided to look at as many of his paintings as I could and combine a number of his styles.  I tried not to obsess too much on his paintings and attempted to infuse my own style in there as well.  Whew.  I’m just happy to be done for today.

Here is my tribute to Paul Klee.  Let’s hope tomorrow is a little better and that my grumpiness fades!

xoxo, Linda

Happy birds?

Happy birds?

Painting is so hard today!

Painting is so hard today!

Churches, Sun and Moon- Tribute to Paul Klee Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Churches, Sun and Moon- Tribute to Paul Klee
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

Side-View Churches, Sun and Moon- Tribute to Paul Klee Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Side-View
Churches, Sun and Moon- Tribute to Paul Klee
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

Close-up Churches, Sun and Moon- Tribute to Paul Klee Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Close-up
Churches, Sun and Moon- Tribute to Paul Klee
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

Close-Up 2 Churches, Sun and Moon- Tribute to Paul Klee Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Close-Up 2
Churches, Sun and Moon- Tribute to Paul Klee
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

Day Thirty- Joy Garnett- Terrible Beauty

It’s Day THIRTY and I’m excited to present today’s artist.  When I was initially researching and finding more contemporary artists for my STILL growing list, her paintings intrigued me.  I then read more about her work and projects and was even more sucked into her work.  Please join me in honoring Joy Garnett!

Joy Garnett

Joy Garnett

Joy Garnett (born 1965 ) is a painter and writer in Brooklyn, New York, USA. Garnett’s paintings, based variously on news photographs, scientific imagery and military documents she gathers from the Internet, examine the apocalyptic-sublime at the intersections of media, politics and culture. She engages contemporary consumption of media and the delineation between journalistic and artistic images.  She takes the digital image itself as her subject and is interested in digital media in general. She is married to visual artist Bill Jones.

Plume 2 (Strange Weather)- Joy Garnett

Plume 2 (Strange Weather)- Joy Garnett

Her work is often associated with sampling in new media art and with appropriation art. Controversy surrounding her 2003 paintingMolotov has drawn international scrutiny to issues of ownership and fair use in appropriation art. Garnett’s work has been reproduced in publications including Harper’s, Perspecta: The Yale School of Architecture Journal, and Cabinet magazine.

Since 2005, Garnett has served as Arts Editor at Cultural Politics, a contemporary culture, politics and media journal published by Duke University Press. She is the editor of NEWSgrist.

Garnett completed her undergraduate work at McGill University in Quebec, Canada in 1983. In 1984 she went to Paris to study

Molotov Man- Joy Garnett

Molotov Man- Joy Garnett

painting, and in 1985 she enrolled at École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts, where she remained until she returned to New York in 1988. Once back in New York, she entered the graduate program at The City College of New York where she received her MFA in 1991. While attending City College, Garnett received the Elizabeth Ralston McCabe Connor Award.

Night Photograph- Joy Garnett

Night Photograph- Joy Garnett

After graduating, her work was exhibited in several group shows, including the Summer Show at Debs & Co., New York in 1999. Debs & Co. also hosted her first solo exhibition the following spring, entitled “Buster-Jangle”, a collection of paintings that appropriated photos of atomic bomb tests from the 1950s that Garnett found on the web after they were released by the US government under the Freedom of Information Act. Her work was reviewed and noted for its exploration of a “paradoxical realm of terrible beauty… tying together the histories of the bomb and American landscape painting.”

In 1997, while doing research for her first solo exhibition, Garnett began gathering images and documents about nuclear testing

Flood (2) (Strange Weather series). 2005. Oil on canvas- Joy Garnett

Flood (2) (Strange Weather series). 2005. Oil on canvas- Joy Garnett

from primary sources on the Internet. Eventually this resulted in an online compilation of material known as The Bomb Project. Spawned from her extensive imagery search, it led to an experimental recontextualization of images in a constantly growing archive. In creating The Bomb Project, Garnett addresses the role of the digital image as a cultural artifact, and attempts to reveal the information and hegemonic coding within these images with as little intervention as possible. She seeks to “establish a context where art, science and government are presented as interlocking and overlapping areas.”  Since its launch in 2000, the Bomb Project has been expanded to include still and moving declassified imagery, as well primary source documents, links to current events and news articles. The original documentation, produced by the nuclear industry, is offered side by side with activist views, providing a context for comparative study, analysis and creativity. In its current form, the compendium is intended to be used as a resource for other artists.

Paris Riots (#3)- Joy Garnett

Paris Riots (#3)- Joy Garnett

Garnett is known for her appropriation of mass media images in her paintings.  She collects images from news sources on the internet and saves them in her archives without noting the source or original photographer. Later, she recreates them in the form of oil painting on canvas. Each painting is produced in one sitting. Stylistically, the results are expressionist as opposed to photorealist.

Garnett explores the problem of the found object by re-mediating and

Air Strip- Joy Garnett

Air Strip- Joy Garnett

transforming the image of a journalistic photograph by painting it, thereby both shifting its context and opening it up for multiple interpretations by the viewer, as is consistent within the framework and context of art.

While Garnett’s appropriation art may be regarded by some as an extension of the postmodernist ambition to defy traditional notions of originality and authorship, it may be best framed in terms of the tradition of painting that responds to, engages and extends contemporary media theory.  In any case, Garnett pushes the boundaries of her medium in order to understand its constraints more fully.

Garnett’s 2004 exhibition Riot featured a series of paintings based on images pulled from mass media sources, depicting figures in

Joy Garnett Smoke (2003) oil on canvas

Joy Garnett Smoke (2003) oil on canvas

“extreme emotional states.” One of the paintings, entitled Molotov, was originally sourced from a jpeg found on the Internet that was later discovered to be a fragment of a larger photograph taken by Susan Meiselas during the Sandinista Revolution (1979). After the Riot exhibition closed, Meiselas’s lawyer contacted Garnett with a cease and desist letter claiming copyright infringementand “piracy” of Meiselas’ photograph. The letter stipulated that she remove the image from her website, sign a retroactive licensing agreement to transfer all rights to the painting to Meiselas, and credit Meiselas on all subsequent reproductions of Molotov.

Garnett responded to a threat of injunction by removing the image of Molotov from her website. Once the image was removed from Garnett’s website, Meiselas did not pursue the matter further.

There is a ton more to read of her biography at wikipedia.

Stones (2003) 60 x 78 inches. Oil on canvas- Joy Garnett

Stones (2003) 60 x 78 inches. Oil on canvas- Joy Garnett

Now here’s my final piece in tribute to Joy Garnett!  I went through so many photos online…tornados, floods, churches on fire

In progress…reference photo in the background.

In progress…reference photo in the background.

(ones that were surprisingly struck by lightening!), fires at night, fires during the day.  I

Painting fire is fun!

Painting fire is fun!

finally narrowed it down to tornados or buildings on fire.  They both seemed very entertaining to paint (in a disturbing way, I suppose).  The bright orange and yellows of the fires called out to me so that was what I did.  This is another example of a painting that I wish I did with oil.  The blending would have been easier and smooth.  Maybe when I move into my new house I can start moving onto oils for some of these paintings.  For now, I think I’m not fairing too poorly with only acrylics!

See you tomorrow on the last day of January!  It’ll be an entire month without a hitch.  Yay me!

xoxo, Linda

Almost done…I could paint smoke all day.

Almost done…I could paint smoke all day.

The Roof is on Fire- Tribute to Joy Garnett Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylics on canvas

The Roof is on Fire- Tribute to Joy Garnett
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylics on canvas

Side- View The Roof is on Fire- Tribute to Joy Garnett Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylics on canvas

Side- View
The Roof is on Fire- Tribute to Joy Garnett
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylics on canvas

Close Up 1 The Roof is on Fire- Tribute to Joy Garnett Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylics on canvas

Close Up 1
The Roof is on Fire- Tribute to Joy Garnett
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylics on canvas

Close-Up 2 The Roof is on Fire- Tribute to Joy Garnett Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylics on canvas

Close-Up 2
The Roof is on Fire- Tribute to Joy Garnett
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylics on canvas

Day Twenty-Nine- Arshile Gorky- Everlastingness

It’s Day 29 and I had such a lovely time painting today!  Maybe it was because I’m painting another abstract expressionist or I took a break from packing this morning.  I just let the brush take on a life of it’s own.  Let’s all pay tribute to the wonderful artist that is…

Arshile Gorky!

Arshile Gorky

Arshile Gorky

One Year the Milkwood 1944 Arshile Gorky

One Year the Milkwood 1944
Arshile Gorky

Arshile Gorky (born Vosdanig Manoug Adoian (Armenian: Ոստանիկ Մանուկ Ատոյեան) (April 15, 1904 – July 21, 1948) was an Armenian-American painter, who had a seminal influence on Abstract Expressionism. As such, his works were often speculated to have been informed by the suffering and loss he experienced of the Armenian Genocide.

Gorky was born on April 15, 1904 Vostanik Manuk Adoian in the village of

Detail from Garden in Sochi (1941) by Arshile Gorky. Photograph: ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London/Museum of Modern Art, New York/Scala, Florence

Detail from Garden in Sochi (1941) by Arshile Gorky. Photograph: ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London/Museum of Modern Art, New York/Scala, Florence

Khorgom, situated on the shores of Lake Van in Ottoman Empire. In later years Gorky was vague about even the date of his birth, changing it from year to year. In 1908 his father emigrated to America to avoid the draft, leaving his family behind in the town of Van.

In 1915 Gorky fled Lake Van during the Armenian Genocide and escaped with his mother and his three sisters into Russian-controlled territory. In the aftermath of the genocide, Gorky’s mother died of starvation in Yerevanin 1919. Arriving in America in 1920, the 16-year old Gorky was reunited with his father, but they never grew close.

The Leaf of the Artichoke is an Owl- 1944

The Leaf of the Artichoke is an Owl- 1944

In the process of reinventing his identity, he changed his name to “Arshile Gorky”, even telling people he was a relative of the Russian writer Maxim Gorky.

In 1922, Gorky enrolled in the New School of Design in Boston, eventually becoming a part-time instructor. During the early 1920s he was influenced by Impressionism, although later in the decade he produced works that were morepostimpressionist. During this time he was living in New York and was influenced by Paul Cézanne. In 1925 he was asked by Edmund Greacen of the Grand Central Art Galleries to teach at the Grand Central School of Art; Gorky accepted and remained with them until 1931.  In 1927, Gorky met Ethel Kremer Schwabacher and developed a lifelong friendship. Schwabacher was his first biographer. Gorky said:

The stuff of thought is the seed of the artist. Dreams form the bristles of the artist’s brush. As the eye functions as the brain’s sentry, I communicate my innermost perceptions through the art, my worldview.

In 1933, Arshile Gorky became one of the first artists to become employed by the Works Progress Administration Federal Art

‘Garden in Sochi’ (1943)

‘Garden in Sochi’ (1943)

Project. This later came to include such artists as Alice Neel, Lee Krasner, Jackson Pollock, Diego Rivera and Mark Rothko.

Notable paintings from this time include Landscape in the Manner of Cézanne (1927) and Landscape, Staten Island (1927–1928). At the close of the 1920s and into the 1930s he experimented with cubism, eventually moving to surrealism. The painting illustrated above, The Artist and His Mother, (ca. 1926–1936) is a memorable, moving and innovative portrait. His The Artist and His Mother paintings are based on a childhood photograph taken in Van in which he is depicted standing beside his mother. Gorky made two versions; the other is in the National Gallery of Art Washington, DC.. The painting has been likened to Ingres for simplicity of line and smoothness, to Egyptian Funerary art for pose, to Cézanne for flat planar composition, to Picasso for form and color.

Gorky, Study for Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia. Study for Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia 1932 Ink on Paper 51.1 x 73 cm

Gorky, Study for Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia. Study for Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia 1932 Ink on Paper 51.1 x 73 cm

Nighttime, Enigma, Nostalgia (1930–1934) is a series of complex works that characterize this phase of his painting. The canvas Portrait of Master Billappears to depict Gorky’s friend, Willem de Kooning. De Kooning said: “I met a lot of artists — but then I met Gorky… He had an extraordinary gift for hitting the nail on the head; remarkable. So I immediately attached myself to him and we became very good friends. It was nice to be foreigners meeting in some new place.”  However recent publications contradict the claim that the painting is of de Kooning but is actually a portrait of a Swedish carpenter Gorky called Master Bill who did some work for him in exchange for Gorky giving him art lessons.

When Gorky showed his new work to André Breton in the 1940s, after seeing the new paintings and in particular The Liver is the Cock’s Comb,Breton declared the painting to be “one of the most important paintings made in America” and he stated that Gorky was a Surrealist, which was Breton’s highest compliment.  The painting was shown in the Surrealists’ final show at the Galérie Maeght in Paris in 1947.

Michael Auping, a curator at the Modern Art Museum in Fort Worth, saw in the work a “taut sexual drama” combined with nostalgic

The Liver is the Cock's Comb- Arshile Gorky

The Liver is the Cock’s Comb- Arshile Gorky

allusions to Gorky’s Armenian past.  The work in 1944 shows his emergence in the 1940s from the influence of Cézanne and Picasso into his own style, and is perhaps his greatest work.  It is over six feet high and eight feet wide, depicting “an abstract landscape filled with watery plumes of semi-transparent color that coalesce around spiky, thornlike shapes, painted in thin, sharp black lines, as if to suggest beaks and claws.”

Read more of his biography at wikipedia.

Letting my brush come to life...

Letting my brush come to life…

“When something is finished, that means it’s dead, doesn’t it? I believe in everlastingness. I never finish a painting – I just stop working on it for a while.”  (Arshile Gorky)

I chose to focus on Gorky’s abstract paintings.  I love them.  The could stare at the

Seriously…it has it's own life...

Seriously…it has it’s own life…

colors and subtle details all day.  Images pop out of them as you stare at them.  As I painted my piece, I started seeing various images as well.  There’s a bit of surreal automatism in his work…at least that’s what I felt as I painted this.  I also felt a bit of orphism going on…it’s just neat that I even know what those are these days!  I hope you enjoy my tribute to Gorky!  I sure had a great time painting it.  See you tomorrow on Day 30!  January…where did you go?  Best, Linda

In the inside light...

In the inside light…

And now the finished piece…

The Man You See is in your Mind- Tribute to Arshile Gorky Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

The Man You See is in your Mind- Tribute to Arshile Gorky
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

Side-View The Man You See is in your Mind- Tribute to Arshile Gorky Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Side-View
The Man You See is in your Mind- Tribute to Arshile Gorky
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

Close-Up 1 The Man You See is in your Mind- Tribute to Arshile Gorky Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Close-Up 1
The Man You See is in your Mind- Tribute to Arshile Gorky
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

Close-Up 2 The Man You See is in your Mind- Tribute to Arshile Gorky Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Close-Up 2
The Man You See is in your Mind- Tribute to Arshile Gorky
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

Day Twenty-Eight- Hannah Höch- Blurring Boundaries

It’s Day 28 and I’ve got to be honest with you.  I’ve started packing up my house and so fitting in painting has been difficult.  BUT, I’m not giving up.  It’s not an option! 🙂  I was excited to see that Hannah Höch was today’s artist.

Hannah Hoch

Hannah Hoch

Hannah Höch (November 1, 1889 – May 31, 1978) was a German Dada artist. She is best known for her work of the Weimar period, when she was one of the originators of photomontage.

Grotesque (1963)

Grotesque (1963)

Hannah Höch was born Anna Therese Johanne Höch in Gotha, Germany. From 1912 to

Bouquet of Eyes- Hannah Hoch

Bouquet of Eyes- Hannah Hoch

1914 she studied at the College of Arts and Crafts in Berlin under the guidance of Harold Bergen. She chose the curriculum glass design and graphic arts, rather than fine arts, to please her father. In 1914, at the start of World War I, she left the school to work with the Red Cross. In 1915 she returned to school, entering the graphics class of the National Institute of the Museum of Arts and Crafts. Also in 1915, Höch began an influential friendship with Raoul Hausmann, a member of the Berlin Dada movement. Höch’s involvement with the Berlin Dadaists began in earnest in 1919. After her schooling, she worked in the handicrafts department for Ullstein Verlag (The Ullstein Press), designing dress and embroidery patterns for Die Dame (The Lady) and Die Praktische Berlinerin (The Practical Berlin Woman). The influence of this early work and training can be seen in her later work involving references to dress patterns and textiles. From 1926 to 1929 she lived and worked in the Netherlands. Höch made many influential friendships over the years, with Kurt Schwitters and Piet Mondrian among others. Höch, along with Hausmann, was one of the first pioneers of the art form that would come to be known as photomontage.

Platonic Love- Hannah Hoch

Platonic Love- Hannah Hoch

After her involvement with Hausmann ended in 1922, she was involved with women and had a relationship from 1926 to 1929 with the Dutch writer and linguist Til Brugman. She supported reproductive rights for women; she had two abortions during her involvement with Hausmann.

While the Dadaists “paid lip service to women’s emancipation,” they were clearly reluctant to

The Flirt 1926

The Flirt 1926

include a woman among their ranks. Hans Richterdescribed Höch’s contribution to the Dada movement as the “sandwiches, beer and coffee she managed somehow to conjure up despite the shortage of money.” Raoul Hausmann even suggested that Höch get a job to support him financially. Höch was the lone woman among the Berlin Dada group, although Sophie Täuber, Beatrice Wood, and Baroness Else von Freytag-Loringhoven were also important, if overlooked, Dada figures. Höch references the hypocrisy of the Berlin Dada group and German society as a whole in her photomontage, Da-Dandy.

Höch’s time at Verlang working with magazines targeted to women made her acutely aware of the difference between women in media and reality, even as the workplace provided her with many of the images that served as raw material for her own work. She was also critical of marriage, often depicting brides as mannequins and children, reflecting the socially pervasive idea of women as incomplete people with little control over their lives. Höch considered herself a part of the women’s movement in the 1920s, as shown in her depiction of herself in Schnitt mit dem Küchenmesser DADA durch die letzte weimarer Bierbauchkulturepoche Deutschlands (1919–20). Her pieces also

Dada Dandy- Hannah Hoch

Dada Dandy- Hannah Hoch

commonly combine male and female traits into one unified being. During the era of the Weimar Republic, “mannish women were both celebrated and castigated for breaking down traditional gender roles.” Her androgynous characters may also have been related to her bisexuality and attraction to masculinity in women (that is, attraction to the female form paired with stereotypically masculine characteristics).

Höch spent the years of the Third Reich in Berlin, Germany, keeping a low profile. She lived

Cut with the Kitchen Knife: Dada Through the Last Weimar Beer-belly Cultural Epoch of Germany" (1919)

Cut with the Kitchen Knife: Dada Through the Last Weimar Beer-belly Cultural Epoch of Germany” (1919)

in Berlin-Heiligensee, a remote area in the outskirts of Berlin, hiding in a small garden house. She married businessman and pianist Kurt Matthies in 1938 and divorced him in 1944.Though her work was not acclaimed after the war as it had been before the rise of the Third Reich, she continued to produce her photomontages and exhibit them internationally until her death in 1978, in Berlin. Her house and garden can be visited at the annual Day of the Memorial (Tag des offenen Denkmals).

Read more of her biography here at wikipedia.

"Hochfinanz" (High Finance) - Hannah Hoch

“Hochfinanz” (High Finance) – Hannah Hoch

I thought my tribute to her came out okay.  I wish that I had more time to work on it.  I wish I filled the canvas entirely.  You would

Hannah Höch, Russian Dancer/My Double, 1928

Hannah Höch, Russian Dancer/My Double, 1928

think that doing a photomontage/Dadaist collage would be easy, but it wasn’t.  I spent a good amount of time sifting through photographs on the computer and trying to visualize cutting them apart and putting them together in the right way.  It was also pretty difficult to paste everything down gracefully.  I felt like a little kid using glue for the first time.  I also printed the photos out with an ink-jet printer onto regular paper so I had to be careful the ink didn’t bleed because of the glue and mod-podge.  I primed the photos with enamel before glossing it over one last time.  My hands were sticky and pretty gross after.  I decided to keep this one simple and of course I wanted to do a self-portrait.  I used her self-portrait for inspiration.

Please enjoy the first of the Dadaists tributes that I’ve created.  I can’t wait for the next Dada/photomontage/collage artist I get to.  I will make sure to do something more involved.  For now I’m just satisfied, but not exactly excited about how it turned out.

I’m giving myself an emotional break and not beating myself up too much because this next month is going to be insane!

See you tomorrow on Day 29!  The month is almost over even though it feels like it just started!

xoxo, Linda

It's for you- Tribute to Hannah Hoch Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Paper/glue on canvas

It’s for you- Tribute to Hannah Hoch
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Paper/glue on canvas

Side- View It's for you- Tribute to Hannah Hoch Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Paper/glue on canvas

Side- View
It’s for you- Tribute to Hannah Hoch
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Paper/glue on canvas

Close-Up 1 It's for you- Tribute to Hannah Hoch Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Paper/glue on canvas

Close-Up 1
It’s for you- Tribute to Hannah Hoch
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Paper/glue on canvas

Close-Up 2 It's for you- Tribute to Hannah Hoch Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Paper/glue on canvas

Close-Up 2
It’s for you- Tribute to Hannah Hoch
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Paper/glue on canvas

Day Twenty-Seven- Jean Crotti- Instrument of God

Day TWENTY-SEVEN and only five paintings to go until the month is done!  Then only 11 months more to go.  Whew!  I was excited about today’s artist when I researched his artwork.  I recognized his work mildly, but really didn’t know anything about this man.  Today I present to you Jean Crotti!

Jean Crotti

Jean Crotti

Jean Crotti (24 April 1878 – 30 January 1958) was a French painter.

Femme au long cou (fond mouchete), 1922, by Jean Crotti

Femme au long cou (fond mouchete), 1922, by Jean Crotti

Crotti was born in Bulle, Fribourg, Switzerland. He first studied in Munich, Germany at

the School of Decorative Arts, then at age 23 moved to Paris to study art at the Académie Julian. Initially he was influenced by Impressionism, then by Fauvism and Art Nouveau. Around 1910 he began to experiment with Orphism, an offshoot of Cubism, and a style that would be enhanced by his association in New York City with Marcel Duchamp and Francis Picabia.

A refugee from World War I, he looked to America as a place where he could live and

JEAN CROTTI. "ATTENTIVE AUX VOIX INTERIEURES". OIL ON CANVAS, SIGNED. SWISS, C. 1920

JEAN CROTTI. “ATTENTIVE AUX VOIX INTERIEURES”. OIL ON CANVAS, SIGNED. SWISS, C. 1920

develop his art. In New York, he shared a studio with Marcel Duchamp and met his sister, Suzanne Duchamp. She was part of the Dada movement in which Crotti would become involved. In 1916, he exhibited Orphist-like paintings, several of which had religious titles that also included his Portrait of Marcel Duchamp and his much discussed Les Forces MÈcaniques de l’amour Mouvement, created by using found objects.

1958 – Jean Crotti

1958 – Jean Crotti

In the fall of 1916, Crotti separated from his wife, Yvonne Chastel, and returned to Paris. He had begun a relationship with Suzanne Duchamp that would culminate in his divorce in 1919 and immediate marriage to Suzanne. An artist in her own right, she would greatly influence Jean Crotti’s painting. In 1920, he produced one of his best known works, a portrait of Thomas Edison. He would be part of the 1925 Exposition International in Paris, and the International Exhibition of Modern Art at the Brooklyn Museum in 1926 – 1927. Over the ensuing years, he would create numerous paintings and be the subject for several solo exhibitions at major galleries in England, France, Germany, and the United States.

Crotti died in Paris.

Jean Crotti’s heirs donated his personal papers to the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, where they can be consulted by researchers.

In Spring 2011, Francis M. Naumann Fine Art showed an exhibition, Inhabiting Abstraction, including important examples from

Jean Crotti - Portrait D' Etienne Bignou. Original 1944

Jean Crotti – Portrait D’ Etienne Bignou. Original 1944

every significant phase and development in the realm of abstraction that Crotti explored, as well as one-of-a-kind works such as “Parterre de reve” (1920), in which he framed his painting palette and then signed it.

Biography from wikipedia.

Here’s an excerpt from Papillon Gallery’s site.

Jean Crotti’s spiritual beginnings deeply affected his development as an artist. Born in 1878 in Bulle, near Fribourg in the western, French-speaking section of Switzerland, his early arts education was in Germany and France. Crotti struggled with questions of a religious and spiritual nature while at the School of Decorative Arts in Munich and the Académie Julian in Paris. As an artist, he wrote, “seems to be an instrument of God charged with transmitting messages to men….art must be therefore a kind of magic, bringing signs and messages to man…” He left school in 1902 in order to detach himself and become independent as an artist.

Through each one of these artists I seem to learn something new.  Through Crotti, I learned about orphism!

Jean Crotti. Jeune Fille, 1921

Jean Crotti. Jeune Fille, 1921

The Section d’Or (“Golden Section”), also known as Groupe de Puteaux (or Puteaux Group), was a collective of painters, sculptors, poets and critics associated with Cubism and Orphism. Based in the Parisian suburbs of Puteaux and Courbevoie, the group was active from 1911 to around 1914, coming to prominence in the wake of their controversial showing at the Salon des Indépendants in the spring of 1911. This showing by

Jean Crotti

Jean Crotti

Jean Metzinger, Albert Gleizes, Robert Delaunay, Henri le Fauconnier and Fernand Léger, created a scandal that brought Cubism to the attention of the general public for the first time. The Salon de la Section d’Or further exposed Cubism to a wider audience. The group seems to have adopted the name Section d’Or to distinguish themselves from the narrower style of Cubism developed in parallel by Pablo Picasso andGeorges Braque in the Montmartre quarter of Paris, and to show that Cubism, rather than being an isolated art-form, represented the continuation of a grand tradition (indeed, the golden ratio had fascinated Western intellectuals of diverse interests for at least 2,400 years).

Read more about that movement and technique here.

Starting my sketch...

Starting my sketch…

I had so much fun painting this piece.  There was a feeling of calm as I painted it.  It wasn’t intimidating and I felt a level of freedom while painting.  I think the only stressful aspect was color choice…which seems to be a common thread with almost all these pieces.  Except Giger which was very monochromatic.  I think I made the right choices and captured his spirit and style.  I will definitely be experimenting more with orphism in the future.  I know that there will be some more of them in the future like Duchamp and some cubists are coming up for sure.

Please enjoy my tribute to Jean Crotti and see you tomorrow on Day 28! xoxo, Linda

My painting and Crotti reference in the background...

My painting and Crotti reference in the background…

Detailing

Detailing

La Réflexion- Tribute to Jean Crotti Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

La Réflexion- Tribute to Jean Crotti
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

Side-View La Réflexion- Tribute to Jean Crotti Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Side-View
La Réflexion- Tribute to Jean Crotti
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

Close-Up 1 La Réflexion- Tribute to Jean Crotti Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Close-Up 1
La Réflexion- Tribute to Jean Crotti
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

Close Up 2 La Réflexion- Tribute to Jean Crotti Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Close Up 2
La Réflexion- Tribute to Jean Crotti
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

Day Twenty-Six- William Baziotes- Subjects Revealing Themselves

Wow, I made it to Day Twenty-Six!  After yesterday’s artist everything seems just a little easier.  I was excited about today’s artist because when I first researched his art I immediately started getting ideas of what I wanted to paint.  It’s sometimes more difficult when I get a surrealist/abstract painter because I tend to over-analyze exactly what I want to paint.  It’s hard to get the style of each painting “just” right.  Today I present to you (who I believe is an under-rated artist…compared to his counterparts.  I will also include a link to an article/blog that goes more into that subject.) William Baziotes!

William Baziotes

William Baziotes

Eclipse- WIlliam Baziotes 1950

Eclipse- WIlliam Baziotes 1950

William Baziotes (June 11, 1912 – June 6, 1963) was an American painter influenced by Surrealism and was a contributor to Abstract Expressionism.

Born and raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to Greek parents Angelos and

Dwarf- William Baziotes

Dwarf- William Baziotes

Stella, Baziotes began his formal art training in 1933 at the National Academy of Design in New York City where he graduated in 1936.  He studied with Charles Curran, Ivan Olinsky, Gifford Beal, and Leon Kroll. Baziotes taught through the Federal Art Project in from 1936-1938 and worked on their WPA Easel Project from 1938-1940.

In the 1940s he became friends with many artists in the emerging Abstract Expressionist group. Although he shared the groups’ interest in primitive art and automatism, his work was more in line with European surrealism Later in his career he taught extensively. His first solo exhibition was at Peggy Guggenheim’s Art of This Century Gallery in 1944.  With David Hare, Robert Motherwell, and Mark Rothko, Baziotes founded the Subjects of the Artist School in New York in 1948. He also taught at theBrooklyn Museum Art School, People’s Art Center, the Museum of Modern Art, and at the City University of New York, Hunter College and New York University in Manhattan during the last ten years of his life.

Toy- William Baziotes 1949

Toy- William Baziotes 1949

Baziotes and his wife Ethel, whom he married in 1941, lived in the Morningside Heights area of northern Manhattan until his death from lung cancer in June 1963, aged 50. During his lifetime, he and his wife shared a love of ancient Greek art and sculpture as well as the poetry of Charles Baudelaire. Many of his paintings are inspired by the latter’s poetry as well as by ancient art.

Some of his famous works are AquaticDusk, and The Room, all of which are in the

Beach Shadows- William Baziotes 1947

Beach Shadows- William Baziotes 1947

Guggenheim Museum in New York.

Biography from wikipedia.

Here is an excerpt from a wonderful blog entry about Baziotes called Art Before Sleep that I stumbled across.

I never tire of looking at the paintings of William Baziotes. His works are so simple and perhaps because of that are always so fresh, no matter how many times I’ve seen them. It’s interesting to see the evolution of his work—a continual distillation to basic forms.

“Each painting has its own way of evolving…when the painting is finished, the subject reveals itself,” Wm. Baziotes

Night Form- William Baziotes 1947

Night Form- William Baziotes 1947

I also learned about surrealist automatism when I researched Baziotes…and realized that I used that technique while doing my own art!  Here’s the wikipedia description of that art form.

Automatism has taken on many forms: the automatic writing and drawing initially (and still to this day) practiced by surrealists can be compared to similar, or perhaps parallel phenomena, such as the non-idiomatic improvisation.

Surrealist automatism is different from mediumistic automatism, from which the term

Cyclops- William Baziotes 1947

Cyclops- William Baziotes 1947

was inspired. Ghosts, spirits or the like are not purported to be the source of surrealist automatic messages.

I tried to keep this in mind while creating my tribute to Baziotes…I kept wanting to pull out the pencil and sketch something before painting, but I mentally slapped my hand and started painting on a completely blank canvas.  I hope you enjoy my piece dedicated to this wonderful artist!

The Flesh Eaters- William Baziotes

The Flesh Eaters- William Baziotes

And now I present to you my Baziotes tribute and then it’s onto Day 27!  Wow, getting closer to the end of the month.  Maybe I’ll do some sort of round-up at the end of each month.  For now my art space is running out of wall space and I’m loving it.  Thanks for reading and come back soon…like tomorrow!  xoxo, Linda

The Second Moon- Tribute to William Baziotes Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

The Second Moon- Tribute to William Baziotes
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

Side-View The Second Moon- Tribute to William Baziotes Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Side-View
The Second Moon- Tribute to William Baziotes
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

Close-Up 1 The Second Moon- Tribute to William Baziotes Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Close-Up 1
The Second Moon- Tribute to William Baziotes
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

Close-Up 2 The Second Moon- Tribute to William Baziotes Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Close-Up 2
The Second Moon- Tribute to William Baziotes
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

Close-Up 3 The Second Moon- Tribute to William Baziotes Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Close-Up 3
The Second Moon- Tribute to William Baziotes
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

Day Twenty-Five- H.R. Giger- Night Terrors

Today I celebrate an artist that has been my favorite since I was little.  Alien is one of the first movies I remember watching…yes it’s strange, but I grew up with a single father that loved science fiction/fantasy and action movies.  I also remember his set design and art from David Lynch’s Dune, another one of my favorites.  As I got older (throughout high school) I continued to be in awe of his paintings, sculptures and conceptual designs.  I present to you…H.R. Giger!

H.R. Giger

H.R. Giger

H.R. Giger at work

H.R. Giger at work

Biography from wikipedia.

Landscape XIV. 1973. Acrylic on paper on wood- H.R. Giger

Landscape XIV. 1973. Acrylic on paper on wood-
H.R. Giger

Hans Rudolf “Ruedi” Giger (born 5 February 1940) is a Swiss surrealist painter, sculptor, and set designer. He was part of the special effects team that won an Academy Award for Best Achievement for Visual Effects for their design work on the film Alien.  He was named to the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 2013.

Giger was born in 1940 in Chur, capital city of Graubünden, the largest and

H.R. Giger

H.R. Giger

easternmost Swiss canton. His father, a chemist, viewed art as a “breadless profession” and strongly encouraged him to enter pharmaceutics, Giger recalls. Yet he moved in 1962 to Zürich, where he studied Architecture and industrial design at the School of Applied Arts until 1970.  Giger had a relationship with Swiss actress Li Tobler until she committed suicide in 1975. He married Mia Bonzanigo in 1979; they separated a year and a half later.

Giger’s style and thematic execution have been influential. His design for the

E.L.P.- H.R. Giger

E.L.P.- H.R. Giger

Alien was inspired by his painting Necronom IV and earned him an Oscar in 1980. His books of paintings, particularly Necronomicon and Necronomicon II (1985) and the frequent appearance of his art in Omnimagazine continued his rise to international prominence.  Giger is also well known for artwork on several music recording albums.

In 1998 Giger acquired the Château St. Germain in Gruyères, Switzerland, and it now houses the H. R. Giger Museum, a permanent repository of his work.

Giger got his start with small ink drawings before progressing to oil paintings. For most of his career, Giger has worked predominantly in airbrush, creating monochromatic canvasses depicting surreal, nightmarish dreamscapes. However, he has now largely abandoned large airbrush works in favor of works with pastels, markers or ink.

The Tourist- H.R. Giger

The Tourist- H.R. Giger

His most distinctive stylistic innovation is that of a representation of human bodies and machines in a cold, interconnected

Other- H.R. Giger

Other- H.R. Giger

relationship, he described as “biomechanics”.  His main influences were painters Ernst Fuchs and Salvador Dalí. He met Salvador Dalí, to whom he was introduced by painter Robert Venosa. He was also a personal friend of Timothy Leary. Giger suffers from night terrors and his paintings are all to some extent inspired by his experiences with that particular sleep disorder. He studied interior and industrial design at the School of Commercial Art in Zurich (from 1962 to 1965) and made his first paintings as a means of art therapy.

In 2007, Giger and his work were subjects of a 19-minute documentary, H.R. Giger’s Sanctuary, which toured internationally and was released on DVD in May 2008.

There are evidences that Giger was very influenced by the works of the American horror fiction writer H.P. Lovecraft, such as in his first compendium of images Necronomicon, which is a clear reference to Lovecraft’s Necronomicon.

“This Academy Award-winning artist claims to be influenced by Lovecraft, and yet his number of explicitly Lovecraftian pieces of art are very few.”

H.R. Giger

H.R. Giger

In the 1960s and 1970s, Giger directed a number of films, including Swiss Made (1968), Tagtraum(1973), Giger’s Necronomicon (1975) and Giger’s Alien (1979).

Giger has created furniture designs, particularly the Harkonnen Capo Chair for a movie of the novel Dune that was to be directed by Alejandro Jodorowsky. Many years later, David Lynch directed the film, using only rough concepts by Giger. Giger had wished to work with Lynch, as he states in one of his books that Lynch’s film Eraserhead was closer than even Giger’s own films to realizing his vision.

Giger is often referred to in pop culture, especially in science fiction and

H.R. Giger's “A L I E N” Artwork

H.R. Giger’s “A L I E N” Artwork

cyberpunk. William Gibson (who wrote an early script for Alien 3) seems particularly fascinated: a minor character in Virtual Light, Lowell, is described as having New York XXIV tattooed across his back, and in Idoru a secondary character, Yamazaki, describes the buildings of nanotech Japan as Giger-esque.

~

H.R. Giger

H.R. Giger

Read this awesome article from wired.com.  Here’s a tiny excerpt to tease you to do so.

His childhood home’s cellar became, as Giger described, “a monstrous labyrinth, where all kinds of dangers lay in wait for me.” Similarly, his early fear of worms and snakes were sublimated by skeletal sculptures of wire, plaster and cardboard.

As I saw his name get closer on my handy excel spreadsheet, I got excited, but also very intimidated and nervous.  Thoughts and

Oh yeah!  I'm doing a blog…maybe I should take a photo.

Oh yeah! I’m doing a blog…maybe I should take a photo.

huge doubts started plaguing my brain.  “I can’t POSSIBLY paint a Giger-esque painting!”  But I did and I am VERY excited about how it turned out.  I have almost no photos of the progress of this particular art piece because I was so nervous as I was painting that I didn’t even think of taking pictures.  It wasn’t until I was in the middle of painting details on the alien that I thought of taking photos.

Needs more detailing and something else...

Needs more detailing and something else…

At first I was going to do a Giger-esque self-portrait of myself wearing the safety-pin glasses from the Magma album, Attahk.  Maybe have weird baby aliens emerging from my body or have them breaking out of pods behind me…you know, the usual.  Then I kept staring at the alien pieces that he did.  I was really intimidated by all the bio-mechanical machines so I decided to to an alien-esque background wash on the painting first and then see what emerged from my brain.

I think I captured his essence pretty well.  I don’t think I’m going to ever be as talented as him, but I am happy and relieved to present my piece.

A.L.I.E.N.- Tribute to H.R. Giger Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

A.L.I.E.N.- Tribute to H.R. Giger
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View A.L.I.E.N.- Tribute to H.R. Giger Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
A.L.I.E.N.- Tribute to H.R. Giger
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up A.L.I.E.N.- Tribute to H.R. Giger Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up
A.L.I.E.N.- Tribute to H.R. Giger
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day Twenty-Four- Horace Pippin- Defying Classification

It’s Day Twenty-Four and that means…24 paintings!  Today’s painting was surprisingly difficult.  Although the artist is classified as a naive/primitive and self taught painter, there’s something that was hard to capture when I painted my piece in honor of him.  He embodied something raw that I felt like I was missing in my artwork.  Something subtle and emotional maybe…Let’s all learn about this wonderful artist, Horace Pippin!

Horace Pippin

Horace Pippin

Biography is from wikipedia.

Self-Portrait- Horace Pippin

Self-Portrait- Horace Pippin

Horace Pippin was born in West Chester, Pennsylvania, and grew up in Goshen, New York.

HORACE PIPPIN 1888-1946. Zachariah, 1943. Oil on canvas

HORACE PIPPIN 1888-1946. Zachariah, 1943. Oil on canvas

There he attended segregated schools until he was 15, when he went to work to support his ailing mother.  As a boy, Horace responded to an art supply company’s advertising contest and won his first set of crayons and a box of watercolors. As a youngster, Pippin made drawings of racehorses and jockeys from Goshen’s celebrated racetrack. Prior to 1917, Pippin variously toiled in a coal yard, in an iron foundry, as a hotel porter and as a used-clothing peddler.  He was a member of St. John’s African Union Methodist Protestant Church.

Pippin served in the 369th infantry in Europe during World War I, where he lost the use of his right arm after being shot by a sniper. He said of his combat experience:

I did not care what or where I went. I asked God to help me, and he did so. And that is

Horace Pippin, Portrait of Marian Anderson, 1941.

Horace Pippin, Portrait of Marian Anderson, 1941.

the way I came through that terrible and Hellish place. For the whole entire battlefield was hell, so it was no place for any human being to be.

While in the trenches, Pippin kept illustrated journals of his military service, of which six drawings survived.

John Brown Going To His Hanging by Horace Pippin

John Brown Going To His Hanging by Horace Pippin

Pippin initially took up art in the 1920s to strengthen his wounded right arm; his activity as a painter began in earnest around 1930, when he completed his first oil painting, The End of the War: Starting Home. By the late 1930s, critic Christian Brinton, artists N. C. Wyeth and John McCoy, collector Albert C. Barnes, dealer Robert Carlen and curators Dorothy Miller and Holger Cahill championed Pippin’s distinctive paintings that captured his childhood memories and war experiences, scenes of everyday life, landscapes, portraits, biblical subjects, and American historical events. Pippin enrolled in art classes at the Barnes Foundation during autumn 1939 and spring 1940 semesters.

One of his best-known paintings, his Self-portrait of 1941, shows him seated in front of an easel, cradling his brush in his right hand (he used his left arm to guide his injured right arm when painting). His painting of John Brown Going to his Hanging (1942) is in the collection of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia.

Horace Pippin Self-Portrait oil painting picture

Horace Pippin Self-Portrait oil painting picture

Among Pippin’s work there are many genre paintings, such as the Domino Players (1943), in the Phillips Collection, Washington D.C., and several versions of Cabin in the Cotton. His portraits include a depiction of the contralto Marian Anderson singing, painted in 1941. He also painted landscapes and religious subjects.

In the eight years between his national debut in the Museum of Modern Art’s traveling

Mr. Prejudice, by Horace Pippin, 1943

Mr. Prejudice, by Horace Pippin, 1943

exhibition “Masters of Popular Painting” (1938) and his death at the age of fifty-eight, Pippin’s recognition increased on the east and west coasts. During this period, he had three solo exhibitions (1940, 1941, and 1943) at the Carlen Gallery, Philadelphia, PA and solo exhibitions at the Arts Club of Chicago (1941), and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (1942), while private collections and museums such as the Barnes Foundation, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art, purchased his works. His paintings were featured in national surveys held at the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL; Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, PA; Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Dayton Art Institute, OH; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Newark Museum, Newark, NJ; Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, PA. and Tate Gallery, London, UK.

In 1947 critic Alain Locke described him as “a real and rare genius, combining folk quality with artistic maturity so uniquely as

The Trial of John Brown- Horace Pippin

The Trial of John Brown- Horace Pippin

almost to defy classification.”

Although he painted only about 140 works, concentrations of his work can be found in the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, PA; Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA; the Brandywine River Museum, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania; the Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.; and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, CA.

Man on a Bench-Horace Pippin

Man on a Bench-Horace Pippin

It was hard to figure out what I wanted to paint when it came to Horace Pippin.  I am not a black man living during the time that he lived so it was hard for me to choose a subject matter that resonated with me.  Instead of getting to into that aspect of it (I only have a day!), I decided to just stare at his paintings and paint something that emotionally resonated with me…which was the man sitting on the bench.  I love it so I decided to do my own version of it.  I hope you enjoy it as much as I did painting it.  I am still not sure how I feel about how it turned out.  Not sure if it’s because of the different medium I use (acrylics vs. oils) or the color choices…I had a fair amount of doubt while mixing colors.  My friend Karli even helped me out a bit with that.  Tomorrow is DAY 25!  And it’s going to be a doozy…can’t wait to see you then. 🙂  Linda

Here is my finished piece in tribute to Horace Pippin!  He definitely defied classification in my book.

My initial sketch for the painting.

My initial sketch for the painting.

My first choice of blue that I didn't like...

My first choice of blue that I didn’t like…

Man on Bench Smoking- Tribute to Horace Pippin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Man on Bench Smoking- Tribute to Horace Pippin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Man on Bench Smoking- Tribute to Horace Pippin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Man on Bench Smoking- Tribute to Horace Pippin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up Man on Bench Smoking- Tribute to Horace Pippin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up
Man on Bench Smoking- Tribute to Horace Pippin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas