Day 181- Thornton Willis- Self-Analysis

It’s Day 181 and it’s another hot summer day!  About to head out to eat lunch with a friend and then get back to business.  As I write this, I’m still working on my painting…hope it turns out okay.  Join me in honoring Thornton Willis today.

Thornton Willis in front of The Ceremony in the studio NYC.

Thornton Willis in front of The Ceremony in the studio NYC.

Thornton Willis, Halfspin, 2006

Thornton Willis, Halfspin, 2006

Thornton Willis (born May 25, 1936 in Pensacola, Florida) is an American abstract painter. He has contributed to the New York School of painting since the late 1960s. Viewed as a member of the Third Generation of American Abstract Expressionists, his work is associated with Abstract Expressionism, Lyrical Abstraction, Process Art, Postminimalism, Bio-morphic Cubism (a term he coined) and Color Field painting.

Thornton Willis’s father, Willard Willis, was an evangelical preacher in the Church of Christ. Willis

Razorback, oil on canvas, 92 15/16 x 100 in.

Razorback, oil on canvas, 92 15/16 x 100 in.

spent formative years in Montgomery Alabama, returning to graduate from Tate High School in Pensacola, Florida. After three years in the United States Marine Corps, Thornton Willis studied, under the G.I. Bill, at Auburn University for one year transferring to the University of Southern Mississippi where he graduated with a B.A. in 1962.

In the summer of 1964, he enrolled at the University of Alabama, in Tuscaloosa, for graduate studies and received a teaching assistantship, and his M.A. in 1966. While at the University of Alabama he was befriended by the American football quarterbackJoe Namath, met visiting artist Theodoros Stamos, and primarily studied painting with Melville Price, a painter who had shown in New York City with Franz Kline and Willem de Kooning and had been a member of The Club at the Cedar Tavern. During these years, Willis also participated in the Civil Rights Movement including the march from Selma to Montgomery, led by Martin Luther King, Jr.

Thornton Willis - Rachel's Dream

Thornton Willis – Rachel’s Dream

Throughout his painting studies, Thornton Willis became highly influenced by the tenets of Abstract Expressionism embodied in The New York School of painting, including second generation painters such as Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns. His early work was equally informed by the more reductive paintings of Piet Mondrian and Frank Stella. These two polarities, Expressionism and Cubism were the early foundations of his paintings and continue to inform his work to this day.

In 1967 Thornton Willis accepted a teaching position at Wagner College in Staten

Sunrise- Thornton Willis

Sunrise- Thornton Willis

Island, and moved to New York City. He established his first studio in the Chelsea district of Manhattan. In 1968, he had his first one-person show at the Henri Gallery in Washington, DC. In New York, Willis met fellow painters, Dan Christensen, Jules Olitski, Ken Showell as well as sculptors and installation artists Richard Serra, Alan Saret, and Gordon Matta-Clark, all working out of a process art orientation.

Thornton Willis

Thornton Willis

Shortly after the exhibition entitled Painting: 40 Years,” a retrospective at the Sideshow Gallery in 2007, Willis returned to a rectilinear format. Combining the early “Slat” paintings, with exploration of form and field in his “Wedge” series, he created a body of work he entitled “Lattices” where lines appear to weave forward and back. Michael Feldman documented the transition to this new work in a film, in 2008-09, Portrait of an American Painter  In 2009, Willis had a one person show at the Elizabeth Harris Gallery, with catalog entitled The Lattice Paintings essay, by James Panero of The New Criterion. In his essay, Panero writes, “Ever since his wedge paintings in 1970s, Thornton has played with the density of volumes, the interaction of colors to come forward and recede, and the character of the line.”

Two years later, in 2011, Willis took on form over field where form or volume appear to dominate the line. The resulting images harken to the

Thornton Willis, Black Warrior, 2008, 70 x 59 inches, oil on canvas

Thornton Willis, Black Warrior, 2008, 70 x 59 inches, oil on canvas

dense mass of city buildings and maps. In an essay for this new series, Lance Esplund writes: “Those who have followed Willis’s work over the years may see his current series of paintings as a departure from “Slats” of the 1960s, the “Wedges,” or “Fins,” of the 1970s and early ’80s, the triangular facets of recent years, and the “Lattice” paintings from his last show, in 2009, at Elizabeth Harris. But all of these pictures have in common the allover surface plane held in tension, between figure and ground, as an interwoven field. They also share the subject of the urban landscape”

Willis continued to show with Elizabeth Harris, and in April 2013, had a one-person show of new “Step” paintings. The artist included in the show, consisting predominantly of his paintings, several three dimensional painted wall pieces or assemblages. The wall sculptures, starting with a painted canvas base, are built up with layers of found objects and painted wood. Also in April and May 2013, two large paintings by Willis were exhibited at Gagosian Gallery, 980 Madison, New York, in the exhibition entitled, “Works of the Jenney Archive.”

Partial biography is from wikipedia.  I focused on his “grid” paintings part of the bio since that’s what I was inspired from.

“I invent, find, and borrow ways of making painterly statements, which reflect my person to the extent that I am able to reach into that core of my being. It’s a kind of self-analysis that requires a balance between the rational and the intuited.” ~ Thornton Willis

Design phase...

Design phase…

It was difficult to choose what I wanted to paint from all his different styles and focus.  I thought a play on the grid painting would be fun.  I hope you enjoy my piece and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 182…the OFFICIAL halfway mark!  Best, Linda

Go Home- Tribute to Thornton Willis Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Go Home- Tribute to Thornton Willis
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Go Home- Tribute to Thornton Willis Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Go Home- Tribute to Thornton Willis
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Go Home- Tribute to Thornton Willis Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Go Home- Tribute to Thornton Willis
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Go Home- Tribute to Thornton Willis Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Go Home- Tribute to Thornton Willis
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Go Home- Tribute to Thornton Willis Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Go Home- Tribute to Thornton Willis
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 180- Robert De Niro Sr.- Reality and Abstraction

It’s Day 180 and I had fun painting today’s piece.  It was neat honoring Robert De Niro’s father who I never knew was a painter!  Karli and I also went to Home Depot and Blick to buy more art supplies.  Girls day!  It’s also close to 90 today.  My garden is loving the sun.  Join me in honoring Robert De Niro Sr. today!

Robert De Niro Sr.

Robert De Niro Sr.

Four Figures- Robert De Niro Sr.

Four Figures- Robert De Niro Sr.

Robert Henry De Niro, better known as Robert De Niro, Sr. (May 3, 1922 – May 3, 1993) was an American abstract expressionist painter and the father of actor Robert De Niro.

Robert De Niro, Sr., was born in Syracuse, New York, to an Italian American father, Henry Martin De Niro (1897–1976), whose parents emigrated from Ferrazzano, in the province of Campobasso, Molise, and an Irish American mother, Helen M. (née

Robert De Niro Sr.

Robert De Niro Sr.

O’Reilly; 1899–1999). He was the eldest of three children; he and siblings John and Joan were raised in Syracuse, New York. De Niro studied at the renowned Black Mountain College under Josef Albers from 1939 to 1940. While Albers’ highly analytical approach to painting did not appeal to De Niro’s more instinctive style, the experience and international perspective of the Bauhaus master nonetheless left a lasting impression. De Niro studied with Hans Hofmann at his Provincetown, Massachusetts summer school. Hofmann’s teaching, focused on Abstract Expressionism and Cubist formalism, had a strong influence on De Niro’s development as a mature artist.

Robert De Niro Sr.

Robert De Niro Sr.

At Hofmann’s summer school, he met fellow student Virginia Admiral, whom he married in 1942. The couple moved into a large, airy loft in New York’s Greenwich Village, where they were able to paint. They surrounded themselves with an illustrious circle of friends, including writers Anaïs Nin and Henry Miller, playwright Tennessee Williams, and the actress and famous Berlin dancer Valeska Gert. Admiral and De Niro separated shortly after their son, Robert De Niro, Jr., was born in August 1943.

After studying with Hans Hofmann in New York and Provincetown and Josef Albers at Black

Robert De Niro Sr.

Robert De Niro Sr.

Mountain College, North Carolina in the late 1930s and early 1940s, De Niro worked for five years at Hilla Rebay’s legendary Museum of Non-Objective Art. In 1945, he was included in a group show at Peggy Guggenheim’s Art of This Century in New York, which was a leading gallery for the art of both established European modernists and members of the emerging Abstract Expressionist group like Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Robert Motherwell, and Clyfford Still. De Niro had his first solo exhibition at Peggy Guggenheim’s gallery in April and May of the following year. At that point, he was primarily working in an abstract manner, often with figural references. Sadly, much of his work from this period was lost in a studio fire in 1949.

Robert De Niro Sr.

Robert De Niro Sr.

De Niro had a series of solo exhibitions in the 1950s at the Charles Egan Gallery in New York, which exhibited the work of Willem de Kooning and other early abstract expressionist artists. Critics praised DeNiro’s compositions filled with improvised areas of vibrant color that gave way to loosely painted still lifes and curvaceous nudes. By the mid-1950s, De Niro was regularly included in important group exhibitions such as the Whitney Annual, the Stable Annual, and the Jewish Museum. He was awarded a Longview Foundation award in 1958.

From 1961 to 1964, De Niro traveled to France to paint in Paris and in the surrounding

Robert De Niro Sr.

Robert De Niro Sr.

countryside. Collector Joseph Hirshhorn purchased a number of the artist’s paintings and works on paper during this period through De Niro’s gallerist, Virginia Zabriskie, which are now in the permanent collection of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Gardenin Washington, DC. In 1968, he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship.

Partial biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I had a good time painting it.  I feel like I could have blended a little less, but I think it turned out okay.  I will see you tomorrow on Day 181!  On Day 182 it will be the halfway mark…feel like I should have a party or something. 😉

Best, Linda

Seated Nude- Tribute to Robert De Niro Sr.  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Seated Nude- Tribute to Robert De Niro Sr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Seated Nude- Tribute to Robert De Niro Sr.  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Seated Nude- Tribute to Robert De Niro Sr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Seated Nude- Tribute to Robert De Niro Sr.  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Seated Nude- Tribute to Robert De Niro Sr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Seated Nude- Tribute to Robert De Niro Sr.  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Seated Nude- Tribute to Robert De Niro Sr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Seated Nude- Tribute to Robert De Niro Sr.  Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Seated Nude- Tribute to Robert De Niro Sr.
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 179- El Lissitzky- Task Oriented Creation

It’s Day 179 and it was a hot day!  Feeling a little exhausted because I’m a lady (girl times coming up), but I got some big grocery shopping done, drove around, walked the dogs and did a painting!  Join me in honoring El Lissitzky today.

El Lissitzky 1924

El Lissitzky 1924

A Prounen- El Lissitzky

A Prounen- El Lissitzky

Lazar Markovich Lissitzky (Russian: Ла́зарь Ма́ркович Лиси́цкий) (November 23, 1890 – December 30, 1941), better known as El Lissitzky (Russian: Эль Лиси́цкий, Yiddish: על ליסיצקי), was a Russian artist, designer,photographer, typographer, polemicist and architect. He was an important figure of the Russian Avant Garde, helping develop suprematism with his mentor, Kazimir Malevich, and designing numerous exhibition displays and propaganda works for the Soviet Union. His work greatly influenced the Bauhaus and constructivist movements, and he experimented with production techniques and stylistic devices that would go on to dominate 20th-century graphic design.

Lissitzky’s entire career was laced with the belief that the artist could be an agent for change, later

Beat the Whites with the Red Wedge- El Lissitzky

Beat the Whites with the Red Wedge- El Lissitzky

summarized with his edict, “das zielbewußte Schaffen” (goal-oriented creation). Lissitzky, of Jewish оrigin, began his career illustrating Yiddish children’s books in an effort to promote Jewish culture in Russia, a country that was undergoing massive change at the time and that had just repealed its antisemitic laws. When only 15 he started teaching; a duty he would stay with for most of his life. Over the years, he taught in a variety of positions, schools, and artistic media, spreading and exchanging ideas. He took this ethic with him when he worked with Malevich in heading the suprematist art group UNOVIS, when he developed a variant suprematist series of his own, Proun, and further still in 1921, when he took up a job as the Russian cultural ambassador to Weimar Germany, working with and influencing important figures of the Bauhaus and De Stijl movements during his stay. In his remaining years he brought significant innovation and change to typography, exhibition design, photomontage, and book design, producing critically respected works and winning international acclaim for his exhibition design. This continued until his deathbed, where in 1941 he produced one of his last works – a Soviet propaganda poster rallying the people to construct more tanks for the fight against Nazi Germany. In 2014, the heirs of the artist, in collaboration with Van abbemuseum and the leading worldwide scholars, the Lissitzky foundation was established, to preserve the artist’s legacy and preparing a catalogue raisone of the artist oeuvre.

Basic Calculus 1928- El Lissitzky

Basic Calculus 1928- El Lissitzky

Lissitzky was born on November 23, 1890 in Pochinok, a small Jewish community 50 kilometres (31 mi) southeast of Smolensk, former Russian Empire. During his childhood, he lived and studied in the city of Vitebsk, now part of Belarus, and later spent 10 years in Smolensk living with his grandparents and attending the Smolensk Grammar School, spending summer vacations in Vitebsk. Always expressing an interest and talent in drawing, he started to receive instruction at 13 from Yehuda Pen, a local Jewish artist, and by the time he was 15 was teaching students himself. In 1909, he applied to an art academy in Saint Petersburg, but was rejected. While he passed the entrance exam and was qualified, the law under the Tsarist regime only allowed a limited number of Jewish students to attend Russian schools and universities.

Like many other Jews then living in the Russian Empire, Lissitzky went to study in

Broom- El Lissitzky

Broom- El Lissitzky

Germany. He left in 1909 to study architectural engineering at a Technische Hochschule in Darmstadt, Germany. During the summer of 1912, Lissitzky, in his own words, “wandered through Europe”, spending time in Paris and covering 1,200 kilometres (750 mi) on foot in Italy, teaching himself about fine art and sketching architecture and landscapes that interested him. His interest in ancient Jewish culture has originated during the contacts with Paris-based group of Russian Jews led by sculptor Ossip Zadkine, a lifetime friend of Lissitzky since early childhood, who exposed Lissitzky to conflicts between different groups within the diaspora. In the same 1912 some of his pieces were included for the first time in an exhibit by the St. Petersburg Artists Union; a notable first step. He remained in Germany until the outbreak of World War I, when he was forced to return home through Switzerland and the Balkans, along with many of his countrymen, including other expatriate artists born in the former Russian Empire, such as Wassily Kandinsky and Marc Chagall.

Upon his return to Moscow, Lissitzky attended the Polytechnic Institute of Riga, which had been evacuated to Moscow because of the war, and worked for the architectural firms of Boris Velikovsky and Roman Klein. During this work, he took an active and passionate interest in Jewish culture which, after the downfall of the openly antisemitic Tsarist regime, was experiencing a renaissance. The new Provisional Government repealed a decree that prohibited the printing of Hebrew letters and that barred Jews from citizenship. Thus Lissitzky soon devoted himself to Jewish art, exhibiting works by local Jewish artists, traveling to Mahilyow to study the traditional architecture and ornaments of old synagogues, and illustrating many Yiddish children’s books. These books were Lissitzky’s first major foray in book design, a field that he would greatly innovate during his career.

Proun Series- El Lissitzky

Proun Series- El Lissitzky

His first designs appeared in the 1917 book, Sihas hulin: Eyne fun di geshikhten (An Everyday Conversation), where he incorporated Hebrew letters with a distinctly art nouveau flair. His next book was a visual retelling of the traditional Jewish Passover song Had gadya(One Goat), in which Lissitzky showcased a typographic device that he would often return to in later designs. In the book, he integrated letters with images through a system that matched the color of the characters in the story with the word referring to them. In the designs for the final page , Lissitzky depicts the mighty “hand of God” slaying the angel of death, who wears the tsar’s crown. This representation links the redemption of the Jews with the victory of the Bolsheviks in the Russian Revolution. An alternative view asserts that the artist was wary of Bolshevik internationalization, leading to destruction of traditional Jewish culture. Visual representations of the hand of God would recur in numerous pieces throughout his entire career, most notably with his 1924 photomontage self-portrait The Constructor, which prominently featured the hand.

During this period Lissitzky proceeded to develop a suprematist style of his own, a series

El Lissitzky

El Lissitzky

of abstract, geometric paintings which he called Proun (pronounced “pro-oon”). The exact meaning of “Proun” was never fully revealed, with some suggesting that it is a contraction of proekt unovisa (designed by UNOVIS) or proekt utverzhdenya novogo (Design for the confirmation of the new). Later, Lissitzky defined them ambiguously as “the station where one changes from painting to architecture.”

Proun was essentially Lissitzky’s exploration of the visual language of suprematism with spatial elements, utilizing shifting axes and multiple perspectives; both uncommon ideas in

El Lissitzky

El Lissitzky

suprematism. Suprematism at the time was conducted almost exclusively in flat, 2D forms and shapes, and Lissitzky, with a taste for architecture and other 3D concepts, tried to expand suprematism beyond this. His Proun works (known as Prounen) spanned over a half a decade and evolved from straightforward paintings and lithographs into fully three-dimensional installations. They would also lay the foundation for his later experiments in architecture and exhibition design. While the paintings were artistic in their own right, their use as a staging ground for his early architectonic ideas was significant. In these works, the basic elements of architecture – volume, mass, color, space and rhythm – were subjected to a fresh formulation in relation to the new suprematist ideals. Through his Prouns, utopian models for a new and better world were developed. This approach, in which the artist creates art with socially defined purpose, could aptly be summarized with his edict “das zielbewußte Schaffen” – “task oriented creation.”

Very partial biography from wikipedia.

I focused on his Proun works for my tribute.  I really fell in love with his artwork and design.  I would elaborate more on this piece, but I’ve been pretty busy and fell ill this week so I have a ton to get done tonight.  I hope you enjoy this piece and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 180!  Best, Linda

The Shape of Things- Tribute to El Lissitzky Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

The Shape of Things- Tribute to El Lissitzky
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View The Shape of Things- Tribute to El Lissitzky Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
The Shape of Things- Tribute to El Lissitzky
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 The Shape of Things- Tribute to El Lissitzky Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
The Shape of Things- Tribute to El Lissitzky
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 The Shape of Things- Tribute to El Lissitzky Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
The Shape of Things- Tribute to El Lissitzky
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 The Shape of Things- Tribute to El Lissitzky Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
The Shape of Things- Tribute to El Lissitzky
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day 178- Gerhard Richter- “Art is the highest form of hope”

It’s Day 178 and I woke up early to do my painting and get things done before heading out tonight.  I’m still feeling a little tired from fighting some weird bug or insane allergies.  Join me in honoring Gerhard Richter today.

Gerhard Richter with a huge squeegee.

Gerhard Richter with a huge squeegee.

Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter (born 9 February 1932) is a German visual artist and one of the pioneers of the New European Painting that has emerged in the second half of the twentieth century. Richter has produced abstract as well as photorealistic paintings, and also photographs and glass pieces. His art follows the examples of Picasso and Jean Arp in undermining the concept of the artist’s obligation to maintain a single cohesive style.

In October 2012, Richter’s Abstraktes Bild set an auction record price for a painting by a living artist at £21m ($34m). This was exceeded in May 2013 when his 1968 piece Domplatz, Mailand (Cathedral square, Milan) was sold for $37.1 million (£24.4 million) in New York.

Richter was born in Dresden, Saxony, and grew up in Reichenau, Lower Silesia, and in

Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter

Waltersdorf (Zittauer Gebirge), in the Upper Lusatian countryside. He left school after 10th grade and apprenticed as an advertising and stage-set painter, before studying at the Dresden Academy of Fine Arts. In 1948, he finished higher professional school inZittau, and, between 1949 and 1951, successively worked as an apprentice with a sign painter, a photographer and as a painter. In 1950 his application for tuition in the Dresden Academy of Fine Arts was rejected as “too bourgeois”. He finally began his studies at the Dresden Academy of Fine Arts in 1951. His teachers were Karl von Appen,Heinz Lohmar (de) and Will Grohmann.

In the early days of his career, he prepared a wall painting (Communion with Picasso, 1955) for the refectory of his Academy of Arts as part of his B.A. Another mural followed at the German Hygiene Museum entitled Lebensfreude (Joy of life), for his diploma and intended to produce an effect “similar to that of wallpaper or tapestry”.

Gerhard Richter Editions

Gerhard Richter Editions

Both paintings were painted over for ideological reasons after Richter escaped from East to West Germany two months before the building of the Berlin Wall in 1961; after German reunification two “windows” of the wall painting Joy of life (1956) were uncovered in the stairway of the German Hygiene Museum, but these were later covered over when it was decided to restore the Museum to its original 1930 state. From 1957 to 1961 Richter worked as a master trainee in the academy and took commissions for the then state of East Germany. During this time, he worked intensively on murals like Arbeiterkampf (Workers’ struggle), on oil paintings (e.g. portraits of the East German actress Angelica Domröse and of Richter’s first wife Ema), on various self-portraits and furthermore, on a panorama of Dresden with the neutral name Stadtbild (Townscape, 1956).

When he escaped to West Germany, Richter began to study at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf under Karl Otto Götz. With Sigmar Polkeand Konrad Fischer (de) (pseudonym Lueg) he introduced the term Kapitalistischer Realismus (Capitalistic Realism) as an anti-style of art, appropriating the pictorial shorthand of advertising. This title also referred to the realist style of art known as Socialist Realism, then the official art doctrine of the Soviet Union, but it also commented upon the consumer-driven art doctrine of western capitalism.

Richter taught at the Hochschule für bildende Künste Hamburg and the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design as a visiting professor; he returned to the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf in 1971, where he was a professor for over 15 years.

Coming full-circle from his early Table (1962) in which he cancelled his photorealist image with haptic swirls of grey paint, in 1969, Richter

Artist Gerhard Richter at work, as seen in Corinna BelzÕs documentary GERHARD RICHTER PAINTING.  Courtesy of Kino Lorber.

Artist Gerhard Richter at work, as seen in Corinna BelzÕs documentary GERHARD RICHTER PAINTING. Courtesy of Kino Lorber.

produced the first of a group of grey monochromes that consist exclusively of the textures resulting from different methods of paint application.

In 1976, Richter first gave the title Abstract Painting to one of his works. By presenting a painting without even a few words to name and explain it, he felt he was “letting a thing come, rather than creating it.” In his abstract pictures, Richter builds up cumulative layers of non-representational painting, beginning with brushing big swaths of primary color onto canvas. The paintings evolve in stages, based on his responses to the picture’s progress: the incidental details and patterns that emerge. Throughout his process, Richter uses the same techniques he uses in his representational paintings, blurring and scraping to veil and expose prior layers. From the mid-1980s, Richter began to use a home-made squeegee to rub and scrape the paint that he had applied in large bands across his canvases. In the 1990s the artist began to run his squeegee up and down the canvas in an ordered fashion to produce vertical columns that take on the look of a wall of planks.

Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter

Richter’s abstract work is remarkable for the illusion of space that develops, ironically, out of his incidental process: an accumulation of spontaneous, reactive gestures of adding, moving, and subtracting paint. Despite unnatural palettes, spaceless sheets of color, and obvious trails of the artist’s tools, the abstract pictures often act like windows through which we see the landscape outside. As in his representational paintings, there is an equalization of illusion and paint. In those paintings, he reduces worldly images to mere incidents of Art. Similarly, in his abstract pictures, Richter exalts spontaneous, intuitive mark-making to a level of spatial logic and believability.

Firenze continues a cycle of 99 works conceived in the autumn of 1999 and executed in the same year and thereafter. The series of overpainted photographs, or übermalte Photographien, consists of small paintings bearing images of the city of Florence, created by the artist as a tribute to the music of Steve Reich and the work of Contempoartensemble, a Florence-based group of musicians.

After 2000, Richter made a number of works that dealt with scientific phenomena, in particular, with aspects of reality that cannot be seen by the naked eye. In 2006, Richter conceived six paintings as a coherent group under the title Cage, named after the American avant-garde composer John Cage. In May 2002, Richter photographed 216 details of his abstract painting no. 648-2, from 1987. Working on a long table over a period of several weeks, Richter combined these 10 x 15 cm details with 165 texts on the Iraq war, published in the German FAZ newspaper on March 20 and 21. This work was published in 2004 as a book entitled War Cut.

In November 2008, Richter began a series in which he applied ink droplets to wet paper, using alcohol and lacquer to extend and retard the

Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter

ink’s natural tendency to bloom and creep. The resulting November sheets are regarded as a significant departure from his previous watercolours in that the pervasive soaking of ink into wet paper produced double-sided works. Sometimes the uppermost sheets bled into others, generating a sequentially developing series of images. In a few cases Richter applied lacquer to one side of the sheet, or drew pencil lines across the patches of colour.

Since there is no such thing as absolute rightness and truth, we always pursue the artificial, leading, human truth. We judge and make a truth that excludes other truths. Art plays a formative part in this manufacture of truth.- Gerhard Richter

Art is the highest form of hope.- Gerhard Richter

Partial biography is from wikipedia.  I only included the “abstract” art section from his bio since it was so long and that was the work I focused on with my piece.

My squeegee work…much smaller than his squeegee...

My squeegee work…much smaller than his squeegee…

I hope you enjoy my piece today.  I bought a squeegee for just this occasion and for future painting that I may want to use it for.  I am loving using unlikely tools for creating these pieces.  I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 179…getting closer to the halfway mark!  Best, Linda

Abstract Blur- Tribute to Gerhard Richter Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Abstract Blur- Tribute to Gerhard Richter
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Abstract Blur- Tribute to Gerhard Richter Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Abstract Blur- Tribute to Gerhard Richter
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Abstract Blur- Tribute to Gerhard Richter Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Abstract Blur- Tribute to Gerhard Richter
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Abstract Blur- Tribute to Gerhard Richter Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Abstract Blur- Tribute to Gerhard Richter
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Abstract Blur- Tribute to Gerhard Richter Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Abstract Blur- Tribute to Gerhard Richter
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 177- Herbert Bayer- The Total Artist

It’s Day 177 and I’m a little behind in getting stuff done.  I need to finish this blog, send out a chapter for my writing group and do a couple other things too.  My hubby is out of town til Sunday…I already miss him!  But I got my painting done so join me in honoring Herbert Bayer today.  He was a prolific artist so it was challenging choosing what style I wanted to capture.  I think I did okay though.

Herbert Bayer- Self Portrait 1932

Herbert Bayer- Self Portrait 1932

"Lonesome Big City Dweller," 1932, Herbert Bayer

“Lonesome Big City Dweller,” 1932, Herbert Bayer

Herbert Bayer (April 5, 1900 – September 30, 1985) was an Austrian and American graphic designer, painter, photographer, sculptor, art director, environmental and interior designer, and architect, who was widely recognized as the last living member of the Bauhaus and was instrumental in the development of the Atlantic Richfield Company’s corporate art collection until his death in 1985.

Born in 1900, Bayer apprenticed under the artist Georg Schmidthammer in Linz. Leaving the

Herbert Bayer, iconograph of a day, 1978

Herbert Bayer, iconograph of a day, 1978

workshop to study at the Darmstadt Artists’ Colony, he became interested in Walter Gropius’s Bauhaus manifesto. After Bayer had studied for four years at the Bauhaus under such teachers as Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee and László Moholy-Nagy, Gropius appointed Bayer director of printing and advertising.

In the spirit of reductive minimalism, Bayer developed a crisp visual style and adopted use of all-lowercase, sans serif typefaces for most Bauhaus publications. Bayer is one of several typographers of the period including Kurt Schwitters and Jan Tschichold who experimented with the creation of a simplified more phonetic-based alphabet. From 1925 to 1930 Bayer designed a geometric sans-serif Proposal for a Universal Typeface that existed only as a design and was never actually cast into real type. These designs are now issued in digital form as Bayer Universal. The design also inspired ITC Bauhaus and Architype Bayer, which bears comparison with the stylistically related typeface Architype Schwitters.

Herbert Bayer

Herbert Bayer

In 1928, Bayer left the Bauhaus to become art director of Vogue magazine’s Berlin office. He remained in Germany far later than most other progressives. In 1936 he designed a brochure for the Deutschland Ausstellung, an exhibition for tourists in Berlin during the 1936 Olympic Games – the brochure celebrated life in the Third Reich, and the authority of Hitler. However, in 1937, works of Bayer’s were included in the Nazi propaganda exhibition “Degenerate Art”, upon which he left Germany. Upon fleeing Germany, he traveled in Italy.

In 1938 Bayer settled in New York City where he had a long and distinguished career in nearly every aspect of the graphic arts.

In 1944 Bayer married Joella Syrara Haweis, the daughter of poet and Dada artist Mina Loy. The same year, he became a U.S. citizen.

In 1946 the Bayers relocated. Hired by industrialist and visionary Walter Paepcke, Bayer moved to Aspen, Colorado as Paepcke promoted skiing as a popular sport. Bayer’s architectural work in the town included co-designing the Aspen Institute and restoring the Wheeler Opera House, but his production of promotional posters identified skiing with wit, excitement, and glamour.

In 1959, he designed his “fonetik alfabet”, a phonetic alphabet, for English. It was sans-serif

Chromatic Circles - Wool-Pile Wall Hanging by Herbert Bayer

Chromatic Circles – Wool-Pile Wall Hanging by Herbert Bayer

and without capital letters. He had special symbols for the endings -ed-ory-ing, and -ion, as well as the digraphs “ch”, “sh”, and “ng”. An underline indicated the doubling of a consonant in traditional orthography.

While living in Aspen, Bayer had a chance meeting with the eccentric oilman, outdoorsman and visionary ecologist, Robert O. Anderson. When Anderson saw the ultra-modern, Bauhaus-inspired home that Bayer had designed & built in Aspen, he walked up to the front door and introduced himself. It was the beginning of a lifelong friendship between the two men and instigated Anderson’s insatiable passion for enthusiastically collecting contemporary art.

With Anderson’s eventual formation of the Atlantic Richfield Company, and as his personal art collection quickly overflowed out of his New Mexico ranch and other homes,ARCO soon held the unique distinction of possessing the world’s largest corporate art collection, under the critical eye and sharp direction of Bayer as ARCO’s Art and Design Consultant.

Overseeing acquisitions for ARCO Plaza, the newly built (1972) twin 51-story office towers in Los Angeles that served as the new company’s corporate headquarters, Bayer was also responsible for the ARCO logo and designing all corporate branding related to the company. Prior to the completion of ARCO Plaza, Anderson commissioned Bayer to design a monumental sculpture-fountain to be installed between the dark green granite towers. Double Ascension still stands between the twin skyscrapers.

Herbert Bayer- Bazaar Cover Design

Herbert Bayer- Bazaar Cover Design

Under Bayer’s direction, ARCO’s art collection grew to nearly 15,000 works nationwide, managed by Atlantic Richfield Company Art Collection staff. ARCO’s collection was eclectic, and consisted of an extremely wide range of media & styles; ranging from contemporary and earlier paintings, sculpture, works on paper (including drawings, watercolors and signed original lithographs, etchings and serigraphs) and signed photographs to tribal and ethnic art from many cultures, as well as historic prints and artifacts, all displayed throughout ARCO’s buildings in Los Angeles and several other cities. Three years after ARCO was taken over by BP in 2000, that company’s then-chairman, Lord Brown, personally ordered ARCO’s art collection liquidated. It was sold through Christie’s and LA Modern Auctions.

Bayer made provisions to donate, after his death, a collection of his works which had been housed in

Post 9, Kay – Herbert Bayer

Post 9, Kay – Herbert Bayer

ARCO’s conference center in Santa Barbara to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The works are currently on loan to the Denver Art Museum. He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1979.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I tried to put a bunch of different pieces here to show my challenge on what I should paint.  I decided to do a combination of collage/photomontage and color blocks.  I hope you enjoy my piece and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 178!  Best, Linda

Eye See- Tribute to Herbert Bayer Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media/Acrylic on Canvas

Eye See- Tribute to Herbert Bayer
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media/Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Eye See- Tribute to Herbert Bayer Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media/Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Eye See- Tribute to Herbert Bayer
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media/Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Eye See- Tribute to Herbert Bayer Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media/Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Eye See- Tribute to Herbert Bayer
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media/Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Eye See- Tribute to Herbert Bayer Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media/Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Eye See- Tribute to Herbert Bayer
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media/Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Eye See- Tribute to Herbert Bayer Linda Cleary 2014 Mixed Media/Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Eye See- Tribute to Herbert Bayer
Linda Cleary 2014
Mixed Media/Acrylic on Canvas

Day 176- Larry Zox- Colorist

It’s Day 176 and I’m still recovering from feeling ill yesterday.  Still congested, but no fever!  I’m just super tired so I wanted to get my painting and blog done before slipping back into just laying down and maybe going back to sleep.  Join me in honoring Larry Zox today.

Larry Zox

Larry Zox

Untitled - Two Shapes (Orange and Green)

Untitled – Two Shapes (Orange and Green)

Lawrence “Larry” Zox (May 31, 1937 – December 16, 2006) was an American painter and printmaker who is classified as an Abstract expressionist, Color Field painter and a Lyrical Abstractionist, although he did not readily use those categories for his work.

Zox was born in Des Moines, Iowa to Oscar and Mildred (née Friedman) Zox, but

Larry Zox

Larry Zox

moved to New York City at an early age. He lived an artist’s life, running in the circles of many prominent names in the art world. In recent years he had relocated to his second home in Colchester, Connecticut. Zox was considered an abstract artist, but more often he described himself as a colorist.

Diamond Drill Series, Jodhpur (1967)

Diamond Drill Series, Jodhpur (1967)

Zox received his education at the University of Oklahoma and Drake University. He studied with George Grosz at the Des Moines Art Center. He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship and received grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Adolph and Esther Gottlieb Foundation. He was Artist-in Residence at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Dartmouth College, and Yale University.

His work has been exhibited in many one-person and group shows including the Whitney

Due East 1966- Larry Zox

Due East 1966- Larry Zox

Museum of American Art (New York); the Museum of Modern Art (NY); Albright-Knox Art Gallery (Buffalo, New York); Art Institute of Chicago; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (NY). In recent years his work has been exhibited at the Stephen Haller Gallery in New York City and Rocket Gallery, London.

Open White Center 1974- Larry Zox

Open White Center 1974- Larry Zox

He died, aged 69, from cancer and was survived by his second wife, the former Virginia King, his two children from his first marriage Alexander and Melinda, a brother Alan Zox, a sister Susan Zox-Smith, and his brother-in law, the painter David R. Prentice among others.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 177!  Hopefully I feel physically better then. Best, Linda

Untitled 176- Tribute to Larry Zox Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Untitled 176- Tribute to Larry Zox
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Untitled 176- Tribute to Larry Zox Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Untitled 176- Tribute to Larry Zox
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Untitled 176- Tribute to Larry Zox Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Untitled 176- Tribute to Larry Zox
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Untitled 176- Tribute to Larry Zox Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Untitled 176- Tribute to Larry Zox
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Untitled 176- Tribute to Larry Zox Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Untitled 176- Tribute to Larry Zox
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 175- Stuart Davis- Proto Pop

It’s Day 175 and the day started out good.  The appraiser came, I took the dogs on a long beautiful walk in the sunshine…then I started to feel very pooped…then sick.  Now I have a slight fever and have green snot.  Ugh.  I’m going to finish this blog and then be a turd.  Join me in honoring Stuart Davis today!

Stuart Davis

Stuart Davis

Report from Rockport  1940 (180 Kb); Oil on canvas, 24 x 30 in; Collection Mr. and Mrs. Milton Lowenthal, New York

Report from Rockport
1940 (180 Kb); Oil on canvas, 24 x 30 in; Collection Mr. and Mrs. Milton Lowenthal, New York

Stuart Davis (December 7, 1892 – June 24, 1964), was an early American modernist painter. He was well known for his jazz-influenced, proto pop art paintings of the 1940s and 1950s, bold, brash, and colorful, as well as his ashcan pictures in the early years of the 20th century.

He was born in Philadelphia to Edward Wyatt Davis and Helen Stuart Davis. His

Colonial Cubism  1954 (90 Kb); Oil on canvas, 44 7/8 x 60 1/8 in; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Colonial Cubism
1954 (90 Kb); Oil on canvas, 44 7/8 x 60 1/8 in; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

parents both worked in the arts. His father was the art editor of the Philadelphia Press while his mother was a sculptor. From 1909 to 1912, Davis studied painting under Robert Henri, the leader of the early modern art group the Eight. Among his ashcan paintings is Chinatown (1912), set in Lower Manhattan. A black cat in the picture represents a promiscuous woman who is depicted nearby dressed in black and standing next to trash cans in a seedy neighborhood.

In 1913, Davis was one of the youngest painters to exhibit in the controversial Armory Show, where he displayed five watercolors.

Composition- Stuart Davis

Composition- Stuart Davis

Exposed at this exhibition to the work of such artists as Vincent van Gogh, Henri Matisse, and Pablo Picasso, Davis became a committed “modern” artist and a major exponent of cubism and modernism in America. He spent summers painting in Gloucester, Massachusetts, and made painting trips to Havana in 1918 and New Mexico in 1923.

In the 1920s he developed his mature style of Hard-edge paintings, mainly abstract still

Rapt- Stuart Davis

Rapt- Stuart Davis

lifes and landscapes; his use of contemporary subject matter such as cigarette packages, spark plug advertisements and the contemporary American landscape make him a proto-Pop artist.

In 1928, he visited Paris, where he painted street scenes. In the 1930s, he became increasingly politically engaged; according to Cécile Whiting, Davis’ goal was to “reconcile abstract art with Marxism and modern industrial society”. In 1934 he joined the Artists’ Union; he was later elected its President. In 1936 the American Artists’ Congress elected him National Secretary. He painted murals for Federal Arts Project of the Works Progress Administration which are influenced by his love of jazz.

Stele- Stuart Davis

Stele- Stuart Davis

He was represented by Edith Gregor Halpert at the Downtown Gallery in New York City.

Davis died of a stroke in New York on June 24, 1964, aged 71.

For any artist to persevere, they must have an enthusiastic audience of at least one. (Stuart Davis)

Biography is from wikipedia.

I had a challenging time painting today.  Not sure if it was because I was getting sick or because I’m not sure if I made the right choices with my piece.  I guess it turned out fine.  I’m sick now so I’m not able to analyze it right now.  I hope you enjoy it though!  I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 176!

Best, Linda

Go- Tribute to Stuart Davis Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Go- Tribute to Stuart Davis
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Go- Tribute to Stuart Davis Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Go- Tribute to Stuart Davis
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Go- Tribute to Stuart Davis Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Go- Tribute to Stuart Davis
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Go- Tribute to Stuart Davis Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Go- Tribute to Stuart Davis
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Go- Tribute to Stuart Davis Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Go- Tribute to Stuart Davis
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 174- Ernst Wilhelm Nay- Rhythmic Images

It’s Day 174 and I’m exhausted from cleaning the entire house and reorganizing my garden to another part of my backyard…then I went on a dog walk, cooked dinner and want to fall into a nice coma now!  But first, join me in honoring Ernst Wilhelm Nay today.  Then I shall lay back and relax.

Ernst Wilhelm Nay on the right. 1960

Ernst Wilhelm Nay on the right. 1960

Ernst Wilhelm Nay

Ernst Wilhelm Nay

Ernst Wilhelm Nay (1902, Berlin – 1968, Cologne) was a German abstract painter influenced by L’Art Informel.

Ernst Wilhelm Nay studied under Karl Hofer at the Berlin Art Academy from 1925 until

Ernst Wilhelm Nay, Mit heiterem Blau, 1956

Ernst Wilhelm Nay, Mit heiterem Blau, 1956

1928. His first sources of inspiration resulted from his preoccupation with Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and Henri Matisse as well as Caspar David Friedrich and Nicolas Poussin. Nay’s still lifes, portraits and landscapes were widely acclaimed.

Motion 1962- Ernst Wilhelm Nay

Motion 1962- Ernst Wilhelm Nay

In 1931 Nay received a nine-months’ study bursary to the Villa Massimo in Rome, where he began to paint in the abstract Surrealist manner. On the recommendation of the Lübeck museum director, C.G. Heise, Nay was given a work grant financed by Edvard Munch, which enabled Nay to spend time in Norway and on the Lofoten Islands in 1937. The “Fischer- und Lofotenbilder” represented a first pinnacle of achievement. That same year, however, two of his works were shown in the notorious exhibition of “Degenerate art” and Nay was forbidden to exhibit any longer. He wasn’t even allowed to paint nor buy ready made colours.

Conscripted into the German armed forces in 1940, Nay went with the infantry to France, where a French sculptor placed his studio at Nay’s disposal where Nay could paint in secret. In the “Hekatebildern” (1945–48), featuring motifs from myth, legend and poetry, Nay worked through his war and postwar experiences.

The “Fugale Bilder” (1949–51) proclaim new beginnings in a fiery palette and entwined forms. In 1950 the Kestner Gesellschaft Hannover

Ernst Wilhelm Nay

Ernst Wilhelm Nay

mounted a first retrospective of Nay’s work. The following year the artist moved to Cologne, where, with the “Rhythmischen Bildern” he took the final step towards entirely non-representational painting.

In them he began to use colour purely as figurative values. From 1955 Nay’s painted “Scheibenbilder”, in which round colour surfaces organize subtle modulations of space and colour. These are developed further in 1963/64 in what are known as the

Ohne Titel, 1954

Ohne Titel, 1954

“Augenbilder”. A first one-man-show in America at the Kleeman Galleries, New York, in 1955, participation in the 1956 Venice Biennale and the Kassel documenta (1955, 1959 and 1964) are milestones marking Nay’s breakthrough on the international art scene. Ernst Wilhelm Nay was awarded important prizes and is represented by work in nearly all major exhibitions of German art in Germany and abroad. The first English-language monograph of Nay’s work was published by Ridinghouse in 2012.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I had a great time painting today’s colorful piece.  Nay painted in a few different styles, but I really liked his colorful spatial round shape pieces.  I hope you enjoy my piece and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 175…almost to the halfway mark!  Best, Linda

Glücklich Farbigen Formen- Tribute to Ernst Wilhelm Nay Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Glücklich Farbigen Formen- Tribute to Ernst Wilhelm Nay
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Glücklich Farbigen Formen- Tribute to Ernst Wilhelm Nay Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Glücklich Farbigen Formen- Tribute to Ernst Wilhelm Nay
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Glücklich Farbigen Formen- Tribute to Ernst Wilhelm Nay Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Glücklich Farbigen Formen- Tribute to Ernst Wilhelm Nay
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Glücklich Farbigen Formen- Tribute to Ernst Wilhelm Nay Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Glücklich Farbigen Formen- Tribute to Ernst Wilhelm Nay
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Glücklich Farbigen Formen- Tribute to Ernst Wilhelm Nay Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Glücklich Farbigen Formen- Tribute to Ernst Wilhelm Nay
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Day 173- Willi Baumeister- Foundations of Art

It’s Day 173 and it’s a beautiful summer day out!  We did have a little ant party going on in my best girl roommate Karli’s kitchen this morning though.  I think it’s all under control now. 🙂  Other than that just painting and doing something exciting tonight.  Also getting the house tidy for the appraiser on Tuesday.  We just want to get it reappraised since we put so much work into it when we bought it.  Whew.  Join me in honoring Willi Baumeister today.  It was a challenge only because I wanted to do so much.

Willi Baumeister

Willi Baumeister

Composition in Blue- Willi Baumeister

Composition in Blue- Willi Baumeister

Willi Baumeister (January 22, 1889 – August 31, 1955) was a German painter, scenic designer, art professor, and typographer.

Willi Baumeister, born in Stuttgart in 1889, completed an apprenticeship as a

Willi Baumeister

Willi Baumeister

decorative painter in his native city from 1905 to 1907, followed by military service (fall 1907–1908). During his apprenticeship, Baumeister also began art studies at the Stuttgart Art Academy (Königlich Württembergische Akademie) (1905–1906), attended Robert Poetzelberger’s drawing class, and took additional lessons fromJosef Kerschensteiner. In 1906 he resumed his apprenticeship and, in 1907, completed the trade test.

Spiral on Yellow- Willi Baumeister

Spiral on Yellow- Willi Baumeister

Following his military service, Baumeister continued his studies at the art academy. Dismissed by his teacher Poetzelberger due to lack of talent, he switched into the composition class of Adolf Hölzel, with whom he studied until 1912, where he met his lifelong friend, Oskar Schlemmer. Baumeister took his first trip to Paris in 1911, successfully participated in a gallery exhibition in Zurich in 1912 and a year later participated in Der Erste Deutsche Herbstsalon (The First German Autumn Salon) in the Berlin gallery Der Sturm. There he met the

Fantasma Negro- Willi Baumeister

Fantasma Negro- Willi Baumeister

expressionist painter Franz Marc. In 1914 Baumeister had his first solo exhibition at Der Neue Kunstsalon (New Art Salon) in Stuttgart. In the same year, Adolf Hölzel arranged a commission for wall paintings at the Deutsche Werkbund-Ausstellung (German Werkbund Exhibition) in Cologne for Baumeister, Schlemmer, and Herman Stenner. Prior to being drafted into the army in the summer of 1914 (until 1918), Baumeister travelled to Amsterdam, London, and Paris. During the war, Baumeister met the painter Oskar Kokoschka and the architect Adolf Loos in Vienna in 1915. In 1916 he participated in the exhibition Hölzel und sein Kreis (Hölzel and his Circle) at the Art Association in Freiburg im Breisgau, which was subsequently shown at the Ludwig Schames Art Salon in Frankfurt am Main. In 1918, still prior to being discharged from military service, he threw an exhibition with his friend Oskar Schlemmer at the Galerie Schaller in Stuttgart. Baumeister and Schlemmer campaigned to bring Paul Klee to the Stuttgart Academy, which was rejected by the Academy. Klee, for his part, would have been willing to come. In 1919 Baumeister became a member of the Berlin artist association Novembergruppe (November Group). The group was founded by Max Pechstein in 1918, immediately following Germany’s capitulation and the fall of the monarchy. It remained one of the most important alliances of German artists until 1933.

Kessaua-Aru- Willi Baumeister

Kessaua-Aru- Willi Baumeister

In Stuttgart in 1919, Baumeister took up the initiative with Schlemmer and other artists to found the artist group Üecht (Alemannic: genuine, true), which he left in 1921. In 1919 he produced his first stage design, which was followed by seventeen others. In 1920 Baumeister completed his art studies, worked as an independent artist, and participated in exhibitions in Berlin, Dresden, and Hagen. His popularity and recognition abroad became evident in a joint exhibition with Fernand Léger in the Berlin gallery Der Sturm in 1922. During these years, Baumeister developed professional relationships with artists such as Paul Klee, Léger, Le Corbusier, Amédée Ozenfant, and Michel Seuphor. In 1924 several of his works were shown at the Erste Allgemeine Deutsche Kunstausstellung (First General German Art Exhibition) in Moscow and, in 1925, he participated in the Paris exhibition L’Art d’aujourd’hui (Art Today). Alongside his artistic work, he was also active in the area of commercial art and designed advertisements for numerous companies, such as Bosch and DLW (Deutsche Linoleumwerke)

In 1926 Willi Baumeister married the painter Margarete Oehm (1898-1978) and was

Gesto Cosmico- Willi Baumeister 1950

Gesto Cosmico- Willi Baumeister 1950

offered, in the same year, the opportunity to take part in the International Exhibition of Modern Art in New York, followed by a solo exhibition in Paris the following year, where he also participated in the Große Berliner Kunstausstellung (Great Berlin Art Exhibition) (with his own room), where he met Kasimir Malevich.

In 1927 Baumeister accepted a teaching post at the Frankfurt School of Applied Arts, later known the Städel. There he taught from 1928 a class in commercial art, typography, and textile printing. That very year, his daughter was born. The following year he turned down a position at the Bauhaus in Dessau. A member of the ring neue werbegestalter(Circle of New Commercial Designers) (chairman: Kurt Schwitters) since 1927, Baumeister joined the artist association Cercle et Carré (Circle and Square) in 1930. In the same year, he received the Württemberg State Prize for the painting Line Figure. After “Cercle et Carré”, he also became a member of the artist association “Abstraction-Création” inParis.

Willi Baumeister

Willi Baumeister

On the 31st of March 1933, following the National Socialist rise to power, Baumeister was dismissed from his professorship at the Städel. His colleague Professor Albert Windisch and Wilhelm Biering continued his lessons. Thereafter Baumeister earned his living mainly from commercial art, he was still however able to travel to Switzerland, Italy, and France. In the same year, his daughter Felicitas was born. In 1936 he was introduced by the Wuppertaler architect Heinz Rasch, with whom he work during the 1924 Exhibition in Stuttgart, to Dr. Kurt Herberts, the owner of a varnish factory in Wuppertal. He began working for the company in 1937, joining other artists ostracized by the National Socialist regime: Franz Krause, Alfred Lörcher, Georg Muche, and Oskar Schlemmer, and the art historian Hans Hildebrandt. That year five of his works were shown in the National Socialist exhibition Entartete Kunst (Degenerate art) in Munich.

Until 1941, when a ban on his paintings and exhibitions was issued by the National Arts Chamber, Baumeister still had many opportunities to exhibit his works abroad in Europe. Despite the prohibition and the constant surveillance, he still worked at the Herberts varnish factory, as well as on his art. In 1943, when a bomb attack rendered Wuppertal as well as Baumeister’s house in Stuttgart uninhabitable, he moved with his family to Urach in the Swabian Alps.

In 1945, after the end of the Second World War, Willi Baumeister completed his book Das Unbekannte in der Kunst (The Unknown in Art),

Willi Baumeister

Willi Baumeister

which was only published in 1947, even though he had completed the manuscript in 1943–44. In 1946 he received the position to teach a class in decorative paintings at the Stuttgart Academy of Arts and in 1947 resumed his exhibition activities. In 1949 he became the co-founder of the artist group Gegenstandlose (The Group of Nonrepresentational Artists), which threw its first exhibition called ZEN 49 in 1950. Here Baumeister met Fritz Winter, Ernst Wilhelm Nay, Paul Fontaine, and many others who worked in the field of fine arts after the end of the war and the dictatorship in Germany to forge a new beginning and connection to international developments. In his participation in the Erstes Darmstädter Gespräch (First Darmstadt Dialogue) in July 1950, at the exhibition Das Menschenbild in unserer Zeit (The Human Image of Our Time), Baumeister defended modern art against Hans Sedlmayr’s thesis of a “loss of the center” (“Verlust der Mitte”).

Henceforth until his death in 1955 Baumeister stood at the peak of his artistic career, which was demonstrated by his participation in many national and international exhibitions such as the Venice Biennale in 1948, the São Paulo Biennale (Brazil) in 1951 (where he received a prize for his painting Cosmic Gesture), and Younger European Artists at the Guggenheim Museum in New York in 1953. In 1955 Willi Baumeister retired (emeritus) from the Stuttgart Art Academy, although he still received a teaching contract for the following semester. On the 31st of August 1955, he died sitting with his brush in his hand in his atelier in Stuttgart.

Das schwarze Zelt by Willi Baumeister

Das schwarze Zelt by Willi Baumeister

Baumeister took part in his first exhibition in 1910, showing figurative works inspired by impressionism. His chief interest was even at this time already in cubism and Paul Cézanne, whose work remained important to him throughout his life. These influences of impressionism and cubism that shaped Baumeister’s early paintings played an essential role in his work until the end of the 1920s. On the one hand, his representational painting was increasingly reduced (abstracting and geometric) as it gained form and lost depth. Parallel to the paintings of his friend Oskar Schlemmer, Baumeister’s independent exploration of form and color emerged. Already around 1919, his teacher Adolf Hölzel wrote to him: “Out of all of us, you will be the one who will achieve the most.” Also worth noticing is that the idiosyncratic German path into modernism, expressionism, barely resonates at all in Baumeister’s work, even though he had met, for instance, Franz Marc earlier on, and was certainly acquainted with the works of the Brücke (Bridge) artists and those of the Blaue Reiter (Blue Rider).

After his return from the First World War, Baumeister rigorously developed his work further. Although one still finds figurative elements in his paintings, the forms grew increasingly geometric and took on a dynamic of their own, and Baumeister broke the traditional connection between form and color. Various work groups emerged at this time, including the relief-like wall pictures, and paintings with sports theme (as a symbol for modernity). In his painting, the grappling with shapes and material of the painting as well as the relationship between reality and representation became visible. Parallel to this development, nonrepresentational painting began to gain a foothold in works that centered on geometric shapes and their relationships to one another in the picture (e.g. Planar Relation of 1920). Baumeister’s lively exchange with other German and foreign artists must also be seen as vitally important in the consequent development of his work. Indeed, as it was for many of his fellow artists, posing such questions was part of the agenda of the modern age (for example, El Lissitzky, Kazimir Malevich, Wassily Kandinsky, Fernand Léger, Amédée Ozenfant, Le Corbusier, Paul Klee).

Towards the end of the 1920s, the shapes in Baumeister’s pictures grew softer. His paintings moved away from being oriented by the

Willi Baumeister Original-Serigraphie "Phantom II", 1951

Willi Baumeister Original-Serigraphie “Phantom II”, 1951

elementary shapes of the circle, triangle, and square towards organic forms. Although this development could also be observed concurrently in the work of other artists of his time, in Baumeister’s case, it was tied to his fascination for the prehistoric and archaic paintings. Baumeister intensely explored artifacts of early paintings and integrated this pictorial experience into his own painting. He identified the symbols, signs, and figures of cave painting as components of a valid archaic pictorial language that he used in his works. These included his increasing number of paintings in “oil on sand on canvas” that, in their materials, also approached the cave painting that Baumeister so admired (beg. ca. 1933). He himself collected examples of prehistoric findings, small sculptures, and tools, and occupied himself with cliff drawings that had been discovered in Rhodesia. This experience was undoubtedly important for Baumeister’s artistic disposition since he, evidently inspired by this rich store of prehistoric works, ultimately used extraordinarily reduced organic shapes for his “ideograms” (beg. ca. 1937). In these works he used a unique world of signs, which he saw as symbols for the laws of nature, their evolution, and human existence.

Willi Baumeister

Willi Baumeister

Baumeister’s artistic development was not interrupted when he lost his professorship at the Städel in Frankfurt in 1933. He continued to paint despite political persecution and economic difficulties. His work and its development are correspondingly diverse, even for the period after 1941, when he was imposed with an exhibition prohibition. While on the one hand his employment at the Dr. Kurt Herberts & Co. varnish factory in Wuppertal to research antique and modern painting techniques protected him politically, it also on the other hand gave him the opportunity to explore the fundamentals of painting, so that he could further his knowledge on the prehistoric cave painting techniques. At the same time, he tuned to Goethe’s theory of plant morphology. Out of this study the “eidos pictures” (eidos: idea) emerged: paintings that, unlike Baumeister’s ideograms, are rich in their variety and coloration. Moreover, the forms are organic, but seem to be less of symbols or signs, than images of simple plantlike and animal life forms. The pictures bear titles such as Rock GardenEidos, or Primordial Vegetable.

As an indefatigable researcher and collector, Baumeister also owned examples of African sculpture, in which he, as in the case of the prehistorical artifacts, saw universal images for life, development, and human existence. Correspondingly, their formal language entered Baumeister’s work in the early 1940s—highly abstracted, at first chromatically restrained (African Tale, 1942), and with time, became increasingly colorful and in part very complex in their formal design (Owambo 1944–1948). Both the titles and formal language reveal Baumeister’s preoccupation with other old (Latin American) cultures (‘Peruvian Wall, 1946, and Aztec Couple, 1948).

Willi Baumeister

Willi Baumeister

Another example of his search for the “foundations of art” is Baumeister’s transposition of the Gilgamesh Epic, one of the oldest surviving literary works. Therefore, Baumeister used his personal pictorial and sign language in his illustration of the narrative (beg. 1943), which resulted in an astonishingly unified cycle, which with his pictorial language came strikingly close to depicting the literary and linguistic effects(impression) of the epic. He also produced illustrations to texts from the Bible—Saul, Esther, Salome—as well as to William Shakespeare’s The Tempest.

In this way, Baumeister single-mindedly and successfully developed a very personal and impressive visual language that was and still is unique in the German art immediately after 1945. The national and international recognition that Willi Baumeister received in the postwar period was correspondingly high. But his artistic development did not stop there. On the one hand, he developed his painting further in a virtuosic manner and, what is more, combined the variety of his formation phases in many other pictures—in part into “overalls structures” that nonetheless still possessed a fundamental that was reminiscent of landscape imageries (Blue Movement, 1950). On the other hand, Baumeister also produced densely packed abstractions that, proceeding from a central form, characterized him as an outstanding “nonrepresentationalist.” These paintings became quite possibly the most famous of his works, and were immediately associated by a broad public with Baumeister (e.g. ARU 2, 1955). Even so, Baumeister did not limit himself to this late “trademark.” Multiform and multicoloured pictures emerged as well in the year of his death.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my painting for today!  It was challenging because I wanted to keep painting, but I’m working with a 10″ X 10″ canvas so I can only paint so much.  Some aspects of it I’m not too thrilled about.  I think I got impatient for layers to dry so it’s a little lumpy.  All in all it was fun.  I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 174.  Am I at the halfway mark yet?  I think that’s around Day 182…I’ll have to celebrate!  Only halfway?  I feel like I’ve been painting a lifetime already. 🙂  Best, Linda

Phantom!- Tribute to Willi Baumeister Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Phantom!- Tribute to Willi Baumeister
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

Side-View Phantom!- Tribute to Willi Baumeister Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Side-View
Phantom!- Tribute to Willi Baumeister
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

Close-Up 1 Phantom!- Tribute to Willi Baumeister Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Close-Up 1
Phantom!- Tribute to Willi Baumeister
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

Close-Up 2 Phantom!- Tribute to Willi Baumeister Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Close-Up 2
Phantom!- Tribute to Willi Baumeister
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

Close-Up 3 Phantom!- Tribute to Willi Baumeister Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Close-Up 3
Phantom!- Tribute to Willi Baumeister
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

Day 172- Gérard Ernest Schneider- An Orchestra

It’s Day 172 and I did my painting early this morning so that I could hang out with my friend Joey and hubby to work on Commander Quacks songs for the musical episode.  It sure is fun writing music for puppets!  Join me in honoring Gerard Schneider today!

Gerard Ernest Schneider

Gerard Ernest Schneider

Painting No. 19- Gerard Ernest Schneider

Painting No. 19- Gerard Ernest Schneider

Gérard Ernest Schneider (1896–1986) was a Swiss painter.

A major pioneer of Lyrical Abstraction, a gestural and personal form of abstraction,

Gérard Ernest SCHNEIDER, SANS TITRE - 1985

Gérard Ernest SCHNEIDER, SANS TITRE – 1985

along with Hans Hartung and Pierre Soulages, Gérard Schneider was shown in Paris at the Galerie Louis Carré as early as 1950.

From 1955 to 1960, Schneider’s work was exhibited at the famous Kootz Gallery in New York where an exclusivity contract connected the artist and the major American dealerSamuel Kootz.

Gerard Schneider

Gerard Schneider

From gesture, “the shape is born, whether lyrical or dramatic, with its colour and technical means, without any reference to external nature” according to Schneider.

Eugène Ionesco even spoke of “the original, eruptive, richness” of his work.

Gérard Ernest SCHNEIDER

Gérard Ernest SCHNEIDER

From nervous gesture and volcanic composition, full of tension, of the 1950s followed “the light years” from Michel Ragon’s expression, which were marked by the balance of forms reflecting each other and the explosion of colour. “Painting should be looked in the same way as music is listened to” as Schneider enjoyed saying.

Opus 15- Gerard Ernest Schneider

Opus 15- Gerard Ernest Schneider

Musical, his work is to be understood like “an orchestra” which expresses “passion, fury, romanticism“ according to Michel Ragon.

Biography is from wikipedia.

Like all the lyrical abstractionist paintings I’ve experienced and completed, I really enjoyed the process of creating this piece.  I love the freedom of form and relaxation pieces like this bring to me.  All I do is concentrate on colors and brushstrokes.  You can really do no wrong.  Such a meditative experience!  I hope you enjoy this piece and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 173.  Best, Linda

Peinture No. 172- Tribute to Gerard Ernest Schneider Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Peinture No. 172- Tribute to Gerard Ernest Schneider
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Peinture No. 172- Tribute to Gerard Ernest Schneider Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Peinture No. 172- Tribute to Gerard Ernest Schneider
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Peinture No. 172- Tribute to Gerard Ernest Schneider Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Peinture No. 172- Tribute to Gerard Ernest Schneider
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Peinture No. 172- Tribute to Gerard Ernest Schneider Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Peinture No. 172- Tribute to Gerard Ernest Schneider
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Peinture No. 172- Tribute to Gerard Ernest Schneider Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Peinture No. 172- Tribute to Gerard Ernest Schneider
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas