Day 212- Richard Serra- Reoccurring Dreams

It’s Day 212 and today’s artist was mainly a sculptor I believe…but I saw that he also did paintings and I loved his paintings.  I didn’t have the exact materials (oilsticks that he melted onto paper or canvas) so I improvised…since that’s what I do! 🙂  Join me in honoring Richard Serra today!  I am pasting portions of his biography here from wikipedia.

Richard Serra

Richard Serra

Untitled 1972-73- Richard Serra

Untitled 1972-73- Richard Serra

Richard Serra (born November 2, 1939) is an American minimalist sculptor and video artist known for working with large-scale assemblies of sheet metal. Serra was involved in the Process Art Movement. He lives and works in Tribeca, New York, and onCape Breton Island in Nova Scotia.

Serra was born in San Francisco as the second of three sons.  His father, Tony, was a Spanish native of Mallorca. His mother, Gladys, was a Russian Jewish immigrant from Odessa (she committed suicide in 1979). He went on to study English literature at the University of California, Berkeley and later at the University of California, Santa Barbara between 1957 and 1961. While at Santa Barbara, he studied art with Howard Warshaw and Rico Lebrun.

On the West Coast, he helped support himself by working in steel mills, which was to

Traces #52- Richard Serra

Traces #52- Richard Serra

have a strong influence on his later work. Serra discussed his early life and influences in an interview in 1993. He described the San Francisco shipyard where his father worked as a pipe-fitter as another important influence to his work, saying of his early memory: “All the raw material that I needed is contained in the reserve of this memory which has become a reoccurring dream.”

Richard Serra

Richard Serra

Serra studied painting in the M.F.A. program at the Yale University School of Art and Architecture between 1961 and 1964. Fellow Yale Art and

Architecture alumni of the 1960s include the painters, photographers, and sculptors Brice Marden, Chuck Close,Nancy Graves, Gary Hudson and Robert Mangold. He claims to have taken most of his inspiration from the artists who taught there, most notably Philip Guston and the experimental composer Morton Feldman. With Albers, he worked on his book Interaction of Color (1963).

He continued his training abroad, spending a year each in Florence and Paris. In 1964,

Richard Serra

Richard Serra

he was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship for Rome, where he lived and worked with his first wife, sculptor Nancy Graves. Since then, he has lived in New York, where he first used rubber in 1966 and began applying his characteristic work material lead in 1968. In New York, his circle of friends included Carl Andre, Walter De Maria, Eva Hesse, Sol LeWitt, and Robert Smithson. At one point, to fund his art, Serra started a furniture-removals business, Low-Rate Movers, and employed Chuck Close, Philip Glass, Spalding Gray, and others.

Richard Serra Sculpture

Richard Serra Sculpture

In 1966, Serra made his first sculptures out of nontraditional materials such as fiberglass and rubber. Serra’s earliest work wasabstract and process-based made from molten lead hurled in large splashes against the wall of a studio or exhibition space. In 1967 and 1968 he compiled a list of infinitives that served as catalysts for subsequent work: “to hurl” suggested the hurling of molten lead into crevices between wall and floor; “to roll” led to the rolling of the material into dense, metal logs. He began in 1969 to be primarily concerned with the cutting, propping or stacking of lead sheets, rough timber, etc., to create structures, some very large, supported only by their own weight. His “Prop” pieces from the late 1960s are arranged so that weight and gravity balance lead rolls and sheets. Cutting Device: Base Plate Measure (1969) consists of an assemblage of heterogeneous materials (lead, wood, stone and steel) into which two parallel cuts have been made and the results strewn around in a chance configuration. In Malmo Role (1984), a four-foot-square steel plate, one and a half inches thick, bisects a corner of the room and is prevented from falling by a short cylindrical prop wedged into the corner of the walls.

Richard Serra Sculpture

Richard Serra Sculpture

Still, he is better known for his minimalist constructions from large rolls and sheets of metal (COR-TEN-Steel). Many of these pieces are self-supporting and emphasize the weight and nature of the materials. Rolls of lead are designed to sag over time.

Since 1971, Serra has focused not only on sculptural works, but also on large-scale drawings on handmade Hitomi paper or Belgian linen using various techniques. In the early 1970s he drew primarily with ink, charcoal, and lithographic crayon on paper.  His primary drawing material has been the paintstick, a wax-like grease crayon.

Serra melts several paintsticks to form large pigment blocks. The drawings do not function as preparatory studies but typically come after a sculpture has been completed, as a form of notating its spatial relationships. Drawings After Circuit (1972), for

Richard Serra Sculpture

Richard Serra Sculpture

instance, followed an installation for documenta of four huge steel plates (8 by 24 feet each) jutting in from the corners of a room, stopping short of meeting in the center. In the mid-1970s, Serra made his first “Installation Drawings” — monumental works on canvas or linen pinned directly to the wall and thickly covered with black paintstick, such as Abstract Slavery (1974), Taraval Beach (1977), Pacific Judson Murphy (1978), and Blank (1978). The drawings Serra has executed since the 1980s continue the experiments with innovative techniques but are less monumental physically. In the late 1980s he explored how to further articulate the tension of weight and gravity by placing pairs of overlapping sheets of paper saturated with paintstick in horizontal and vertical compositions, often working on the floor and using a mesh screen as an intermediary between the gesture and the transfer of pigment to the paper.

At the 2006 Whitney Biennial, Serra showed a simple litho crayon drawing of an Abu Ghraib prisoner with the caption “STOP BUSH.” This

Richard Serra

Richard Serra

image was later used by the Whitney Museum to make posters for the Biennial. The posters featured an altered version of the text that read “STOP B S .” Serra also created a variation on Goya’s Saturn Devouring His Son featuring George W. Bush’s head in place of Saturn’s. This was featured prominently in an ad for the website pleasevote.com (now defunct) on the back cover of the July 5, 2004 issue of The Nation.

Richard Serra -Tracks 2

Richard Serra -Tracks 2

For his 2011 exhibition of drawings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Serra reworked some of his earlier pieces on paper. Some of the drawings that he reworked had been damaged or destroyed, and the artist recreated them specifically for the show. The museum hinted at this by labelling the works with two dates: that of the original and that of the reworked version. According to Serra, however, it is not important whether audiences know which version they are seeing.

~

I hope you enjoy my tribute piece.  It was nice to do another black & white piece.  I always enjoy those!  I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 213!  Best, Linda

Incline- Tribute to Richard Serra Linda Cleary 2014 Spackle & Acrylic on Canvas

Incline- Tribute to Richard Serra
Linda Cleary 2014
Spackle & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Incline- Tribute to Richard Serra Linda Cleary 2014 Spackle & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Incline- Tribute to Richard Serra
Linda Cleary 2014
Spackle & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Incline- Tribute to Richard Serra Linda Cleary 2014 Spackle & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Incline- Tribute to Richard Serra
Linda Cleary 2014
Spackle & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Incline- Tribute to Richard Serra Linda Cleary 2014 Spackle & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Incline- Tribute to Richard Serra
Linda Cleary 2014
Spackle & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Incline- Tribute to Richard Serra Linda Cleary 2014 Spackle & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Incline- Tribute to Richard Serra
Linda Cleary 2014
Spackle & Acrylic on Canvas

Day 211- Jean (Hans) Arp- All Art is but Dream and Nature

It’s Day 211 and today’s piece seemed simple when I was beginning to plan it and then as I started to create it it began to get difficult.  Then I remembered that the artist created some of his pieces using automatism and then I just let the piece create itself.  I like how it turned out.  Join me in honoring Jean (Hans) Arp today!

Jean Arp

Jean Arp

Jean Arp, Configuration 1927

Jean Arp, Configuration 1927

Jean Arp / Hans Arp (16 September 1886 – 7 June 1966) was a German-French, or Alsatian, sculptor, painter, poet and abstract artist in other media such as torn and pasted paper.

When Arp spoke in German he referred to himself as “Hans”, and when he spoke in French he referred to himself as “Jean”. Many people believe that he was born Hans and later changed his name to Jean, but this is not the case.

Arp was born in Strasbourg as the son of a French mother and a German father, during the period

Arp Abstract (From The Dada Almanac)

Arp Abstract (From The Dada Almanac)

following the Franco-Prussian War when the area was known as Alsace-Lorraine (Elsass-Lothringen in German) after France had ceded it to Germany in 1871. Following the return of Alsace to France at the end of World War I, French law determined that his name become Jean.

In 1904, after leaving the École des Arts et Métiers in Strasbourg, he went to Paris where he published his poetry for the first time. From 1905 to 1907, Arp studied at the Kunstschule in Weimar, Germany and in 1908 went back to Paris, where he attended the Académie Julian. Arp was a founder-member of the Moderne Bund in Lucerne, participating in their exhibitions from 1911 to 1913.

Jean Arp, De continent qui aurait ..., Executed circa 1964-1966. Painted wood relief, 37 x 34.5 cm.In 1912, he went to Munich, called on Wassily Kandinsky, the influential Russian painter and art theorist, was encouraged by him in his researches and exhibited with the Der Blaue Reiter group. Later that year, he took part in a major exhibition in Zürich, along with Henri Matisse, Robert Delaunay and Kandinsky. In Berlin in 1913, he was taken up by Herwarth Walden, the dealer and magazine editor who was at that time one of the most powerful figures in the European avant-garde.

In 1915 he moved to Switzerland to take advantage of Swiss neutrality. Arp later told the story of how, when he was notified to report to the German consulate, he avoided being drafted into the German Army: he took the paperwork he had been given and, in the first blank, wrote the date. He then wrote the date in every other space as well, then drew a line beneath them and carefully added them up. He then took off all his clothes and went to hand in his paperwork.

Arp was a founding member of the Dada movement in Zürich in 1916. In 1920, as Hans Arp,

Jean Arp original original woodcut "Soleil Recercle"

Jean Arp original original woodcut “Soleil Recercle”

along with Max Ernst, and the social activist Alfred Grünwald, he set up the Cologne Dada group. However, in 1925 his work also appeared in the first exhibition of the surrealist group at the Galérie Pierre in Paris.

In 1926, Arp moved to the Paris suburb of Meudon. In 1931, he broke with the Surrealist movement to found Abstraction-Création, working with the Paris-based group Abstraction-Création and the periodical, Transition. Beginning in the 1930s, the artist expanded his efforts from collage and bas-relief to include bronze and stone sculptures. He produced several small works made of multiple elements that the viewer could pick up, separate, and rearrange into new configurations.

Overturned blue shoe with two heels under a black vault 1925 by Jean Arp

Overturned blue shoe with two heels under a black vault 1925 by Jean Arp

Throughout the 1930s and until the end of his life, he wrote and published essays and poetry. In 1942, he fled from his home in Meudon to escape German occupation and lived in Zürich until the war ended.

Arp visited New York City in 1949 for a solo exhibition at the Buchholz Gallery. In 1950, he was invited to execute a relief for the Harvard University Graduate Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts and would also be commissioned to do a mural at the UNESCO building inParis.

In 1958, a retrospective of Arp’s work was held at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, followed by an exhibition at the Musée National d’Art Moderne, Paris, France, in 1962. Organized by the Minneapolis Institute of Arts and the Wurttembergischer Kunstverein of Stuttgart, a 150-piece exhibition titled “The Universe of Jean Arp” concluded an international six-city tour at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in 1986.

The Musée d’art moderne et contemporain of Strasbourg houses many of his paintings and sculptures.

Egg Board- Jean Arp

Egg Board- Jean Arp

Constellation According to the Laws of Chance circa 1930 Jean Arp (Hans Arp) 1886-1966 Bequeathed by E.C. Gregory 1959 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T00242

Constellation According to the Laws of Chance circa 1930 Jean Arp (Hans Arp) 1886-1966 Bequeathed by E.C. Gregory 1959 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T00242

Arp and his first wife, the artist Sophie Taeuber-Arp, became French nationals in 1926. In the 1930s, they bought a piece of land in Clamart and built a house at the edge of a forest. Influenced by the Bauhaus, Le Corbusier and Charlotte Perriand, Taeuber designed it. She died in Zürich in 1943. After living in Zürich, Arp was to make Meudon his primary residence again in 1946.

Arp married the collector Marguerite Hagenbach (1902–1994), his long-time companion, in 1959. He died in 1966, in Basel, Switzerland.

Biography is from wikipedia.

The man who speaks and writes about art should refrain from censuring or pontificating. He will thus avoid doing anything foolish, for in the presence of primordial depth all art is but dream and nature.- Jean Arp

I hope you enjoy my piece today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 212!  Best, Linda

Nuit Sonne- Tribute to Jean (Hans) Arp Linda Cleary 2014 Wood Cutouts & Acrylic on Canvas

Nuit Sonne- Tribute to Jean (Hans) Arp
Linda Cleary 2014
Wood Cutouts & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Nuit Sonne- Tribute to Jean (Hans) Arp Linda Cleary 2014 Wood Cutouts & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Nuit Sonne- Tribute to Jean (Hans) Arp
Linda Cleary 2014
Wood Cutouts & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Nuit Sonne- Tribute to Jean (Hans) Arp Linda Cleary 2014 Wood Cutouts & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Nuit Sonne- Tribute to Jean (Hans) Arp
Linda Cleary 2014
Wood Cutouts & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Nuit Sonne- Tribute to Jean (Hans) Arp Linda Cleary 2014 Wood Cutouts & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Nuit Sonne- Tribute to Jean (Hans) Arp
Linda Cleary 2014
Wood Cutouts & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Nuit Sonne- Tribute to Jean (Hans) Arp Linda Cleary 2014 Wood Cutouts & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Nuit Sonne- Tribute to Jean (Hans) Arp
Linda Cleary 2014
Wood Cutouts & Acrylic on Canvas

Day 210- Jeff Muhs- Natural Environments

It’s Day 210 and I had kind of a busy day…which included therapy and other things.  I need to get  started on feedback for my writing group and get some chores done so join me in honoring Jeff Muhs before all that!  I found his art while researching art online and love his work.

Jeff Muhs

Jeff Muhs

"The Splendid Alliance"- Jeff Muhs

“The Splendid Alliance”- Jeff Muhs

Jeff Muhs

American, b. 1966

Place of Birth: Southampton, NY

Specialities: Contemporary Art

Jeff Muhs was born in Southampton, New York, on June 24th 1966. His early interests

Beyond The Seventh Heaven, 2014 Oil on canvas 72 × 96 in 182.9 × 243.8 cm Jeff Muhs

Beyond The Seventh Heaven, 2014
Oil on canvas
72 × 96 in
182.9 × 243.8 cm
Jeff Muhs

in art were encouraged by his parents, Captain Fred and Geraldine Muhs. Fred Muhs, himself an artist and third generation hunting and fishing guide, instilled in Jeff an intimate knowledge of their local natural environment.

Loveland- Jeff Muhs

Loveland- Jeff Muhs

Thus the barrier beach of Long Island’s south shore would later become the heart of the inspiration for Jeff’s work. It was in these early years that Jeff, also a world champion sculptor first learned the art of wood sculpting from his father. It is this traditional and exacting art form that developed in Jeff a dedication and penchant for excellence he has carried throughout his life.

From 1984 to 1988 Jeff attended the School of Visual Arts in New York City, from which he received a Bachelors degree in Fine Art. It was there that he had his first formal art training and developed the techniques and tastes that would later shape his artistic aesthetics. After graduation, he stayed in New York City and worked as an illustrator and studio sculptor.

Three years later, unsatisfied with the direction of his career and stifled by the limitations of commercial artwork, Jeff returned to Southampton

Red Drift- Jeff Muhs

Red Drift- Jeff Muhs

to pursue his own artistic development. It was through his own analysis of art history and what it taught him that Jeff began the evolution toward what his work constitutes today.

“Transsapphire” by Jeff Muhs. Oil on canvas, 48 x 57 inches.

“Transsapphire” by Jeff Muhs. Oil on canvas, 48 x 57 inches.

Biography is from Blouin ArtInfo website.  I tried to copy it from his website (which you have to go check out his art on!), but they were images as opposed to actual text.  I did the best I could.  Enjoy!

I hope you enjoy my tribute to him and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 211.  I had a very nice time painting this piece today. 🙂  This was yet another painting where I wish I used oils…one day!

Best,

Linda

Emerald Daze- Tribute to Jeff Muhs Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Emerald Daze- Tribute to Jeff Muhs
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Emerald Daze- Tribute to Jeff Muhs Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Emerald Daze- Tribute to Jeff Muhs
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Emerald Daze- Tribute to Jeff Muhs Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Emerald Daze- Tribute to Jeff Muhs
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Emerald Daze- Tribute to Jeff Muhs Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Emerald Daze- Tribute to Jeff Muhs
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Emerald Daze- Tribute to Jeff Muhs Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Emerald Daze- Tribute to Jeff Muhs
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 209- Jimi Gleason- Reflective Possibilities

It’s Day 209 and I got really excited about today’s artist.  I did a textured piece yesterday and wanted to do another one today and found this wonderful artist.  I got motivated even though I didn’t have any of the right materials or tools, but wanted to give it a go anyway!  I think I at least captured his spirit with my piece and it was super fun and inspiring.  I want to do a huge piece in this style.  One day I’ll have the right materials to fully appreciate his work.  Join me in honoring Jimi Gleason today. 🙂

Jimi Gleason

Jimi Gleason

Jimi Gleason

Jimi Gleason

Jimmy Gleason is an American artist born in 1961.

Below is from www.artsy.net.

Jimi Gleason has spent his career exploring the reflective possibilities of a painterly surface. “By using an iridescent surface coat, I have managed to create visual spaces that respond to both the play of light and the location of the viewer,” he says.

Mixing nontraditional materials such as silver deposit with acrylic paints, Gleason’s

Jimi Gleason

Jimi Gleason

surfaces are highly reactive to light and shifts in the viewer’s position. Rather than using focusing on the surface as an end in itself, his paintings track the play of light and the movement of the viewer across the surface, thereby acting as a mirror onto the external world. Through this movement, Gleason hopes to induce a meditative experience for his viewers.

Below’s statement is from www.samuelfreeman.com.

Jimi Gleason

Jimi Gleason

Artist Statement

My work can be seen as a response to physical environments through visual problem solving. I first create an interesting space (the problem) and then balance form and structure within that space in a manner that seems to distill or harmonize natural forces (the solution.) My forms and colors have always suggested nature on some scale, with the aesthetic of my paintings based in large part on the integrity of their organization.

This new collection is consistent with the themes I have developed over the last decade,

Jimi Gleason

Jimi Gleason

but is a radical departure in execution. By using an iridescent surface coat, I have managed to create visual spaces that respond to both the play of light and the location of the viewer. Forms emerge and recede within shifting fields of color as the paintings simultaneouslyreacttoandrepresenttheirphysicalenvironment. Thepaintingsare meticulously designed to create a meditative experience in which the viewer is given the opportunity to explore a dynamic solution to space articulated through color and form.

Silver Window- Jimi Gleason

Silver Window- Jimi Gleason

Below is from R.B. Stevenson Gallery’s website.

I use paint in a determined way which means the physical and metaphysical force of my paintings
is a direct result of my intuitive process. By finishing with an iridescent surface coat, I inject a certain
presence, bringing the light through, eradicating the very surface.
This creates a depth of visual space that responds to both the play of light and the

White Light- Jimi Gleason

White Light- Jimi Gleason

location of the
viewer. Forms emerge and recede within shifting fields of color as the paintings simultaneously
react to and modify their physical environment. By letting the image gradually evolve through the
painting activity I design the painting to ultimately create a presence in which the viewer is given

Jimi Gleason

Jimi Gleason

the opportunity to explore a dynamic expression of space articulated through color and form.

~

Like I said earlier, I did not really know the exact materials he uses, but I did watch a video of him

Waiting for spackle to dry...

Waiting for spackle to dry…

creating one of his pieces on youtube.  You can watch it here if you like!  It’s wonderful!  So after watching that, I set out today to find some supplies that would suffice.

I used spackle and hot glue to create a really textured background and then I sprayed it down with some highly metallic silver spray paint.  I then bought this hematite metallic thick paint which I sponged onto the glue surfaces and then glossed it over with enamel spray.  Whew.  It sure was fun and I hope to have emulated his style somewhat.  His pieces are a joy to look at!  I couldn’t get the lighting quite right since it’s so reflective…but they look okay. 🙂  It’s definitely more “silvery” in real life!

 

Adding more texture...

Adding more texture…

 

I hope you enjoy my piece and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 210!  Best, Linda

Silver Trails- Tribute to Jimi Gleason Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Silver Trails- Tribute to Jimi Gleason
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View Silver Trails- Tribute to Jimi Gleason Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Side-View
Silver Trails- Tribute to Jimi Gleason
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Silver Trails- Tribute to Jimi Gleason Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Silver Trails- Tribute to Jimi Gleason
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Silver Trails- Tribute to Jimi Gleason Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Silver Trails- Tribute to Jimi Gleason
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Silver Trails- Tribute to Jimi Gleason Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Silver Trails- Tribute to Jimi Gleason
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media on Canvas

Day 208- Samantha Thomas- Optic Textures

It’s Day 208 and my hubby and I spent ALL day yesterday beautifying my art space.  We painted the walls and the concrete floors so it’s safe to say that I am pooped today.  My thighs are super sore from squatting on top of the washer and dryer to paint the edges of the walls and also the floors.  I had so much fun doing today’s mixed media piece.  I found this artist because I wanted to do something exactly in the vein of what she does.  She’s great!  Join me in paying tribute to Samantha Thomas today.

 

Samantha Thomas

Samantha Thomas

 

Landscapification #2 2011-12 48 x 60 in oil and charcoal on linen over panel

Landscapification #2 2011-12 48 x 60 in oil and charcoal on linen over panel

Samantha Thomas

Age: 33 
From: McAllen, Texas

Thomas is currently based out of LA. She graduated from the Art Center College of Design,

Samantha Thomas

Samantha Thomas

Pasadena, Calif. in 2004. Her solo exhibitions have taken place at LAXART, New York’s Mike Weiss Gallery, Patricia Faure Gallery in Santa Monica, and New Gallery/Thom Andriola in Houston. Aside from her solo exhibitions, her work has been shown at MOCA, L&M Arts in Venice, Calif., and Miami’s Fredric Snitzer Gallery.

Thomas explores modern urbanism and cities in her series for RH Contemporary Art called “Landscapification.” She distorts and plays with canvas, paint, enamel, sandpaper, and thread to create an abstract topographical map of Los Angeles. The series tests the boundaries of painting, sculpture, and the urban landscape with her three-dimensional pieces. The pieces are minimal in color but create a maximum impact. The juxtaposition created between the man-made and the natural in a city in one monochromatic form takes this series to the next level.

 

Samantha Thomas

Samantha Thomas

Biography above is from her website.

The next bit is from an Art in America article about Samantha Thomas that I also found via her site.

 

Abstract painting’s meteoric rise to the sine qua non of modern art history was less linear than

Texture/Parameter #12, 2013 Canvas over egg crate over panel

Texture/Parameter #12, 2013
Canvas over egg crate over panel

erratic, a trajectory aptly charted earlier this year in MoMA’s “Inventing Abstraction.” If such grand surveys aim to reveal the history of a period by mapping it expansively, Los Angeles – based artist Samantha Thomas mines the canon of abstraction by working intensively, creating canvases that quote from a century-long history of modern art while questioning some its most hallowed assumptions through a sly use of materials.

The works (all 2013) in Thomas’s exhibition “Texture/Parameter” were mostly easel-size and installed salon-style on one wall, with two larger pieces nearby. They venture down a path of familiar citations: actual tangled and matted yarn alludes to Pollock’s skeins, a tilted frame conjures Mondrian’s lozenges, a vertical band pays homage to Newman’s zips. The artist’s most explicit interlocutor is Kazimir Malevich, whose early 20th-

Samantha Thomas installation

Samantha Thomas installation

century Suprematist paintings of nearly monochromatic squares–each offset just enough so as not to merely echo the canvases’ shape, but rather to exist as an autonomous form–became the stuff of avant-garde legend. Today, the once-austere surfaces of Malevich’s squares–especially the famous black ones–are cracking; the deleterious effects of corrosion and decay have qualified the work’s promise of truth as embodied in geometry. Thomas intimates as much in two works, each the chromatic inversion of Malevich’s black-on-white schema. The raw canvas of Texture/Parameter #12 hides an egg carton, resulting in a bulging, spectral grid. Texture/Parameter #20 is plagued with holes, the result of the canvas having been burned.

While some narratives of abstract art celebrate the purging of figural references in favor

Landscapification #10 by Samantha Thomas

Landscapification #10 by Samantha Thomas

of pure line and color, Thomas’s work strongly suggests the body in a variety of ways. After all, latent within proposed narratives of abstraction’s purely “optical” experimentation was always its shadowy other: the sense of touch. For Thomas, the canvas is far from flat, and materials form an entry point for testing a range of textures. In some pieces, oil and acrylic are built up and smoothed over so as to take on a quality of vinyl or latex. In addition to creating these more synthetic effects, Thomas is persistent in her use of coarse vegetable fibers: burlap, linen, and rope.

Landscapification #8 by Samantha Thomas

Landscapification #8 by Samantha Thomas

Several cruciform reliefs appear wilted and slightly slouching, evoking not universal language of forms, but rather the course of gravity and age. Elsewhere, the canvases seem to sprout appendages. In Texture/Parameter #2, vertical bands of vermillion flank a section of burlap, its raised seam suggesting both the bumpy flesh of scar tissue and the curvature of the human spine. Thomas’s vocabulary of orifices and sineway coils, conjuring Eva Hesse and others, invites further bodily associations: a bulky girth of rope becomes entrails, the creasing and wrinkles of linen a protruding navel.

Ambitious in scope, “Texture/Parameter” portended to take on a modernist art history, but it most successfully considers the temporality of a distinctly bodily register: the rhythms of fecundity and rot. Thomas seems to understand that exploring abstraction’s parameters is less about interdicting the possibilities of canvas than marshaling its excesses.

 

Article by—-Catherine Damman

I had tons of fun with today’s piece.  I cut up a soft black vinyl material and glued it onto the canvas after folding it.  I was inspired by her Landscapification series obviously.  I then painted it over with a nice glossy white acrylic paint.  Then scraped away some of the paint from some of the vinyl which left a a gray veiny texture which I liked.  It kind of looks like a mountain landscape.  Well, I hope you enjoy it and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 209!

Textures- Tribute to Samantha Thomas Linda Cleary 2014 Vinyl, Glue & Acrylic on Canvas

Textures- Tribute to Samantha Thomas
Linda Cleary 2014
Vinyl, Glue & Acrylic on Canvas

SIde-View Textures- Tribute to Samantha Thomas Linda Cleary 2014 Vinyl, Glue & Acrylic on Canvas

SIde-View
Textures- Tribute to Samantha Thomas
Linda Cleary 2014
Vinyl, Glue & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Textures- Tribute to Samantha Thomas Linda Cleary 2014 Vinyl, Glue & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Textures- Tribute to Samantha Thomas
Linda Cleary 2014
Vinyl, Glue & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Textures- Tribute to Samantha Thomas Linda Cleary 2014 Vinyl, Glue & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Textures- Tribute to Samantha Thomas
Linda Cleary 2014
Vinyl, Glue & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Textures- Tribute to Samantha Thomas Linda Cleary 2014 Vinyl, Glue & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Textures- Tribute to Samantha Thomas
Linda Cleary 2014
Vinyl, Glue & Acrylic on Canvas

Day 207- Leon Berkowitz- Depth of Vision

It’s Day 207 and the dogs woke me up early…so I decided to get my painting done so that I can finish my last chapter of my book today. 🙂  Join me in honoring Leon Berkowitz today.  When I looked at his paintings I thought it’d be an easy one…but alas, it wasn’t.  Yet another lesson learned during the process of this project. 🙂  I decided to focus on a certain era of his paintings.  They are wonderful and “known for their mystical radiance”.

Leon Berkowitz

Leon Berkowitz

Leon Berkowitz (1919–1987)

Leon Berkowitz

Leon Berkowitz

A painter, philosopher, and teacher, Leon Berkowitz was a central figure in the Washington Color School. He began his career as a landscape painter, but evolved into a painter of abstract canvases. Using glazes of oil to produce luminous effects, he created works noted for their mystical radiance.

Berkowitz was born in Philadelphia and studied at the University of Pennsylvania and the Art Students League in New York, as well as in Paris, Florence, and Mexico City. He was stationed in Virginia while serving in the army during World War II. After completing his military service, he moved to Washington, D.C. There he taught art, both in high schools and at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, where he was chairman of the painting department. He continued teaching until his death in 1987.

In 1945, Berkowitz established the Washington Workshop Center for the Arts, with his

Golda 1979- Leon Berkowitz

Golda 1979- Leon Berkowitz

first wife, Ida Fox, who was a poet. Established to foster artistic culture through an exchange of ideas, the center played an important role in the capital’s art scene. The painters associated with it included Morris Louis, Kenneth Noland, and Gene Davis.

These artists, along with Berkowitz, would become known as the main figures in the Washington Color School. Berkowitz did not feel comfortable with this label, preferring to acknowledge “the greater influences of poetry, music, and physics” rather than a description of his art as color for its own sake.

Big Blue-  Leon Berkowitz

Big Blue- Leon Berkowitz

After the center closed in 1956, Berkowitz spent a decade traveling extensively and living abroad with his wife. They resided for periods of time in Wales and Spain. Berkowitz developed his art in a new direction during this time. Merging art with structure, he created fully abstract works filled with mists of color and light. Berkowitz sought to restore to color a “depth of vision,” engaging the viewer in a discovery of the natural forms in the universe: sea, sky, and earth. His works have been related to those of Barnett Newman and Mark Rothko for their use of color for a meditational experience.

Berkowitz exhibited his work widely and received several awards, including a purchase prize

Source #7-  Leon Berkowitz

Source #7- Leon Berkowitz

from the Flint Invitational, Michigan (1970)and a grant from the National Foundation for Arts and Humanities (1971). A solo exhibition of his work was held at Guelph University, Ontario, in 19170.

His work belongs to many important private and public collections including the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, Connecticut; the Boca Raton Museum of Art, Florida; the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; the Flint

 Leon Berkowitz

Leon Berkowitz

Institute of Arts, Michigan; the High Museum of Art, Atlanta; the James A. Michener Collection, Houston, Texas; the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota, Florida; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.; the Tucson Museum of Art, Arizona; and the Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, Connecticut.

Biography is from Spanierman Modern Gallery’s website.

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  It was difficult to emulate since I didn’t use oil glazes, but I tried to do the best I could with water colors and an enamel glaze!  I will see you tomorrow on Day 208!  Best, Linda

 

Sunspot- Tribute to Leon Berkowitz Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor and Enamel on Canvas

Sunspot- Tribute to Leon Berkowitz
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor and Enamel on Canvas

Side-View Sunspot- Tribute to Leon Berkowitz Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor and Enamel on Canvas

Side-View
Sunspot- Tribute to Leon Berkowitz
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor and Enamel on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Sunspot- Tribute to Leon Berkowitz Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor and Enamel on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Sunspot- Tribute to Leon Berkowitz
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor and Enamel on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Sunspot- Tribute to Leon Berkowitz Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor and Enamel on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Sunspot- Tribute to Leon Berkowitz
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor and Enamel on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Sunspot- Tribute to Leon Berkowitz Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor and Enamel on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Sunspot- Tribute to Leon Berkowitz
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor and Enamel on Canvas

Day 206- Keith Johnston- The Process of Spontaneity

It’s Day 206 and I found today’s artist on artsy.net as well.  I’m really enjoying that site.  Tonight is my first improv show with my new group, The Incidentalists and I’m excited and a little nervous so I wanted to get my blog and painting done a little earlier so that I could get other things done today before just being anxious.  Haha.  Join me in honoring Keith Johnston today.  I wish I would’ve bought an encaustic board to do this painting on, but that’s okay.  I also for the life of me could not find a portrait of him anywhere, so please forgive me for that.

Lemon Wedge, 2011 Encaustic and graphite on wood panel

Lemon Wedge, 2011
Encaustic and graphite on wood panel

Keith Johnston’s minimalist works are spare, tonal arrangements of light and dark forms, with tentative whispers of drawings. He conceives the work on wood panel in encaustic, which is often scraped and reapplied, and then adds graphite. There are no preliminary sketches.

He wants “to see the marking’s of the artist’s hand, the process of spontaneity, the

Chinese New Year, New York Encaustic and graphite on wood panel

Chinese New Year, New York
Encaustic and graphite on wood panel

economy—where subtlety, pitch, line or blocking, with the slightest of movement, can completely alter the work.”

The simplicity of his paintings reflects this vision by the inherent significance attached to each line, shape or form, given the minimalist quality of the work. His choice to use black and white intensifies the importance of line, form and composition as the central components of the painting.

As stated by Jean McCartney, Director of Calvin Klein, Inc., “Johnston’s work relies upon

Asian Elephant, 2011 Encaustic and graphite on wood panel

Asian Elephant, 2011
Encaustic and graphite on wood panel

evoking emotions and feeling, related not only to what appears on canvas—but as important, what he chooses to leave out.” In minimalist work such as Johnston’s, the void created by the absence of extraneous colors, lines, and details is equally significant in generating the ultimate feeling expressed by the piece. He aims to “convey a kind of energy … [that] this intensity will transmit to the viewer.”

Keith Johnston

Keith Johnston

Johnston lived and traveled extensively in Europe following his formal education, which he says “threw open my soul to the ultimate, living, breathing art history book, to take in daily, to feed on and digest.”

This experience served as inspiration for him to develop a painting style that can be seen as a precursor to his current minimalist work. His early paintings were in a figurative tradition, but at the millennium he decided that a new century required “a new outlook: back to drawing, back to basics, back to black and white.”

Johnston received his BFA from the School of Visual Arts in New York City in 1980. He first

Keith Johnston

Keith Johnston

exhibited his paintings in New York City in 1995.

Biography above is from artresourceboston.com.

I hope you enjoy my piece today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 207!

Best,

Linda

Doorways at Night- Tribute to Keith Johnston Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Doorways at Night- Tribute to Keith Johnston
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Doorways at Night- Tribute to Keith Johnston Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Doorways at Night- Tribute to Keith Johnston
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Doorways at Night- Tribute to Keith Johnston Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Doorways at Night- Tribute to Keith Johnston
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Doorways at Night- Tribute to Keith Johnston Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Doorways at Night- Tribute to Keith Johnston
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Doorways at Night- Tribute to Keith Johnston Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Doorways at Night- Tribute to Keith Johnston
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 205- Huguette Arthur Bertrand- Dazzling

It’s Day 205 and I really love today’s artists artwork.  I’m so exhausted from singing for three hours last night at improv.  I think today I’m going to just spend on painting, finishing up a chapter for my writing group and just chillaxing for once!  Join me in celebrating Huguette Arthur Bertrand today!  I had to translate her biography from French into English so it’s going to read a little strange.  I think instead of translating “her” it says “his”…oops!  Hope you don’t mind!  It’s from the French wikipedia.

Huguette Arthur Bertrand

Huguette Arthur Bertrand

L'amant cachalot, circa. 1990 Oil on canvas

L’amant cachalot, circa. 1990
Oil on canvas

Huguette Arthur Bertrand, born in 1920 and died in Ecouen 2005 in Paris, is a French non-figurative painter of the post-war related the adventure of the lyrical abstraction .

Rare woman painter of lyrical abstraction Postwar, Huguette Arthur Bertrand actively

Pirador, 1961 Oil on canvas

Pirador, 1961
Oil on canvas

involved in the Parisian art scene, alongsidePierre Soulages and Hans Hartung , Zao Wou-Ki and Chu Teh-Chun and others.

Huguette Arthur Bertrand has shown very early among the first representatives of abstract art French postwar designated under the name of the young and the new school of Paris .

Flèches en berges ensablées, circa. 1985 Oil on canvas

Flèches en berges ensablées, circa. 1985
Oil on canvas

Born in 1920 and after a childhood spent in the region of Saint-Étienne in contact with the textile tradition, she moved to Paris in the immediate post-war period, is befriended artists orbiting the Galerie Denise René and travel (purse Prague).

Its sensitivity and the ardor however take away from the smooth and cold geometry developed by his environment and encourage him to follow his own pictorial energy.Present in living May 1949, she participated in the group “The Hands dazzled” exposed by the Maeght Gallery in 1949-1950 and gained his first solo exhibitions at the gallery Niepce in 1951, then Galerie Arnaud from 1953 to 1959. Price Fénéon in 1955, she exhibited the following year in New York (Meltzer Gallery) to Copenhagen (Birch Gallery) and in England, Belgium, Germany and Japan.

In 1956, she participated in the exhibition of abstract art Adventure presented by Michel Ragon .

1950s to the 1990s, his work evolves very constructed compositions, organizing masses of color and lines in bundles, to smoother fields overgrown and covered in dazzling shades. His pictorial universe expands a reasoned implement a freedom won and matured, perceptible in erasing the line and the color distribution. The material is lighter and shapes disappear to make way for transparent clouds borne solvents, as to reach the essence of painting in a roll-overs (all over).

The transition takes place over several years gradually, in a slow and patient research. If progress is soft, energy is released and the gesture

Sans titre, 1957 Oil on canvas

Sans titre, 1957
Oil on canvas

says forcefully. Construction and organization values ​​always take precedence over the color used in small registers, often with dominant brown, red and orange, his favorite colors

“Neither geometrism or abstract landscape. A beautiful lyrical abstraction which takes its source in the fifties and has never ceased to swell its waters (…);strong beliefs that no user can shake, “writes Michel Ragon in the catalog of a recent exhibition of the painter (Galarté gallery, Paris, 1987).

Huguette Arthur Bertrand is also the author of numerous tapestry made in Aubusson, a form of loyalty to his parentage and origins (gallery La Demeure, Paris, 1975).

Works of Huguette Arthur Bertrand are collected worldwide, in major international museums including the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the Museum of Fine Arts of Quebec,the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, as well as in private collections and foundations such as the renowned Gandur Foundation for Art in Geneva.

In March 2012, the Galerie Diane de Polignac in Paris presented a solo booth artist Huguette Arthur Bertrand at the Pavilion of Art and Design, PAD Tuileries. The Gallery Diane de Polignac has also published a monographic catalog on the artist.

~

The paintings are from her page on artsy.net.  It’s such a wonderful site filled with great art.  Check it out!

I hope you enjoy my piece today!  I feel that I may have made it a little busier than I wanted it to be.  Well, I still like it. 😉  I will see you tomorrow on Day 206!  Best, Linda

Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Voie Courbé- Tribute to Huguette Arthur Bertrand
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 204- Amy Pleasant- Exploring Images

It’s Day 204 and I really really enjoyed painting today’s piece.  I found today’s and yesterday’s artist on a website where they sell fine art.  I was looking for new artists that are younger and living in the now…if that makes any sense.  Well, I saw Amy Pleasant’s art and I fell in love with her style.  My piece is kind of from the concept of her pieces.  Join me in honoring Amy Pleasant today.  🙂  All info and photos/content are from her website.  Please visit it and see more of her beautiful pieces and read about her!

Amy Pleasant

Amy Pleasant

Amy Pleasant

Amy Pleasant

Amy Pleasant received a BFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and an MFA from The Tyler School of Art, Philadelphia, PA.

She has held solo exhibitions at Jeff Bailey Gallery, NY, whitespace gallery, Atlanta,

Heads in White- Amy Pleasant

Heads in White- Amy Pleasant

GA, The Birmingham Museum of Art, The Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, CANDYLAND, Stockholm, Sweden, Rhodes College, Tandem Gallery, The Ruby Green Center for Contemporary Art, and The University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Heads I- Amy Pleasant

Heads I- Amy Pleasant

Her work has been included in group exhibitions in venues such as The Knoxville Museum of Art, The Hunter Museum of American Art, The Weatherspoon Museum of Art, The Columbus Museum of Art, The Wiregrass Museum of Art, The National Museum for Women in the Arts, The Mobile Museum of Art, The Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, The Huntsville Museum of Art, Clifford Chance, and The U.S. Embassy, Prague, Czech Republic.

Pleasant’s work has been reviewed in publications such as Art in America, The

Engraved IV- Amy Pleasant

Engraved IV- Amy Pleasant

Brooklyn Rail, Art Papers, The Commercial Appeal, BurnAway and artforum.com.

Legs I- Amy Pleasant

Legs I- Amy Pleasant

She currently lives and works in Birmingham, Alabama and is represented by Jeff Bailey Gallery, NYC and whitespace gallery in Atlanta, GA.

Read an interview with her at the Studio Critical Blog.

~

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I’m thinking about doing a couple of huge watercolor pieces.  Yesterday’s and today’s artists really inspired me to work outside of my normal materials!  I’m off to sing for 3 hours at improv tonight so I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 205!

 

Best,

Linda

Part of Me- Tribute to Amy Pleasant Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Part of Me- Tribute to Amy Pleasant
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Part of Me- Tribute to Amy Pleasant Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Part of Me- Tribute to Amy Pleasant
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Part of Me- Tribute to Amy Pleasant Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Part of Me- Tribute to Amy Pleasant
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Part of Me- Tribute to Amy Pleasant Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Part of Me- Tribute to Amy Pleasant
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Part of Me- Tribute to Amy Pleasant Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Part of Me- Tribute to Amy Pleasant
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor & Acrylic on Canvas

Day 203- Meredith Pardue- Organic Forms

It’s Day 203 and I was excited to do a piece in tribute to today’s artist.  Please join me in honoring the wonderful Meredith Pardue today.  Her pieces are beautiful and I hope my piece does her artwork justice.  It makes me want to go out and buy some really deep colored inks.  Her short bio and statement are from her website as are the photos and paintings.  Please visit it and take a look at all of her lovely paintings!

Meredith Pardue

Meredith Pardue

Bloom IV- Meredith Pardue

Bloom IV- Meredith Pardue

Meredith Pardue is an abstract artist with an M.F.A. from Parsons School of Design in New York and a B.F.A. from the Savannah College of Art and Design. Her work has been exhibited and collected worldwide and published in Architectural Digest, Dwell, New American Paintings, and Austin Monthly Home.

Her work is included in the corporate collections of J. Crew Corporate Headquarters,

Bloom II- Meredith Pardue

Bloom II- Meredith Pardue

Genstar Capital, The Michael and Susan Dell Foundation, Oceania Cruise Lines, Scott and White Children’s Hospital, and the Savannah College of Art and Design. She lives and works in Austin, TX.

I combine the random actions of painting with controlled, deliberate mark-making to describe each form in my work, which often appears floral or plantlike in structure. The canvases are composed of organic forms that derive from those found in nature, but ultimately the paintings are a visual record of an unplanned dialogue between myself and a blank canvas.

Elysian Gems V- Meredith Pardue

Elysian Gems V- Meredith Pardue

Together the marks and forms create a visual language that reads as something unique to each viewer. I position these forms against a pale ground that at first glance appears to be an expanse of negative space, but is actually a built-up surface that, upon closer inspection, reveals the history of the layers of paint, which are more elevated from the surface of the canvas than the forms themselves. It is neither the form nor the ground that I explore in my work, but the relationship between these two.

The space is pushed and pulled through the tension of positive and negative spaces and through the dynamic of the compositions, which generally tend to rotate or undulate within the framework of the canvas.

I could say that I intimate a certain relationship between physical and psychological

Superflow Flora III- Meredith Pardue

Superflow Flora III- Meredith Pardue

space in my work, because in a sense that is true. But my approach to making a painting is more comfortable, intuitive, and personal than cerebral.

And the result of this visual investigation – the painting – reflects that process. I am most interested in extracting singular experiences – snapshots – from life’s endless cycles of growth and decay, and in transforming the public, universal worlds of nature and human dynamics into sites of private knowledge.

~

Remember to visit her website!

Doing this piece inspired me to do an even larger piece playing with this style, but also making it my own.  I love the colors and textures in her pieces.  I also want to get some really nice and dark inks to play with as well.  I ended up using watercolors and a thick acrylic paint.  I hope you enjoy my piece today and I will see you tomorrow on Day 203!

Best, Linda

Blooming Field- Tribute to Meredith Pardue Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor/Acrylic on Canvas

Blooming Field- Tribute to Meredith Pardue
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor/Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Blooming Field- Tribute to Meredith Pardue Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor/Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Blooming Field- Tribute to Meredith Pardue
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor/Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Blooming Field- Tribute to Meredith Pardue Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor/Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Blooming Field- Tribute to Meredith Pardue
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor/Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Blooming Field- Tribute to Meredith Pardue Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor/Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Blooming Field- Tribute to Meredith Pardue
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor/Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Blooming Field- Tribute to Meredith Pardue Linda Cleary 2014 Watercolor/Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Blooming Field- Tribute to Meredith Pardue
Linda Cleary 2014
Watercolor/Acrylic on Canvas