Day 304- Ramon Maiden- Vintage Addict

It’s Day 304!  I found today’s artist through my friend Karli and did some research on his work…loved it!  Was going to do it a while back, but then thought it’d be appropriate to do it on Halloween and close to Dia de Los Muertos!  Please join me in honoring Ramon Maiden today.  It was hard to find a biography on him and his blog seems to be down.  I will keep trying today before I post!  Happy Halloween to all of you today!

Ramon Maiden

Ramon Maiden

Ramon Maiden

Ramon Maiden

I was born in 1972 in Barcelona, but I’ve never felt bound anywhere and I have traveled extensively. I lived in other countries and I considered NYC as my second city. I have never studied art and my training as an artist has been entirely self-taught.

My training, ideas, sources of inspiration… are all dynamic and changing, and so are the

Ramon Maiden

Ramon Maiden

techniques and methods I employ. I try not to focus on anything too specific and progress by using different sources and experimenting.

My training as a social worker, my passion for traveling, my family history and my experience with visual arts…are all very diverse and not at all uniform, which allows me to be very creative.

I recently started painting on wood, is a bit complicated because you have to be very careful and delicate, but the result is very rewarding. My work is a reflection of my way of life, my career, training, experiences, travels, interests.

Ramon Maiden

Ramon Maiden

It is difficult to define and is constantly moving, growing and modified on the fly.
I am very interested in history, the ancient religions, politics and my art is imbued with that.

Ramon Maiden is an artist currently based out of Barcelona, Spain who reappropriates

vintage illustrations from postcards, calendars, and various prints to transform them into fully

Ramon Maiden

Ramon Maiden

tattooed characters and subjects with a mere ball-point pen.

Maiden uses everything from Vargas pin-ups to religious prints depicting Saints and other holy characters to create his detailed pieces dawning full body tattoos.

Biography is from his blog that I found somewhere else because his blog isn’t working.  He also

has an etsy shop…buy his stuff!  Also see more of his art on tumblr.

Ramon Maiden

Ramon Maiden

I hope you enjoy my self portrait I did in tribute of today’s artist.  I had a ton of fun working with pen and ink today.  My arm is definitely

My original photo...

My original photo…

hurting though.  Damn tennis elbow!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 305!

Best,

Linda

Self-Portrait (HOPE)- Tribute to Ramon Maiden Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Self-Portrait (HOPE)- Tribute to Ramon Maiden
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View Self-Portrait (HOPE)- Tribute to Ramon Maiden Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View
Self-Portrait (HOPE)- Tribute to Ramon Maiden
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Self-Portrait (HOPE)- Tribute to Ramon Maiden Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Self-Portrait (HOPE)- Tribute to Ramon Maiden
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Self-Portrait (HOPE)- Tribute to Ramon Maiden Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Self-Portrait (HOPE)- Tribute to Ramon Maiden
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Self-Portrait (HOPE)- Tribute to Ramon Maiden Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Self-Portrait (HOPE)- Tribute to Ramon Maiden
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

 

Day 303- Robert Indermaur- The Theater of Man

It’s Day 303 and I’m feeling slightly under the weather…hopefully it’s just allergies and not a cold or flu…I have shows coming up that I don’t want to miss!  My friend Jon told me about today’s artist and lent me a book of his and I love his work.  It was really challenging finding much information on him online AND it was difficult to paint in his style…but it was very inspiring and thought-provoking.  I love the images and people he portrays.  Join me in honoring Robert Indermaur today!  I did find a small biography on his website.

Robert Indermaur

Robert Indermaur

Der Kuckuck 1981- Robert Indermaur

Der Kuckuck 1981- Robert Indermaur

Robert Indermaur

Born 1947 in Chur / Graubünden.

I went to school in Chur until completion at the Grisons teacher seminar in 1967.

In the following years I was traveling with friends across Europe, Asia and Africa.

In between, I taught as a primary school teacher in St.Antönien, Passugg, Domat / Ems and Chur.

With my future wife and a few friends I founded in 1974 in Chur, the first small theater (Klibühni Schnidrzunft) in Graubünden, which we initiated ten years and accompanied.

30 years ago I began to make my favorite activity to the profession. First, as an abstract, then as a figurative painter and sculptor later I showed my works at more than one hundred solo and many group exhibitions in Switzerland and abroad.

In 1977, the graphic artist Albert Brun and I, six issues of the satirical magazine

Kopf V 1988-  Robert Indermaur

Kopf V 1988- Robert Indermaur

“The ball horn” out.

I am married since 1975. My wife, Barbara, gave birth to our three children, daughter Rebecca and their two sons Alexander and Adrian.
I have different sculptures and murals for public spaces – created and for three theater productions the stage.

Fenster V 1988-  Robert Indermaur

Fenster V 1988- Robert Indermaur

1989/90 we spent a year in California / USA. Otherwise, since 1983, we live in Almens / GR. I work there – and from 2004 also in my second studio in the neighboring village Paspels.

Biography is from www.indermaur.net.  The translation is kind of wonky, but understandable!

Below is text transcribed from the book that was loaned to me.  Robert Indermaur- Departure (Bilder 1983-1989) I wanted to include more information. 🙂 Photos are also from the same book.

Excerpts from Ambiguous Dramas, Tangible Dreams: The Art of Robert Indermaur- By Katherine Gregor

Robert Indermaur’s paintings capture this bittersweet quality of human experience in a powerful, wonderfully visual fashion.  His work makes the unspoken tangible; in his odd, often mysterious images we instinctively recognize our own internal doubts, perceptions, moods, anxieties.  Indermaur’s world of muted palettes and deep shadows, isolated individuals, empty rooms, and ambiguous drams

Frauenhaus 1988-  Robert Indermaur

Frauenhaus 1988- Robert Indermaur

seems to map a kind of universal psychological terrain.  The searching characters at the center of this world, who carry on and look for meaning despite the oddness of their circumstances, serve as our allegorical stand-ins, so that ultimately these paintings portray not individuals but something larger and more tentative – the difficulties and tensions of being human.

Many of these paintings are strongly narrative, literary, even theatrical.  They tell us stories, complete with characters and settings and dramatic tension, but their tales are strange, absurdist, incomplete; they provoke our need to explain.

In other works Indermaur explores the idea of the theater of man – Humans on display in another sense, by their own choice.  An audience is almost never visible in these works; the issue seems to be the individual’s act of exposure, the experience of being publicly “on stage”.

Der Freund 1982-  Robert Indermaur

Der Freund 1982- Robert Indermaur

Through works like these, Indermaur stimulates us to think deeply about the experience of being human.  Sometimes these paintings suggest the artist’s own conclusions; more often they pose open-ended questions, merely hinting at shades of meaning. To solve the puzzles of these paintings present, we must supply pieces of ourselves.

~

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  It was much more difficult that I initially thought it was going to be this morning.  I couldn’t quite get the brushstrokes right and if I was feeling better, I could spend more time on it, but I think it turned out well enough.  I really like the concept of my piece and I hope you do too!

I will see you tomorrow on Day 304!  Whew, I can’t believe I haven’t missed a day this year yet!  Knock on wood.  Knock knock.

 

Best,

Linda

Lachen ist Leben- Tribute to Robert Indermaur Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Lachen ist Leben- Tribute to Robert Indermaur
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Lachen ist Leben- Tribute to Robert Indermaur Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Lachen ist Leben- Tribute to Robert Indermaur
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Lachen ist Leben- Tribute to Robert Indermaur Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Lachen ist Leben- Tribute to Robert Indermaur
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Lachen ist Leben- Tribute to Robert Indermaur Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Lachen ist Leben- Tribute to Robert Indermaur
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Lachen ist Leben- Tribute to Robert Indermaur Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Lachen ist Leben- Tribute to Robert Indermaur
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 302- Wifredo Lam- Hallucinating Figures

It’s Day 302 and I had a great time creating today’s piece.  It was a nice difference compared to yesterday’s tribute.  Join me in honoring Wifredo Lam today.

Wifredo Lam

Wifredo Lam

Wifredo Lam, Zambezia, Zambezia, oil on canvas, 1950

Wifredo Lam, Zambezia, Zambezia, oil on canvas, 1950

Wifredo Óscar de la Concepción Lam y Castilla (Chinese: 林飛龍; pinyin: Lín Fēilóng; December 8, 1902 – September 11, 1982), better known as Wifredo Lam, was a Cuban artist who sought to portray and revive the enduring Afro-Cuban spirit and culture. Inspired by and in contact with some of the most renowned artists of the 20th century, Lam melded his influences and created a unique style, which was ultimately characterized by the prominence of hybrid figures. Though he was predominantly a painter, he also worked with sculpture, ceramics and printmaking in his later life.

Wifredo Lam was born and raised in Sagua La Grande, a village in the sugar farming province of Villa Clara, Cuba. He was of mixed-race ancestry: his father, Yam Lam, was a

Wifredo Lam - Your Own Life, 1942

Wifredo Lam – Your Own Life, 1942

Chinese immigrant and his mother, the former Ana Serafina Castilla, was born to a Congolese former slave mother and a Cuban mulatto father. In Sagua La Grande, Lam was surrounded by many people of African descent; his family, like many others, practiced Catholicism alongside their African traditions. Through his godmother, Matonica Wilson, a Santería priestess locally celebrated as a healer and sorceress, he was exposed to rites of the African orishas. His contact with African celebrations and spiritual practices proved to be his largest artistic influence.

In 1916, Lam moved to Havana to study law, a path that his family had thrust upon him. Simultaneously, he also began studying tropical plants at the Botanical Gardens. From 1918 to 1923, Lam studied painting at the Escuela de Bellas Artes. However, Lam disliked both academic teaching and painting. He left for Madrid in the autumn of 1923 to further his art studies.

Satan 1942 - Wifredo Lam

Satan 1942 – Wifredo Lam

In 1923, Lam began studying in Madrid under Fernando Álvarez de Sotomayor y Zaragoza, the curator of the Museo del Prado and teacher of Salvador Dalí. In the mornings he would attend the studio of the reactionary painter, while he spent his evenings working alongside young, nonconformist painters. At the Prado, Lam discovered and was awed by the work of Hieronymus Bosch and Pieter Bruegel I. While his early paintings were in the modernist Spanish tradition, his work soon became more simplified and decorative. Though Lam’s dislike for academic conservatism persisted, his time in Spain marked his technical development in which he began to merge a primitive aesthetic and the traditions of Western composition. In 1929, he married Eva Piriz but both she and their young son died in 1931 of tuberculosis; it is likely that this personal tragedy contributed to the dark nature of his work.

During the 1930s Lam was exposed to a variety of influences. In his work, the influence of Surrealism was discernible, as well as that of Henri Matisse. Throughout Lam’s travels through the Spanish countryside, he developed empathy for the Spanish peasants, whose

Masked Woman 1973- Wifredo Lam

Masked Woman 1973- Wifredo Lam

strife, in some ways, mirrored that of the former slaves he grew up around in Cuba. Therefore, at the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War, Lam sided with the Republicans where he used his talent to fashion Republican posters and propaganda. Drafted to defend Madrid, Lam was incapacitated during the fighting in late 1937 and was sent to Barcelona. There, he met Helena Holzer, a German researcher, and the Catalan artist known as Manolo Huguë. Manolo gave Lam the letter of introduction that sparked his friendship with Picasso, whose artwork had impressed and inspired Lam a year before when he saw an exhibition in Madrid.

In 1938, Lam moved to Paris. Picasso quickly became a big supporter of Lam, introducing him to many of the leading artists of the time, such as Fernand Léger, Henri Matisse,Georges Braque and Joan Miró. Picasso also introduced him to Pierre Loeb, a Parisian art dealer; Loeb gave Lam his first exhibition at the Galerie Pierre Loeb in 1939, which received an enthusiastic response from critics. Picasso and Lam also exhibited their work together at the Perls Galleries in New York in the same year. Lam’s work went from showing the influence of Matisse seen in his still lifes, landscapes and simplified portraits to being influenced by Cubism. Mainly working with gouache, Lam began producing stylized figures that appear to be influenced by Picasso. Much of his work in 1938 possessed emotional intensity; the subject matter ranged from interacting couples to women in despair and showed a considerably stronger African influence, seen in the figures’ angular outlines and the synthesis of their bodies.

Untitled- Wifredo Lam

Untitled- Wifredo Lam

While Lam began simplifying his forms before he came into contact with Picasso’s work, it is apparent that Picasso had a significant impact on him. With regard to Picasso’s exhibition, Lam said that it was “not only a revelation, but… a shock.” Lam gained the approval of Picasso, whose encouragement has been said to have led Lam to search for his own interpretation of modernism.

With the outbreak of World War II and the Germans invading Paris, Lam left for Marseille in 1940. There, he rejoined many intellectuals, including the Surrealists, with whom he had been associated since he met André Breton in 1939. In Marseille, Lam and Breton collaborated on the publication of Breton’s poem Fata Morgana, which was illustrated by Lam. Though the drawings he created in Marseille between 1940 and 1941 are known as the Fata Morgana suite, only about three inspired the illustrations for the poem. In 1941, Breton, Lam and Claude Lévi-Strauss, accompanied by many others, left for Martinique only to be imprisoned. After forty days, Lam was released and allowed to leave for Cuba, which he reached in midsummer 1941.

Upon Lam’s return to Havana, he developed a new awareness of Afro-Cuban traditions. He noticed that the descendents of the slaves were still being oppressed and that the Afro-Cuban culture was degraded and made picturesque for the sake of tourism. He believed that Cuba was in danger of losing its African heritage and therefore sought to free them from cultural subjugation. In an interview with Max-Pol Fouchet, he said,

“I wanted with all my heart to paint the drama of my country, but by thoroughly expressing the negro spirit, the beauty of

"Maternidad en verde", c. 1942- Wifredo Lam

“Maternidad en verde”, c. 1942- Wifredo Lam

the plastic art of the blacks. In this way I could act as a Trojan horse that would spew forth hallucinating figures with the power to surprise, to disturb the dreams of the exploiters.”

Additionally, his time in Cuba marked a rapid evolution of his style. Drawing from his study of tropical plants and familiarity with Afro-Cuban culture, his paintings became characterized by the presence of a hybrid figure—part human, animal and vegetal elements. His style was also distinctive because of its fusion of Surrealist and Cubist approaches with imagery and symbols from Santería. In 1943, he began his best-known work, The Jungle. It reflected his mature style, depicting four figures with mask-like heads, half-emerging from dense tropical vegetation. Later that year, it was shown in an exhibition at the Pierre Matisse Gallery in New York where it created controversy. The painting depicted the tension between Modernism and the vibrancy and energy of African culture. The Jungle was ultimately purchased by the Museum of Modern Art N.Y. It is often compared to Picasso’s Guernica, which is hung in the Museo Reina Sofía in Madrid.

Lam continued to simplify and synthesize abstraction yet continued painting figurally; he also kept on developing the mythology and totemism that defined his style. In 1944, he married Helana Holzer, whom he divorced in 1950. In 1946, he and Breton spent four months in Haiti, enriching his already extensive understanding and knowledge of African divinity and magic rituals through observing Voodounceremonies. Although he later said that his contact with the African spirituality that he found throughout the Americas did not directly impact his formal style. African poetry, on the other hand, was said to have had a broadening effect on his paintings. In 1950 Wifredo Lam worked together with René Portocarrero and others in the village Santiago de Las Vegas, the group of painters worked on ceramic. In 1952, Lam settled in Paris after having divided his time between Cuba, New York and France.
Wifredo Lam

Wifredo Lam

Lam, who continued to sympathize with the common man, exhibited a series of paintings at Havana University in 1955, to demonstrate his support for the students’ protests against Batista’s dictatorship. Similarly, in 1965, 6 years after the revolution, Lam showed his loyalty to Castro and his goals of social and economic equality by painting El Tercer Mundo (The Third World) for the presidential palace. In 1960, Lam established a studio in Albissola Marina on Italy’s northwest coast and settled there with his wife Lou Laurin, a Swedish painter, and their three sons. In 1964, he was awarded the Guggenheim International Award and between 1966 and 1967 there were many retrospectives of his work throughout Europe. At the encouragement of Asger Jorn and after being intrigued by the local pottery making, Lam began to experiment with ceramics and had his first ceramic exhibition in 1975. He progressed to model sculptures and cast in metal in his twilight years, often depicting personages similar to those he had painted.

Wifredo Lam died on September 11, 1982 in Paris. Having had over one hundred personal exhibitions around the world, Lam had a well established reputation by the time of his death.

Lam, like many of the most renowned artists of the 20th century, combined radical modern styles with the “primitive” arts of the Americas. While Diego Rivera and Joaquín Torres García drew inspiration from Pre-Columbian art, Wifredo Lam was influenced by the Afro-Cubans of the time. Lam dramatically synthesized the Surrealist and Cubist strategies while incorporating the iconography and spirit of Afro-Cuban religion. For that reason, his work does not singularly belong to an art movement.

He held the belief that society focused too much on the individual and sought to show humanity as a whole in his artwork. He painted generic figures, creating the universal. To further his goal, he often painted mask-like faces. While Cuban culture and mythology permeated his work, it dealt with the nature of man and therefore was wholly relatable to non-Cubans.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece for today!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 303.

Best,
Linda

Inner Spirits- Tribute to Wifredo Lam Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Inner Spirits- Tribute to Wifredo Lam
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Inner Spirits- Tribute to Wifredo Lam Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Inner Spirits- Tribute to Wifredo Lam
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Inner Spirits- Tribute to Wifredo Lam Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Inner Spirits- Tribute to Wifredo Lam
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Inner Spirits- Tribute to Wifredo Lam Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Inner Spirits- Tribute to Wifredo Lam
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Inner Spirits- Tribute to Wifredo Lam Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Inner Spirits- Tribute to Wifredo Lam
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Day 301- Leonardo da Vinci- The Joy of Understanding

It’s Day 301 and I wanted to get this painting done yesterday, but didn’t quite have the time to finish it so I finished it today.  Well, I realized that there was no way I could paint like Leonardo da Vinci in one day, but I think I did okay with my tribute. 🙂  So join me in honoring the great Leonardo da Vinci today!

Leonardo da Vinci

Leonardo da Vinci

Mona Lisa- Leonardo da Vinci

Mona Lisa- Leonardo da Vinci

Leonardo da Vinci was a true genius who graced this world with his presence from April 15, 1452 to May 2, 1519. Like Athens in the age of Pericles, Renaissance Italy is a summit in human history. Today, no name better seems to symbolize that age than Leonardo da Vinci.

Leonardo was born on April 15, 1942, in the Vinci, which is found in the Arno River’s lower valley. His hometown was within the territory of the Republic of Florence under the rule of the Medici. He was born out of wedlock, and his parents were Caterina (a peasant) and Messer Piero Fruosino di Antonio da Vinci (notary).

There were few documentations on the early years of Leonardo. It was noted that he remained in his

Ginevra de' Benci- Leonardo da Vinci

Ginevra de’ Benci- Leonardo da Vinci

mother’s home until he was 5 years old, but he moved to his father’s household beginning 1457. His father married four times, and his first to third marriages were not quite successful.

During his childhood, he received informal education in mathematics, geometry and Latin. It was only when he was 14 years old that he took up art training, under the guidance of Andrea di Cione, who was popularly called as Verrocchio. Several other artists were trained by this master including Perugino, Lorenzo di Credi, Botticelli and Domenico Ghirlandaio.

Portrait of Cecilia Gallerani (Lady with the Ermine), about 1488- Leonardo da Vinci

Portrait of Cecilia Gallerani (Lady with the Ermine), about 1488- Leonardo da Vinci

As an apprentice, Leonardo was taught a wide range of areas including metallurgy, plaster casting, carpentry, chemistry, metal working, leather working, and mechanics. He also refined his artistic skills in modelling, sculpting, and painting.

Leonardo worked closely with Verrocchio on the painting entitled The Baptism of Christ, which

Vitruvian Man- Leonardo da Vinci

Vitruvian Man- Leonardo da Vinci

depicted an angel holding the robe of Jesus. The young artist’s work was quite superior, that it greatly impressed Verrocchio. Based on scholars, the painting showed that it employed a new technique of using oil paint. This proved to show Leonardo’s ingenuity and his skills that were rather ahead of his time.

When Leonardo turned 20, he was able to qualify in the Guild of St. Luke, which was an association of doctors of medicine and artists. However, he was more interested to maintain his collaboration with Verrocchio even if his father has already set up his very own workshop.

Head of a Woman- Leonardo da Vinci

Head of a Woman- Leonardo da Vinci

During the years 1482 until about 1499, Leonardo was able to make a living for his artistic skills while in Milan. It was there that he was able to prove his superb talent as a painter, as he was commissioned to complete two significant paintings. These artworks included The Virgin of the Rocks, which he painted for the Confraternity of the Immaculate Conception. Another painting that he made was The Last Supper, intended for the Santa Maria delle Grazie Monastery. In 1485, Leonardo decided to visit Hungary, where he met the artist Matthias Corvinus. This man was believed to be the painter behind the masterpiece “Holy Family”.

Between the years 1513 and 1516, Leonardo spent a huge amount of his time in the Belvedere, situated in Vatican, in Rome. Two other artists were quite popular at that time including Michelangelo and Raphael. Leonardo, along with these two artists, were under the guidance of Pope Leo X.

In 1515, Milan was recaptured by Francis I. In a meeting of the Pope and Francis I, Leonardo

The Last Supper- Leonardo da Vinci

The Last Supper- Leonardo da Vinci

was among those who were present at that time. The said meeting was held in Bologna. After knowing about Leonardo’s exceptional skills, he was commissioned by Franci to create a mechanical lion that had a capability of moving forward and opening its chest filled with lilies.

The Virgin and Child with St Anne and St John the Baptist, sometimes called The Burlington House Cartoon, is a drawing by Leonardo da Vinci.

The Virgin and Child with St Anne and St John the Baptist, sometimes called The Burlington House Cartoon, is a drawing by Leonardo da Vinci.

During the year 1516, Leonardo became a part of Francis’ service, and he was given a permanent residence at the Clos Luce, which was the manor house locted ner the Chateau d’Amboise or the king’s royal residence. Leonardo lived the final three years of his well-lived life. Alongside him was an apprentice and friend by the name of Count Francesco Melzi. Furthermore, Leonardo obtained a pension that amounted up to 10,000 scudi.

On May 2, 1519, Leonardo died at his residence at the Clos Luce. It was also noted that during his last years, Francis I had become one of his closest friends. In fact, the king held the head of Leonardo in his death. However, there were accounts that this story may be more of fictitious. Nevertheless, Francis and Leonardo developed a professional relationship that has led to their strong friendship even up to the artists death.

Leonardo was best known for his painting of The Mona Lisa. The painting’s focal point was the

Medusa- Leonardo da Vinci

Medusa- Leonardo da Vinci

Mona Lisa’s rather elusive smile, as well as the mysterious quality of the woman as depicted in her eyes and corners of the mouth. There was also quite a shadowy feature in this painting, which was obtained from Leonardo’s smoke or sfumato.

Aside from being a great painter, Leonardo was also a gifted draftsman. He kept a journal of sketches and drawings that he made throughout his life. These sketches served as the preparation for his works including The Virgin of the RocksThe Last Supper and The Adoration of the Magi. As for his earliest drawing, it was a Landscape of the Arno Valley. It featured in detail the farmlands, Montelupo Castle and the mountains around it.

Throughout his life, Leonardo da Vinci avoided the intrigues of worldly ambitions and vanity. He was a reserved and withdrawn man, not concerned with glory, and yet absolutely sure of the value of his abilities. A consummate intellectual endowed with an extraordinary imagination, he remains the most outstanding figure of the Renaissance.

“The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.” – Leonardo da Vinci

Biography is from www.leonardodavinci.net.

I hope you enjoy my tribute to Leonardo today.  It was difficult to choose which of his paintings to highlight in this blog since there is soooo much!  I knew I wasn’t going to be able to paint a masterpiece in a day so I just wanted to pay tribute to him, which I think I did well. 🙂  I’m also relieved I just got another great out of the way.  Whew.  Also, who can resist painting themselves as the Mona Lisa?  I will see you tomorrow on Day 302!

Best,

Linda

Mona Linda- Tribute to Leonardo da Vinci Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Watercolor and Crackle paint on Canvas

Mona Linda- Tribute to Leonardo da Vinci
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Watercolor and Crackle paint on Canvas

Side-View Mona Linda- Tribute to Leonardo da Vinci Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Watercolor and Crackle paint on Canvas

Side-View
Mona Linda- Tribute to Leonardo da Vinci
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Watercolor and Crackle paint on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Mona Linda- Tribute to Leonardo da Vinci Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Watercolor and Crackle paint on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Mona Linda- Tribute to Leonardo da Vinci
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Watercolor and Crackle paint on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Mona Linda- Tribute to Leonardo da Vinci Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Watercolor and Crackle paint on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Mona Linda- Tribute to Leonardo da Vinci
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Watercolor and Crackle paint on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Mona Linda- Tribute to Leonardo da Vinci Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic, Watercolor and Crackle paint on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Mona Linda- Tribute to Leonardo da Vinci
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic, Watercolor and Crackle paint on Canvas

Day 300- Gary Baseman- Bittersweetness of Life

It’s Day 300!  I cannot believe this is my 300th painting.  I originally wanted to do Da Vinci today, but I ran out of time so I am pushing it back to another day.  I did have a blast painting today’s painting and he’s one of my faves.  Join me in honoring Gary Baseman today!

Gary Baseman

Gary Baseman

Gary Baseman-Open Wounds

Gary Baseman-Open Wounds

Gary Baseman (born September 27, 1960) is a contemporary artist who works in illustration, fine art, toy design, and animation. He is the creator of the ABC/Disney cartoon series, Teacher’s Pet, and the artistic designer of Cranium, a popular board game. Baseman’s aesthetic combines pop art images, pre- and post-war vintage motifs, cross-cultural mythology and literary and psychological archetypes.

Baseman’s art is frequently associated with the lowbrow pop movement, also known as pop

"For the Love of Toby"- Gary Baseman

“For the Love of Toby”- Gary Baseman

surrealism.

Baseman was born and raised in the Fairfax District of Los Angeles. He is the fourth child of Holocaust survivors from Ukraine. Baseman’s mother worked at the famous Canter’s Deli and his father was an electrician.  Baseman cites Warner Bros. cartoons, MAD Magazine, and Disneyland as early sources of inspiration. In junior high school, Baseman met Barry Smolin, who is now a radio host and musician, and Seth Kurland, a writer and TV producer. They remain close friends.

Baseman studied communications at UCLA. He graduated magna cum laude as a member of the Phi Beta Kappa society.

A Moment Ago Everything Was Beautiful Paintings- Gary Baseman

A Moment Ago Everything Was Beautiful Paintings- Gary Baseman

Baseman cites Yoshitomo Nara, Takashi Murakami, and the illustrator William Joyce as contemporaries.

Baseman coined the term ‘pervasive art’ as an alternative to the lowbrow art label. He has stated that his goal is to “blur the lines between fine art and commercial art.”  According to Baseman, pervasive art can take any medium, and need not be “limited to one world, whether [that] is the gallery world, editorial world, or art toy world.”

Baseman exemplifies pervasive art in that he works commercially and also remains an independent artist.  He creates products that are sold to a mass market, and also shows in museums and galleries, selling original artworks to collectors. Baseman employs traditional art practices such as painting, printmaking, sculpture, drawing, and collage.

From 1986 to 1996, Baseman worked as an illustrator in New York City. He earned several awards from American Illustration, Art

GARY BASEMAN “THE EXPLOSION OF DREAM REALITY”

GARY BASEMAN “THE EXPLOSION OF DREAM REALITY”

Directors Club, and Communication Arts. Baseman refers to his illustration work, and to his general process, as message-making.

Baseman’s drawings have been published in The New YorkerThe Atlantic MonthlyClutter MagazineTimeRolling StoneThe New York Times, and The Los Angeles Times. He has had major independent and corporate clients such as AT&T Corporation, Gatorade, Nike, Inc., and Mercedes-Benz. Baseman illustrated the best-selling board game Cranium. After ten years in New York, Baseman returned to Los Angeles to explore opportunities in art and entertainment.

Gary Baseman

Gary Baseman

In 1999, Baseman exhibited “Dumb Luck and Other Paintings About Lack of Control” at the Mendenhall Gallery in Los Angeles. The exhibition established Baseman’s transition from illustration to fine art, during a time when many of his artist-friends, like Mark Ryden, the Clayton Brothers, and Eric White made similar moves. Since then, Baseman has shown in close to twenty independent exhibitions, notably, “Happy Idiot and Other Paintings About Vulnerability” at the Earl McGrath Gallery in New York City; “For the Love of Toby” at Billy Shire Fine Arts in Los Angeles; “I Melt in Your Presence” at the Modernism Gallery in San Francisco; and “Hide and Seek in the Forest of ChouChou,” also at Billy Shire.

Baseman has exhibited in museums and galleries throughout the US and in Brazil, Germany, Israel, Italy, Russia, Spain, and Taiwan. Baseman’s work is featured in the permanent collections of the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. and the Museum of Modern Art in Rome.

n 2009, Baseman added performance art to his oeuvre with “La Noche de la Fusión,” a mythical holiday festival. Over two thousand

The Contemplation of the Uga- Gary Baseman

The Contemplation of the Uga- Gary Baseman

attendees celebrated a melding of cultural practices and ideas. Along with games, live music, and dancers, the event featured live models in costume playing Baseman’s female characters Skeleton Girl, Hickey Bat Girl, Bubble Girl, and Butterfly Girl. Displayed at the exhibition was the Enlightened Chou, a new character inspired by Baseman’s international travels.

In June 2010, Baseman presented “Giggle and Pop!” at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Live action costumed ChouChous played in the La Brea Tar Pits along with models dressed as Baseman’s Wild Girls, who were renamed “Tar Pit Girls” for the occasion. The characters performed a dance choreographed by Sarah Elgart, and the audience joined in with singer-songwriter Carina Round, who performed a song she composed for the event.

Partial biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece for today!  I really enjoyed creating it.  He’s such a fun artist.  I love staring at his art and I wish I had more time to work on it.  I didn’t start painting until late this afternoon.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 301!

Best,

Linda

Let Me Show You My Dreams- Tribute to Gary Baseman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Let Me Show You My Dreams- Tribute to Gary Baseman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Let Me Show You My Dreams- Tribute to Gary Baseman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Let Me Show You My Dreams- Tribute to Gary Baseman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Let Me Show You My Dreams- Tribute to Gary Baseman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Let Me Show You My Dreams- Tribute to Gary Baseman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Let Me Show You My Dreams- Tribute to Gary Baseman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Let Me Show You My Dreams- Tribute to Gary Baseman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Let Me Show You My Dreams- Tribute to Gary Baseman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Let Me Show You My Dreams- Tribute to Gary Baseman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 299- Antonio Ballester Moreno- Sublimated Props of Childhood

It’s Day 299 and I have a meeting with my landscaper and also a long rehearsal with my improv group!  So I worked on my painting earlier and want to finish this blog before I head out.  I had such a fun time with today’s piece.  Join me in honoring Antonio Ballester Moreno today!

Antonio Ballester Moreno

Antonio Ballester Moreno

Antonio Ballester Moreno

Antonio Ballester Moreno

Antonio Ballester Moreno. Born in Madrid in 1977, the artist studied at the Universität der Künste in Berlin and graduated from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, where he studied both painting and more contemporary forms of art practice. Upcoming exhibitions include a solo show at the Museo de Arte Contemporaneo de Castilla y Leon, Leon, Spain (MUSAC) in September. The artist will be present for the opening.

Over the last few years, Antonio Ballester Moreno has decidedly focused on

Antonio Ballester Moreno, SIN TÍTULO, 2008

Antonio Ballester Moreno, SIN TÍTULO, 2008

returning to the basics, often painting as a child, and even going as far as dedicating an entire week to only generating one type of image – for example scribbling triangles on his canvases for weeks, then dedicating another week to spreading dots over the works…the end results are works that can be seen as both abstract and figurative, real and surreal. Yet their bright colors and silly playfulness belie a darker side.

Antonio Ballester Moreno

Antonio Ballester Moreno

Composed for the gallery’s two exhibition spaces, “Hunter House” will present an installation of large-scale paintings and drawings, while “Bear Suit Number Two” is a continuation of “Barkostum” (or “Bear Suit”), the artist’s 2008 exhibition at Peres Projects Berlin. The latter draws its title from the figure of Timothy Treadwell, the eco-warrior, who spent thirteen summers living in dangerous proximity to grizzly bears in Alaska’s Katmai National Park.

More at home among the simple laws of nature, Treadwell reflects a certain current

Antonio Ballester Moreno

Antonio Ballester Moreno

in distrust of the industrial-technological system. Like Ted Kaczinski (the unabomber), who also makes an appearance in Antonio Ballester Moreno’s works, his madness is indeed anti-social and manic; it is both chilling and brilliant.

Antonio Ballester Moreno

Antonio Ballester Moreno

Delving into the fascinating and unsettling waters between madness and society, the artist creates works that teeter on the crux between man and nature, between technology and Walden-like hermeticism. These works approach true madness unromanticized – banal and inescapable, all the while with a low-fi approach that is comic, darkly comic.

With broad, heavily layered brushstrokes and occasional thick drips depicting everything from lions and pixelated flowers to castles and ghosts, he underlies his subjects with repeating patterns (checkerboards, floral patterns, skulls) often executed in ink.

Antonio’s figures are romantic and nostalgic, churning up the forgotten, sublimated props of childhood, which, in their consciously rough

"Montañas", Antonio Ballester Moreno, 2012

“Montañas”, Antonio Ballester Moreno, 2012

execution, reveal the careful hand of someone who cares deeply about his subject. Indeed what the works of Antonio Ballester Moreno reveal is an absolutely authentic aesthetic in the face of their own disturbed context.

Blurb is from Art Agenda’s website.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I had a fun time creating it.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 300!  Whew!

Best,

Linda

Nuevo Día- Tribute to Antonio Ballester Moreno Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Nuevo Día- Tribute to Antonio Ballester Moreno
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Nuevo Día- Tribute to Antonio Ballester Moreno Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Nuevo Día- Tribute to Antonio Ballester Moreno
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Nuevo Día- Tribute to Antonio Ballester Moreno Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Nuevo Día- Tribute to Antonio Ballester Moreno
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Nuevo Día- Tribute to Antonio Ballester Moreno Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Nuevo Día- Tribute to Antonio Ballester Moreno
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Nuevo Día- Tribute to Antonio Ballester Moreno Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Nuevo Día- Tribute to Antonio Ballester Moreno
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 298- Pedro Calapez- Extending Past the Edges

It’s Day 298 and I’m having a big painting day.  I’m trying to get a little ahead and plan a bit this week.  My schedule has been a little busy and will stay that way until the holidays get started.  And then I’ll be busy in a whole new way!  Join me in honoring Pedro Calapez today.

Pedro Calapez

Pedro Calapez

Pedro Calapez ESTUDIO PARA PINTURA SIN TÍTULO 11 Acrylic on cardboard

Pedro Calapez
ESTUDIO PARA PINTURA SIN TÍTULO 11
Acrylic on cardboard

Pedro Calapez was born 1953 in Lisbon where he lives and works. He began his studies in civil engineering but changed later to the Escola de Belas Artes (School of Fine Arts). While attending Belas Artes he worked as a professional photographer until 1985, when he was able to dedicate himself exclusively to painting.

Pedro Calapez is internationally exhibiting since the 80’s and has presented his

Gallery Installation- Pedro Calapez

Gallery Installation- Pedro Calapez

work in many important museums and galleries. He has participated 1986 at the Venice Biennale and 1987 and 1991 at the São Paulo Biennale. In the german speaking part of Europe, his work was shown 1999 at the Kunstmuseum Bonn in the exhibition “Tage der Dunkelheit und des Lichts”.

Expansion rather than concentration, is an obvious driving power in the artistic language of Pedro Celapez, who is working in the field between drawing and painting, figurative expression and abstraction.

horizonte bloqueado | 2013 | acryl on canvas- Pedro Calapez

horizonte bloqueado | 2013 | acryl on canvas- Pedro Calapez

He often divides his multiple-part image compositions puzzle-like on strictly geometric surfaces and within those are ruling the most expressive gestures and mediterranean colors. Pedro Calapez is creating on individual aluminium boards images of large painted ribbons and surfaces, placing strong primary colors near muddy shades that are defining, layer after layer, the painted space.

But not only each board might appear in a severe struggle, but as well the different parts of the whole composition can be of distinct depth. The several painted boards invade more or less deeply the exhibition space and are forming a relief-like macro mosaic and as in a magnetic field, the individual components are attracting or rejecting each other.

Sometimes few painted boards are creating tension and form, but other works are

Pedro Calapez, Bareira J, painted aluminium

Pedro Calapez, Bareira J, painted aluminium

compositions of twenty or more image bodies with different sizes and suddenly a mediterranean color spectrum opens the view to the southern brightness.

“My major concern is always the discussion of the edges of painting. I want the picture to extend beyond those. In a determined space my paintings together form a single piece that I cannot imagine being broken up in different walls.

Untitled- Pedro Calapez

Untitled- Pedro Calapez

Each painting goes beyond itself, each wall is a painting by itself; this does not allow the gaze to be fixed, it is all around. The fact is that your look dominates the reason why you keep looking at a painting; the eye takes over control of the way in which we look at a picture. Reason invokes a discourse made up of these fragments of vision. You penetrate/enter the painting by the invoking of its own details. It is not the general idea of a painting that is important, but the small stroke or line. What is important is the particular, the detail.” Pedro Calapez

Biography is from arthobler.com.

I hope you enjoy my piece for today!  I really loved looking at today’s artist’s paintings.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 299…almost to 300!  Then only 65 days to go.  Whew!

Best,

Linda

Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Rayas y Bloques- Tribute to Pedro Calapez
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 297- William Anastasi- Master of Accretion

It’s Day 297 and I happened to find this artist randomly and I’m so glad I did!  I was in the mood to do some conceptual art and I like the way this artist thinks.  Please join me in honoring William Anastasi today.

William Anastasi

William Anastasi

Untitled- William Anastasi

Untitled- William Anastasi

William Anastasi (b. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1933) is an American painter and visual artist. He has lived and worked in New York City since the early 1960s.

His work is predominantly abstract and conceptual. Early works such as Relief (1961) and Issue (1966) incorporate the use of industrial and construction materials. His works are held by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Guggenheim Museum, the Whitney Museum, the Walker Art Center, the National Gallery of Art, and the Art Institute of Chicago. In 2010 Anastasi was awarded The John Cage Award, an unrestricted grant awarded biennially, from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts.

Currently exhibited works include “Nine Polaroid Photographs of a Mirror”,

Subway Drawing- William Anastasi

Subway Drawing- William Anastasi

currently at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Biography above is from wikipedia.

American, b. 1933

William Anastasi, 60 Minutes, 1987

William Anastasi, 60 Minutes, 1987

A primary player in the first generation of American Conceptual artists, William Anastasi is a “classmate” of such artists as Andy Warhol, Sol LeWitt, and Hans Haacke. Though his name may not be as well known as his more famous contemporaries, his work is no less compelling. Anastasi’s formal education includes and is limited to high school, however he has lectured at numerous institutions including The School of Visual Arts where he taught for 18 years; University of North Carolina, and Yale University.

Well known for his delving concepts, the media of his work takes all forms. Anastasi’s subway drawings which prevail as some of his most

Pocket drawing 9.9.11, 2011 pencil on chinese silk paper- William Anastasi

Pocket drawing 9.9.11, 2011
pencil on chinese silk paper- William Anastasi

subtle albeit engaging works. Stemming from his Blind Drawing series, the Subway Drawings take their shape from the motion of the subway cars on which he rides. Placing the pencil on the page, the turns of the track and ridges in the wheels push the artist’s hand this way and that creating a cacophony of marks, reminiscent of a naive scribble. The chance taken in this manner of working is what drives the mystery and tension that is inherent to the process of making.

Untitled, 2013 one gallon of industrial high-gloss enamel, thrown- William Anastasi

Untitled, 2013
one gallon of industrial high-gloss enamel, thrown- William Anastasi

Anastasi’s work has enjoyed a star studded collection of showings nationally and internationally including Dwan Gallery, New York; The Mattress Factory Museum, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; The Guggenheim Museum, New York; and Stalke Galleri, Copenhagen.

Info above is from artsy.com.

One day, Anastasi was taking a ride on the New York city subway to play chess with a friend across town. He had his drawing supplies with him, so he taped a piece of paper to a board, put the board in his lap, held a pencil in his hand touching the paper, and closed his eyes. Then he let the bouncing and tilting of the subway car move the pencil. The drawing that he made on the way to see his friend that day was – in a way – a drawing of his trip.

When William Anastasi took art classes at school, he learned to draw in the regular way – with his eyes open, looking at the paper. He wondered what his drawings would look like if he didn’t use his eyes, so he began to experiment. He discovered that he liked drawing this way, and even liked the drawings themselves better than when he looked at what he was doing.

Sometimes Anastasi will tie a piece of cloth over his eyes like a blindfold and take a pencil in each hand, drawing for a specific length of

In Heat Portfolio: Semiconscious, 2007- William Anastasi

In Heat Portfolio: Semiconscious, 2007- William Anastasi

time. He calls these his “timed blind drawings.” That’s what he did at the Mattress Factory.

Untitled (July 25, 2010 Laporte), 2010 Ink & graphite on paper- William Anastasi

Untitled (July 25, 2010 Laporte), 2010
Ink & graphite on paper- William Anastasi

For one drawing, called April 15, 1989, 32 minutes, 4B, he held a 4B pencil in each hand. With his eyes covered, he moved from one end of the room to the other for exactly 32 minutes, marking the wall in big, sweeping movements as far as his arms could reach.

Excerpt above is from The Mattress Factory Art Museum.

Read this wonderful interview with him here on artsy.net.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I painted with a blindfold on and with a timer for 10 minutes.

I decided to do it with white pen on a

Me drawing blind-folded...10 minutes.

Me drawing blind-folded…10 minutes.

black background.  There were moments while scribbling where I thought things like, I want to draw a bird, a face, a lightning bolt, a cloud, etc.  There is something magical about not knowing at all how things will turn out.  I love my end result.  It was a release!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 298.

Best,

Linda

10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Side-View 10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Side-View
10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 1 10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 1
10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 2 10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 2
10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 3 10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Close-Up 3
10 Minute Blind Drawing- Tribute to William Anastasi
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic and Pen on Canvas

Day 296- Conrad Marca-Relli- Broken Surfaces

It’s Day 296 and I really enjoyed today’s tribute piece.  I am still happy from my improv show last night today as well.  Join me in honoring Conrad Marca-Relli today.

Conrad Marca-Relli

Conrad Marca-Relli

Conrad Marca-Relli, the Woman of Samura (1958)

Conrad Marca-Relli, the Woman of Samura (1958)

Conrad Marca-Relli (born Corrado Marcarelli; June 5, 1913 Boston – August 29, 2000 Parma) was an American artist who belonged to the early generation of New York School Abstract Expressionist artists whose artistic innovation by the 1950s had been recognized across the Atlantic, including Paris. New York School Abstract Expressionism, represented by Jackson Pollock,Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline, Marca-Relli and others became a leading art movement of the postwar era.

Marcarelli (he changed the spelling later in life) was born in Boston and, with his father

Untitled Collage- Conrad Marca-Relli

Untitled Collage- Conrad Marca-Relli

Cosimo, brother Ettore, and sisters Dora and Ida, moved to New York City when he was 13. In 1930 he studied at the Cooper Union for a year. He later supported himself by working for the Works Progress Administration, first as a teacher and then with mural painting divisions of the Federal Art Project during this period he won the Logan Medal of the arts. He served in the US Army military service during World War II (1941–1945).

Marca-Relli taught at Yale University from 1954 to 1955 and from 1959 to 1960, and at the University of California at Berkeley. In 1953, he bought a house near Jackson Pollock’s home in Springs, East Hampton. As his career progressed, he increasingly distanced himself from the New York School.

Conrad Marca-Relli

Conrad Marca-Relli

He lived and worked in many countries around the world, moving to Parma, Italy with his wife, Anita Gibson, whom he married in 1951. Conrad Marca-Relli died on August 29, 2000, in Parma, at the age of 87.

After the war Marca-Relli joined the “Downtown Group” which represented group of artists who found studios in lower Manhattan in the area bounded by 8th and 12th street between First and Sixth Avenues during the late 1940s and early 1950s. During the late 1940s and early 1950s, he was actively involved in the avant-garde art world in Greenwich Village. These artists were called the “Downtown Group” as opposed to the “Uptown Group” established during the war at The Art of This Century Gallery.

His first one-man show was in New York City in 1948. In 1949 Marca-Relli was

Conrad Marca-Relli

Conrad Marca-Relli

among the founders of the “Artists’ Club” located at 39 East 8th Street. He was selected by his fellow artists to show in the Ninth Street Show held on May 21-June 10, 1951. The show was located at 60 East 9th Street on the first floor and the basement of a building which was about to be demolished.

The artists celebrated not only the appearance of the dealers, collectors and museum people on the 9th Street, and the consequent exposure of their work but they celebrated the creation and the strength of a living community of significant dimensions.

Conrad Marca-Relli

Conrad Marca-Relli

Conrad Marca-Relli was among the 24 out of a total 256 New York School artists included in the Ninth Street Show and in all the following New York Painting and Sculpture Annuals from 1953 to 1957. These Annuals were important because the participants were chosen by the artists themselves.

Marca-Relli’s early cityscapes, still lifes, circus themes and architectural motifs are reminiscent of Italian surrealist painter Giorgio de Chirico. Throughout his career, Marca-Relli created monumental-scale collages. He combined oil painting and collage, employing intense colors, broken surfaces and expressionistic spattering. He also experimented with metal and vinyl materials. Over the years the collages developed an abstract simplicity, evidenced by black or somber colors and rectangular shapes isolated against a neutral backdrop.

In 1967, the Whitney Museum of American Art gave him a retrospective show.

The Dressmaker- Conrad Marca-Relli

The Dressmaker- Conrad Marca-Relli

The Archivio Marca-Relli, which was established by the artist and Galleria d’arte Niccoli in Parma in 1997, collects informations about Conrad Marca-Relli and archives his work for a future general catalogue.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  Marca-Relli’s artwork and collages are so inspiring that I became a little overwhelmed with what exactly I wanted to do.  I knew I wanted to do a collage…but what colors? What materials?  I am happy with how it turned out. I will see you tomorrow on Day 297!

Best,

Linda

L'inverno è Vicino- Tribute to Conrad Marca-Relli Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

L’inverno è Vicino- Tribute to Conrad Marca-Relli
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View L'inverno è Vicino- Tribute to Conrad Marca-Relli Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Side-View
L’inverno è Vicino- Tribute to Conrad Marca-Relli
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 L'inverno è Vicino- Tribute to Conrad Marca-Relli Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
L’inverno è Vicino- Tribute to Conrad Marca-Relli
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 L'inverno è Vicino- Tribute to Conrad Marca-Relli Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
L’inverno è Vicino- Tribute to Conrad Marca-Relli
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 L'inverno è Vicino- Tribute to Conrad Marca-Relli Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed-Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
L’inverno è Vicino- Tribute to Conrad Marca-Relli
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed-Media on Canvas

Day 295- Fritz Bultman- Symbolism and Geometry

It’s Day 295 and I enjoyed the abstract piece I worked on today.  I’m also excited about my improv show tonight and need to do some research so join me in honoring Fritz Bultman today.

Fritz Bultman

Fritz Bultman

Rosa Park- Fritz Bultman

Rosa Park- Fritz Bultman

Fritz Bultman (April 4, 1919 – July 20, 1985) was an American Abstract expressionist painter, sculptor, and collagist and a member of the New York School of artists.

A. Fred Bultman was the second child and only son of A. Fred and Pauline Bultman. His family was prominent in New Orleans, where his father owned a Catholic funeral company. By the age of thirteen he was interested in art, and worked with Morris Graves, who was a family friend.

As a high school junior in 1935 Fritz went to study in Munich for two years, and there boarded with Maria Hofmann, the wife of artist and teacher Hans Hofmann.

King Zulu- Fritz Bultman

King Zulu- Fritz Bultman

After returning to the United States he studied with Hofmann in New York City and Provincetown, Massachusetts. Despite his father’s wishes that he become an architect, with Hofmann’s encouragement he decided instead to continue his study of art. In 1944 he bought a house in Provincetown, and thenceforth Bultman and his wife Jeanne divided their time between Cape Cod and New York City.

His early paintings have been described as “rough and painterly”, an amalgam of symbolism and geometry.

Red Rope- Fritz Bultman

Red Rope- Fritz Bultman

Bultman was exhibiting with other abstract expressionists by the late 1940s, and in 1950 was aligned with the group of New York School artists, nicknamed the “Irascibles” in an article in Life magazine, who signed a letter to the Metropolitan Museum of Art protesting the institution’s conservative policies. With the assistance of a grant from Italy he studied bronze casting in Florence in 1951; subsequently he was the sole abstract expressionist to fully integrate sculpture into his oeuvre.

Affected by anxiety and depression, Bultman worked little between 1952 and 1956, and resumed painting and sculpting after undergoing Freudian analysis. At a time when African Americans were prohibited from visiting white museums in the south, in 1963 Bultman and his wife led a group of prominent New York artists and writers in the creation of a collection of modern art for Tougaloo College, a black institution in Jackson, Mississippi. Bultman was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship in 1964-5 to work in Paris. In the 1960s Bultman began to make large collages, using pre-painted paper cut or torn and assembled into shapes reminiscent of his figurative drawings and more abstract sexual symbolism. In 1976 he started making stained glass windows with the aid of his wife.

Bultman died of cancer in 1985.

To Robert Motherwell, Bultman was “one of the most splendid, radiant and inspired painters of my generation.”, and David Houston,

Interior Game- Fritz Bultman

Interior Game- Fritz Bultman

curator of the Ogden Museum of Southern Art in New Orleans called him “an important artist from the South who was part of that great moment that changed the American cultural landscape.”

Idea I, 1958, by Fritz Bultman

Idea I, 1958, by Fritz Bultman

It has been suggested that Bultman’s career and subsequent reputation suffered from the vagaries of chance: he was not available for inclusion in the now iconic photo shoot for Life magazine that helped establish the reputations of the New York School painters; another possibility, according to Motherwell, was Bultman’s lack of interest in “art world politics”.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I’m really happy with it.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 295.

Best,

Linda

One Way- Tribute to Fritz Bultman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

One Way- Tribute to Fritz Bultman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View One Way- Tribute to Fritz Bultman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
One Way- Tribute to Fritz Bultman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 One Way- Tribute to Fritz Bultman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
One Way- Tribute to Fritz Bultman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 One Way- Tribute to Fritz Bultman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
One Way- Tribute to Fritz Bultman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 One Way- Tribute to Fritz Bultman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
One Way- Tribute to Fritz Bultman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas